Unit Catalogue

ARCH0001: Acoustics & sound control

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To strengthen the link between theory and design. Objectives: To complement previous acoustics courses with an understanding of the analytical methods and practical techniques for the acoustic design of buildings.
Content:
Wave theory: plane and spherical waves Standing waves. Propagation across medium boundaries. Vibration in buildings: free and forced vibration. Damping. Machine motion, inertial bases Traffic noise. Sound insulation case studies. Ventilation noise design: - ductborne and regenerated noise Speech in offices Open plan offices

ARCH0002: Continuum mechanics 1

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce continuum mechanics and its application to elasticity, plasticity and fluid mechanics.
Content:
The unit is complementary to other units describing the numerical methods which would be used to solve the equations. Equations in three dimensions using 'Timoshenko notation'. Stress functions. Compatability equations. Two dimensional elasticity: derivation of del4phi=0 and solutions using polynomials. Reworking of this using cartesian tensor notation to demonstrate its utility. Plasticity: Tresca and von Mises yield criteria. Outline proof of upper and lower bound theorems. Application to indentation problems. Derivation of Navier-Stokes equations in fluid mechanics.

ARCH0003: Building environment 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX60 CW40
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: Introduction to basic concepts and general design issues. Objectives: To provide a basic vocabulary which enables a sensible discussion of environmental issues. To make students aware of the effects of physical impingements upon the body. The introduction of principal design variables. To use calculations at a basic level sufficient to enable students to make informed decisions about the orientation of buildings, the choice of building envelope and satisfactory internal conditions.
Content:
Lighting Seeing: Receptors, stimulus, sensation, adaption, contrast, perceptual constancies Design criteria: Seeing the world as it is, performance, critical detail, contrast, light level. Units: Radiant flux, luminous flux, illuminance, luminous exitance. Calculations: Average illuminance, average daylight factor. Natural light: Light environments, sunlight and daylight availability, sunpath diagrams. Windows: Design criteria for windows, area, distribution, position, shape, details. Thermal Comfort: Physiology and metabolism, work performance, criteria, comfort charts. Air quality: airborne contaminants, O2, CO2, bacteria, odours , ventilation needs. Climate: Global, macro, micro, built form related to climate, design values. Properties: radiation, convection, conduction, water vapour Units: Temperature, irradiance, humidity, moisture content Fabric: heat gain and loss, U-values, condensation, Building Regulations, peak temps. Acoustics Hearing: The experience of sound and the auditory system. Sound: Its nature, Frequency and wavelength, measurement and quantification. Units: Decibels, addition of sound levels. Sound propagation: In free space, within rooms, Reverberation and the Sabine equation. Sound insulation: Transmission and absorption. Insulation and mass.

ARCH0004: Building environment 2

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX60 CW40
Requisites: Pre ARCH0003

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: A review of some design methods encountered in practice. Objectives: To gain a basic understanding of all principal concerns in buildings including both the modification of external environment using the building envelope and creation of good internal conditions by appropriate building design and the incorporation of necessary electrical and mechanical systems. To be able to do simple calculations as well as apply the knowledge to design projects.
Content:
Lighting Daylight: Daylight factors at a point, Waldram diagrams, no sky lines. Shading: Design of solar shading to exclude sunlight. Units of light: Point sources, luminous intensity, luminance, calculation of illuminance. Light sources: Efficacy, life, colour, rendering, optical size, physical size, flicker, lumen maintenance, starting time, restart time, wattages available, cost. Installations: Choice of luminaire, illuminance ratios, uniformity, regular arrays, lumen method, discomfort glare, disability glare, reflected glare, vector/scalar ratios. Acoustics Sound and noise analysis. Propagation of sound: Outside. Sound reflection, diffraction and diffusion. Sound absorption. Sound level and reverberation in rooms. Transmission and insulation: Single partitions. Sound propagation in and out of buildings. Cavity constructions. Flanking transmission. Impact noise insulation. Acoustic design for speech and music: Sightline design, acoustic faults. Outside and enclosed theatres. Concert hall design including the traditional rectangular hall. Thermal Energy: Requirements for heating and cooling, assessments, targets, efficiency. Spaces: Zones of discomfort, action of heat emitters, co-ordination, safety. Ventilation: Natural, mechanical, systems, mixing, distribution patterns. Materials: Choosing appropriate characteristics for walls, ceilings, floors and roofs. Solar heating: Windows, atria, sun spaces, active collection and storage. Heat production: Electricity, oil, gas, centralised and distributed boiler plant, emission control. Sick building syndrome: Causes, avoidance. Air-conditioning: Essential psychrometrics, comfort cooling, ventilation, full air-conditioning. All air systems: High & low velocity, single duct, dual duct, variable air volume/temperature. Air /chilled water: High and low velocity, fan coil, induction, terminal reheat, chilled surfaces. Plant: Central vs. distributed, space requirements, water chillers, cooling towers, air-cooled condensers, air handling units, fresh air intakes, exhausts.

ARCH0005: Building environmental engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0004, Pre ARCH0086

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To consider the strategy of design for the thermal environment. Objectives: To understand the analytical techniques available to investigate the thermal responses of building fabric and the conditions within the building. To provide the information needed to choose an appropriate heating, ventilation or air conditioning system and estimate energy consumption throughout the year.
Content:
Passive control: Built form, thermal storage, natural ventilation Active systems: Heating and air conditioning systems, energy use, automatic controls and energy measurement systems. Themal modelling software.

ARCH0005: Building environmental engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To consider the strategy of design for the thermal environment. Objectives: To understand the analytical techniques available to investigate the thermal responses of building fabric and the conditions within the building. To provide the information needed to choose an appropriate heating, ventilation or air conditioning system and estimate energy consumption throughout the year.
Content:
Passive control: Built form, thermal storage, natural ventilation Active systems: Heating and air conditioning systems, energy use, automatic controls and energy measurement systems. Themal modelling software.

ARCH0006: Civil engineering construction

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The course covers the practical, safety and organisational aspects of civil engineering construction and is intended to present an overview of procedures in the industry.
Content:
Early roads (Roman to Macadam) and Bridges (beams, arches, trusses to steel and concrete). Present organisation and procedure - DOT, Welsh Office, etc. RCU's and County Councils - rules, codes, memoranda. Road Alignment horizontal curves, vertical curves, gradients, sight lines. Pavement Design rigid, flexible, vertical curves, gradients, sight lines. Bridge Design types of crossing, relationship to strata, factors affecting choice of materials and construction, headroom, loading rules. Cut and fill/embankments factors affecting excavation and fill (costs, suitability of fill, difficulties of excavation programme etc), calculations for cut and fill, slopes of embankments, compaction. Piers and caissons, box foundations buoyancy rafts and basements, piers, open caissons, box caissons, pneumatic caissons. Methods of construction. Excavating below water table or in water sheet cofferdams, diaphragms, underwater construction, well-pointing, pumping. Excavations in cohesive and non-cohesive soils methods of excavation and shoring, means of determining forces and bending moments in shoring systems. Tunnelling in rock and in soft ground types of machines, immersed tubes. Safety and Health on construction sites, good practice and relationship to law.

ARCH0007: Civil engineering hydraulics 1

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop the student's knowledge and understanding of open channel flow beyond that covered in Fluid Mechanics, and give the student a knowledge of civil engineering structures in which that understanding is applied.
Content:
Open channel flow: normal flow, critical flow, Froude Number, surges, hydraulic jump, broad crested weir, narrowing channel, gradually varied flow, backwater curve and surface profiles. Hydraulic structures: dams, spillways, stilling basins, draw off towers, constant velocity channel, settlement tanks, flow dividers.

ARCH0008: Civil engineering hydraulics 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0007

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To give the students some knowledge and understanding of Water Engineering applied to coastal, estuary and river engineering. To give the students a knowledge of Public Health Engineering including water supply, drainage and treatment. Learning objectives: The succesful student should be able to: - demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the factors and relationships affecting groundwater, including replenishment, contamination and extraction - demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the main factors affecting the design of civil engineering works on coasts - demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the application of open-channel hydraulics to river and canal engineering - demonstrate knowledge of the factors influencing the design of hydro-electric and tidal power schemes - demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the main elements of water supply, sewage disposal, and surface water drainage systems.
Content:
a) Water Engineering Hydrology: hydrological cycle, meteorology, groundwater, surface run-off, analysis and forecasting. Groundwater: wells, groundwater movement, groundwater contamination, dispersion and diffusion. Coastal Engineering: Wave action, sediment transport, natural bays, defences and protection, coastal structures, wave power. River and canal engineering: optimum cross-section, unlined channels, alluvial channels, river modelling. Hydro-electric power, tidal power. b) Public Health Engineering Sanitation: Appliances, materials and components; sanitary incinerators and mascerators; sanitary provision. Discharge pipe systems, terminal velocities, pressure variation in stacks. Water supply: sources of water, purity, hardness, water consumption, methods of treatment; corrosion, sludge, micro-organism control in water and steam systems, supply networks; supply installations, estimation of demand and sizing, simultaneous demand. Drainage: foul and surface water drainage; materials and components; sizing and design; ventilation; sewage lifting. Sewage disposal and drainage: water cycle, rainfall, run off, soakaways, sewerage systems, chemical and biological methods of treatment, small plants; problems with various effluents, septic tanks, disposal to rivers or sea outfalls. Environmental risk assessment, pollution

ARCH0009: Computer aided design 1

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course is intended to introduce students to the use of CAD software in the construction industry and to develop skills using AutoCAD for Windows. In addition students will be given an introduction to the campus network and to the sofware available on machines throughout the University. By the end of the course student should be able to use AutoCAD to construct 2D drawings and 3D models of their design projects.
Content:
By the end of the course student should be able to use AutoCAD to construct 2D drawings and 3D models of their design projects. The course is taught through illustrated lectures, tutorial exercises which students work through in their own time and tutorial classes where they receive help in the CAD Studio.

ARCH0010: Computer aided design 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0009

Aims & learning objectives:

Content:
The course will consist of introductory lectures on advanced AutoCAD modelling techniques and optimising design projects for use in 3DStudio. By the end of the course students should be confident in the use of 3DStudio for assigning textured materials with lighting and camera effects to produce rendered stills or animations. The course will be taught through illustrated lectures and tutorials in the CAD studio alongside small projects worked through in the students own time. Submission can either be in the form of rendered stills or a short animation.

ARCH0011: Conservation of historic buildings

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give the student sufficient specialist knowledge and insight to enable participation in design and appraisal of engineering work on historic buildings. Objectives: To familiarise the student with issues affecting the structural conservation of historic buildings. To teach the correct methodological approach. To encourage an interest in historic and architectonic issues. To encourage a flair for investigation supported by sound structural knowledge.
Content:
The mechanics of historic materails, and the assessment of their properties in situ and in the laboratory. The use of analytical tools in the interpretation of the structural condition of existing buildings. The methodology for the analysis of historic buildings: - the collectin of data from different fields of analysis (history, architectonic quality, visual inspection, survey and in situ testing, crack pattern interpretation and structural analysis). - interpretation of data to produce a final judgement on causes of damage and present safety level, with examples Choice and implementation of structural conservation techniques. Level of alteration of existing structure, reversibility of new work, homogeneity of old and new materials, with direct involvement in project work. Dedicated seminars will be used throughout the course, given by representatives of English Heritage and engineering companies.

ARCH0012: Construction 2.2

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0014

Aims & learning objectives:
The aims are to demonstrate how to integrate construction, building services and engineering into the Design Studio, and to establish standards of technical ('working') drawing technique of a standard that may be expected in the first Professional Placement ARCH0064. The learning objectives are to provide students with good examples of modern constructional practice, and to assess their ability to apply good practice to a specific building type.
Content:
Lectures by representatives of specialist sectors of the building industry. Preparation of a 1:20 uncut sectional working drawing of a building (usually multi-storey in height) designed during Design Studio 2.1 or 2.2: ARCH0017/18. To be presented together with structural diagrams, building services diagrams, 'U'-value calculations and full descriptive notation.

ARCH0013: Construction 3

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0012

Aims & learning objectives:

Content:
Materials Metals, glass, coatings and finishes, plastics and insulants. Performance Criteria Principles: joint and support design. Systems Structural gasket and panel, structural and silicone glazed, pressure plate and components. Case Studies Hong Kong Bank, B3 + B8 Stockley Park etc. Site Visit Stockley Park, Taywood Engineering, Elemeta. Design Project Tutorial sessions related to the joint 3rd year design project.

ARCH0014: Construction & materials

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a basic understanding of building construction and materials, sufficient to allow students to integrate this knowledge into their design work.
Content:
This course will take place within the studio, and will be co-ordinated as much as possible with other studio projects. The basic human need for shelter. Natural and man-made materials and textures. Foundations: strip, raft, piled foundations. Columns. External walls in masonry and brick. Bonding, insulation, coursing, dimensions, junctions. Eaves, gables and ridges. Flat roofs, parapets and eaves. Wall openings. Windows and doors. Jambs, sills, heads, thresholds, sizes and frames. Glazing. Suspended timber floors. Concrete floors. Stairs and ramps. Internal walls and partitions. Junctions and finishes. Glazed walls and roofs. Curtain walling. Timber construction. The Segal method. Cladding materials and techniques. Detailed 3-dimensional studies of junctions.

ARCH0015: Design studio 1.1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students the basic dawing and model making skills required in subsequent project work. To provide an introduction to the design process.
Content:
The conventions of architectural and engineering drawing. Orthographic, planometric, isometric and oblique projections. Freehand survey drawing. An introduction to perspective. Consideration of spatial, structural, environmental and constructional issues in the design of a small building.

ARCH0016: Design studio 1.2

Semester 2
Credits: 24
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0015

Aims & learning objectives:
To continue, through a series of short structured projects, the exploration of fundamental theoretical and historical themes in architecture begun with the reading programme in Semester 1. The aim of these projects is to provoke students to ask - and suggest some answers to - the basic question, what is this activity called 'architecture' which we propose to devote our careers to? In the process they will also acquire and develop skills in design and communication.
Content:
Four major project-programmes are undertaken, each comprising four discrete projects which are separately criticized and assessed. The first programme is a creative application of the themes of the Semester 1 reading programme. The second is devoted to materials, which the four projects explore at a technical, environmental, ecological and emotive level. The third concentrates on the spatial structure and historical evolution of the house, taken as a paradigm for architecture in general (Alberti's house-city analogy). The final project explores the perception of architecture and the problems of communicating the architectural experience through a number of examples.

ARCH0017: Design studio 2.1

Semester 1
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0016

Aims & learning objectives:
The unit aims to provide students with specific design skills (as listed in the unit contents), and provide further experience of design process. The learning objectives are to assess the readiness of students for their first placement experience (Professional Placement 1).
Content:
The design and detailing of an interior space. The achievement of quality in space. Materials and the junctions between them. Development of presentation skills. Housing theory through study of housing precedents: through a visit to a British or European city. Housing as an element of urban design The enclosure, planning and detailing of external space Site analysis. There will be a joint design project with engineering students.

ARCH0018: Design studio 2.2

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0017

Aims & learning objectives:
Apart from the acquisition of design skills listed in the unit contents, this unit gives continuing experience of the design process, and in particular prepares students for their first placement (Professional Placement 1)
Content:
The design and detailing of an interior space The achievement of quality in space Materials and junctions between them Development of presentation skills Housing theory Study of housing precedents through a visit to a British or European city Housing as an element of urban design The enclosure, planning and detailing of external space Site analysis There will be a joint design project with students of engineering in the year.

ARCH0019: Design studio 3.1

Semester 1
Credits: 15
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0018, Co ARCH0093

Aims & learning objectives:
The third year studio syllabus exploits the international profile of the year. The studio furthers the individual student's capacity for independent architectural thought and its application at all stages of the design process. The studio explores the relationship between culture, urban form and architecture, allowing students from diverse cultural backgrounds to share their understanding and experiences, as well as the coherent presentation of ideas through suitable media, and on open group discussion of these ideas. The studio develops skills in working as individuals and as members of a team.
Content:
A series of design projects, including a joint design project with students of engineering in the year.

ARCH0020: Design studio 3.2

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0019

Aims & learning objectives:
The third year studio syllabus exploits the international profile of the year. The studio furthers the individual student's capacity for independent architectural thought and its application at all stages of the design process. The studio explores the relationship between culture, urban form and architecture, allowing students from diverse cultural backgrounds to share their understanding and experiences, as well as the coherent presentation of ideas through suitable media, and on open group discussion of these ideas.The studio develops skills in working as individuals and as members of a team.
Content:
A series of design projects, including a joint design project with students of engineering in the year.

ARCH0021: Design studio 4.1

Semester 1
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0019

Aims & learning objectives:

Content:
Part of the year is spent in a joint project with students of engineering, leading to the award of the Basil Spence Prize for the best multidisciplinary teamwork. In addition, students of architecture will undertake: The development of design strategies for a significant public space, related to - The detailed design of a large building with high structural and environmental demands, typically a performance space. This design will be used, where possible, as a vehicle for assessment for the technical modules in years 3/4.

ARCH0022: Design studio 4.2

Semester 2
Credits: 30
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0021

Aims & learning objectives:

Content:
Part of the year is spent in a joint project with students of engineering, leading to the award of the Basil Spence Prize for the best multidisciplinary teamwork.In addition, students of architecture will undertake:The development of design strategies for a significant public space, related to - The detailed design of a large building with high structural and environmental demands, typically a performance space. This design will be used, where possible, as a vehicle for assessment for the technical modules in years 3/4.

ARCH0023: BEng Dissertation

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To assess the ability of students for original and individual thought and application to a substantial project/ programme of work.
Content:
A substantial work of research presented as a short thesis, normally entailing experimental and analytical or numberical modelling and their practical application to a researched topic. This preliminary unit represents the background reading and planning for the investigation. Assessment will be together with Dissertation Completion, but a formal presentation must be made by each student describing the background, aims, and proposed methods of their dissertation, which will carry 50% of the mark for this unit.

ARCH0024: Continuum mechanics 2

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give a brief introduction to cuvilear co-ordinates and tensors which are useful for any advanced work in continuum mechanics, the finite element method, or shell theory. To stimulate the students interest in physics and its relation to some important areas of current engineering research.
Content:
Revisio of Navier-Stokes equations and introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics. Curvilinear co-ordinates, covariant and contravariant base vectors, metric tensor. Tensor product. Tensors in cuvilenear co-ordinates. Properties of symmetric second order tensors - principal values and directinos, Mohr's circles in three dimensions. Definition of stress and strain in curvilinear co-ordinates. Christoffel symbols and covariant differentiation. Equilibrium equations in curvilinear co-ordinates. Constiutive equations in elasticity, plasticity and fluid mechanics using curvilinear co-ordinates. Geometry of surfaces, metric tensor, second fundamental form, normal curvature and twist, mean and Gaussian curvature. Order of covariant differentiation, Reimann-Christoffel tensor. Gauss's theorem and the Codazzi equations. Membrane equilibrium equations. Application to shell and tension structures. Discussion of ccurvilinear co-ordinates in 4-dimensional space-time, the Bianci relations, the Ricci tensor, the Einstein tensor and the General Theory of Relativity.

ARCH0025: BEng Dissertation completion

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
As for Dissertation.
Content:
The main part of the dissertation work, following on from the 'Dissertation' unit.

ARCH0026: Facade engineering construction

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give a knowledge and understanding of the design and construction of building facades. Objectives: To give an understanding of the various structural and environmental requirements of facades. To give a knowledge of the various methods used in facade construction, and of how they meet design requirements.
Content:
Design principles Windows, curtain walling, slope glazing, overcladding. Front sealed, drained and ventilated and pressure equalised systems. Materials Glass, aluminium, steel, PVC.U, G.R.P., G.R.C., bricks, natural stone, precast concrete, finishes, sealants, gaskets. Performance criteria Water penetration, air leakage, wind, thermal mass and insulation, condensation, acoustics, building movement, thermal movement, ventilation, fire, security, blast. Specification and contracts Nature of the industry, construction/manufacturing, specification, contracts, installation. Detailing Joints, anchorages, stick systems, panellised systems, untied systems, tolerances.

ARCH0027: Electrical engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give the student a basic knowledge of those aspects of electrical engineering most pertinent to civil engineering and building design.
Content:
Basic units, electromagnetic theory, AC generation, phasor diagram, power factor, three phase supply, transformer characteristics, AC machines, power electronics

ARCH0029: Environmental design

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0004

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To improve students confidence to use building environmental design as a major positive factor in the design of buildings. Objectives: To examine in some detail the objectives of design using examples from practice. The course will use the joint design project as a vehicle for the early lectures in the course.
Content:
Lighting Design: Designed appearance, enclosure, structure, rational use of colour. Combined lighting: Exploitation of natural light, control of electric lighting. Design criteria: Establishing criteria, isolation of variables, effects of experimentation. Display: Art galleries, museums, principles of design, conservation. Nightime lighting: Security, floodlighting of buildings. Green buildings: Integrated design. Acoustics Principles of internal room acoustic design. Acoustic design of lecture and drama theatres. Multi-purpose hall design. Noise control in buildings. Case histories of internal acoustic and noise control design. Guidance for the final year joint design project. Thermal Choice between passive and active control of internal environment. incorporating major Building services.

ARCH0030: Facade engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To extend the knowledge and understanding gained in Facade Engineering Construction by examining the engineering issues involved in current developments in Window and Cladding Technology.
Content:
Brittle materials, anchorages and fixings Engineering use of adhesives Structural/ cladding interaction Structural use of glass Heat transfer, thermal capacity, component temperatures, shading, moisture and condensation Advanced glazing Durability, weathering

ARCH0031: Fire & construction safety

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the subject of Fire Engineering and develop previous course material concerning construction safety on site and in design considerations for the future use of building structures.
Content:
An introduction to fire engineering including the nature of fire, the mechanism of combustion and the behaviour of its products. The behaviour of people in fire is examined, the interaction between fire, buildings and other enclosures and the principles of escape and survival studies. The course goes on to examine safety in the context of the construction site, the industry and application of legislation and the development of safety policies and management systems.

ARCH0033: Geology

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX90 CW10
Requisites: Co ARCH0212

Aims & learning objectives:
To give a general knowledge of geological processes appropriate to the needs of a civil engineer, and to teach basic methods of interpretation of simple geological maps
Content:
Soil and rock description. Particle size classification. Definitions of voids ratio, Moisture content, density, Atterberg Limits with explanation of their relevance. Plate tectonics, volcanoes and earthquakes. Formation and characteristics of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. Intrepretation of simple geological maps, producing accurate cross-sections for inclined and faulted strata, includingg unconformities, and sketch cross-sections for folded strata. To be able to appreciate the topography from the geology in common situations. Processes of weathering, erosion and transportation. The formation of sediments in different environments and key characteristics. Intrepretation of simple geological maps, producing accurate cross-sections for inclined and faulted strata, includingg unconformities, and sketch cross-sections for folded strata. To be able to appreciate the topography from the geology in common situations. The Hydrological cycle and occurrence of ground water.

ARCH0034: Geotechnical engineering

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX60 CW40
Requisites: Co ARCH0214

Aims & learning objectives:
To give an understanding of the behaviour of piled foundations, and of the principles, theory and methods used in their design and analysis.
Content:
Earth Retaining Structures Soil as fill. Reinforced soil. Piling : construction and design of single piles and pile groups. Types of pile and appropriate analytical methods, related to site investigation methods. Calculation of working loads and settlements.

