University of Bath

Take part in new psychology research

Our psychologists are looking for volunteers for a new study to understand more about compulsive hoarding.

Take part in our latest psychology study on compulsive hoarding.
Take part in our latest psychology study on compulsive hoarding.

What we're doing

This study looks at the kinds of images or pictures that commonly pop into minds of people with hoarding difficulties. We currently know very little about these images.

People with hoarding difficulties are struggling to discard or part with possessions, to the extent that possessions congest and clutter their home. By finding out more about the mental images experienced by these people, we hope to find new psychological approaches for helping people to overcome mental health problems.

Take part

We are looking for people with hoarding problems as well as individuals with no current mental health difficulties to be part of the control group.

To be eligible for this study you must:

  • be aged 18 or over
  • have either difficulties with hoarding OR have no current mental health difficulties
  • not be diagnosed with any organic brain injury or neurological disorder
  • not have a past or current diagnosis of psychosis or bipolar disorder
  • not have a current problem with substance dependence

What's involved

The study involves a telephone interview followed by a questionnaire that you can complete either online or by post.

Your participation will take approximately 1 hour 15 minutes.

What you'll get

You will be given a £5 Amazon voucher as a small gesture of thanks for taking part.

If you wish, we will also make a small donation to a hoarding charity on your behalf.

To take part, email hoarding.research@bath.ac.uk

Nick Stewart, who is leading the study, explained: “My study looks at the kinds of images or pictures that commonly pop into people’s minds. Research has shown that people with particular mental health problems can experience particular types of images, and I was surprised to learn that no researcher has yet investigated the images experienced by people with hoarding problems. I’m excited to be looking into such an important topic.”

Dr James Gregory, Lecturer and Clinical Psychologist with a specialist clinical and research interest in hoarding difficulties, added: “This study is part of a wider effort at Bath to better understand the special relationship that people have with their possessions. Ultimately, we hope to use this knowledge to create improved psychological support that enhances the well-being of people who hoard.”