Academic Skills Centre

Semester 2

As a visiting and exchange student, here are the course options you have for Semester 2 2017/18:

British history and society

The aim of this course is to give you a broad understanding of the way in which contemporary Britain has been shaped and influenced by its history.

Having completed the course you should have some insight into the incremental nature of the development of British society and will have gained a good knowledge of selected areas of British life and history.

The course will cover aspects of British history and society in a thematic rather than a purely chronological way, inlcluding:

  • the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom and how they came together
  • ‘from rooster to feather duster?’ different definitions of the beginning of modern Britain as the result of the rise and fall of the British Empire
  • women: Chartism and the Suffragettes
  • the Industrial Revolution, urbanisation and demographic change
  • the Victorians: monarchy, social mores and the ‘Dickensian’
  • restoration England through the eyes of Samuel Pepys.

What to do next

Email us now if you would like us to send you a reminder email two weeks before registration opens.

Contemporary literature and film of the British Isles

The aim of this course is to give you an overview of the kind of literature and films emerging in recent years from various regions of the British Isles.

Having completed the course you will have studied, in depth, a selection of texts and films; to consider them in the contexts of history, geography and literary and film culture. Common themes and differing treatments of them will be analysed.

The course includes:

  • Atonement by Ian McEwan (novel and film)
  • Kes (film directed by Ken Loach)
  • a selection of poetry from various parts of the British Isles, including poems by Carol Ann Duffy, Tony Harrison, Philip Larkin, Liz Lochhead and Benjamin Zephaniah
  • additional films will be selected from the following list: This is England; Shallow Grave; Four Weddings and a Funeral; Submarine; Bend it Like Beckham; Secrets and Lies; The Wind that Shakes the Barley; The Remains of the Day; Orlando
  • the themes of place, class and humour will be discussed in relation to texts and films on this unit.

What to do next

Email us now if you would like us to send you a reminder email two weeks before registration opens.

Nineteenth Century English literature

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the main literary developments, movements and themes of the 19th century.

Having completed the unit you will have studied, in depth, some major literary texts from different decades of the 19th century.

The unit includes:

  • Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (novel)
  • Great Expectations by Charles Dickens (novel)
  • The Importance of Being Ernest by Oscar Wilde (play)
  • a variety of poetry from throughout the century. Poets to include Wordsworth, Keats, C Rossetti.

What to do next

Email us now if you would like us to send you a reminder email two weeks before registration opens.

Introduction to English linguistics

The aim of this course is to provide you with an understanding of theories and concepts relating to structural aspects of the English language, and insights into issues surrounding use of the English Language.

Having completed the course you will be able to use a variety of theoretical approaches to analyse language in a range of different contexts.

The course will cover the following topics:

  • the historical background to linguistic analysis
  • phonetics and phonology
  • morphology
  • syntax
  • semantics and pragmatics
  • spoken and written discourse
  • social aspects of language
  • globalisation of English.

What to do next

Email us now if you would like us to send you a reminder email two weeks before registration opens.

Modern British society: social institutions

The aim of this course is to give you an overview of modern British society. The unit will cover different definitions of Britishness: legal, cultural, political and geographic. Political institutions and the welfare state will be studied in the light of political devolution and cultural variation.

Having completed the course you will have gained an understanding of contemporary Britain and will be able to distinguish between superficially distinctive features of this country and those features which represent real differences between the United Kingdom and other countries in Western Europe and North America.

The course will cover the following topics:

  • geography and demography of the UK
  • variations in prosperity and in patterns of employment
  • the welfare state
  • leisure, sport and the arts
  • changes in family patterns
  • the rise in social security, leading to a growing gap between the prosperous and the poor
  • education.

What to do next

Email us now if you would like us to send you a reminder email two weeks before registration opens.