ARCH0035: History & theory 1.2

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this unit is to introduce students of architecture to architectural literature, and to enable them to read this literature effectively, and to use it when developing work in the studio. The learning objectives are to provide students with key texts that have influenced the course of architectural history, and to assess their ability to identify the relationship between architectural ideas and form.
Content:
Following the structured reading that will have taken place in the first semester, students will be invited to implement what they have learned through special projects within the design studio.

ARCH0036: History & theory 2

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this course is to enable students to use their basic knowledge of achitectural history and theory to develop their own opinions, and to understand the theoretical issues that confront us today. The course's title is 'Architecture after Modernism'.
Content:
Each week students will examine a text selected from an established writer, starting chronologically with Robert Venturi. The range of texts will provide students with a thorough working knowledge of contemporary issues. Following presentation of the selected texts by the students themselves, there will be a structured discussion in which all students will be encouraged to participate. Assessment will be through the presentation of a script of each student's presentation. Typical subjects areas covered will be: Venturi; Urban Theorists; PostModerns in Britain; Urban Reconstruction; Privatisation

ARCH0038: History & theory 4

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES75 CW25
Requisites: Pre ARCH0036

Aims & learning objectives:
Designed to complement the project work set in the studio, this unit aims to introduce a range of analytical theories and formal research techniques associated with the proportional design of buildings. Students are assessed on their knowledge of the application of proportional systems to buildings through history, in relation to a design project in the studio.
Content:
Lectures providing a thorough grounding in the history of the use of proportion in architectural design based on recent texts on proportional history and theory. The course is assessed in two modes: by an essay to be completed at the end of the semester; and by a studio project in which students use principles of proportion in their design work.

ARCH0039: History & theory 5

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
An introductory course examining the effect of theoretical positions on design activity and the kind of explanation which can be put forward for architectural solutions.
Content:
The area and nature of theories; boundary between history and theory and between practice and theory. Building types as equivalent of biological species; 18th and 19th century French history. Activity and space links in primative functionalism; the importance of the brief. Space and activity as unrelated phenomena; flexibility as a determinant; the architecture of Mies van der Rohe. Categories of space as in served and servant spaces; the architecture of Louis Kahn. Defined criteria and solutions for aspects of the environment; Christopher Alexander's 'Pattern Language'. Popper's hypothetico - deductive theory and its implications; model selection and model shifts. The library as a building type; development of the library plan. The museum as a building type; analysis of characteristics. Case studies of Louis Kahn and Carlo Scarpa.

ARCH0040: History and Theory 1.1

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The unit aims to provide a summary of key architectural movements from classical to modern times, alongside an overview of the historical development of civil engineering. The learning objectives are to provide students with good examples of constructions that have influenced the course of building history, and to assess their ability to identify the factors that determine the quality and contribution of such buildings to society.
Content:
Different lecturers from within the Department will provide a series of discrete lectures in which the period, movement or area of activity is examined through key buildings and structures.

ARCH0041: History/ Case studies civil and structural engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites: Co ARCH0215

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To strengthen the basic understanding of structures given to the students in Structures 1 by relating it to the history of civil and structural engineering, and to the design of specific structures through case studies. Objectives: The student should axquire a knowledge of the history of civil and structural engineering. The student should acquire an understanding of the way in which that history, together with an understanding of statics, informs the design of structures.
Content:
A range of lecturers from within and outside the School will give a series of discrete lectures examining a period of historical development or the design of a specific structure.

ARCH0042: Industrial placement 1

Semester 2
Credits: 15
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: RT100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0006, Pre ARCH0213, Pre ARCH0082, Co ARCH0067

Aims & learning objectives:
To gain experience and knowledge of civil engineering in practice, and to report on an area of interest.
Content:
Practical experience and first hand observation of civil engineering and construction, preferably on a construction site as an employee of a contractor, but possibly as an employee of a consultant with visits to sites. The student is supported in finding an employer, but the School cannot guarantee that every student will be employed. All students will be given an academic supervisor for the duration of the unit. Students who obtain employment in the UK will normally be visited at their place of work; otherwise, communication will be maintained by other means. Should a student fail to find a job, they would be expected to carry out a relevent study in the area in which they live; their supervisor will discuss this study with them, and give guidance where required. Students will be assessed for the award of the credits on the basis of a report on one aspect of the work they have done.

ARCH0043: Industrial placement 2

Semester 2
Credits: 18
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: RT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To gain experience and knowledge of civil engineering design in practice, and to report on an area of interest.
Content:
Practical experience and first hand observation of civil engineering desgn, preferably in a consulting practice. The student is supported in finding an employer, but the School cannot guarantee that every student will be employed. All students will be given an academic supervisor for the duration of the unit. Students who obtain employment in the UK will normally be visited at their place of work; otherwise, communication will be maintained by other means. Should a student fail to find a job, they would be expected to carry out a relevant study in the area in which they live; their supervisor will discuss this study with them, and give guidance where required. Students will be assessed for the award of the credits on the basis of a report on one aspect of the work they have done.

ARCH0044: Industrial placement M2

Semester 1
Credits: 24
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: RT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To gain experience and knowledge of civil engineering design in practice, and to report on an area of interest.
Content:
Practical experience and first hand observation of civil engineering desgn, preferably in a consulting practice. The student is supported in finding an employer, but the School cannot guarantee that every student will be employed. All students will be given an academic supervisor for the duration of the unit. Students who obtain employment in the UK will normally be visited at their place of work; otherwise, communication will be maintained by other means. Should a student fail to find a job, they would be expected to carry out a relevant study in the area in which they live; their supervisor will discuss this study with them, and give guidance where required. Students will be assessed for the award of the credits on the basis of a report on one aspect of the work they have done.

ARCH0045: Industrial project IP1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: RT100 or CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give experience in solving a real industrial problem under both industrial and academic supervision.
Content:
Structural or Environmental Engineering Design carried out in industry with academic links, following or during the second industrial placement M2. For students who are unable to gain an industrial placement the project IP1 will be undertaken as a sponsored project on behalf of one of the companies who would normally employ students. In this case the project will be undertaken wholly at the University (in labs or CAD labs) during the first part of term 2 and before commencement of Semester 2.

ARCH0046: Industrial project IP2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give further experience in solving a real industrial problem under both industrial and academic supervision.
Content:
Structural or Environmental Engineering Design linked with industry sponsorship, following on from Industrial Project IP1, but for all students based in the University under closer academic supervision.

ARCH0047: Laboratory 1

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0082, Pre ARCH0076, Pre ARCH0004, Pre MECH0134

Aims & learning objectives:
To consolidate material covered in lecture-based units and demonstrations, and to introduce good civil and environmental engineering laboratory and practical techniques. To develop skills in the writing up and analysis of practical work.
Content:
Laboratory experiments and exercises in geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, fluid mechanics, acoustics and lighting

ARCH0048: Laboratory 2

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: PR100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce more sophisticated laboratory techniques including electronic instrumentation and data logging, and to give experience of some of the methods and apparatus referred to in lecture modules.
Content:
Laboratory experiments and exercises in geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, fluid mechanics, acoustics and lighting

ARCH0049: Landscape

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To raise awareness of the physical environment around buildings and its modification, through passive and active technical means.
Content:
Understanding the Site: An introduction to the principles of landscape assessment and the basic methods of recording and analysing site specific landscape and ecology information so that it can be used effectively in the design process. Landscape Design theory: Including an outline understanding of landscape design history from prehistory to today and an introduction to contemporary landscape planning and design. Ecology: Introduction to the basic principles of ecology with an emphasis on the planning and design of ecological landscapes. Landscape and Buildings: Providing a basic outline of how landscapes influence the design of buildings including consideration of energy conservation, setting, daylighting, access, external spaces, choice of materials and colours, construction methods, orientation, views and long term management. Technical details: An introduction to the basic principles of landscape detailing to include consideration of paving, planting, boundaries and edges, changes in level and water features.

ARCH0050: Lighting

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: Lighting for civil engineering projects and overall building form. Objectives: Introduction to external lighting which may be experienced by practicing civil engineers. The calculation of sky factors to enable rapid estimation of sky components in order to assess the adequacy of window design.
Content:
Applications: Streetlighting, Floodlighting,Tunnel lighting, Sports lighting, Light sources: Discharge light sources, luminaires. Theory: Adaption time, apparent brightness, unit hemisphere, vector summation method.

ARCH0051: Lightweight structures

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop an understanding of the theory and practical design of lightweight wide-span structures, particularly tensile membranes, cable networks, grid shells, air-supported and pneumatic structures.
Content:
Characteristics, behaviour and analytical methods for funicular cable structures subject to uniform and non-uniform loadings. Effects of elastic extensino, temperature effects, support settlements and cable slip. Matrix methods for geometric and material non-linear cable and membrane structures. Incremental, Newton-Raphson and modified N-R methods. Zero stiffness controls in the iteration process. Implicit and explicit integration vector methods. Dynamic Relaxation applied to shell, space and tension structures. Form-finding controls. Kinetic and viscous damping. Behaviour and modelling of prestressed fabric membranes. Crimp interchange and on-off non-linear material properties modelling. Computer Aided Design packages for form-finding and analysis of membrane, cable network, grid shell and pneumatic structures. Wind load response and numerical and physical modelling. Practical design aspects for steelwork, membrane and foundation design, steelwork detailing and steelwork and membrane fabrication patterning. Assembly and on-site construction procedures. The course will entail design project studies embracing conceptual and structural engineering dsign and detailing using both CAD and physical modelling methods.

ARCH0052: Management 1

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
An introductory course concerning the management of the construction industry and the roles and responsibilities of the professions.
Content:
Procurement of construction work tendering, design and build, project management. Contractors and sub-contractors. Organisation of construction sites - the roles of architect, engineer, contractor, project manager. The importance of construction sequence, time, critical paths. The course is designed to develop the individual's concept of employment, professional duties and the 'business of business' by: 1. Ensuring an understanding of the various ways in which the design team may be structured. 2. Demonstrating the role and differing levels of the professional's responsibility within each structure. 3. Generating an understanding of sole trader, partnership and corporate entities. 4. Examining the laws governing employment. 5. Discussing personal promotion in terms of the use of technology, e.g. the use of computer technology for the presentation of c.v.'s and the like.

ARCH0053: Management 2

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0052

Aims & learning objectives:
These courses are designed to ensure an understanding of the Architect's authority under the terms of the standard forms of contract and the effect that the exercising of that authority may have on the client in terms of time and money.
Content:
The course will further examine the Architect's responsibility and liability, in law, for the adverse effects of decisions and actions that may ultimately be proven to have been made wrongfully. This course will further generate an appreciation of due legal process.

ARCH0054: Management 2C

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0213

Aims & learning objectives:
To give a general knowledge of legal and contract obligations in the construction industry. At the end of the unit, the student should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the following areas at a level to provide appropriate preparation for employment as a graduate in the construction industry: - the management roles of the engineer; - basic management theory; - business management in construction; - methods of civil engineering procurement; - processes and roles on construction sites; - construction hazards and their management / responsibility for safety
Content:
Structure of business organisations. The Engineer as Manager Management theory: Organisational culture Handy's paradoxes of modern organisational life. Changing patterns of organisation and their relevance to construction. Decision-making models: rationalist, Carnegie, incremental, 'garbage can'. Business management in construction: Corporate policy, objectives, strategies, tactics, marketing. The tender process: Procurement of design, consultancy contracts, methods of payment Construction contracts (design and build; subcontracting; design, build and operate). Environmental impact of construction: Overview Construction and operation (energy, pollution, ecology, resources, recycling, sustainability) Environmental Impact Assessment (process, EC and UK approaches, methods, monitoring, risk assessment) Life cycle costing Value management & engineering Construction sites: Basic terminology of construction techniques and plant. Organisation of construction sites Roles of architect, engineer, contractor, project manager. Buildability, method statements, access to workface, commissioning, international variations Construction health and safety: Safety law and regulations, safety management systems, construction hazards, cost of accidents, CDM. Economics of safety (financial and non-financial costs of accidents, ethical standards).

ARCH0055: Management 3C

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0054

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students a knowledge of the economics of the construction industry. At the end of the unit, the student should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the following areas at a level to provide appropriate preparation for employment as a graduate in the construction industry: - law of torts - contract law - company law - employment law - a systematic approach to human resources and motivation/responsibility for safety - operational research - project planning and control.
Content:
Introduction to English law and legal system Law of torts Negligence Design liability Introduction to CDM regulations Insurance and Litigation; the ethical context and the legal context. Contract Law: Creation of a contract document Defects in a contract, termination Parties to a contract Introduction to construction contracts. Company law (types of business organisation; setting up a limited company; appointment and responsibilities of directors; meetings, financing a company, partnership, insolvency, bankruptcy) Employment law (contract of employment; rights and duties; statutory regulation of remuneration; legal constraints on terms and conditions of employment; termination of employment) Human resources and motivation: Theories of motivation Responsibility for safety Team building, conflict, leadership, group theory, power and influence, conduct of meetings. Human Resource Management Performance appraisal. Introduction to operations research techniques: Queuing theory Simulation Linear programming Dynamic programming Introduction to project planning and control: Planning, activity planning, logic, critical path networks, resource analysis, GANTT Charts & PERT charts

ARCH0056: Management 4C

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0055

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students a working knowledge of project and business management in the construction industry. At the end of the unit, the student should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the following areas, at a level which provides adequate preparation for making a full contribution to the management of construction projects: - organisations, teams, structures and responsibilites; - operations management; - estimation and bills of quantities; - contract procedures; - quality assurance; - risk analysis and management; - management of safety; - dealing with organisational change.
Content:
Project management: Anatomy of a project, project boundaries, multi-project planning. Defining the project, the design brief. Leadership and teams, project organisation. Structure of a design team Professional responsibilities within different structures. Operations management: Management of safety Product, plant, processes, programs, people Estimation and bills of quantities: Civil Engineering Standard Method of Measurement Preparing bill items and taking-off quantities Operational estimations; measurement, valuation and claims, role of method-related charges Preparation of contract documents Contract procedures: Conditions of contract (ICE 5th and 6th ed., NEC), Parties to the contract, duties and responsibilities; running the contract, programmes, Certificates, durations; paying for work, variations, claims; disputes resolution. Quality Assurance: Principles of QA Quality auditing TQM (principles and practice; Implementing quality management in a construction firm. Risk analysis and management: Forecasting, sensitivity, mean expected values, decision strategies. Managing uncertainty and variation. Organisational change 'New Thinking' in organisational theory and practice Implementation in construction Industrial relations Use of computers in construction management.

ARCH0059: Mathematics 1

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a general mathematical basis for the development of engineering subjects at first year level of the civil engineering courses.
Content:
Elementary functions Exponential and logarthmic functions, hyperbolic functions and inverses in logarithmic form, inverse circular functions. Differentiation and its applications Maximum and minimum values, inflection points, tangents, normals, curvature, solution of non-linear equations using Newton's method, limits. Integration and its applications General revision of techniques, by parts, use of partial fractions, substitution, length of curves, areas and volumes, first and second moments, centre of gravity, parallel and perpendicular axes theorem.

ARCH0060: Mathematics 2

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a general mathematical basis for the development of engineering subjects at first year level of the civil engineering courses.
Content:
Infinite series Maclaurin and Taylor's series, binomial expansion, ideas of convergence, geometrical series, comparison, ratio and integral tests, l' Hôpital's rule. Complex numbers Complex plane, Cartesian, polar and exponential forms, algebra of complex numbers, de Moivre's theorem multiple roots, complex logarithm. Statistics Basic descriptive statistics, his-tograms, stem-and-leaf plots, cumulative frequency, measure of location and dispersion, mean, mode and median, upper and lower quartiles, variance and standard deviation. Concept of probability, exclusivity, dependence and independence of events, conditional probability. Binomial and Poisson distributions.

ARCH0061: Mathematics 3 & computing

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a general mathematical basis for the development of engineering subjects at second year level of the civil engineering courses.
Content:
Differential equations Simple first order using separation of variables and integrating factor. Linear equations with constant coefficients using trial method for particular integral. Simultaneous equations. Application of differential equations to mechanical systems and structural problems. Numerical solution of first order equations. Functions of several variables Partial differentiation. Small errors. Taylor's theorem. Maxima and minima. Method of least squares. Regression. Determinants and matrices Properties of determinants. Matrix algebra. Solution of simultaneous equations using the matrix inverse. Cramer's rule and Gauss elimination. Consistency. An introduction to the principles and techniques of computer programming using C++.

ARCH0062: Mathematics 4

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a general mathematical basis for the development of engineering subjects at third year level of the civil engineering courses.
Content:
Fourier series Full and half-range series. Odd and even functions, odd harmonics. Laplace Transforms Basic theory for simple functions, derivatives and integrals, step and impulse functions. Solution of differential equations. Periodic functions. Convolution integral. Elementary vector analysis Basic definitions and algebra. Scalar and vector products. Equations of lines and planes. Geometrical interpretations, orientation of planes, volumes of solids. Partial Differential Equations Separation of variables, Laplace's equation, diffusion and wave equations. Numerical analysis Solution of non-linear equations, zeros of polynomials, both real and com-plex. Finite differences, interpolation using Lagrange and Newton difference formulae. Error estimation, splines, Chebychev polynomials. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. Euler, improved Euler, Runge-Kutta methods. Accuracy and stability. Initial and boundary value problems.

ARCH0063: Numerical modelling

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide practice in the computational formulation and solution of engineering problems; principally related to structures but including field problems such as seepage and fluid flow.
Content:
The theoretical basis for computer packages used or demonstrated will be studied and students will develop their own (simplified) computer programs or routines for the numerical methods employed. These will cover step-by-step integration methods for the modelling of structural dynamics, heat transfer and potential flow problems. Individual projects will be undertaken to cover one of these areas and will be presented in seminar groups covering all aspects.

ARCH0064: Professional placement 1

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims and objectives are stipulated as part of an RIBA Practice Logbook to be completed by the student and his/her employer.
Content:
The thin sandwich system at Bath offers students of architecture the opportunity to experience a range of employment in architectural practices, or on other activities that are related to the academic and professional nature of the course.The Department will support all students in their search for placements, and will in particular offer guidance in the preparation of applications. However, employment is not guaranteed, and students who are not successful will be encouraged to pursue activities that will form a useful contribution to their development. Students will be assessed for the award of the cedits attached to this unit on the basis of a written report on the work they have done.

ARCH0065: Professional placement 2 (Bath)

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims and objectives are stipulated as part of an RIBA Practice Logbook to be completed by the student and his/her employer.
Content:
The thin sandwich system at Bath offers students of architecture the opportunity to experience a range of employment in architectural practices, or on other activities that are related to the academic and professional nature of the course.The Department will support all students in their search for placements, and will in particular offer guidance in the preparation of applications. However, employment is not guaranteed, and students who are not successful will be encouraged to pursue activities that will form a useful contribution to their development. Students will be assessed for the award of the cedits attached to this unit on the basis of a written report on the work they have done.

ARCH0066: Professional placement 2 (Socrates)

Semester 2
Credits: 21
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:

Content:


ARCH0067: Project C1

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ARCH0042

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the art of resolving apparently conflicting architectural and engineering requirements in the context of a simple building.
Content:
Structural and Environmental Engineering Design linked with architecture and engineering studio Precedent lectures are used to discuss relevent examples. Suitable buildings might include a woodworking shop used for training, a small exhibition space, or a visitor centre with spans typically up to 10m. Structural issues should cover the overall conceptual design, choice of apprpriate materials, sizing of members and connection details, and simple foundation design. Environmental issues should concentrate on light, sound and energy control. The proportion of time spent on common group working with the architectural students is about 25% (at the early stages of the project).

ARCH0068: Project C2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop skills in integration of engineering and architectural objectives to produce creative and competent designs.
Content:
Structural and Environmental Engineering Design linked with architectures studio. Precedent lectures are used to discuss relevent examples. Suitable buildings might include a community centre, an electronics factory with spans typically up 15m. Structural issues should include the integration of architectural and environmental aspects in the complete conceptual design, the design to codes of practice of all principal members, connection details and construction aspects, and the design of foundations. Environmental issues should include optimal use of daylight, solar heating, natural ventilation, noise from surroundings. The proportion of time spent on group working with the architectural students is up to 50% (in the first half of the project development).

ARCH0069: Project C3/1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students experience in developing a complex scheme working in teams with architecture students.
Content:
Precedent lectures are used to discuss relevent examples. The building type will have more complex planning problems and potential for elegance to suit the needs of the architects. There should be environmental conditions to consider, ie air conditioning/ natural ventilation to compare, and lighting and acoustic problems. Types of building which are suitable include autitoria based (theatre, opera house, concert hall - all have potential for interesting structures, eg cable, domes, frameworks etc), museum (differing types from art galleries to 'Exploratory' type, and libraries, requiring exclusion of noise and good lighting ), industrial (eg brewery, with the process providing a problem), or sports complex. All have air conditioning / natural ventilation, potential for interest visually as well as in services and structure, and heavy foundation loads. The project will be tutored both by academic staff and industrial visiting tutors.

ARCH0070: Project M4

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the wider urban issues and how they affect structural, environmental and architectural design, and give them some experience of resolving those issues.
Content:
Joint design work with BArch students involving consideration of civil, structural and environmental engineering design issues in a broad urban context. Normally a real current development project will be used for this brief, and the project will involve the full structural, geotechnical and environmental design for a particular building or small complex of buildings within the development. Precedent lectures are used to discuss relevent examples, and the work is tutored by visiting architects and engineers.

ARCH0071: Project C3/2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop further the project designed in Project C4
Content:
The development and structural engineering design of particular aspects of project C4 to professional levels of competence. This more detailed design development is carried out by students individually and will usually also give rise to a substantial revision of the conceptual design. Alternatively, entirely new aspects are developed; the itention in either case is to assess ingenuity and engineering design competence. Precedent lectures are used to discuss relevent examples. The project is tutored by both academic and industrial visiting tutors.

ARCH0072: Project M1

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give experience in considering both structural and environmental engineering issues in the context of a simple building, with particular emphasis on those areas covered in the co-requisite units.
Content:
Application of structural and environmental engineering design in a simple building

ARCH0073: Project M2

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Integrated design of a building which can be handled in a simple way architecturally but which gives rise to realistic problems of integration of structure, environmental and services requirements.
Content:
Structural and Environmental Engineering Design, with particular emphasis on problems of integration.

ARCH0075: Socrates Exchange & Placement (BSc)

Academic Year
Credits: 60
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0018

Aims & learning objectives:
This exchange programme with 12 other European Schools of Architecture provides students with an opportunities to study abroad. Students on this unit learn directly about the architectural values of the institution being visited through design project work and lectures, as well as from travel within the country. The Placement allows them to then extend these experiences into the work-place. They also have an opportunity to perfect their language skills - particularly the technical language relating to design and practice.
Content:
This is tailored to the requirements of the individual student, partly by the Socrates co-ordinators (here and at the host university), and according to the units being offered by the host institutions. Exchange students complete design projects which is first assessed by the host institution, and marks and a report on each student are sent to Bath. On returning to Bath each student is required to submit their portfolio of designs and Placement logbook to the Socrates co-ordinator for inspection and assessment.

ARCH0076: Soil mechanics 1

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop an understanding of the behaviour of soil, and the factors that influence that behaviour.
Content:
Seepage, Darcy's law of permeability, definitions of effective stresses and pore water pressure. Introductory flow net, principles. Non-linear stress-strain character of soils, consolidation of natural deposits, normally consolidated and over-consolidated materials. The critical state model, isotopic and one-dimensional consolidation, drained and undrained soil behaviour.

ARCH0077: Soil mechanics 2

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX75 CW25
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To gain a knowledge of the way in which the understanding developed in Soil Mechanics 1 can be applied to the design of foundations and soil structures, and how the necessary information is obtained in practice.
Content:
The shear strength of soils and applications to retaining wall design, slope stability. Site investigation and laboratory testing. Slope stability analysis. Foundation design - stress distributions, bearing capacity and settlement calculation, related to site investigation techniques.

ARCH0079: Structures 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX60 CW40
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To make students aware of the role played by structure in the design and building process. To introduce the concepts of statics and load carrying mechanisms, sufficient for an elementary appraisal of structures. To familiarise students with different types of structural materials and assemblies.
Content:
Enclosure of space, spatial forms and structures. Functional and environmental loads on structures; real and design loads, and the concepts of structural safety. Stable structures and structural mechanisms. Newton's laws, free body diagrams, triangles of forces and reciprocal figures. Static equilibrium and free body diagrams. The concepts of forces and moments in structural members. Equilibrium of loads, forces and moments in simple structures; external and internal constraints. Traditional building materials, their characteristics, and concepts of structural connections. Reinforced Concrete, masonry, timber and steel. Introduction to load carrying action of trusses, beams, arches, cables and columns. The concepts of stress, section sizes and shapes. Pin-jointed trusses: resolving at joints and method of sections; physical behaviour and structural form and efficiency. Direct stresses and strains; Young's Modulus. Direct determination of deflections in simple trusses. Beams and free body diagrams, bending moments and shear forces. Bending stresses in beams, section shape and structural efficiency; web action and the concept of shear stresses. Overall efficiency of beams and simple bridges. Combined bending and axial loading in short columns; the middle third; wall construction; slender columns and stability concepts. Hanging chains and funicular shapes; simple suspension systems. Voussoir arches and masonry domes. Three pin arches and portal frames. The above topics concentrate on a broad overview of structural concepts and will be supported by laboratory demonstrations, tutorial classes and case studies emphasising the relation between structural and architectural concepts, structural safety and examples of structural failures.

ARCH0080: Structures 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX70 CW30
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop an analytical understanding of the statics and mechanics of statically determinate structures and structural mechanisms. To introduce students to the internal action of structures, stresses and strains, and the comparative action of statically determinate and indeterminate structures. To consider in greater detail the range of structures examined conceptually in Structures 1. To develop a physical and analytical understanding of stresses and strains in two (and three) dimensions, and of the three-dimensional action of structures and components.
Content:
The action of statically determinate and indeterminate structures; concepts of redundancy and redistribution of forces; construction tolerances, temperature effects and settlements. Bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; comparison of statically determinate and continuous beams. Bending and shearing stresses in beams; concept of principal stresses, stress trajectories and analolgies with truss action; structural form efficiency. Centroid, neutral axis, section modulus and beam sectional shape efficiency. Analysis of suspension systems subject to uniform and non-uniform loading; funicular polygons. Analysis of three-pin arches and portals; consideration of thrust lines; comparison with two-pin and fixed systems. Voussoir arches, thrust lines, and their mechanism of collapse. Deflected forms and bending moments in portal and framed structures; weak beam/ strong column and strong beam solutions (physical action and approximate analysis). Young''s modulus and Poisson''s ratio; shear modulus; elastic and plastic behaviour; brittle failure and fatigue. Internal stress equilibrium; Mohr''s circle for stresses and strains; principal stresses and strains. Failure and safety criteria for common structural materials. Theory of bending of beams; moment/curvature relations and analysis of deflections. Shear stresses and shear flow in beams; fabricated and composite beams; welds and shear connectors. Bending of asymmetric sections. Torsion of thin-walled closed sections. Shear centre; torsion of thin-walled open sections; warping constraints in torsion. Stresses due to combined bi-axial bending, torsion and axial loading in structural members. Euler buckling load for columns; differing end constraints; imperfections, eccentric loading and initial curvatures. Plastic moment and reduced plastic moment; concepts of plastic failure mechanisms. Plastic analysis of continuous beams, portals and pitched portal frames; failure mechanisms and instantaneous centres. Approximate elastic analysis and plastic analysis of vierendeel girders and multi-storey frames.

ARCH0081: Structures 2A

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0079

Aims & learning objectives:
To consider the historical development of various classes of structures and their form efficiency. To consider in more detail bridging and vaulting systems through the examination of works by acclaimed engineers.
Content:
The historical development and action of various classes of structural forms: suspension chains, cable structures and prestressed mechanisms; funicular vaults, gothic cathedrals and flying buttresses; beams, arches and shells; trusses, girders and space frames; the historical development of high-rise buildings. The bridges of Telford, Brunel, Eiffel, Maillert, Leonhardt and Calatrava. The Forth Bridge, Saltash Bridge and Brooklyn Bridge Conceptual thinking in two and three dimensions. Gothic cathedrals, fan vaulting and modelling. The structures of Nervi, Candella and Torroja. Structure in nature. Funicular forms, Frei Otto and Antonio Gaudi. The concept of ideal structural form, Maxwell and Mitchell. The constraints of real construction.

ARCH0082: Structures 3

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop analytical and conceptual understanding of structural action through the use of compatability methods (virtual work and flexibility analysis). To develop an appreciation of the importance of construction tolerances and foundation settlements. To develop understanding of structural analysis using equilibrium methods.
Content:
Virtual work and the Unit Load method for calculating deflections. Maxwell's reciprocal theorem and influence lines. Flexibility Analysis of statically indeterminate truss and frame structures. Lack of fit, support settlements and temperature effects. Virtual work extended to beams subject to bending, shear and torsion. Torsional and shear deflection of beams. Derivation of slope deflection relations. Application of the slope/deflection method to continuous beams, pitched portals and sway frames.

ARCH0083: Structures 4

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Development of matrix methods of analysis and computer techniques for structural analysis. To advance the student's knowledge and ability in the plastic analysis of structures, including multibay frames and the yield line analysis of slabs.
Content:
Derivation of moment distribution / relaxation concepts. Application of the moment distribution method to frame structures. Matrix Methods: stiffness analysis of pin-jointed space trusses and rigidly jointed frames. Organisation of stiffness method for computation. Introduction to finite element method. Finite element method: Shape functions. Application of virtual work and the Rayleigh-Ritz method to the derivation of stiffness and load matrices. Compatibility requirements between elements. Plane stress, plane strain and three dimensional elements. Simple plate bending elements. Finite element analysis of complete structures; compatibility of in-plane and bending displacements. Application of Finite Element Computer Package to analysis of frame and slab structures. Plastic analysis of frames: Upper and lower bound solutions. Instantaneous centres, combined mechanisms for multibay and multistorey frames. Plastic analysis of slabs and yield line theory: equilibrium and energy methods, isotropic and orthotropic slabs, skew reinforcement. Iterative methods, "Affine" methods.

ARCH0084: Structures 5

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Co ARCH0214

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop the understanding and application of design procedures for various materials (particularly steel and concrete) related to professional codes of practice. To cover the effects of vibrations and issues affecting the stability of structures.
Content:
Reinforced concrete: beams - T & L beams, doubly reinforced beams, crack widths. Slabs - two way span slabs, flat slabs, strip theory. Columns - combined compression and bending, compression and tension control, derivation of design graphs, moment increase due to slenderness. Prestressed concrete: derivation of losses, elastic and ultimate analysis. Introduction to shear and end blocks. Structural steel: lateral torsional buckling. Local buckling of webs, web stiffeners. Combined shear and bending. Column design. Plastic sizing of elements. Structural timber: properties of timber, strength of joints, slenderness, notching, combined stresses, glued laminated members. Masonry: strengths and partial safety factors, stress block, slenderness, arching. Wind loading, tensile stresses, precompression. Tables of panel moments. Composites. Vibrations Single degree of freedom systems: free vibrations, response to step load, sinusoidal load and seismic and inertial excitation. Dynamic loads: random loads. Earthquakes, rigid model and aeroelastic model wind tunnel tests. Natural frequencies and mode shapes or buckling loads and mode shapes with a variety of end conditions. Orthogonality conditions. Damping and response to loads including moving loads. Multi degree of freedom systems: lateral vibrations of beams under constant axial load. Discussion of post buckled stability via single degree of freedom models. Interaction of buckling and plasticity; lateral torsional buckling of beams. Modal analysis for vibrations and buckling of structures; eigenvalues, eigenvectors and othogonality conditions. Damping and geometric stiffness.

ARCH0085: Structures 6

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To extend previously introduced structural theory and analysis to an appropriate level for a broad coverage of finite element methods. To develop the understanding and application of finite element methods to a range of structural systems. To extend understanding of, and the ability to design, prestressed concrete structures.
Content:
Numerical methods: revision of matrix methods of analysis as applied to pin jointed trusses, rigidly jointed frames, and finite element modelling of continuum structures. Isoparametric elements, plate and shell elements. Classical plate theory. Plate buckling and buckling of thin-walled box-beams. Non-linear behaviour of structures, geometric and material non-linearity; Newton-Raphson and incremental solution methods. Computer finite element modelling of non-linear problems. Prestressed concrete: slip losses in prestressed tendons; ultimate conditions in prestressed beams; principal stresses in prestressed beams; composite anchorage, bursting effects. Continuous prestressed concrete members, cable effects, concordant cable line, transformed cable line, effects on support reactions.

ARCH0086: Thermodynamics

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0004, Pre ARCH0061

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics and their implications for the use of energy in buildings. At the end of the unit, the student should be able to demonstrate: - an understanding of the 1st law of thermodynamics and its application to open and closed systems - an understanding of entropy - an ability to apply a knowledge and understanding of property relationships for pure substances to simple power, refrigeration and heat pump cycles - an understanding of the 2nd law of thermodynamics and thermodynamic efficiency - an understanding of psychrometrics, and an ability to analyse air conditioning processes - a knowledge of vapour power processes - a knowledge of refrigeration and heat pump systems - a knowledge of types of compressors, their characteristics, and their use in air conditioning systems - a knowledge of fuel types, combustion, and efficiency.
Content:
Power generation and the environment. Energy resources and the effects of fossil fuel combustion. Renewable energy sources and their possibilities for future use. Definitions, 1st law of thermodynamics for closed systems, thermodynamic properties of the perfect gas, relationship between internal energy and specific heat at constant volume. Work transfer in closed systems for constant volume, constant pressure, hyperbolic and polytropic processes; adiabatic reversible process for perfect gas. 1st law of thermodynamics for open systems and the Steady Flow Energy Equation; enthalpy and entropy changes for a perfect gas; relationship between enthalpy and specific heat at constant pressure. Applications of the SFEE to power and refrigeration plant. Introduction to entropy, isentropic efficiency, entropy as a measure of irreversibility, entropy changes in a perfect gas. Property relationships for pure substances, two property rule, phase diagram. T-s, p-h and h-s diagrams. Applications to simple power, refrigeration and heat pump cycles. 2nd law of thermodynamics, Entropy and Clausius inequality, Carnot cycle; corollaries to the 2nd law, absolute temperature scale and thermodynamic efficiency. Mixtures of gases and vapours , introduction to psychrometrics and condensation. Psychrometrics: analysis of air conditioning processes. Vapour power cycles: steam turbine cycles , power cycles and CHP. Refrigeration and heat pump systems; multistage vapour compression cycles, refrigerant properties. Absorption refrigeration: analysis of LiBr systems; comparison with NH3 systems. Compressors: compressor types and applications, analysis and characteristics of compressors, compressors for air conditioning. Fuels and combustion: introduction to fuel types, classification and properties; combustion processes, combustion equations, stoichiometric analysis, combustion efficiency.

ARCH0087: Surveying 1

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ARCH0212

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students the knowledge and skills required to carry out an engineering survey of a small site.
Content:
Object and application of surveys - basic functions of survey instruments - survey planning - assessment of accuracy. Measurements of distance - direct tape measurements - cumulative errors in chainage measurements and corrections applied. Principles of electronic methods of distance measurement. Measurement of level - types of levels - levelling procedures and methods of booking - errors - reciprocal levelling - recording and plotting levels. Measurement of angles - principles and operations of the theodolite - scope of use - instrument errors and adjustments. Usage of theodolite and computation for tacheometry, traverse surveys, triangulation. After a series of initial practice periods with survey instruments the course concludes with a survey project consisting of the measurment of a closed traverse around a land plot and its detailed mapping.

ARCH0088: Surveying 2

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: PR60 CW40
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To extend the student's knowledge of surveying by giving them an understanding of how terrerial and aerial photogrammetry can be used in support of engineering projects.
Content:
Photogrammetry Definition, history, uses and application of photogrammetry. Photographic measurements, coordinate systems, scale and relief displacement. Stereoscopic viewing, depth perception, the human eye, principle of parallax. Terrestrial photogrammetry. Geometry of photo pairs, intersection procedures for computation of coordinates for parallel and angled camera sights. Planning air photography, flight map, required photo scale, end and side flap. Surveying accuracy / errors Differences between random and systematic errors, observations not equally precise, assessment of accu-racy. Sources of Errors in photogrammetry and plain survey work. Assessment of acceptable tolerances in construction and building. Laboratory / practical work Measurement of point coordinates on Terrestrial photographs. Practical Terrestrial camera exercise for comparative appraisal of method's accuracy. Air photo studies, stereoscopic methods of parallax measurement, elevations by parallax differences. Review of photogrammetric equipment, camera requirements, comparators.

ARCH0089: Thermofluids

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The movement of energy and fluids in buildings.
Content:
Dimensionless analysis and similarity : Introduction to the principles of dimensionless analysis; determination of dimensionless groups; use of dimensionless groups in experimental investigation. Turbo-machinery Performance characteristics of rotodynamic machines; centrifugal, axial and mixed flow pumps and fans; use of specific speed for pump selection; simple applications of network machine systems. Euler one dimensional theory for axial and centrifugal turbomachines. Introduction to heat transfer :General conduction equation, 2-D steady state solutions; 1-D unsteady state, lumped parameter approach, Biot and Fourier numbers. Convection : Velocity and temperature boundary layers, calculation of convection coefficients, use of dimensionless parameters in heat transfer, analogies between momentum and heat transfer; dimensionless correlations in forced and natural convection. Radiation : Laws of radiant heat transfer, radiation properties of real materials, geometric factors. Radiation networks in buildings. Extended surfaces : Analysis of heat transfer from fins, overall U-value for extended surfaces. Heat exchangers : Analysis of parallel and counterflow exchangers, log mean temperature difference and Transfer Unit approaches, fouling factors. Heat recovery devices used in buildings

ARCH0093: Urban studies report

Semester 1
Credits: 9
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES100
Requisites: Co ARCH0019

Aims & learning objectives:
The aims of this course are twofold: firstly, to introduce students to issues of urban design, to the ideas and ideals which have shaped cities in Europe and America. Secondly, to introduce students to the methodology of academic writing.
Content:
The course will be taught through one introductory lecture covering the 20th century literature on city development, and through subsequent supervisions agreed between the students and their tutors. The students will be required to select a region or 'neighbourhood' of a city in Europe or America and to discuss the changes to the structure of that city region over the last 50 years (ie post war), emphasising the shifting relationship between monuments and fabric, between nature and built form, emphasising wherever possible the competing 'visions' of the city which have shaped the chosen area in the second half of the 20th century.

ARCH0094: Urban studies dissertation (Socrates)

Semester 2
Credits: 9
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:

Content:


ARCH0095: Wind & earthquake engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To enable understanding of the use of power spectra analysis in the design of structures (e.g., how do you plan wind tunnel tests to give the information necessary to predict the rms acceleration of a building caused by the peak ten minutes of a storm with a return period of five yers?).
Content:
The nature of wind, flow around angular, curved and streamlined bodies. Vorticity and turbulence. The effect of terrain. Introduction to the statistics of extremes, return periods, gusts, etc.. Introduction to codes and standards. Wind tunnel testing. Comfort criteria limiting sway of tall buildings. Introduction to aero-elasticity, flutter, galloping and divergence. Aero elastic wind tunnel tests. The causes of eartquakes, prediction of ground movements. Effects of earthquakes on buildings and other structures. Introduction to codes and standards. Rules for the design of earthquake resistant buildings and structures. Description of wind and earthquake loads using power spectra. 'Reconstitution' of load from power spectrum. Fourier tansform, auto-correlation and cross-correlation. Use of modal analysis to predict the root mean square building acceleration from power spectrum of load. The use of tuned mass dampers to reduce the motion of tall buildings.

ARCH0096: Socrates exchange (MArch)

Semester 1
Credits: 24
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
SOCRATES Exchange This exhange programme with 12 other European Schools of Architecture provides students with an opportunity to study abroad from October to December. As the usual exchange period for Bath students occurs in year 3 of the BSc in General Architectural Studies, it is usual for incoming students to the BArch course from other UK institutions to take advantage of SOCRATES at this time. Students on the programme learn from first-hand experience about the architectural values of another European country, by travelling within the country, and perfecting their knowledge of its language. The unit is undertaken prior to commencement of units based at the University.
Content:
The content of the SOCRATES Exchange is tailored to the requirements of the individual student in collaboration of the host institution in which the student is placed. SOCRATES Exchange students complete project work which is assessed by the host institution and marks and a report are sent to Bath. On returning to Bath each student is to submit their Socrates portfolio for inspection by the Director of Studies of the MArch programme.

ARCH0097: Placement MArch

Semester 1
Credits: 24
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Graduation in the BSc in General Architectural Studies takes place in march of the year preceding the commencement of the MArch programme. The unit is undertaken prior to commencement of units based at the University. The unit provides practical experience of architectural design and/or building construction. It develops integrated design and professional practice skills introduced during the first degree in architecture, and introduces students to specialist activities, which will be developed during the MArch programme. More detailed aims and objectives are stipulated in the RIBA Practice Logbook that every student is required to complete, with his/her employer, as partial fulfilment of this unit. On the successful completion of this unit students will have demonstrated an ability to integrate design and professional skills in an architectural practice.
Content:
The Placement is tailored to the requirements of the individual student in collaboration of the host office in which the student is placed, and in line with the checklist of activities compiled in the RIBA Practice Logbook. The Wessex Region RIBA Professional Practice Officer, who also scrutinises and counter-signs the RIBA Practice Logbook completed by the student, visits placement students in their work place when it is considered necessary to do so.

ARCH0098: Design studio 5.1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To emphasise the role of architectural design and planning in an urban, UK context. To encourage an understanding of the historical and cultural evolution of the city being studied and provide an overview - through text and drawings - of its present condition. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate through drawings, models and written reports an understanding of the relationship between individual buildings and the development of a particular city.
Content:
The exploration of architecture within a UK urban context explored through Architectural Design. It involves a short fieldtrip to study a UK town or city. Collection by groups of visual, historical, social and cultural information relating to its urban development. Presentation by groups of drawings photographs and models of the past and present character and future potential of the area. Written documentation as necessary supportive of visual and verbal presentations. Specialist expertise will be provided by visiting Architectural, Landscape, Environmental and Structural Engineering consultants, and visiting design critics will be invited at appropriate times during the project.

ARCH0099: Design studio 5.2

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The exploration of architecture within an a UK urban context explored through Architectural Design. The course builds on knowledge acquired during the first degree in architecture, with an emphasis on architectural design and planning in an urban context presented in unit Design Studio 5.1 (ARCH0098). Students are to demonstrate a competence in the integrated design of a range of building types while producing architecturally elegant designs.
Content:
The formulation of group and/or individual design briefs using material accumulated in Design Studio 5.1 (ARCH0098) for different building types (public and residential) in different locations within the established urban context. The design to be presented at a drawing scale not less than 1:100 through plans and sections of key examples of these types, and supplemented by models (physical and/or computer models). Designs will be developed with due regard to aesthetic and technical requirements pervailing nationally and especially within the urban context studied; and with due regard to the perceived long-term social and physical needs of the local community. Specialist expertise will be provided by visiting Architectural, Landscape, Environmental and Structural Engineering consultants.

ARCH0100: Construction studies

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To extend awareness of high quality building construction through individual case studies of buildings selected by the unit co-ordinator and researched by individual students and presented for discussion in the form of an illustrated report and a physical or computer generated model. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to determine the constructional standards appropriate to specific building types, as shaped by current legislation and recognised good practice.
Content:
Lectures on the approaches of architects to six different building types in differing contexts. Individual tutorials to develop the design of building types which constitute Design Studio 5.2 (for MArch-Ft students) and 5.2a (for MArch-Pt students), and to understand the specific qualities and characteristics of the particular building being presented, in its cultural context. The content is identical for both cohorts of MArch students (Ft and Pt).

ARCH0101: Management 5

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To demonstrate the need for advanced planning in the cost of construction works, and for the combined control of expenditure. To develop an understanding of estimating procedures, cost analyses and the impact of design changes upon costs. To provide an advanced knowledge of the practice of architecture, the place of the discipline in the construction industry, and the professional role of the architect. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate through discussion and in writing how the architect practices his professional responsibilities according to the demands of current legislation and RIBA practice guidelines.
Content:
To include 12 lectures on Building Cost Control (5A), and on Architectural Practice, Management & Law (5B). On Building Cost Control: the nature of cost planning and the preparation and use of viability studies; estimates of capital construction cost and cost analyses; sources of cost information; impact of design on cost and principles of cost control; cost reporting procedures and preparation of final accounts; cost benefit analysis, cost-in-use and life cycle costing. On Architectural Practice, Management and Law: sources of work, the appointment process, management and design process; areas of work for the architect, types of client, marketing, the strategic view of the profession; contracts of appointment, codes of conduct, fees, consultants, collateral warranties, registration acts; the RIBA Job Book, Planning ahead, pricing the job, tendering procedures for the architect, communication in the office, feedback and development; job getting, confirming the appointment, planning the work, pricing for fees, dealing with warranties and appointing other consultants.

ARCH0102: Urban history & theory

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with a background to historical and current debates about the city: what factors influence the formation of cities, and the role of the architect in shaping cities. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate through drawings, models and written reports the relationship between theory, practice and design development as it is being studied in unit Design Studio 5.2/5.2a.
Content:
The unit commences with lectures on Western Urban Ideals and continues with accounts of major world cities in the context of particular historical periods: The Idea of the Town in antiquity; Italian Renaissance urban planning; Stuart London, Georgian Bath and Edinburgh; East and West Coast USA; Current developments in the UK and Continental Europe. Student led seminars will explore the relationship between specific urban design theories and practice, and engage with tutors involved in the Design Studio.

ARCH0103: Landscape & ecology

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To create an awareness of the physical environment around buildings, and to demonstrate a range of appropriate measures for modifying this environment, through passive and active, visual and technical means. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate in an essay, and in relation to a specific building type in the design project being explored in Design Studio 5.2/5.2a, the impact of Landscape & Ecology on architectural design.
Content:
The unit will comprise of introductory lectures relating prevalent landscape and ecological attitudes to the context of the urban situation being studied in Design Studio 5.2/5.2a. Tutorials will develop individual and group responses to such issues by students in the context of design problems that are part of these respective units.

ARCH0104: Advanced computer imaging

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop Computer Aided Design (CAD) presentation techniques to an advanced level, so that students can appreciate the advantages (or otherwise) of available software and hardware, and experience at first-hand how best to present their own designs. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the application of different software packages in relation to their individual design project work.
Content:
The unit commences with lectures demonstrating different software visualisation packages and showing examples of their application. This is followed by workshop sessions during which time students are required to explore part of one of the building types being designed for Design Studio 5.2 (FT MArch students) and Design Studio 5.2a (PT MArch students), by passing their design into a 3-D visualisation package, selecting key view-points which are then lit and rendered to best explain the design concept and realisation of the building/component of the building design.

ARCH0105: Western philosophers (Architectural theory)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To present the relationship between philosophy, the principal written architectural theories and architectural practice. To provide a forum for the discussion of cultural, aesthetic and philosophical issues relating to architectural design and society at large. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to realise the connection between theory and design process, and to express their understanding of this in writing, and in group presentations.
Content:
The unit commences with introductory lectures outlining the scope of the subject, followed by student led seminars at which seminar papers are submitted for discussion, and which explore the writings of selected themes.

ARCH0106: Dissertation

Semester 1
Credits: 15
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an opportunity for students to study an aspect of architecture in depth, and to present this material primarily in written form. The dissertation is to take the form of an academic piece of writing structured with a clear argument which reaches a balanced conclusion. The dissertation should be written as a balanced review of archive material, or as a survey of a building and/or associated products. It is intended to demonstrate an individual's use of written English and powers of reasoning and expression.
Content:


ARCH0106: Dissertation (MArch)

Semester 1
Credits: 15
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an opportunity for students to study an aspect of the history, theory or practice of architecture in depth, and to present this material primarily in written form. The dissertation is to take the form of an academic piece of writing structured with a clear argument that reaches a balanced conclusion. The dissertation should be written as a balanced review of archive material, or as a survey of a building and/or associated products. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate their use of written English and powers of reasoning and expression, and presentation skills in relation to the agreed topic.
Content:
Emphasis is to be placed on the cultural context of architecture, with particular to respect to the history, theory and urban design of architecture; or, on a technical aspect of architectural design or production. The dissertation is to be on a theme selected by the candidate and agreed to by the dissertation co-ordinators. It is to be written in English, have a maximum length of 8,000 words, and be illustrated as necessary. It is to be properly referenced, provided with a full bibliography and bound.

ARCH0106: Dissertation (BArch)

Semester 2
Credits: 18
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an opportunity for students to study an aspect of architecture in depth, and to present this material primarily in written form. The dissertation is to take the form of an academic piece of writing structured with a clear argument which reaches a balanced conclusion. It is intended to demonstrate an individual's use of written English and powers of reasoning and expression.
Content:
The dissertation should be written as a balanced review of archive material, or as a survey of a building and/or associated products. It is to comprise of around 8,000 words on a theme selected by the candidate and agreed to by the dissertation co-ordinators. Emphasis is to be placed on the cultural context of architecture, with particular to respect to the history, theory and urban design of architecture; or, on a technical aspect of architectural design or production. The dissertation is to be written in English and illustrated as necessary. It is to be poperly referenced and provided with a full bibliography. Each student will be appointed a supervisor, and the dissertation assessed by two readers.

ARCH0107: Urban design studio 1

Semester 1
Credits: 9
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0098

Aims & learning objectives:
The exploration of architecture within a European urban context explored through Architectural Design. The unit develops skills in urban analysis acquired during units Design Studio 5.1 and 5.2 (FT MArch students), and Design Studio 5.1 and 5.2a&b (PT MArch students), and relates the individual and group understanding of a specific urban environment (physical and cultural) to the development of a brief, which is used to shape an individual building design. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate through drawings, models and written reports their understanding of how the selected city was shaped by its unique history, culture and natural topography.
Content:
Field trip lasting not less than eight days to study a major European city. Collection in groups of visual, historical, social and cultural information relating to its urban development. Presentation singly, or in groups through sketch books, drawings, photographs and models of the past and present character and future potential of the area. Written documentation as necessary supportive of visual and verbal presentations.

ARCH0108: Urban design studio 2

Semester 2
Credits: 21
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Students are to demonstrate a high level of competence in the integrated design of one building type in a major European urban setting, while producing an architecturally elegant design. The course builds on knowledge acquired during unit Design Studio 5.2 (ARCH0098) and Urban design studio 1 (ARCH0107).
Content:
The formulation of group and/or individual design briefs using material accumulated in Urban Design Studio 1 for one building type (public or residential) in one location within the established urban context. The design is to be presented at a drawing scale not less than 1:100 through plans and sections, and supplemented by models (physical and/or computer models). The design will be developed with due regard to the technical requirements pervailing in the UK and aesthetically in accordance with the urban context being studied; and with due regard to the perceived long-term social and physical needs of the local community. Specialist expertise will be provided by visiting Architectural, Landscape, Environmental and Structural Engineering consultants.

ARCH0109: Urban design project reports

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0107

Aims & learning objectives:
Design Project Reports will be used to explain the urban context of the European city under investigation in Urban design Studio 1 and 2a+b (ARCH0107 & ARCH0221 & ARCH0222, or ARCH0108), and to describe group and individual architectural and urban design responses to it. The unit aims to demonstrate the role of concise report writing in the presentation of architectural and urban ideas. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate their ability to summarise complex ideas concisely in writing and through appropriately selected images.
Content:
An illustrated A3-sized bound project report to be produced by a study group/or an individual student describing the cultural and physical context of the city as it was in the past, as it is now, and as it may be developed in the near future. An illustrated A4-sized bound project report describing the building type designed by each student and in its national, regional and local cultural and physical context.

ARCH0110: Management 6

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: ES100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0101

Aims & learning objectives:
To determine some of the principles of policy organisation, planning and control that are present in project management in the construction industry. To encourage an understanding of the present strengths and weaknesses of project management, and to appreciate something of the cause and effect in business practice. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate through discussion and in writing how the architect practices his professional responsibilities according to the demands of current legislation and RIBA practice guidelines.
Content:
Lectures on Project Management and Building Cost Control: The business system and the market, project and enterprise; The participants in the project; Management control; Control of time, resources and money; Corporate Management; Team building.

ARCH0112: Building services engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Co ARCH0073

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To enable the design of mechanical and electrical services. Objectives: To understand the techniques available to design various air consitioning systems and choice of suitable plant. To provide tools needed design principal electrical service distribution systems. To consider the design of utility systems within buildings.
Content:
Design of heating systems Design of mechanical ventilation systems Design of air conditioning systems Coice of cooling plant and methods of heat rejection, Design of Utility systems, Design of hot and cold water services, Gas distribution Telephones and communiactions Waste systems and management. Design of electrical distribution systems, fault protection, harmonics, interference Emergency power generation Fire and security systems.

ARCH0113: History & theory 1A

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment:
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to a number of key texts dealing with fundamental concepts in architecture: space, proportion, structure, ornament.
Content:
The Unit is an unsupervised reading programme. Students work in four groups, each reading and summarizing texts dealing with one of the four concepts.

ARCH0114: Structures 4A

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0081

Aims & learning objectives:
To reinforce the understanding of architectural students in the role of statics in determining the form efficiency of structural systems.
Content:
A number of architectural projects with significant qualities in their structural engineering and conceptual realisation are examined in the context of their statical actions as a whole and the influence of these actions on the construction detailing.

ARCH0142: Structural engineering & integrity

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0143: Building environmental engineering

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0146: Structural conservation

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0147: Materials construction and skills

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0148: History and theory

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0149: The legislative framework

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0150: Case studies & project work

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0150: Case studies & project work

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0151: Dissertation

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0152: Design, construction, systems, materials & finishes

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0153: Management, manufacture, fabrication & erection

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0156: Structural conservation

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment:
Requisites: Co ARCH0157



ARCH0157: History & theory

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment:
Requisites: Co ARCH0156



ARCH0158: Historical analysis 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment:
Requisites: Co ARCH0159



ARCH0159: Research methodology

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment:
Requisites: Co ARCH0158



ARCH0160: Dissertation (b)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0161: Dissertation

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0162: Dissertation outline

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0164: Construction 2.1

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0014

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit aims to encourage a better understanding of the connection between building design, the use of materials and the construction and assembly of buildings. The learning objectives are to provide students with good examples of modern constructional practice, and where to find these examples in the library and through other sources.
Content:
A series of 12 lectures, each on an element of building construction illustrated by extracts from construction text books, building trade (product) information, case studies and a range of completed buildings that are an important source in architectural history. Reference notes accompany each lecture providing information on sources used and available in the library.

ARCH0204: Historical Analysis 1

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0205: Research methodology

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0206: Historical Analysis 2

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ARCH0207: Bridge Engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims and Learning Objectives: To develop an awareness and enthusiasm for the design, construction and assessment of various forms of bridge structures. The successful student should be able to demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the material given in the content.
Content:
The history of bridge engineering, from stone arches and rope-suspension bridges to the wholly plastic Aberfeldy Bridge and the 2km long span Akashi Bridge. Lessons learned from intermittent bridge collapses. Bridge components and their nomenclature. The choice of bridge types and suitablility at specific sites for reasons of constructability, aesthetics, economics, function and available materials. Issues involved in short, medium and long span bridge design. Bridge construction techniques available for various applications, and design of the bridge to allow for easier construction. Design loading on bridges, including dead, superimposed dead, traffic, wind, temperature, earthquake, etc. Elastic and plastic analysis techniques available for the design of various forms of bridge structure. Realistic strength assessment of existing highway bridges, so that needless demolition of adequate bridges may be prevented. Bridges of the future, from short-span to the Messina Crossing.

ARCH0208: Structures design and construction

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX50 CW50
Requisites: Pre ARCH0079

Aims and Learning Objectives: To introduce students to the concepts of limit state design and its practical application to reinforced concrete, steel, timber and masonry structural elements. To further develop analytical and conceptual understanding of structural action through the design of elements and simple structures. To introduce elements of construction technology as applied to reinforced concrete, steel, timber and masonry construction. To introduce principles of prestressed concrete.
Content:
Structral arrangements to resist vertical loading and wind loading. Design philosophies (Geometrical principles; P{ermissible stress; LFRD; Limit state). Codes of Practice, Standards, Building Regulations, British Standards, Euro-codes. Design loads and actions. Layout of calculations, drawings. Reinforced concrete design - materials; singly reinforced rectangular beams; doubly reinforced beams; non-rectangular sections; serviceability - deflection, cracking; shear; detailing of reinforcement; fire resistance; simple retaining wall design. Structural steel design - steel sections; materials; simple tension members; simple compression members; beam design (bending; lateral restraints; laterally restrained beams; laterally unrestrained beams; shear; deflections); bolted and welded connections. Structural timber - materials (grading, species); tension; compression; bending; connections. Structural masonry - materials; compression; bending; shear. Introduction to principles of prestressed concrete; section stresses; losses; load-balancing. Introduction to construction technology (steel, concrete, timber, masonry); temporary works used in concrete, steel, timber and masonry construction.

ARCH0209: Architectural history & theory

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & Objectives: To offer an introduction to historical and theoretical research in architecture, by analysing the ways in which architecture has been understood - as a practical and/or intellectual discipline - at different points in history. Students should acquire an overview about research methods, and how it is undertaken in research libraries and national archives. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate the knowledge they have acquired in verbal and written form.
Content:
Lectures and structured discussions will cover the following topics: an introduction to Bath's built fabric, showing how the buildings have been appropriated in different ways; the Philosophy of History; defining Legitimate Knowledge, Magic and Alchemy in architecture; and the shaping of history through historical method; the illustrated architecture book in history; Alberti and Vitruvius, the similarities and differences between key concepts in their two treatises; Dom Hans Van Der Laan's interpretation of Vitruvius' six fundamental principles; the notion of bodily perfection in classical antiquity and the 20th century; Richard Payne Knight's concern to abolish formulae and regulations in matters of taste. There will also be structured visits to the Building of Bath Museum and the County Records Bath.

ARCH0210: Conservation of historic buildings

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims and learning objectives: An introduction to the range of philosophies and techniques concerning the repair and re-use of historic buildings, drawing on the resource of the classical city of Bath and its regional context. The unit introduces the range of tasks performed by conservation professionals from the repair of individual buildings through to the field of urban management, and describes the historic evolution of structures and the causes of, and remedies for structural defects and decay. The aim is to stimulate debate and to develop individual viewpoints on the issues raised. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate in essay form their knowledge of the subject covered. Contents: Lectures and discussion include: conservation and classicism in Bath, reviewing the phases of building in Bath, and examining some of the conservation techniques that have been applied locally; the ethics and aesthetics of architectural conservation and a discussion of society's influence on the emergence of twentieth century planning and conservation law; an historical outline of structural engineering, an overview of the history of structures and structural materials; causes of damage and decay in structures; the assessment of structural defects; and repair criteria and techniques; monitoring and maintenance, techniques for ongoing care and maintenance of building structures.

ARCH0211: Environmental Design (Eng)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ARCH0214

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To improve students confidence to use building environmental design as a major positive factor in the design of buildings.Objectives: To examine in some detail the objectives of design using examples from practice. The course will use the joint design project as a vehicle for the early lectures in the course.
Content:
LightingDesign: Designed appearance, enclosure, structure, rational use of colour.Combined lighting:Exploitation of natural light, control of electric lighting.Design criteria: Establishing criteria, isolation of variables, effects of experimentation.Display: Art galleries, museums, principles of design, conservation.Nightime lighting: Security, floodlighting of buildings.Green buildings: Integrated design. Acoustics: Principles of internal room acoustic design.Acoustic design of lecture and drama theatres.Multi-purpose hall design.Noise control in buildings.Case histories of internal acoustic and noise control design.Guidance for the final year joint design project.Thermal: Choice between passive and active control of internal environment. Value engineering.Implications on building design when incorporating major Building services. Fire: An introduction to fire engineering including the nature of fire, the mechanism of combustion and the behaviour of its products. The behaviour of people in fire is examined, the interaction between fire, buildings and other enclosures and the principles of escape and survival studies.

ARCH0212: Surveying and Geology Field Course

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0059, Co ARCH0033, Co ARCH0087

Aims & learning objectives:
To learn how to apply modern surveying techniques appropriate to a larger scale and rougher terrain than can be found on the university campus, and to gain experience in geological field observations. At the end of the course, the student should be able to: appreciate the requirements for carrying out geological and surveying observations in the field; carry out a limited range of geological field observations; understand the use of methods for surveying in rough terrain; appreciate the scale of some geological structures; be able to describe some geological structures and materials.
Content:
Surveying: Techniques for reconnaisance surveys. Use of total stations. Geology: Study of glacaited landforms. Study of coastal and fluvial systems. Study of patterns of discontinuities and description of materials in outcrops.

ARCH0213: Management 1C

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0014

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide students with a basic knowledge of the civil engineering profession and its place in society, and other basic skills needed for obtaining and successfully completing a first industrial placement. Objectives: By the end of the course, the student should be able to: Demonstrate an understanding of what is needed for good written and verbal communication skills, and an awareness of the requirements for the effective use of mass media and graphical communications. Demonstrate an outline understanding of the importance of the engineer's role in society, and some of the broader issues affecting an engineer's work. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of professional organisations, and the ethical and behavioural framework within which the engineer is expected to operate. Demonstrate a knowledge of the routes to corporate membership of ICE and IStructE, and the contribution to be made by the industrial placements. Demonstrate an ability to find and apply for a job. Demonstrate an ability to assume responsibility for their personal safety on a construction site.
Content:
Communication skills: Written communication skills (English usage; Word processing; Report writing) Verbal communication skills (e.g. Presentations; Interviews; Meetings; Conversation) Mass media Graphic communication skills (Data presentation) Organisation of the construction industry: Sectors, clients, designers, contractors, roles of the various parties The Engineer & Society: Role of the engineer Case studies of contentious engineering products The basics of English Law as applied to: Contracts Employment Professional responsibility Negligence Professional ethics: Professions professional organisations (ICE, IStructE) Code of ethics Professional behaviour Professional training: SARTOR Employer's role Sandwich training Looking for a job: Matching applicant's and employer's potentials Research Applications (C.V.s and covering letters) Personal safety on construction sites.

ARCH0214: Project C3/M3

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment:
Requisites: Pre ARCH0073, Pre ARCH0083, Co ARCH0034, Co ARCH0084, Co ARCH0211

Aims & Objectives: To give students experience in developing a complex scheme working in teams with final year BSc architecture students or MArch students. At the end of the unit, the student should have demonstrated an ability to engage in interdisciplinary design of a complex scheme. Contents: Precedent lectures are used to discuss relevent examples. The building type will have more complex planning problems and potential for elegance to suit the needs of the architects. There should be environmental conditions to consider, ie air conditioning/ natural ventilation to compare, and lighting and acoustic problems. Types of building which are suitable include autitoria based (theatre, opera house, concert hall - all have potential for interesting structures, eg cable, domes, frameworks etc), museum (differing types from art galleries to Exploratory type, and libraries, requiring exclusion of noise and good lighting ), industrial (eg brewery, with the process providing a problem), or sports complex. All have air conditioning / natural ventilation, potential for interest visually as well as in services and structure, and heavy foundation loads. The project will be tutored both by academic staff and industrial visiting tutors.

ARCH0215: Energy, power supply and the environment

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment:
Requisites: Pre ARCH0059, Co ARCH0041

Aims & Objectives: Efficient use of energy, both in construction and in use, is an important factor in the design of civil engineering projects. Generation of electrical power is an important area of civil engineering, an important factor in energy use in buildings, and for some technologies a major problem in clearing up problems afterwards. This course aims to provide students with a knowledge of the generation and distribution of electricity, an understanding of the fundamental thermodynamic limitations of what can be done, and a broader knowledge of sources of energy and means of storage of energy. Objectives: At the end of the course the student should be able to: - give a brief explanation of means of converting other forms of energy into electrical power; - explain the material and environmental costs of a range of technologies using each of these means, and the inherent limitations on efficiencies; - give a brief explanation of the efficiency of converting electricity into other forms of energy - electric motors, pumps, heating and cooling; - explain technologies available for storage of electrical energy, considering the efficiency of storage and recovery; - explain the losses associated with power distribution over different distances, and the means employed for minimising those losses; - discuss the advantages and disadvantages of local generation of electricity, storage of energy, and regional, national and international electricity distribution.
Content:
The world's energy usage for developed and developing nations - the importance of power generation. Basic units for electricity and power. Electromagnetic theory. AC power generation, phasor diagram, power factor, three phase supply, transformer characteristics, Electricity distribution. The thermodynamics of power generation - 1st and 2nd Law considerations. Fossil fuels and their combustion - the resultant emissions. Efficient means of generating power using fossil fuels and heat engines. The effect on the environmente.g. the contribution to the Earth's heating load, the greenhouse effect and acid rain. Energy resources and the need to conserve fossil fuels. Nuclear fission power - advantages and disadvantages Discussion of state of development, costs and prospects for alternative energy sources: solar, wind, wave, tidal, geothermal, biomass, waste, nuclear fusion.

ARCH0216: Management 5C

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment:
Requisites: Pre ARCH0055

Aims & Objectives: To develop an increased depth of understanding of construction project management by the examination of case studies. At the end of the unit, the succesful student should be able to write a critical appraisal of a construction project, demonstrating an understanding of the relationships between the engineering design and construction, the management process, including design and responsibility for safety, and the social, political and environmental contexts as appropriate.
Content:
Case studies in the management of significant current and/or historical construction projects presented by leading practitioners. The case studies will include both successful and problematic projects. Academics with appropriate experience in practice will also be involved and will co-ordinate the course.

ARCH0217: MEng dissertation

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment:
Requisites: Pre ARCH0073, Pre ARCH0007, Pre ARCH0077, Pre ARCH0083

Aims & Objectives: To assess the ability of students for original and individual thought and application to a substantial project/ programme of work. At the end of the unit, the student should be able to demonstrate the ability to design a short research programme.
Content:
A substantial work of research presented as a short thesis, normally entailing experimental and analytical or numberical modelling and their practical application to a researched topic. This preliminary unit represents the background reading and planning for the investigation. Assessment will be together with Dissertation Completion, but a formal presentation must be made by each student describing the background, aims, and proposed methods of their dissertation, which will carry 20% of the mark for this unit.

ARCH0218: MEng dissertation completion

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment:
Requisites: Pre ARCH0217

Aims & Objectives: To assess the ability of students for original and individual thought and application to a substantial project/ programme of work. At the end of the unit, the student should be able to demonstrate the ability to design a short research programme, excecute it, and report on it.
Content:
The main part of the dissertation work, following on from the 'Dissertation' unit.

ARCH0219: Design studio 5.2a

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0098

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide competence in the integrated design of a range of building types within an urban context. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to produce architectural designs suitable specifically to the environmental constraints defined in Design Studio 5.1 (ARCH0098).
Content:
The formulation of group and/or individual design briefs using material accumulated in Design Studio 5.1 (ARCH0098) for different building types (public and residential) in different locations within the established urban context. The design to be presented at a drawing scale not less than 1:100 through plans and sections of key examples of these types, and supplemented by models (physical and/or computer models). Designs will be developed with due regard to aesthetic and technical requirements prevailing nationally and especially within the urban context studied; and with due regard to the perceived long-term social and physical needs of the local community. Visiting Architectural, Landscape, Environmental and Structural Engineering consultants will provide specialist expertise.

ARCH0220: Design studio 5.2b

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0098

Aims & learning objectives:
The exploration of architecture within a UK urban context explored through Architectural Design. The unit builds on knowledge acquired during Design Studio 5.2a, and emphasises architectural design and planning in an urban context. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate a competence in the integrated design of a range of building types expressed through drawings, models and verbal presentations, while producing architecturally elegant designs.
Content:
The integrated design and detailing of the design project developed in Design Studio 5.2a, and based on supplementary research into appropriate precedents. The design to be presented at a drawing scale not less than 1:50 through plans and sections of key details, and supplemented by models (physical and/or computer models). Designs will be developed with due regard to aesthetic and technical requirements prevailing nationally and especially within the urban context studied; and with due regard to the perceived long-term social and physical needs of the local community. Visiting Architectural, Landscape, Environmental and Structural Engineering consultants will provide specialist expertise.

ARCH0221: Urban design studio 2a

Semester 1
Credits: 9
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0107

Aims & learning objectives:
The unit aims to build on knowledge acquired during unit Design Studio 5.2 a&b (ARCH0219 & ARCH0220) and Urban Design Studio 1 (ARCH0107). On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate a high level of competence in the integrated design of one building type in a major European urban setting, while producing an architecturally elegant design expressed through drawings, models and verbal presentations.
Content:
The formulation of group and/or individual design briefs using material accumulated in Urban Design Studio 1 for one building type (public or residential) in one location within an established urban context. The design is to be presented at a drawing scale not less than 1:500 through plans and sections, and supplemented by models (physical and/or computer models). Visiting Architectural, Landscape, Environmental and Structural Engineering consultants will provide specialist expertise.

ARCH0222: Urban design studio 2b

Semester 2
Credits: 15
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ARCH0221

Aims & learning objectives:
The unit aims to build on knowledge acquired during unit Design Studio 5.2 a&b (ARCH0219 & ARCH0220) and Urban Design Studio 1 (ARCH0107), and Urban Design Studio 2a (ARCH0221). On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate a high level of competence in the integrated design of one building type in a major European urban setting, while producing an architecturally elegant design expressed through drawings, models and verbal presentations.
Content:
The development of the building type presented in Urban Design Studio 2a (public or residential) in the agreed location within the established urban context. The design is to be presented at a drawing scale not less than 1:100 through plans and sections, and supplemented by models (physical and/or computer models). The design will be developed with due regard to the technical requirements prevailing in the UK and aesthetically in accordance with the urban context being studied; and with due regard to the perceived long-term social and physical needs of the local community. Visiting Architectural, Landscape, Environmental and Structural Engineering consultants will provide specialist expertise.

BIOL0001: Skills & techniques 1 (basic laboratory & communication skills)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW50 PR50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide students with an opportunity to acquire basic laboratory skills ((general microbiological practice and biochemistry techniques) and communication skills delivered by directed tutorial assignments and computer practical sessions). Tutorial sessions will develop group discussion and presentation skills. Computer sessions will introduce students to Windows, MS Work and BIDS. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* present reasoned arguments and analyses in the form of a word-processed document
* to cite references (in recognised format) which they have obtained form an on-line bibliographical database
* possess skills of accurate autopipetting and spectrophotometric determinations.
Content:
Practical skills: Basic quantitative laboratory skills; micro-organism handling; radioisotope techniques. IT skills: Introduction to IT and campus IT facilities; word-processing, BIDS. Presentation skills: Essay writing. Small group discussion work. These skills will be developed during tutorial sessions which have the additional aim of identifying and rectifying weaknesses in subject background.

BIOL0002: Skills & techniques 2 (quantitative skills)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0001

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide students with an opportunity to develop data analysis and mathematical skills through statistics workshops, directed tutorial assignments and computer session with Minitab. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* decide on an appropriate statistical test for the analysis of scientific data
* execute basic statistical tests using Minitab and interpret the outcome of such tests
* manipulate and transfer data from one software application to another.
Content:
Introduction to quantitative biology, including elementary statistics. Use of Minitab. Numerical calculation workshops. Small group discussion work. Verbal and written presentation.

BIOL0003: Biochemistry 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Co BIOL0001

Pre A-Level Chemistry Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To teach the students the pathways of central metabolism and to relate the regulation of these pathways to the homeostasis of the whole organism. In order to appreciate and understand metabolism, the students are taught the fundamental aspects of enzymes and their regulation, and this in turn is necessarily preceded by lectures on protein structure. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* know the pathways of central metabolism
* understand the way in which the cell degrades nutrients in small steps to allow the energy to be trapped and converted to a useful form
* appreciate the way in which central metabolism connects catabolism and anabolism
* understand the regulation of central metabolism with respect to the needs of the organism in relation to its environment
Content:
Proteins: amino acids - structures, ionisation and physical properties; primary structure and an overview of protein folding and conformation. Enzymes: catalysis, kinetics, regulation. Metabolism: chemistry of monosaccharides, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, regulation of central metabolism.

BIOL0004: Biochemistry 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0003

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce the central pathways of fatty acid metabolism and mitochondrial oxidation and integrate these into overall cell function. To inculcate appreciation of the metabolic pathways into function at the organ and tissue level. To teach the implications of stereochemistry into the biochemistry of key metabolic intermediates. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* appreciate the principles of mitochondrial oxidative function
* understand lipid structure and the pathways of fatty acid oxidation and synthesis
* understand the mechanisms of neurotransmission and muscle contraction
* comprehend the stereochemistry of small organic molecules of biological importance
Content:
The course is a direct follow on from BIOL0003. Topics studied are 1) mitochondrial bioenergetics, respiration, oxidative phosphorylation and the chemiosmotic theory; 2) lipid metabolism structure of lipids, catabolism and anabolism of fatty acids, ketogenesis and coordination with other metabolic pathways; 3) biochemistry of animal tissues and organs, such as mechanisms of neurotransmission and muscle contraction; 4) stereochemistry of simple carbohydrates and citric acid cycle intermediates with applications of biochemical mechanisms.

BIOL0005: Cell biology 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce the techniques available for determining the structure and function of cellular components and processes, to describe the structure and function of cells and cell organelles and to show the diversity of cells. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* describe the structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells
* describe the structure and explain the function of cell organelles
* make comparisons between related structures and functions
* critically appraise methods available to determine the nature and function of cellular processes
* understand the dynamic nature of cell behaviour.
Content:
Introduction: eucarya, eubacteria and archaea; microscopical techniques; cytochemistry; cell fractionation and autoradiography. The structure and function of cell membranes, plant walls, intercellular channels. Cellular processes such as cell signalling, cytoskeleton and cell movement, secretion and absorption. Organelles involved in energy metabolism: chloroplasts and mitochondria, plant microbodies. Nucleus, chromosomes, cell growth and proliferation, mitosis and meiosis.

BIOL0006: Cell & molecular biology

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0005

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce the structure and function of nucleic acids; To introduce the concepts and methodology of genetic modification. To introduce the processes of animal and plant development. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand how the structure of nucleic acid determines their biological function
* understand the power of the techniques of genetic modification for studying and manipulating organisms, especially micro-organisms, for fundamental and applied science
* appreciate the role changing patterns of gene expression play in modulating development during animal embryogeny
Content:
The structure and function of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) in relation to organisms, genes, gene expression and protein synthesis. How organisms, genes and gene expression can be altered and studied via the technology of genetic modification. How the changing patterns of gene expression in cells and tissues can lead to the development of an egg into an animal, using examples from Xenopus, Drosophila and mouse.

BIOL0007: Genetics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX60 PR30 OT10
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce the principles of inheritance, to describe the chemical nature of inheritable material and the molecular basis of mutagenesis, to describe the structure and expression of genes and genomes in cells, to enable the student to appreciate how genetic data are generated and interpreted, to show basic genetic techniques in a wide range of organisms. After taking the course the student should be able to:
* explain Mendelian principles and their underlying concepts
* explain and create a genetic map
* describe how the chemical structure of DNA accounts for information encoding and its change
* appreciate the structure and dynamic nature of the genome
* understand the basis of the gene transfer in prokaryotes.
Content:
Topics: Principles of inheritance in eukaryotes; chemical nature of the gene; structure of genomes; gene expression; mutagenesis; non-Mendelian genetic systems. Practical sessions cover: Random assortment of two genetic markers in the fruit fly (Drosophila); sex linkage in Drosophila; tetrad analysis in a fungus (Sordaria); complementation testing in the yeast Saccharomyces; genetic mapping in the fungus Aspergillus; mutagenesis in the bacterium Salmonella; genetic polymorphism in Homo sapiens.

BIOL0008: Diversity I

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce students to the characteristic features and biological properties of bacteria (prokaryotes) and fungi (eukaryotes). The two strands of the unit are taught separately to provide a thorough grounding in the cellular, morphological and general physiological properties of the two groups of organisms through lectures and complementary practical sessions. These are related to the diversity of habitats, modes of life and practical and environmental importance of the two groups. After taking this course the student should be able to: (in bacteria)
* describe in detail the size and anatomical features of typical bacterial cells
* show a clear understanding of the structure and function of important cellular components
* discuss bacterial growth in terms of nutritional requirement and the influence of physicochemical factors on growth and survival
* demonstrate the acquisition of aseptic manipulative skills and accuracy, staining techniques, microscopic examination methods and observational and interpretative faculties (in fungi)
* have an outline knowledge of fungal classification and how this is related to diversity in form and function
* appreciate the scientific, environmental and practical importance of fungi
* know where and how fungi grow and reproduce
* know how to study fungi macroscopically, microscopically and in culture.
Content:
Bacteria: relative to the other domains of cell-based life; bacterial cell shapes and size, ubiquity and adaptability; methods for their visualisation; anatomy, from chromosome to capsule, via ribosomes, cytoplasmic inclusions, cell membrane, cell wall, pili, flagella and endospores; growth/cultivation; nutritional requirements, modes of energy-yielding metabolism, influence of physical factors (temperature, pH, redox potential, water activity). The essentials of practical bacteriology, embodying good laboratory practice. Fungi: Diversity and significance of the fungal Kingdom; hyphal structure and growth and the nature of mycelium; sexual reproductive cycles; asexual reproduction; nutritional ecology fungi as saprotrophs, biotrophs and necrotrophs, decomposers, parasites and symbiotic partners.

BIOL0009: Diversity II

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To demonstrate the diversity of invertebrate animals, to use comparative anatomy and embryology to reveal clues about invertebrate evolution. To demonstrate the diversity of plants, emphasising the adaptive significance of the organisational innovations which have evolved within the constraints imposed. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*define the terms deuterostome, protostome, coelom, diploblastic, triploblastic, radial and bilateral symmetry
*describe aspects of structure and function which contribute to the success of animals at different levels of complexity
*give an account of the defining feature of the major groups of invertebrate animals.
*give an account of the defining features of the major groups of plants
*understand how the different groups of plants use light energy for the biosynthesis of biomolecules
Content:
What is an invertebrate - defining terms, simple metazoans (sponges and coelenterates), 3 types of work-like animal (Nematodes, flatworms and Annelids), shell bearing animals (molluscs), focus on squid, cuttlefish and octopus (cephalopods), invertebrates with an external skeleton - why are insects so successful (arthropods)? A consideration of the functioning of plants as non-mobile, photo-autotrophic life forms with federal organisation.

BIOL0011: The biosphere

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide a global perspective of the communities and ecosystems of the world and the role of these systems in the flow of energy and matter. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* identify the main flows of energy through the biosphere
* understand how minerals cycle in the environment and how soils form
* appreciate the main features of aquatic environments and terrestrial biomes
* have an awareness of the effects that humans have on the environment
Content:
The flow of energy through the biosphere; the global biogeochemical cycles; soils and aquatic environments; the major terrestrial biomes(tundra, northern coniferous forests, temperate deciduous forests, temperate grasslands, and tropical forests). The impact of humankind on the environment, with particular emphasis on pollution.

BIOL0012: Ecology & evolution

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide a broad introduction to key concepts in ecology and evolution. To approach issues in ecology and evolution in a rigorous, cohesive way that will provide the students with a conceptual framework that will help them to examine other areas of biology in a fuller context of evolution and ecology. To provide a firm foundation for more detailed study within the specific fields of evolution and ecology later in their course. It aims to introduce students to the unique position of ecology and evolution in the biological sciences; why these disciplines pose unusual challenges such as huge time scales and an attendant paucity of experimental information; why ecology and evolution tend to be analytical rather than experimental sciences; reasons why these are theory driven sciences and the special role of mathematical models in these disciplines. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*outline certain key principles in evolution and ecology
*demonstrate an understanding of the unique position of evolution and ecology in the biological sciences
*demonstrate an understanding of the logic of the arguments used in the construction of simple mathematical models for population growth, competition and predator prey relationships
*synthesise evidence of many kinds that animal, fungal and plant communities have evolved in highly structured ways
*show some appreciation of the role of ecological and evolutionary thinking in areas such as conservation and biodiversity
*have some basics skill in obtaining, processing and evaluating ecological data in laboratory and field based practicals.
Content:
Key concepts in evolution, including the nature of evolutionary selection, including kin-selection, sexual selection and natural selection. Dynamics of ecological populations including field and laboratory examples and mathematical models. Population growth, intraspecifc and interspecific competition and predator/prey relationships. The structure and development of plant, animal and fungal communities are also examined and evidence is described from studies of the limits of similarity, island biogeography and food webs.

BIOL0013: Directed studies 1

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: Tutorial 100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To give each student experience in the study of biological information and in its written and verbal presentation. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* make appropriate use of the various forms of biological publication
* carry out searches using BIDS and EMBASE
* write and word-process a substantial essay on a biological topic, with appropriately listed references to published literature.
Content:
The course consists of a series of small group sessions with a lecturer and about 6-8 students.

BIOL0014: Directed studies 2

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: Tutorial 100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0013

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To give each student experience in the study of biological information and in its written and verbal presentation.After taking this course the student should have further developed the learning objectives of BIOL0013.
Content:
The course consists of a series of small group sessions with a lecturer and about 6-8 students.

BIOL0015: Biochemical problems

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0018, Pre BIOL0020, Ex BIOL0096

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To develop students' abilities to assimilate compilations of experimental data and to draw valid conclusions from them. After taking the course, the student should be able to:
* study a collection of biochemical observations, such as the Results Section of a publication or simply a series of related observations compiled specifically for the exercise, and assess their significance. Indications of this ability could be, eg answering particular questions or writing the Discussion section of a paper. It is especially important that the student learns to draw only such conclusions as are fully justified by the data.
Content:
Several members of academic staff will participate in the Course, each providing a particular problem. This will be handed out and explained to the class, who will then have some 4 days to provide written answers. These will be marked and returned.

BIOL0016: Professional training in Biochemistry 1

Semester 2
Credits: 30
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: Placement report 100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0003, Pre BIOL0004

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims:
* to provide experience of the application of biochemistry
* to promote understanding of the principles and practices of working in a professional environment After taking this course the student should be able to:
* undertake and report on a piece of work in an agreed programme
* integrate into a commercial or academic environment
Content:
Laboratory or other professional experience which is deemed suitable by the Director of Studies (Placements).

BIOL0018: Enzymology A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0003, Pre BIOL0004, Pre CHEY0007

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide a fundamental basis for understanding the action of enzymes as catalysts, mainly at a physical level, and also those properties of enzymes arising from their nature as proteins. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand the nature of steady-state kinetics of simple enzyme-catalysed reactions
* appreciate the influence that protein structure and organisation has on the catalytic and regulatory functions of enzymes.
* understand the requirements of reliable assay procedures, including practical ability.
* discuss the purpose of studies of the transient phase of enzyme-catalysed reactions.
* from simple mechanisms, to derive steady-state rate equations.
* appreciate the role of coenzymes and their underlying basis in heterocyclic chemistry.
* understand reversible inhibition and covalent modification, and the effects of pH on catalytic activity.
Content:
Ligand binding; steady-state and transient kinetics; theories of catalysis; allostery; multienzyme complexes; chemical modification; effects of inhibitors and pH; isoenzymes; heterocyclic chemistry and coenzymes; purification and assay

BIOL0020: Physical biochemistry & proteins

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0003, Pre BIOL0004, Pre CHEY0007, Pre CHEY0008

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide understanding of protein conformation in terms of noncovalent interactions between amino acid side chains, the thermodynamic principles underlying the protein folding problem. Also to provide understanding of the various physical methods available for the characterisation of biological macromolecules and their application to the study of protein conformation. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* give a qualitative description of the interactions that maintain the native conformation of a protein and determine the stability of the native conformation
* appreciate the structural information that various spectroscopic techniques can give
* understand the structural information that various scattering and diffraction techniques can give.
Content:
Polypeptide chain folding, the role of non-covalent interactions, the protein folding process, denaturation and renaturation, protein conformational change, spectroscopic techniques (UV/visible/IR, Raman, circular dichroism, nmr, esr), scattering techniques (X-ray diffraction, solution scattering), Microscopy (optical and electron)

BIOL0021: Protein purification

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0020, Ex BIOL0097

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide understanding of the principles and application of the various methods for the purification and characterisation of proteins. To provide understanding of the principles and application of the ultracentrifuge in the biochemistry laboratory. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* plan a purification scheme for the isolation of a protein from various starting materials, taking account of requirements for both purity and yield of the product
* design experiments that involve the use of ultracentrifugation techniques.
Content:
Protein separation by column chromatography based on differences in molecular size, charge, hydrophobicity and specific affinity for ligands; electrophoretic methods for the purification and characterisation of proteins; theory and practise of preparative and analytical ultracentrifugation

BIOL0022: Practical biochemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0003, Pre BIOL0004, Pre BIOL0006

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide practical experience of some commonly used molecular biology techniques and to evaluate these in comparison with other available methods so that the students are aware of a range of techniques used for the characterisation of gene structure and gene expression. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand how and why these techniques have been applied when they encounter them in journal articles
* consider these methods when they design their own experiments
* develop planning and organisational skills in carrying out a scientific project
* develop data handling and interpretation skills
Content:
The course involves a series of linked experiments that form a mini-project. This begins with the preparation of cellular RNA, its conversion to cDNA and the amplification of gene fragments using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Specific fragments are cloned in a bacterial plasmid, these screened by restriction enzyme digestion and one or two are subject to DNA sequencing. Data interpretation involves DNA sequence analysis and the interrogation of remote nucleic acid databases, chromosome physical maps and mutational databases. A demonstration of various methods for analysing gene expression is included.

BIOL0023: DNA (making, breaking & disease)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW10 ES10
Requisites: Pre BIOL0006

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide understanding of the relationship between DNA synthesis, DNA repair, the animal cell growth cycle and apoptosis. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* give a detailed account of the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication and repair in a variety of living systems
* show how DNA metabolism and cell cycle controls are related to cancer
* give an account of antitumour therapy.
Content:
DNA replication, and where relevant DNA in øx174, E.coli, SV40, and human cells. Cross talk between synthesis, repair and the cell cycle in complex systems. Immortality and carcinogenesis. Site of action of antifolates, fluorouracil, magic bullets.

BIOL0024: Cell biology 2

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0005, Pre BIOL0006

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To familiarise students with the concepts and vocabulary of key aspects of cell biology. To give students an understanding of current models of how cells attach to and move upon their substrate, how they maintain their composition and shape, how they communicate and how they grow. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* outline and distinguish the roles of carrier proteins and ion channels, and describe current models of their functional mechanisms
* describe the major components of the cytoskeleton and their function in cell integrity, in intracellular trafficking and in cell motility
* differentiate the various types of plant and animal cell-cell junctions
* summarise the major extracellular matrix components in plant and animal tissues and how cell attach to them
* discuss the key signals and mechanisms permitting targeting of protein components to various subcellular locations
* demonstrate knowledge of the major inter cellular signalling systems and intracellular signalling pathways, and also the ways that these are studied
* understand the principles of cellular signal generation, control, recognition, integration and interpretation to generate a response
* extend their knowledge in these areas by reference to primary research articles
Content:
Cell adhesion and the extracellular matrix; membrane transport (carrier proteins and ion channels); intracellular trafficking; cytoskeleton; cell signalling: growth factors and regulation of vertebrate cell proliferation and differentiation; tyrosine kinase receptors and the MAP kinase intracellular signalling pathway; G-protein coupled receptors and the cAMP and Ca2+ second messenger systems; hormone signalling via the intracellular receptor family.

BIOL0024: Cell biology 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0005, Pre BIOL0006

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To familiarise students with the concepts and vocabulary of key aspects of cell biology. To give students an understanding of current models of how cells attach to and move upon their substrate, how they maintain their composition and shape, how they communicate and how they grow. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* outline and distinguish the roles of carrier proteins and ion channels, and describe current models of their functional mechanisms
* describe the major components of the cytoskeleton and their function in cell integrity, in intracellular trafficking and in cell motility
* differentiate the various types of plant and animal cell-cell junctions
* summarise the major extracellular matrix components in plant and animal tissues and how cell attach to them
* discuss the key signals and mechanisms permitting targeting of protein components to various subcellular locations
* demonstrate knowledge of the major inter cellular signalling systems and intracellular signalling pathways, and also the ways that these are studied
* understand the principles of cellular signal generation, control, recognition, integration and interpretation to generate a response
* extend their knowledge in these areas by reference to primary research articles
Content:
Cell adhesion and the extracellular matrix; membrane transport (carrier proteins and ion channels); intracellular trafficking; cytoskeleton; cell signalling: growth factors and regulation of vertebrate cell proliferation and differentiation; tyrosine kinase receptors and the MAP kinase intracellular signalling pathway; G-protein coupled receptors and the cAMP and Ca2+ second messenger systems; hormone signalling via the intracellular receptor family.

BIOL0025: Practical molecular biology

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR80 OR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0005, Pre BIOL0006

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide practical experience of some commonly used molecular biology techniques and to evaluate these in comparison with other available methods so that the students are aware of a range of techniques used for the characterisation of gene structure and gene expression. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand how and why these techniques have been applied when they encounter them in journal articles
* consider these methods when they design their own experiments
* develop planning and organisational skills in carrying out a scientific project
* develop data handling and interpretation skills
Content:
The course involves a series of linked experiments that form a mini-project. This begins with the preparation of cellular RNA, its conversion to cDNA and the amplification of gene fragments using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Specific fragments are cloned in a bacterial plasmid, these screened by restriction enzyme digestion and one or two are subject to DNA sequencing. Data interpretation involves DNA sequence analysis and the interrogation of remote nucleic acid databases, chromosome physical maps and mutational databases. A demonstration of various methods for analysing gene expression is included.

BIOL0027: Animal reproduction

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre SCNC0045

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To explain the structure and differentiation of the reproductive system in vertebrates, including humans, and how it is controlled in order to produce eggs, sperm and offspring and the appropriate time of year. Practical classes will illustrate the material discussed. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* have a clear understanding of different reproductive strategies, the anatomical structures involved, the environmental conditions and hormones that control reproductive physiology and how these hormones themselves are regulated.
Content:
Reproductive strategies; the differentiation of reproductive systems; male and female reproductive anatomy and physiology in mammals; pregnancy, parturition and lactation; in vitro fertilisation and other medical interventions; reproductive physiology in selected birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. In the practical classes students will have the opportunity to examine whole specimens and slides of different reproductive organs and to interpret data from scientific papers dealing with reproduction.

BIOL0028: Cellular neurobiology

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0006, Ex BIOL0099

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an introduction and broad overview of cellular neurobiology which should serve as a basis for more in-depth study in final year courses. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* give a general description of the organisation of the nervous system including the basic anatomically subdivisions
* relate neuronal cell structure with function
* discuss the similarities and differences between receptor classes and their association with various signalling cascades
* describe the principles of electrical signalling in neurons including the properties of ion channels
Content:
A brief description of basic aspects of neuronal development and anatomy: the cells of the nervous system; the subcellular architecture of neurons including features in common with other cells and unique aspects such as axons, dendrites, synaptic vesicles and the neuronal cytoskeleton; synaptic transmission and intercellular communication; and signalling in the nervous system including the electrical properties of neurons, resting and action potentials and ion channels.

BIOL0029: Insect biology

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0009

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an introduction to the biochemistry, physiology, morphology and behaviour of insects, particularly in relation to their role as crop pests and the development of methods of control. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*define the elements of structure and function that have contributed to the diversity and numerical success of insects
*identify aspects of insect biochemistry, physiology and behaviour that provide or potentially could provide targets for exploitation in pest control.
Content:
Insect classification and types of post-embryonic development; characteristics of the major orders of insects; polymorphism as found in aphids and locusts; biochemistry and physiology of some major life systems; insect plant relations; a survey of chemical pesticides - chemical classes, mode of action and mechanisms of resistance; biological pest control.

BIOL0030: Plant biochemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR/CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce some important aspects of plant metabolism and their role in the functioning of the whole plant. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand how plants (by definition static) are able to utilise light energy for the biosynthesis of important biomolecules, yet cope with the potential problems posed by excess solar radiation and drought.
* understand how plant protection systems will not only explain plant survival in an ever changing environment, with the possibility of animal predation, but also how the disruption of proteins and detoxification systems can lead to plant death via herbicides.
Content:
Utilisation of light energy in photosynthesis; CO2 incorporation; carbohydrate synthesis, storage and breakdown; the metabolism of stored carbohydrate to yield energy (respiration) and intermediary metabolites; the function and metabolism of lipids; pigments, with particular reference to porphyrins and carotenoids. Emphasis will be placed on sites where herbicides disrupt normal metabolism and biochemical protective and detoxification mechanisms (e.g.cytochrome P-450) in plants. Practical sessions provide experience in the use of a variety of techniques for the study of plant processes. An equivalent period of directed study will be provided for students who already have adequate experience of practical biochemistry.

BIOL0031: Plant biotechnology

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0006

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce the techniques used in Plant Biotechnology and discuss their applications in Crop Production and Protection. After taking this course the student should be able to
* understand the role that biotechnology and recombinant DNA techniques play in the development of novel plant genotypes:
Content:
This unit introduces the methods of plant tissue culture, genetic transformation and regeneration. The techniques of Agrobacterium - mediated and direct transformation e.g. particle bombardment are described. Applications of plant genetic engineering are discussed with examples drawn from a wide range of Crop Production and Protection situation e.g. manipulation of floral development; fruit ripening; pest and disease resistance. The socioeconomics of Plant Biotechnology as well as its role in germplasm conservation is discussed. Practical sessions provide experience in the use of tissue culture and transformation techniques in the study of Plant Development and Biotechnology.

BIOL0032: Plant pathology

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0009

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of the biology and control of the major groups of fungal and bacterial plant pathogens. To introduce the physiological, biochemical and genetical basis of host-parasite interactions. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* name the major groups of fungal and bacterial plant pathogens and describe their key biological features and methods of controls
* understand the molecular and biochemical basis of host-pathogen interactions
* be able to describe the modes of action of key fungicides
Content:
Pathogens' strategies and modes of nutrition; the biology, disease cycles and control via host resistance, fungicides and cultural practice of the major groups: plasmodial fungi eg clubroot; Phytophthora species; downy mildews; powdery mildews; vascular wilt fungi; smuts; rusts bacterial pathogens. The concept of disease management and integrated control. The genetic basis of host-parasite interactions; host resistance mechanisms. The mathematical modelling of plant disease epidemics and the relationship between these models and practical disease forecasting. Fungicide modes of action and resistance.

BIOL0033: Bacteriology

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0008

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To give students an appreciation of the diversity and importance of bacteria, their ecology and associated physiology, their isolation, characterisation and classification, and their influences on mankind. It also provides training and quantitative experimental/investigative experience in mainstream bacteriology. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand the dynamics of bacterial population growth and how this can be quantified
* know how bacteria can be inactivated and extinguished
* be familiar with procedures (ranging from phenotyping to genotyping) for characterising and recognising bacteria
* have an outline knowledge of the 'Bergey' system for bacterial classification
* describe the main features of some key groups of bacteria and have more detailed knowledge of selected examples with medical, veterinary, environmental, public health and food industry relevance
Content:
Population growth dynamics, with emphasis on batch liquid culture systems; chemical and physical methods for inactivating and eliminating bacteria - heat sterilisation, filtration, antiseptics, disinfectants; characterisation and classification of bacteria, the 'Bergey' system; properties of main groups of bacteria; more detailed consideration of organisms of ecological and public health significance, food and water-borne human pathogens, and agents of plant disease. Practical sessions include quantitative experiments on bacterial growth, bacterial isolation from natural sources and demonstration of some biochemical properties; methods for bacterial characterisation, from traditional tests to state of the art rapid and miniaturised procedures.

BIOL0034: Virology

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0006

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce students to the basic characteristics of viruses, both as microorganisms and as agents of disease of animals and plants. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* define the main characteristics of plant and animal viruses
* know how to detect and identify viruses
* understand the role of viruses in disease
* recognise the importance of new and emerging virus infections
* appreciate how some viruses spread and are controlled
Content:
The physical, chemical and biological properties of viruses; the life cycle and replication strategies of representative RNA and DNA viruses; the effects of viruses, including methods of pathogenesis, at the whole organism, cellular and biochemical levels; principles of virus detection and disease diagnosis; virus transmission, ecology and control; emerging viruses and novel virus-like agents. Practical sessions introduce common methods for identification and characterisation of viruses.

BIOL0035: Genes & development 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0006

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce the study of animal development, making use of the three most important animal models viz. Xenopus, Drosophila and the mouse, to demonstrate basic embryological concepts and the functions of developmentally important genes. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* demonstrate a knowledge of the descriptive embryology of the three model species.
* demonstrate a knowledge of selected methods for the study of gene expression, overexpression and ablation.
* discuss how information from anatomy, molecular biology and genetics can be integrated in the explanation of a particular developmental process.
Content:
Xenopus development covering normal development, fate mapping, specification map, induction, morphogen gradients, DV patterning in egg, mesoderm induction, dorsalisation, neural induction, AP patterning. Drosophila development covering normal developmental genetics, dorsoventral and anteroposterior patterning. Mouse development covering gametogenesis and fertilisation, normal pre and post implantation development, ES cells, transgenesis and targeted mutagenesis. Cell adhesion. Extracellular matrix. Cell movement and morphogenesis.

BIOL0036: Genes & development practicals

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0035, Ex BIOL0100

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce students to the appearance of Xenopus, insect and mouse embryos; to the use of dissecting and compound microscopes; to simple microsurgical procedures and to immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* recognise the stages of Xenopus and mouse embryos.
* carry out simple experiments on Xenopus embryos.
* relate the appearance of two dimensional microscope sections to three dimensional embryos.
* identify selected Drosophila mutants
* carry out immunohistochemical or in situ hybridisation procedures
Content:
12 laboratory practical sessions: sorting and staging Xenopus embryos; embryo culture; maternal inheritance; simple micromanipulations; interpretation of sections; morphology of insect embryos; isolation of preimplantation mouse embryos; analysis of a gene trap ES cell line; in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry.

BIOL0037: Crop protection & weed biology

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of the measures which can be taken to prevent losses of crops due to the effects of pest, diseases and weeds. Approaches range from those used in developed countries, often based on sophisticated technology involving application of pesticides and herbicides, to low cost cultural methods more practicable in developing countries. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* decide upon optimal strategies for controlling pests, diseases and weeds
* evaluate the risks involved in a control method and be aware of relevant legislation
* identify key UK weed species
Content:
The history, principles and practice of protection of crop plants from parasitic microorganisms, pests and competing weeds; biological physical and chemical approaches to crop protection; pesticides and herbicides, their design, screening, formulation and application; legislation; strategic and safe use in view of non-target organisms; development of pest and herbicide resistance and environmental pollution; integrated control measures. Practical sessions include identification of weed plants and excursions to conventional and organic farms to study methods of weed and pest control.

BIOL0038: Environmental physiology

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0012

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To explore how animals (a) detect and react to environmental change, and (b) are influenced by environmental toxicants. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* demonstrate understanding of the cellular and physiological mechanisms by which animals sense change in their environment, and co-ordinate developmental, physiological and behavioural responses to environmental change.
* demonstrate how environmental toxicants affect some physiological and cellular mechanisms and mechanisms by which organisms may show tolerance.
Content:
Bacterial chemotaxis as an example of sensorimotor function; structure and function of animal sense organs; nervous and endocrine encoding of sensory information; central modulation of sensory function; extraordinary sensory modalities (eg electroreception); pheromones, kairomones and allomones, biological clocks - phenomenology, properties, cellular and systems location, genetic analysis; sleep. Impacts of environmental pollutants on animals in terrestrial and aquatic environments. The accumulation of environmental toxicants by animals. What are the consequences of accumulation? (heavy metals as examples). Interactions between toxicants during exposure to mixtures of toxicants. Mechanisms and processes to reduce toxicity. Organochlorines and hydrocarbons as pollutants.

BIOL0039: Autumn field course

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0012

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To enhance students' awareness of the diversity of forms and behaviours to be found in natural populations and communities of organisms and of how the patterns in which this diversity occurs may be studied, described and understood. After taking the course the student should be able to:
*know how to find and identify a variety of kinds of organisms within their natural habitats
*know how to characterise distribution patterns using qualitative and quantitative methods and sampling procedures including conventional descriptive, mapping, quadrat, transect and trapping techniques and estimates of fractal dimension
*recognise the influence of selection on distribution patterns
*begin to question and understand how distribution patterns may arise from dynamic processes of energy transfer and feedback within and between living systems and their environment
*have developed presentational skills enabling them effectively to convey, discuss and analyse ideas and information about natural diversity.
Content:
Two members of academic staff spend six days in full-time residence with students at a suitable location in the south west of the UK. This involves visits to intertidal, sand dune, coastal grassland, moorland/heathland, salt marsh and woodland habitats; sampling, identification, descriptive and recording methods for plants, animals and fungi; data presentation and analysis using statistical and non-linear mathematical approaches; consideration of evolutionary and ecological relationships between genotypes, phenotypes and environment; investigative project; oral and written discourse. Students are required to make a financial contribution to the field course (currently £95)

BIOL0040: Concepts in ecology & evolution

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0012

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To develop an understanding of a) the nature of selection; b) the role of self-organisation in evolution; c) population dynamics and conservation; d) behavioural ecology and optimal foraging theory; e) the contribution of Darwin to the development of modern evolutionary theory. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* utilise concepts from natural selection theory, kin selection theory, optimisation theory, behavioural ecology, community biology, and ecological genetics in understanding ecological and evolutionary issues
* understand the role of self-organisation in social insects.
* offer a critique of the first edition of Darwin's 'The Origin of Species' and understand how key issues raised by Darwin as problems for his theory have been resolved.
Content:
The role of selection in evolution; agents of selection; units of selection; selection and adaptation; selection and fitness; natural selection and kin selection; genetic drift. Conservation and habitat fragmentation; exploiter mediated co-existence. Optimality in ecology and evolution; optimal foraging theory; self organisation; division of labour and the super-organism; battle strategies in social insects. Students are also requested to read 'The Origin of Species' and to discuss it in reading groups.

BIOL0041: Spring field course

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0012

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce the student to natural habitats in ways that enable the students to recognise patterns of distribution and behaviour of organisms and to question the basis of these patterns and behaviours. To introduce the student to the use of appropriate sampling patterns, experimental design, data gathering and statistical analysis. After taking the course the student should be able to:
*appreciate how aspects of behavioural ecology and of community structure can be investigated
*understand how these behaviours and structure may have arisen and how they are maintained
*design and perform a short field-based investigation; analyse and graphically present data
*prepare a written report of field-based investigations.
Content:
Visit to ecosystem types of varying complexity and subject to different kinds of selection process, such as rocky shore, sand dune, coastal grassland, salt marsh, woodland, moorland and fresh water. Investigation of components of these ecosystem types including spatial distribution, size and age distributions, reproduction and behaviour. Each student designs and carries out a half-day and a two-day field-based investigation; a preliminary report of the two-day investigation is presented as a short talk on the last day of the field trip; the data from the investigations are analysed and graphically presented using University computing facilities after the field trip. Students are required to make a financial contribution to the field course (currently £95)

BIOL0042: Investigative project

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide students with skills in planning and undertaking a scientific investigation, analysing and interpreting findings and reporting the outcome. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*appreciate the intellectual, time- and resource-management and technical requirements for productive, rigorous and responsible scientific investigation and reporting
*have gained experience of scientific writing at the level of a primary research paper and/or review
*have acquired technical, time and resource management, analytical, interpretative and literature-accessing skills appropriate to the undertaking and presentation of their project
*have contributed to knowledge.
Content:
Selection and definition of a problem that can be investigated effectively within constraints of safety, time and resources; strategic planning; gathering, processing, analysis and interpretation of information; literature searching and reviewing; scientific writing and presentation.

BIOL0042: Investigative project

Semester 1
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide students with skills in planning and undertaking a scientific investigation, analysing and interpreting findings and reporting the outcome. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*appreciate the intellectual, time- and resource-management and technical requirements for productive, rigorous and responsible scientific investigation and reporting
*have gained experience of scientific writing at the level of a primary research paper and/or review
*have acquired technical, time and resource management, analytical, interpretative and literature-accessing skills appropriate to the undertaking and presentation of their project
*have contributed to knowledge.
Content:
Selection and definition of a problem that can be investigated effectively within constraints of safety, time and resources; strategic planning; gathering, processing, analysis and interpretation of information; literature searching and reviewing; scientific writing and presentation.

BIOL0043: Biological data interpretation

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide experience of the interpretation of biological data. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*understand and interpret information on biological phenomena, using quantitative (numerical) and qualitative (text or image) sources
*make logical statements and reach sound conclusions from biological data
*be aware of the limits of interpretation and be capable of selecting suitable statistical tests
* interpret the outcome of a statistical test on biological data.
Content:
The course comprises a series of assignments and problems which are undertaken by the students and then analysed and discussed in weekly workshops. Using examples which illustrate different types of biological information, the course covers the interpretation of simple data sets, data transformation, graphical presentation, interpretation of trends, selection of appropriate statistical tests for particular data sets. As far as possible, the examples are generic, designed to be capable of interpretation without a requirement for in depth understanding of any particular area of biology.

BIOL0044: Molecular & medical neuroscience

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0003, Pre BIOL0028

or Pre BIOL0099 Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: An advanced review of the molecular and cellular processes underlying intercellular communication in the mammalian nervous system to provide an understanding of the neurochemical basis of brain disorders, their causes and treatments. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand the properties of the various classes of receptors and ion channels present in the mammalian CNS, and how these molecules interact to co-ordinate neuronal activity.
* describe a number of brains disorders in terms of their neurochemistry.
* comprehend the gross regional anatomy of the human brain
* read and comprehend the relevant scientific literature
Content:
Lectures: Receptors and ion channels- the existence of families and super-families. The structure of these various families of polypeptide. The functional consequences of this diversity and how it might be regulated at the gene and protein levels. Synthesis, release and uptake of neurotransmitters. Methods of studying human brain dysfunction. The altered neurochemistry of selected neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases will be reviewed, with respect to neurochemical aspects of their causes, symptons, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Video presentations will illustrate some of the clinical conditions.

BIOL0045: Cell membranes

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0024

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce the student to the principles governing the structure and function of biological membranes. To introduce the principles governing the structure of the lipid bilayer and the topological arrangement of proteins in the membrane. To introduce the principles and mechanisms involved in the transport of solutes across cell membrane. To introduce the student to mechanisms involved in sorting membrane proteins to specialised subcellular compartments. To provide an understanding of the overall importance of membrane processes in cellular function. After taking the course the student should be able to:
*outline how membrane lipids and proteins are structurally organised in the membrane
*describe how ions and sugars are transported across membranes
*describe the mechanisms by which membrane proteins are sorted into specialised subcellular compartments and the routes by which membrane trafficking occurs.
Content:
Functions and common structural feature of membrane lipids and proteins. Case study of the erythrocyte membrane proteins. Lateral diffusion of membrane components. Common features of membrane transporters for ions and neutral molecules together with the specialised features that provide substrate specificity. Simple kinetic features of the membrane transport process. Mechanisms for membrane vesicle budding and fusion and the functional significance of these processes in terms of membrane protein sorting and trafficking.

BIOL0046: Proteins & immunochemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0020

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of the molecular basis of antibody function and the principles of their application in immunochemical techniques. To provide an understanding of the significance of protein:protein and protein:nucleic acid interactions. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*understand the molecular basis for antigen:antibody interaction
*appreciate the role of antibody as a component of the immune system
*understand the basis of specific immunochemical methods and their applications
Content:
Overview of the immune system and the biological role of antibodies, structure of an antibody molecule and its relationship to antigen-binding and effector functions, principles of immunochemical techniques, protein:protein interactions and their importance for the function of oligomeric proteins, protein:nucleic acid interactions and their relevance to restriction enzymes and repressors.

BIOL0047: Carbohydrate polymers

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0003, Pre BIOL0004

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of the principles of carbohydrate conformation and of chemical synthesis of simple oligosaccharides as a basis for structural analysis. To teach methods of structural analysis of complex oligosaccharides. To outline the structure, biosynthesis and metabolic importance of glycogen, of glycoproteins and of mucopolysaccharides. After taking the course the student should be able to:
*understand the principles of conformational analysis as applied to monosaccharides
*appreciate the methods and applications of chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides
*give an account of the means by which glycogen metabolism is regulated by the hormones adrenalin and insulin and by metabolic substrates
*describe the structure and function of mucopolysaccharides
* understand the basic structural pattern of glycoproteins and how these may be determined
* outline the pathways of glycoprotein biosynthesis and discuss their function
Content:
Topics: Conformational analysis; simple chemical approaches to oligosaccharide synthesis, glycogen structure, biosynthesis and catabolism; regulation of glycogen metabolism by hormones; inborn errors of carbohydrate metabolism; relationship between mucopolysaccharide structure and function and distribution; common structural patterns of glycoproteins; methods of structural analysis of carbohydrate polymers and glycoprotein carbohydrates; general distribution of glycoproteins, biosynthesis and functions.

BIOL0048: Enzymology B

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0018

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims To provide an outline of the various approaches that may be used to elucidate the mechanism of enzyme action, illustrating these with specific examples. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*understand how information on kinetics and protein chemistry and structure can be used to provide mechanistic evidence.
*appreciate general approaches and specific types of catalysis in the context of enzyme mechanisms.
Content:
the course addresses the methods used to study end elucidate mechanisms of enzyme catalysis. Three aspects of evidence are discussed. 1) Study of the overall reaction 2) Study of enzymes as proteins 3) Use of non-enzymic models. These approaches are applied to case studies of individual enzymes: ATP citrate lyase, citrate synthase, acetoacetate decarboxylase, ribonuclease and chymotrypsin

BIOL0049: Biochemical parasitology

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0018, Pre BIOL0055

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To examine the biochemical adaptations required for existence as a successful parasite. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*understand the definition of a parasite and give examples of important human parasitic diseases.
*appreciate the metabolic constraints caused by occupancy of this niche and the effects that parasitic infections and infestations have on the host
*note unique aspects of parasite molecular biology & physiology.
Content:
Parasitology: protozoan and helminth biochemistry and molecular biology. Its modifications in parasites. The modes of action of anti-parasite drugs and what these tell us about target metabolism.

BIOL0050: Biochemical problems

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0015, Pre BIOL0048

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To develop students' abilities to assimilate compilations of experimental data and to draw valid conclusions from them. After taking the course, the student should be able to:
*study a collection of biochemical observations, such as the results section of a publication or simply a series of related observations compiled specifically for the exercise, and assess their significance. Indications of this ability could be, e.g. answering particular questions or writing the discussion section of a paper. It is especially important that the student learns to draw only such conclusions as are fully justified by the data.
Content:
Several members of academic staff will participate in the course, each providing a particular problem. This will be handed out and explained to the class, who will then have some 4 days to provide written answers. These will be marked and returned.

BIOL0051: Laboratory project

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0018, Pre BIOL0021

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of the principles of advanced laboratory practice with emphasis on the choice of analytical systems and development of team based research. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*elucidate defined biochemical problem by designing appropriate practical experiments.
Content:
Could include molecular biology, enzymology, protein separation, immunochemistry.

BIOL0051: Laboratory project

Semester 1
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0015

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of the principles of advanced laboratory practice with emphasis on the choice of analytical systems and development of team based research. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*elucidate defined biochemical problem by designing appropriate practical experiments.
Content:
Could include molecular biology, enzymology, protein separation, immunochemistry.

BIOL0052: Scientific communication

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0015

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To examine good and bad practice in communicating science to a variety of professional and lay audiences using written and oral methods. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* communicate new findings in biochemistry to professional, student and lay audiences. They will have produced an education poster suitable for use by "A" level or first year undergraduate students, written a 1,000 word article for publication in the science section of a broadsheet national newspaper and given a short "journal club" oral presentation explaining a recent biochemical paper to an advanced scientific audience. Contents: Students are required to produce three pieces of work for assessment: 1.An education poster suitable for "A" level students or first year undergraduates. 2.A 1,000 word article on a recent advance in the biochemical sciences. 3.A 10-12 minute "journal club" presentation on a recent article in the biochemical literature. The presentation should summarise the paper and its significance and should critically evaluate the methods used, the results obtained and their interpretation.

BIOL0052: Scientific communication

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0015

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To examine good and bad practice in communicating science to a variety of professional and lay audiences using written and oral methods. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* communicate new findings in biochemistry to professional, student and lay audiences. They will have produced an education poster suitable for use by "A" level or first year undergraduate students, written a 1,000 word article for publication in the science section of a broadsheet national newspaper and given a short "journal club" oral presentation explaining a recent biochemical paper to an advanced scientific audience. Contents: Students are required to produce three pieces of work for assessment: 1.An education poster suitable for "A" level students or first year undergraduates. 2.A 1,000 word article on a recent advance in the biochemical sciences. 3.A 10-12 minute "journal club" presentation on a recent article in the biochemical literature. The presentation should summarise the paper and its significance and should critically evaluate the methods used, the results obtained and their interpretation.

BIOL0053: Professional training in Biochemistry 2

Semester 2
Credits: 30
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OT100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0016

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims:
* to provide experience of the application of biochemistry
* to provide a second placement experience, thereby building upon and extending the skills, techniques and knowledge gained in the second year.
* to promote understanding of the principles and practices of working in a professional environment After taking this course the student should be able to:
* undertake and report on a piece of work in an agreed programme
* integrate into a commercial or academic environment
Content:
Laboratory or other professional experience which is deemed suitable by the Director of Studies (Placements).

BIOL0055: Genes & genomes

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0023, Pre BIOL0007

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an advanced study of genome structure and expression in eukaryotes. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*appreciate the complexities of gene regulation and the various stages at which expression is regulated
*review the ways in which mRNA differs from the primary transcript.
*know how to use genome structural information to distinguish between individuals
*devise a strategy for the identification and mapping of genes.
Content:
Genome structure and mapping (genetic & physical). Repetitive DNA, its origins and use in DNA fingerprinting. Assembly of the eukaryotic RNA synthetic machinery and its regulation by transcription factors. Chromatin remodelling in transcription. RNA splicing, editing and other modifications and their control.

BIOL0056: Plant molecular biology

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0006

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce recent work on plant development and genetics as elucidated by a molecular approach. To demonstrate the importance of genes and gene expression in the development and life-cycle of the plant as a whole. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of key topics of plant genetics and development.
* critically evaluate experimental evidence within this field.
* understand the importance of a molecular approach, amongst others, to elucidating aspects of plant biology.
Content:
The course examines plant gene-structure, gene-expression and molecular aspects of development. Topics include: plant genome size and repetitive DNA; plant transposable elements; the chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes; male sterility; epigenetics, plant development; self-incompatibility; embryogenesis and seed formation; fruit ripening; seed germination.

BIOL0057: Cell growth & proliferation

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0023, Pre BIOL0024

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of the principles of cell growth and division, the differences between prokaryotes and eukaryotes, the different constraints on free-living and metazoan cells, and the regulation of the cell cycle. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*give quantitative interpretation of growth curves
*account for the regulation and dependency relationships in cell cycles
*give an account of the control of DNA replication in cells
*give an account of the cell cycle controls that ensure ordered progress of the cell cycle
*show how genetics and biochemistry have been used to elucidate the cell cycle
*relate cell cycle principles to the causes of cancer
*show how an understanding of the molecular biology of cell cycle controls is providing therapeutic insights into the treatment of cancer.
Content:
Topics: Methods for analysing growing cells and proliferating cell populations; batch culture; continuous culture; Escherichia coli cell cycle; cell cycle of yeasts; cell cycle of metazoan cells and cancer; specialised seminar topics presented by each participating member.

BIOL0058: Microbial genetics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0023

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an overview of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetic systems, to relate the genetics of microorganisms to their wider biological role, and give an indication of the diversity of genetic systems. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*compare critically methods of mapping genes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes
*understand the unity and diversity amongst bacterial plasmids
*explain the mechanism and implications of transposition
*provide a critical understanding of the molecular basis and types of recombination
*provide an account of the development of bacteriophage lambda with an understanding of the regulation of promoters and the nature of a genetic switch
*relate the possible evolutionary relationships between different replicating genetic elements.
Content:
Topics: Advanced Mendelian genetics; recombination and repair; mitotic analysis; extranuclear genetics of yeasts; genetics of bacterial plasmids; genetics and development of bacteriophage lambda; specialised seminar topics presented by each participating member.

BIOL0059: Insect-microbe interactions

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0029

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an insight into the nature of symbioses between insects and their microbial flora - from commensal through parasitic to mutualistic association; to provide an understanding of the nature of the diseases in insects caused by bacteria, fungi and viruses; to explore the basis of immunity and host defence against microbial pathogens; to demonstrate some of the complexity of the mutualistic associations that have evolved between insects and their flora. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*discuss the concepts of pathogenesis, virulence and specificity as they relate to microbial pathogens of insects
*compare and contrast the strategies used by different types of microbial pathogen of insects
*define the strengths and weaknesses of insect immune systems
*compare and contrast insect and vertebrate immune systems
*define criteria for establishing a mutualistic role for a micro-organism.
Content:
Concepts of symbiosis; ice nucleating agents and insect cold hardiness; mechanisms of fungal pathogenesis in insects - host recognition, host invasion, role of toxins, molecular approaches to the study of virulence; entomopathogenic bacteria; endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis and B. sphaericus; entomopathogenic viruses - overview, baculoviruses, polyDNA viruses, host immunity - cuticle and gut barriers, cellular defence, humoral defence, immune proteins, comparison with vertebrate systems; mutualism - exogenous mutualists, cellulose digestion, intracellular mutualists.

BIOL0060: Neurobiology - systems

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0028

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of some holistic systems in neurobiology to illustrate the integrated functioning of the nervous system After taking this course the student should be able to:
*describe a number of integrated neuronal systems in terms of their physiology and neurochemistry
Content:
Model systems: Aplysia, C. elegans; Sensory systems: pain, vision; Memory: Plasticity & LTP; Motor control; Language & Lateralisation.

BIOL0061: Topics in endocrinology

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites:

Pre: BIOL0027 recommended but not essential Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To study selected endocrinological topics in depth After taking this course, the student should be able to:
* discuss evidence of hormone evolution
* understand and be able to discuss methods used in hormone research
* appreciate the effects of hormones on aspects of behaviour and physiology and how hormones are regulated
Content:
Techniques used in endocrine research; the biosynthesis of hormones from larger precursors; the hypothalamo-pituitary axis; the neuroendocrinology of stress; the behavioural effects of hormones, including the regulation of appetite and sexual behaviour; the pineal gland and melatonin; medical endocrine problems and hormone therapy

BIOL0062: Fungi & people

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES15 OR5
Requisites: Pre BIOL0008

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide students with an understanding of the many ways (excluding those due to diseases of crops, which are covered in other units) in which fungi either are, or may in future be, of direct relevance to the quality of human life. After taking the course, the student should be able to:
*categorise and describe the ways in which fungi are of practical and cultural importance to people
*describe current methods of controlling and making use of fungi
*identify the intellectual and technological constraints which presently limit ability to control and make use of fungi
*identify opportunities available for the future practical application of fungal properties.
Content:
Toxic fungi - mycetisms and mycotoxicoses and their relevance in human traditions and the aetiology of human and animal diseases; cultivation of fungal fruit bodies and mycelium as sources of food; use of fungi in production of fermented foods and beverages, including cheese making and koji processes; industrial use of fungi in the discovery and production of useful compounds, including pharmaceuticals, organic acids and enzymes; fungal infections of people and animals (mycoses); fungi as agents of biodeterioration and biodegradation; fungi and pollution; future uses of fungi - constraints and opportunities.

BIOL0063: Microbial physiology

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0033

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce principles of microbial pathogenicity (of humans), with particular regard to the roles of the cell envelope and bacterial toxins. To present detailed aspects of the physiological and biochemical processes involved. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* have a sound understanding of a range of physiological properties and biochemical mechanisms, particularly in relation to bacterial pathogenicity towards humans
Content:
Introduction to microbial pathogenicity; iron transport and the bacterial cell membrane; the mechanisms of cell adhesion; bacterial biofilms - their nature, formation and involvement in health problems; an introduction to bacterial toxins and their role in disease; structural properties and detection of toxins; cell envelope structural components and their role in vaccine development; E. coli H0157, an important 'new' pathogen; AIDS.

BIOL0064: Plant-microorganism interactions

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0032

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of the processes involved in infection and colonisation of plants by parasitic microorganisms which lead to disease. To detail the chemical signals exchanged between the two species as key components of recognition events. To reveal the potential range of defences of plants: constitutive, induced non-specifically by damage, or specifically by pathogens. After taking this course, the student should be able to:
*understand the biochemical and physical factors which determine the outcome of interactions between microorganisms and plants
*appreciate how pathogens can avoid, negate or suppress host defences
*recognise different strategies by pathogens for obtaining nutrients from plant hosts
*appreciate alternative strategies for control of plant diseases.
Content:
Constitutive resistance based on existing structural barriers such as cuticle, secondary cell walls and on antimicrobial chemicals such as saponins and phenolics; detoxifying enzymes; toxin binding sites. Induced resistance comprising formation of physical barriers such as new or altered cell walls, vascular occlusions, de novo synthesis of phytoalexins. Triggering of defence by stress or wounding, microbial elicitors or a recognition event. Infection structures of pathogenic fungi. Pathogenicity determinants including depolymerases, toxins, polysaccharides, siderophores, detoxifying enzymes; their structure, modes of action and role. Contrasting strategies of obligate biotrophs and facultative necrotrophs.

BIOL0066: Microbial communication & development

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES10 CW10
Requisites: Pre BIOL0033

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To examine the dynamic interaction between the microbial world and the environment and to explore the principles of microbial communication and development. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* discuss the role of the environment in controlling microbial physiology
* have a detailed knowledge of the various ways by which microbes monitor their environments
* to describe, in detail, various examples of microbial differentiation and development
* to communicate scientific ideas and concepts both orally and in written form
Content:
Definitions of different microbial relationships with the environment; microbial mechanisms for monitoring their environments e.g. nutrient sensing, two-component pathways, quorum sensing; microbes as communities i.e. biofilms and the gastrointestinal tract; various examples of microbial differentiation and development including sporulation in Bacillus, swarming in Proteus mirabilis. heterocyst formation in Anabaena. Students will be expected to write an essay on a given topic relating to the lecture course and present a seminar on any primary research paper relating to microbiology.

BIOL0067: Genes & development 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0035

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an advanced course in developmental biology that will communicate the excitement of recent research advances After taking this course the student should be able to:
*understand the basic principles underlying invertebrate development and organogenesis in higher organisms
*relate the mechanisms of development to cellular and molecular events
*understand the applications and implications of research in developmental biology to human developmental defects
Content:
This course builds on BIOL0035 to give a comprehensive grounding in developmental biology. The vertebrate development lectures will cover HOX genes, somitogenesis, myogenesis, neural development, epithelial-mesenchymal interaction, limb development and regeneration, and developmental defects. Invertebrate model organisms are increasingly being used for molecular genetic analysis of genetic systems important in human medicine. We shall introduce the important model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and extend the analysis of Drosophila development to include the mechanism of segmentation and the patterning of the imaginal discs.

BIOL0067: Genes & development 2

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0035

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an advanced course in developmental biology that will communicate the excitement of recent research advances After taking this course the student should be able to:
*understand the basic principles underlying invertebrate development and organogenesis in higher organisms
*relate the mechanisms of development to cellular and molecular events
*understand the applications and implications of research in developmental biology to human developmental defects
Content:
This course builds on BIOL0035 to give a comprehensive grounding in developmental biology. The vertebrate development lectures will cover HOX genes, somitogenesis, myogenesis, neural development, epithelial-mesenchymal interaction, limb development and regeneration, and developmental defects. Invertebrate model organisms are increasingly being used for molecular genetic analysis of genetic systems important in human medicine. We shall introduce the important model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and extend the analysis of Drosophila development to include the mechanism of segmentation and the patterning of the imaginal discs.

BIOL0069: Plant development

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites:

Pre: BIOL0038 or BIOL0031 Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide a molecular genetic description of the main developmental pathways operating within the higher plant life cycle and to illustrate the principal experimental techniques used in plant developmental biology. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand the principal mechanisms that 1) regulate body plan specification in plants 2) pattern the flower and the root and 3) regulate leaf development
* describe the processes of cell and tissue differentiation at the molecular genetic level
* design experimental approaches to investigate developmental pathways in Arabidopsis
Content:
The course starts by contrasting life cycle and styles of higher plants with that of animals; next we consider the establishment of the basic body plan of plants and again contrast the mechanisms adopted in plants with that of various animal models. The various molecular genetic techniques used in plant development research are then described and illustrated with a focus on plant embryogenesis. Cell fate specification is described in some depth with frequent examples from various organisms. Post-embryonic development is illustrated using flower development. Cell and tissue differentiation is described using anther and carpel development as examples.

BIOL0070: Plant biotechnology & the environment

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To define 'Plant Biotechnology' and describe the categories included within the definition and their applications. By the end of this course the student should have gained:
*a general understanding of the various categories of plant biotechnology
*an understanding of the direct and indirect effects of plant biotechnology on the environment in terms of socio-economic costs and benefits
*an appreciation of policy and institutional issues related to the exploitation of plant biotechnology by both the public and private sectors in a democratic society.
Content:
The definition of Plant Biotechnology, the categories included within the definition and their applications. The link: population + consumption level + (bio) technology = environmental impact. World, regional and national trends in population size and food consumption levels and their implications for agricultural and natural ecosystems. The contribution of plant biotechnology to agricultural systems and their environmental implications. Ex situ and in situ biodiversity conservation strategies and the impact of biotechnology. Risk analysis and the release of genetically manipulated organisms into the environment. Public and private sector research, ownership of biological resources and intellectual property rights. Control of biotechnology R & D and implementation: priority setting; public participation; policies and institutions; developed and developing countries. The Cassava Biotechnology Network as an example of control and implementation of plant biotechnology.

BIOL0071: Topics in environmental plant virology

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0034

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To explore the relationship between viruses, plants (including fungi) and people through the appreciation of plant viruses as pathogenic entities that move and survive, at the molecular level, within cellular environments, and at the whole plant level, within and between natural and crop environments After taking this course the student should be able to:
*understand the biology of plant viruses and their impact on plants and people.
Content:
The nature of plant viruses. Viruses within the cellular environment; virus movement and distribution in planta; viruses in seed and pollen; secondary compounds in virus-infected plants; antiviral compounds; viruses and dsRNA in fungi; viruses within crop and natural environments: symptom expression; emerging crop virus disease problems (especially in developing countries); virus vector transmission mechanisms, especially nematodes, aphids and fungi; the origins and epidemiology of plant viruses; viruses as pathogens of fungi

BIOL0072: Biology as a world view

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To develop an understanding of the history of biological thought in western culture. To develop an understanding of the extent to which the biological world view reflects and shapes the broader western world view. To provide an introduction to debates conducted within the philosophy of science about the potential of science to obtain an accurate picture of reality; this debate is illustrated with a case study which looks at philosophical and biological issues of the mind-brain problem. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*discuss the development of biological thought in ancient Greece, in medieval Europe and between the onset of the Scientific Revolution and the present
*debate problems associated with scientific methodology and discuss the implications for the biological world view of these problems.
Content:
Views of nature in ancient Greece, from presocratic philosophers to Plato, Aristotle and the neoplatonists, and in Europe from the medieval period to the present. Topics include: the nature of reality; what exists and why; the relationship between individuals, universals and classification. A critique of science which will include the following issues: how science is possible; how science identifies areas for study; the scientific approach, including the role of inductive and deductive reasoning, theory-ladeness and theory choice.

BIOL0073: The evolution of genetic systems

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX70 CW30
Requisites: Pre BIOL0040, Pre BIOL0039

(recommended but not essential) Pre: A level Mathematics Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an introduction to mathematical population genetics and its application as regards understanding problems related to the organisation and structure of genetic systems. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*demonstrate competence in the analysis of simple recursion equations as applied to one locus problems
*understand the operation of two locus recursion equations with application to modifier analysis
*understand the methods for testing evolutionary hypotheses
*understand basic concepts within evolutionary genetic and molecular evolution.
Content:
The first four lectures provide an introduction to the mathematics of gene frequency change.This provides the basis for asking the following questions:1) Why do organisms have sex? 2) What determines the mutation rate? and 3) Why be diploid? After this the notion of selfish elements is introduced and their relevance to understanding the number of sexes and to genome structure is examined. Use of molecular evolutionary data comparative analysis and experimental tests of hypotheses are discussed.

BIOL0074: The evolution of social behaviour

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites: Pre BIOL0040

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To develop an understanding of (a) key conceptual issues in the evolution of social behaviour; (b) why sociobiological issues, such as the nature nurture debate, have been, and will continue to be, controversial and (c) the ways in which evolutionary theories can be tested by experimentation. To develop skills in first: recognising and selecting key studies from the primary literature, and second, presenting a case study in the form of a short seminar, complete with summary sheets, in such a way as to highlight how key ideas have been tested and refined empirically. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*demonstrate an understanding both of the theories of social evolution and how such theories are tested and refined by observations and experiments
*discuss and synthesise results from a number of carefully selected case studies in such a way as to critically evaluate the pros and cons of different theories and to form some judgement about their validity
*present a clear concise and well focused short seminar on new topics drawn from the primary literature.
Content:
This course debates the hottest topics in the evolution of social behaviour in animals including Homo sapiens. These topics include kin selection, inclusive fitness theory, sexual selection, kin recognition, altruism, genetic determinism, the evolution of co-operation and conflict, selfishness and spite and human sociobiology. This is a course based largely on seminars presented by students on the basis of their reading of primary publications, reviews and text book examples.

BIOL0075: Professional training placement

Academic Year
Credits: 60
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Pre A good record of achievement at level 1 and 2 Aims & learning objectives:
Aims:
* to provide experience of the application of biological science
* to promote understanding of the principles and practices of working in a professional environment. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* undertake and report on a piece of work in an agreed programme
* integrate into a commercial or academic environment
Content:
Laboratory or other professional experience which is deemed suitable by the Director of Studies (Placements).

BIOL0076: Research project (MBiochem)

Semester 2
Credits: 18
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: OT100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0053

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To develop skills in planning and undertaking a scientific investigation in biochemistry at the level of advanced research. After taking this course the students should be able to
*undertake research at the advanced level, interpret the results and report the outcome.
Content:
All stages are undertaken under the guidance of an academic supervisor. The planning stage involves defining the problem and devising an appropriate strategy to investigate it within constraints of time and resources. Risk assessment. Investigation stage involves the acquisition of (usually) quantitative data. Experimental design. Carrying out quantitative techniques, evaluating sources of error. The analysis and interpretation stage involves the use of appropriate statistical techniques and the evaluation of results in relation to published work. The final phase is to communicate the outcome of the project in the form of a written report.

BIOL0076: Research project (MBiochem)

Semester 1
Credits: 18
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: OT100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0053

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To develop skills in planning and undertaking a scientific investigation in biochemistry at the level of advanced research. After taking this course the students should be able to
*undertake research at the advanced level, interpret the results and report the outcome.
Content:
All stages are undertaken under the guidance of an academic supervisor. The planning stage involves defining the problem and devising an appropriate strategy to investigate it within constraints of time and resources. Risk assessment. Investigation stage involves the acquisition of (usually) quantitative data. Experimental design. Carrying out quantitative techniques, evaluating sources of error. The analysis and interpretation stage involves the use of appropriate statistical techniques and the evaluation of results in relation to published work. The final phase is to communicate the outcome of the project in the form of a written report.

BIOL0077: Molecular evolution

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0018, Pre BIOL0020, Pre BIOL0055

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To draw on the wealth of biochemical and molecular biological information that the students have accumulated over the previous years of their course. The revolution in molecular biology has created an extensive database of sequences and correlations between protein structure and function; to appreciate and analyse this, it is essential to understand the principles of molecular evolution. This course aims to provide that understanding. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand the current theories of molecular evolution
* appreciate that changes occur to the genotype, but selection is of the phenotype
* interpret evolutionary changes in protein structure with respect to changes in function
* apply what we learn from the evolution of proteins to the engineering of enzymes
* understand the way in which phylogenetic trees are constructed
* evaluate critically current theories of cellular evolution
Content:
Topics: Evolution - what is it and why study it? Chemical evolution and the origin of life. The RNA world. Genome evolution. Evolution of proteins: gene duplication, mutation and divergence, adaptation and selection. Construction of phylogenetic trees. Current concepts of cellular evolution.

BIOL0078: Biotechnology

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0006, Pre BIOL0007, Pre BIOL0018

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of the principles and practice of advanced Biotechnology as described by industrial speakers. After taking this course the students should be able to:
*give an account of how Biochemistry relates to Biotechnology in animal cell culture
*describe the commercial use of extremophiles
*understand therapeutic use of biopharmaceuticals
*describe approaches to vaccine development
*account for the world wide implications of Biotechnology.
Content:
Animal cell culture, extremophiles, biopharmaceutical production, vaccine development, clinical diagnostics, biosensors, viral products, computer aided drug design.

BIOL0079: Clinical biochemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0006, Pre BIOL0007, Pre BIOL0018

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of the principles of biochemistry as applied to medicine as described by invited clinical speakers. After taking this course the students should be able to:
*understand the molecular biology and appreciate the medical significance of various congenital and other defects in humans
*give an account of the biochemical aspects of cystic fibrosis; abnormalities of postabsorbtive blood sugar, glycogen storage diseases, plasma lipids.
Content:
Topics: ion channels, metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

BIOL0081: Biochemical ethics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0003, Pre BIOL0004, Pre BIOL0007, Pre BIOL0023

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of the ethical issues that arise from advances in the life sciences. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*give quantitative interpretation of advanced techniques which are ethical concern
*provide balanced argument for a particular ethical stance.
Content:
Biochemical heretics, AIDS controversy, rights to genetic knowledge; embryo research, artificial chromosomes, gene therapy, genetic counselling scientific misconduct, cell transplants.

BIOL0081: Biochemical ethics

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0003, Pre BIOL0004, Pre BIOL0007, Pre BIOL0023

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide an understanding of the ethical issues that arise from advances in the life sciences. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*give quantitative interpretation of advanced techniques which are ethical concern
*provide balanced argument for a particular ethical stance.
Content:
Biochemical heretics, AIDS controversy, rights to genetic knowledge; embryo research, artificial chromosomes, gene therapy, genetic counselling scientific misconduct, cell transplants.

BIOL0082: Neurochemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW 100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0044

Aims & learning objectives:
· To acquire knowledge of neurochemical mechanisms underlying complex, integrated systems and processes in neuroscience
* To gain an insight into current topics and controversies in the neurosciences
* To develop presentation and discussion skills
Content:
e.g.synaptic transmission; plasticity in the nervous system (learning and memory development); biological clocks; sensory systems (olfaction, vision etc)

BIOL0083: Enzymes in biotechnology & medicine

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0003, Pre BIOL0004, Pre BIOL0018, Pre BIOL0048

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To use our current knowledge of enzymes to explore their applications in biotechnology and medicine. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* appreciate the wide potential applications of enzymes with respect to their properties
* understand how enzymes can be engineered to meet the needs of biotechnology and medicine
* know a wide range of examples of biotechnological and medical uses
* appreciate the economic factors involved in the use of enzymes
* appreciate the impact of genome sequencing on enzymes and their applications
Content:
Enzyme engineering; electro-enzymology and biosensors; enzyme chaperones; enzymes in organic solvents; pepzymes; clinical enzymology; enzyme therapy; enzymes as target for drugs; catalytic antibodies; extremozymes; genomics and proteomics.

BIOL0084: Cellular biochemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0045

Pre BIOL0028 or Pre BIOL0099 Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To encourage students to think critically about the current state of knowledge of biochemical processes within cells. Current literature is studied in detail with a view to understanding the molecular basis of cell regulatory processes. The cellular basis for disease states including Diabetes and Cancer are discussed with a view to evaluating the key steps in research required for further progress in these areas. After taking this course students should be able to:
*prepare and present a 40 minute seminar on an advancing area of cell biology and present their own views as to where progress is being made
*critically assess recent scientific literature and be able to comment on areas of the literature where there are controversial or contrasting views.
*prepare a research proposal which identifies a research problem in cell biology and describes a series of experiments which seek to solve the problem.
Content:
Signalling molecules, signalling proteins, cell structure and organisation, cell compartmentalisation and membrane protein trafficking. The cellular basis of disease.

BIOL0085: Medical biochemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0004, Ex BIOL0102

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To generate an understanding of the extent to which Biochemical knowledge influences current clinical practice and therapeutic approaches. After taking the course, the student should be able to:
*appreciate the increasing contribution of biochemical science to drug design and to the day to day activities in both hospital and general clinical practice
*have a knowledge of the areas of biochemical research that are most relevant to clinical medicine.
Content:
A series of lectures/discussions will be led by invited clinicians from Regional Hospitals in the Bath and Bristol area. The specialists will discuss their clinical and related research areas and stress the extent of the foundation of their work on basic science. In a second aspect of the Option, students will prepare and present a 30 min talk on a particular area of clinical biochemistry, chosen, in general, from a list provided by the Option organiser. The talks will be followed by general discussion. Contributions of students to both their own talk and discussion of others will be assessed.

BIOL0086: Molecular immunology

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0046

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To describe the principles of particular aspects of Molecular immunology. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*give qualitative interpretation and description of the human immune systems
*show how this system breaks down to give various disease states
*show how the immune system can be used in therapy.
Content:
Antigen processing and presentation, Tcell receptors and receptor complexes, cell adhesion, self tolerance, allergic reactions, autoimmunity, antibody engineering, therapeutic antibodies, catalytic antibodies, cancer vaccines.

BIOL0087: Vaccines

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To describe how recent advances in knowledge about the viral and microbial factors required for virulence and the immune response to infection are now leading to the development of new vaccines based on rational design. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand pathogenic mechanisms and role of action of whole cell, whole virus and purified subunit vaccines in protecting against various human diseases
* appreciate how recent advances in molecular biology, protein and peptide purification and immunology might lead in the next century to new vaccines of well-defined specificities and low toxicity based on rational design.
Content:
Historical vaccines and eradication of smallpox and polio; diphtheria, tetanus and cholera vaccines; subunit vaccines against pertussis and meningococcal disease; malarial vaccines; possibilities synthetic peptides, chimeric antigens, vaccinia virus recombinants and anti-iodiotype antibodies as novel vaccines; mode of action and different types of adjuvants i.e. depots, emulsions, cell-wall components and liposomes. Specialised seminars presented by invited speakers and participating students.

BIOL0088: Bioinformatics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW 100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0046

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To understand the concept of Bioinformatics; to become familiar with the tools of Bioinformatics; to recognise the ways in which Bioinformatics can be used to develop new drugs. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand the basis of sequence alignment and structure prediction methods
* know how the tools of Bioinformatics are used in the identification of new protein functions
* be familiar with some "hands-on" sequence analysis
Content:
Despite the title, the option in Bioinformatics is not about computing. The series of topics will cover the present methods being used to understand the mass of sequence data from the human and other genome projects. It will cover pattern recognition in DNA sequences and how to derive function from sequence, methods of sequence alignment of protein sequences, prediction of structure from sequence, structural comparison and a discussion of how structure and biological function are related. Particular attention will be paid to the topic of therapeutic target discovery

BIOL0089: Biochemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce students to the fundamentals of central metabolism and to relate the regulation of these pathways to the homeostasis of the whole organism. In order to appreciate and understand metabolism, the students are taught the fundamental aspects of amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid structures. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* know the pathways of central metabolism & energy conversion of the cell
* appreciate the way in which central metabolism connects catabolism and anabolism
* understand the regulation of central metabolism with respect to the needs of the organism in relation to its environment
* appreciate the principles of mitochondrial oxidative function
* understand lipid structure and the pathways of fatty acid oxidation and sythesis
* understand the mechanisms of neurotransmission and muscle contraction
* comprehend the stereochemistry of small organic molecules of biological importance
Content:
1) Proteins: amino acids - structures, ionisation and physical properties; primary structure and an overview of protein folding and conformation 2) Enzymes: catalysis, kinetics, regulation 3) Metabolism: chemistry of monosaccharides, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, regulation of central metabolism. 4) Mitochondrial bioenergetics: respiration, oxidative phosphorylation and the chemiosmotic theory. 5) Lipid metabolism: structure of lipids, catabolism and anabolism of fatty acids, ketogenesis and coordination with other metabolic pathways. 6) Biochemistry of animal tissues and organs, such as mechanisms of neurotransmission and muscle contraction.

BIOL0091: Data interpretation in molecular & cell biology

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide experience of the interpretation of molecular and cellular biological data. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*understand and interpret information on biological phenomena, using quantitative (numerical) and qualitative (text or image) sources
*make logical statements and reach sound conclusions from biological data
*be aware of the limits of interpretation and be capable of selecting suitable statistical tests
* interpret the outcome of a statistical test on biological data.
Content:
The course comprises a series of assignments and problems which are undertaken by the students and then analysed and discussed in weekly workshops. Using examples which illustrate different types of molecular and cellular biological information, the course covers the interpretation of gels and autoradiographs as well as simple data sets, data transformation, graphical presentation, interpretation of trends. As far as possible, the examples are drawn from molecular and cellular biology.

BIOL0093: Practical microbial genetics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: OR70 PR30
Requisites: Pre BIOL0007

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide practical experience of the use of advanced microbial genetics techniques. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*organise working in a pair on two mini-projects
*plan their own time schedule
*make their own materials in advance for the growth and selection of cells
*convert written protocols into practically designed experiments
*perform good aseptic technique
*make comprehensive and accurate records of their work
*critically evaluate their own microbial genetics data
*understand the theoretical basis of the experiments they have performed
*interpret their results in relation to expected outcomes.
Content:
Interrupted mating experiment in Escherichia coli; bacterial conjugation and transposition; resistance factor plasmid transfer; transduction with bacteriophage lambda; genetics of lactose operon; Luria and Delbruck fluctuation experiment with yeast mutants; gene expression following mating in E. coli.

BIOL0094: Professional training placement 2

Semester 2
Credits: 30
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The placement period aims to provide experience of the application of Biological Science in the world. By the end of the placement year, the student should be able: To take individual responsibility for a piece of work within an agreed programme; To organise a personal work schedule, including setting of targets and objectives; To carry out practical work accurately and to appropriate specifications; To take the necessary steps to learn a new technique; To analyse, interpret and report scientific information; To produce a substantial report on the institution and on the personal work programme undertaken.
Content:
The placement period consists of 6 months, undertaken in an establishment, in the UK or abroad. The establishments include government-funded research institutes, commercial research establishments, public health laboratories, agricultural, food science and educational establishments. The majority of placements involve laboratory and/or field experimentation. A small number involve administrative and/or journalistic activities.

BIOL0095: Integrated biochemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX75 OT25
Requisites: Pre BIOL0016, Pre BIOL0075

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To enable students to use information from their courses, their placements and their attendance at departmental seminars to give themselves a competent overview of the subject of biochemistry. To gain expertise in expression of biochemistry research through poster presentation. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*demonstrate the communication of a research (placement) experience through a poster presentation
*in an examination at the end of the course, write two essays of a global nature that will illustrate the comprehension of biochemistry as an integrated subject.
Content:
See above

BIOL0095: Integrated biochemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX75 OT25
Requisites: Pre BIOL0016, Pre BIOL0075

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To enable students to use information from their courses, their placements and their attendance at departmental seminars to give themselves a competent overview of the subject of biochemistry. To gain expertise in expression of biochemistry research through poster presentation. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*demonstrate the communication of a research (placement) experience through a poster presentation
*in an examination at the end of the course, write two essays of a global nature that will illustrate the comprehension of biochemistry as an integrated subject.
Content:
See above

BIOL0096: Biochemical problems [for MBiochemistry students]

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: OT100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0018, Ex BIOL0015

Aims & learning objectives:
Please see the catalogue entry for BIOL0015.
Content:
Please see the catalogue entry for BIOL0015. This unit covers the content of BIOL0015 for the first few weeks of semester 2 before students leave to take up their placement.

BIOL0097: Protein purification [For MBiochemistry students]

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: OT100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0020, Ex BIOL0021

Aims & learning objectives:
Please see the catalogue entry for BIOL0021.
Content:
Please see the catalogue entry for BIOL0021. This unit covers the content of BIOL0021 for the first few weeks of semester 2 before students leave to take up their placement.

BIOL0098: Practical biochemistry [For MBiochemistry students]

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: OT100
Requisites: Ex BIOL0022

Aims & learning objectives:
Please see the catalogue entry for BIOL0022.
Content:
Please see the catalogue entry for BIOL0022. This unit covers the content of BIOL0022 for the first few weeks of semester 2 before students leave to take up their placement.

BIOL0099: Cellular neurobiology [For MBiochemistry students]

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: OT100
Requisites: Ex BIOL0028

Aims & learning objectives:
Please see the catalogue entry for BIOL0028.
Content:
Please see the catalogue entry for BIOL0028. This unit covers the content of BIOL0028 for the first few weeks of semester 2 before students leave to take up their placement.

BIOL0100: Genes & development practicals [for MBiochemistry students]

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: OT100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0035, Ex BIOL0036

Aims & learning objectives:
Please see the catalogue entry for BIOL0036.
Content:
Please see the catalogue entry for BIOL0036. Students should attend either the first half or the second half of BIOL0036.

BIOL0101: Neurobiology - development

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0028, Pre BIOL0099

Aims and Learning Objectives: Aims: To provide a detailed understanding of selected examples of the origins of neural tissues and the mechanisms that control their development. After taking this course the student should be able to:
*outline the processes involved in generating a nervous system
*explain current models of the mechanisms of neural plate specification and patterning
Content:
Neural development, including neuronal specification, survival and proliferation, and axon guidance to target tissues

BIOL0102: Molecular mechanisms of disease

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW 100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0003, Pre BIOL0024, Ex BIOL0085

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To describe how a defect at the level of the gene results in an observed disease phenotype. To show how such patients can be treated with modern molecular medicine. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand the common themes of genetic disorders, and how they relate to the overall phenotype
* understand the principles of tools involved in diagnosis and treatment of the disorders.
Content:
Diseases: diabetes, glycogen storage diseases, hyperbilirubinaemia, familial hypercholesterolaemia, fibroblast growth factor receptors and skeletal dysplasia.Diagnosis and treatment: PCR/cloning, antibody engineering, gene therapy, gene targeting in the mouse, mouse models for human disease.

BIOL0103: Molecular biology of animal adaptation

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre BIOL0006

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To demonstrate to students how novel molecular tools can be used to address questions central to natural selection theory After taking this course the student should be able to:
*describe central examples of natural selection such as pesticide resistance, mimicry and current examples from the growing field of evolution/development, and have examined the impact of molecular biology on these examples
Content:
Possible topics include: how do genotypes produce phenotypes; pesticide resistance, sex determination, colour pattern formation and mimicry, population genetics, neutral theory

BIOL0105: Third year pre-placement course (MBiochem)

Semester 2
Credits: 15
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW50 ES25 PR25
Requisites: Pre BIOL0016

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To provide preparation for the third year placement and final year work. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* be able to use current methods to understand sequence data from the human and other genome projects
* be able to communicate new findings in biochemistry and/or the nature of biochemical employment in writing. At least one of these presentations will be aimed at a lay audience.
* be able (alongside earlier practicals) to perform the full range of biochemical techniques used in the Department
* study a collection of biochemical observations, such as the results section of a publication or simply a series of related observations compiled specifically for the exercise, and assess their significance. Indications of this ability could be, e.g. answering particular questions or writing the discussion section of a paper. It is especially important that the student learns to draw only such conclusions as are fully justified by the data.
Content:
Workshops in bioinformatics. Preparation of presentation of scientific work. Laboratory sessions in advanced biochemistry. Problem classes.

BIOL0106: Plant-animal interactions

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW10 ES10 EX80
Requisites: Pre BIOL0009, Pre BIOL0014

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To explore by means of lectures, directed study and student-led seminars, the biochemical, physiological, toxicological, ecological and evolutionary interactions between plants and animals, leading to an understanding of how these relationships have contributed to the evolution of these groups and of present day biodiversity. After taking this course, the student should be able to:
* Display an appreciation of the richness of interactions between plants and herbivores at the biochemical, physiological, and toxicological levels.
* Describe the host-finding and food-selection mechanisms of a number of herbivores, relating these to the properties of the plants and the environments in which they are found.
* Describe a number of named examples of plant defensive mechanisms and herbivore strategies to overcome these.
* Understand the feeding behaviour of herbivores in terms of optimal foraging and optimal digestion/nutrition strategies.
* Relate the present status of plant-herbivore interactions to the existence of past evolutionary arms races.
* Discuss other kinds of plant-animal interactions, including mutualisms connected with pollination, seed dispersal, and the trophic relations between carnivorous plants and their prey.
* Display a critical appreciation of the experimental and field ecological methods used to study these phenomena.
Content:
Various examples of plant herbivore and other kinds of plant-animal interactions, taken from the scientific literature will be presented in introductory lectures, will form the subject of directed study by the class, and will be presented as topics in student led seminars. The course will focus very largely on angiosperm plants and insects, although examples of other groups will be used as appropriate.

BIOL0107: Plant biochemistry [MBiochem]

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR/CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: To introduce some important aspects of plant metabolism and their role in the functioning of the whole plant. After taking this course the student should be able to:
* understand how plants (by definition static) are able to utilise light energy for the biosynthesis of important biomolecules, yet cope with the potential problems posed by excess solar radiation and drought.
* understand how plant protection systems will not only explain plant survival in an ever changing environment, with the possibility of animal predation, but also how the disruption of proteins and detoxification systems can lead to plant death via herbicides.
Content:
Utilisation of light energy in photosynthesis; CO2 incorporation; carbohydrate synthesis, storage and breakdown; the metabolism of stored carbohydrate to yield energy (respiration) and intermediary metabolites; the function and metabolism of lipids; pigments, with particular reference to porphyrins and carotenoids. Emphasis will be placed on sites where herbicides disrupt normal metabolism and biochemical protective and detoxification mechanisms (e.g.cytochrome P-450) in plants. Practical sessions provide experience in the use of a variety of techniques for the study of plant processes. An equivalent period of directed study will be provided for students who already have adequate experience of practical biochemistry.

BIOL0108: Life, environment and people

CHEL0001: Mass & energy balances

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX60 PR20 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim is to introduce the principles and practices of steady state and unsteady state material and energy balancing, and the formulation of flowsheets. After successfully completing this unit, the student should be able to formulate, and solve manually, material and energy balances for process systems that may include multicomponent streams, phase changes, simple reactions, recycles, purges, by-pass and mixing.
Content:

* units, molar concentrations, mass and molar flowrates
* material balances on non-reacting systems; steady state and transient
* batch and continuous processes, systematic approach; multiple units
* recycle and by-pass streams
* concept of the flowsheet
* reacting systems and purge flows
* multiphase systems
* conservation of energy; interchange of energy and work
* energy balances on closed and open (flow) systems; steady and unsteady state
* enthalpy and sources of data; state properties; process paths
* multicomponent streams; phase changes; mixing ans solution; humidification
* reacting systems; adiabatic, non-adiabatic and isothermal systems
* incomplete conversion; excess reactants; presence of inerts
* combustion calculations

CHEL0002: Communications 1

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the basic personal skills required by a professional chemical engineer. After taking successfully completing this unit the student should be able to: Take notes and listen effectively Structure and prepare written reports in an approved format. Adopt a stuctured approach to solve problems. Recognise personal strengths and weaknesses in themselves and others. Perform as a team member. Collate and interpret information to make well-structured formal presentations. Recognise the personal attributes required by industry. Prepare Application Forms Use basic techniques to enhance personal presentation during an interview. Use word processors and spreadsheets. Be able to access the intra and inter-net Use the Library facilities
Content:
Syllabus: Personal skills required by a professional engineer. Listening and note-taking techniques. Written communication skills and report structure. Team structure. Teamwork. Teamwork practice Effective technical presentations. Structure, style and delivery. Personal presentation practice. Industrial skill requirements. Invited industrial lectures. Application Forms. Structure and content. Form completion practice. Solve numerical problems using a Spreadsheet package on a computer. Prepare documents using a Word Processing package on a computer. Use the Campus Network and the World Wide Web for e-mail and data and information retrieval. Use the Library facilities.

CHEL0004: Reaction engineering 1 & engineering applications 1a

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX70 PR20 OT10
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide instruction and practice in techniques of engineering experimentation. To expose students to items of process equipment. The aim is to introduce principles of reaction kinetics and their applications to chemical and biochemical reactors design. After successfully completing this unit and co-requisites the student should be able to:
* Describe the operation of process equipment e.g. double effect evaporator
* Design and construct experimental equipment e.g. pumping circuit.
* Estimate the accuracy of experimental data and calculated results
* Schedule experimental work to meet imposed deadlines.
* Compare and evaluate different measurement techniques and methods of operation
* Locate specific items on equipment from a PID diagram of the equipment e.g. valves on double effect evaporator. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* Outline the basic principles of reaction engineering; reaction order; rate law; half life and stoichiometric tables.
* Calculate rate constants and half life if the data given in terms of: a) concentrations and b) pressures for first and second order reactions.
* Perform simultaneous material and energy balances on adiabatic reactors.
* Apply the Arrhenius equation to calculate the activation energy and specific reaction rates.
* Carry out basic isothermal reactor designs: Batch, CSTR and plug.
* Appreciate the role of various reactors in chemical and biochemical processes.
Content:
Two experiments requiring a total of 3 laboratory sessions will be carried out e.g. pumping circuit, flow measurement, mass transfer in bubble columns, double effect evaporator.
* Order of reaction and analysis of kinetic rate equations; homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions; elementary and non-elementary reactions.
* Kinetic rate expressions; zero order; first order and second order (equal concentration) reactions.
* Calculation of equilibrium constants (k), conversions. e.g. kc ----- kp -------kc
* Arrhenius equation and simple collision theory.
* Absolute rate theory and interpretation of rate data.
* Stoichiometric tables.
* Reactor material balances: Batch, continuous and plug.
* Applications of traditional chemical interpretations to biochemical processes.
* Basic reactor designs: Batch, CSTR and plug flow.
* Introduction to space time (t) and space velocity (s).
* Introduction to simultaneous material and energy balances; adiabatic reactors.

CHEL0005: Separation processes 1

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX90 PR10
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim is to introduce the application of fundamental principles of phase equilibria to the design and operation of stagewise separation processes, with examples being drawn from distillation and solvent extraction. After successfully completing this unit, the student shold be able to:
* outline the basic features of a broad range of separation processes
* apply the phase rule to a range of phase equilibria
* describe the basic principles of single and mutistage mass balances
* carry out binary and multicomponent bubble and dew point calculations
* carry out binary isothermal flash calculations
* carry out binary multistage distillation calculations for constant molal overflow
* carry out ternary multistage solvent extraction calculations
* analyse for optimum reflux ratios and optimum solvent to feed ratios
Content:
Separation Processes:
* overview of available separation processes
* fundamental principles of phase equilibrium relationships; the phase rule
* principles of steady state single stage mass balancing
* principles of multistage contacting; cross-current and countercurrent contacting
* vapour/liquid equilibria; ideal and non-ideal liquid systems; binary phase diagrams
* bubble and dew point calculations; binary and multicomponent
* binary isothermal flash distillation
* binary mutlistage distillation with constant molal overflow
* reflux ratio, total, minimum and economic reflux ratios
* selection of distillation column pressure
* multiple feed and sidestreams
* liquid/liquid equilibria; choice of solvent; ternary phase diagrams
* cross and countercurrent extractions; minimum and economic solvent ratio

CHEL0005: Separation processes 1

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce some of the basic concepts behind the design and operation of separation processes in general, and provide a more detailed treatment of distillation, solvent extraction and crystallisation in particular. After successfully completing this course the student should:
* have an understanding of the fundamental principles of phase equilibria;
* have an understanding of material and energy balances and how they can be combined with equilibrium relationships in order to describe separation processes;
* be able to use this understanding in order to prepare elementary designs of the following stage-wise separation process operations: binary distillation, solvent extraction, crystallisation;
* understand the basic concepts behind membrane technology and adsorption processes.
Content:
Fundamentals:
* Thermodynamic relationships
* Vapour/liquid equilibria
* Liquid/liquid equilibria
* Solid/gas, solid/liquid equilibria
* Concepts of single-stage and multi-stage contacting
* Development of mass and energy balances Unit Operations:
* Distillation
* Solvent extraction
* Crystallisation
* Adsorption
* Membranes

CHEL0007: Engineering applications laboratories 1a & design project

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide instruction and practice in techniques of engineering experimentation. To expose students to items of process equipment. After successfully completing this unit and co-requisites the student should be able to:
* Describe the operation of process equipment e.g. double effect evaporator
* Design and construct experimental equipment e.g. pumping circuit.
* Estimate the accuracy of experimental data and calculated results
* Schedule experimental work to meet imposed deadlines.
* Compare and evaluate different measurement techniques and methods of operation
* Locate specific items on equipment from a PID diagram of the equipment e.g. valves on double effect evaporator. Students having successfully completed this module will have acquired further abilities in working in teams, including division of labour, intra-team communication, time management and planning. Students will have experience in solving an open-ended problem, and have learnt how to synthesize material learnt from many courses in solving a real-life problem. Students will appreciate the opportunities to exercise creativity in engineering solutions. Experience in oral presentation of results to outside parties will be gained.
Content:
Two experiments each requiring 1 laboratory session will be carried out e.g. pumping circuit, flow measurement, mass transfer in bubble columns, double effect evaporator. The design project requires students to specify how a limited supply of reaction vessels, driers, heat exchangers, pumps and storage vessels can be used to produce a specified product mix using a series of recipes for the manufacture of several types of starch. Students will work in teams of 4 or 5 and each team will be asked to produce a schedule for a different product mix.

CHEL0008: Biology & fermentation

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course assumes that the majority of students will have done some biology at GCSE but none at A-level. It is therefore an introduction to aspects of biology and fermentation that enable us to exploit microorganism systems in order to develop useful products and processes (eg. enzymes, alcohol, effluent treatment, pharmaceuticals and food stuffs). After completing this module the students should:
* have an understanding of the importance of biological systems in the modern process industries;
* be aware of the different types and classifications of organisms which exist in the microbial kingdom;
* understand the basic chemistry, structure and function of the main classes of biochemicals;
* have a basic understanding of the role of DNA and genetics in regulating biological activity, and how DNA can be manipulated to produce "new" processes and products;
* be aware of the major internal structures in microbial cells and their functions;
* understand that enzymes are responsible for the catalysis of biochemical reactions, and how these reactions are regulated;
* have a basic knowledge of at least two commercial bio-processes.
Content:

* Introduction to biochemical processes and the types of product that are currently produced on industrial scale.
* Classification of organisms within the microbial kingdom and the types of compound which they require for growth or which they can produce as products.
* Basic chemistry, structure and function of these biochemical compounds.
* The role of DNA and genetics in regulation of metabolic and microbial activity, and its significance in modern biotechnology.
* Basic structure of microbial cells, including intra-cellular structures and their biological function.
* The role of enzymes in regulation and catalysis of biochemical reactions.
* Case studies of selected commerical bioprocesses, eg sewage treatment, alcoholic beverage production, cheese production, antibiotic production, food processing etc.

CHEL0009: Computer programming 1

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A basic introduction to Fortran programming. This course will run on an informal basis and will essentially be a teach-yourself exercise with guidance. Learning to program computers is like learning another spoken language - you generally get further by teaching yourself and practising. Students should be able to carry out the following after this course:
* understand the need for programming within Chemical Engineering;
* draw and understand program flowsheets;
* break simple problems down into a series of defined steps and formulate them into an algorithm to solve the problem;
* use a FORTRAN compiler to produce and edit simple programs;
* read and write information between a program and a data file;
* be in a position to use program code from other sources, eg text books
Content:
Introduction to programming: Assignment 1: write a review of the need for programming in the modern chemical engineering environment Introduction to flowsheets and algorithm development with examples and problems: Assignment 2: Produce algorithms and flowsheets for a given set of given examples. Assignment 3: Produce a program to calculate a regression line and correlation coefficient for a set of data points. Assignment 4 (typical example):
* Draw a flowsheet for a program to take 20 numbers (in the range 1 to 100) entered by a user and sort these into order, finally print a list of the original data and the ordered list next to each other for comparison.
* Using this flowsheet, write a properly structured program to implement this task.
* Use a subroutine to check that the entered data is in the correct range and format. Add an option to sort in either direction (forwards or backwards).
* Extend the program to take any amount of random numbers.
* Extend the program to read the numbers from a data file, and output the sorted numbers to another data file.

CHEL0010: Particle technology

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX85 PR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students an introduction to the behaviour of particulate systems within a broad range of applications. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* characterise particles by size, shape, and size distribution,
* calculate drag forces using standard correlations and determine particle trajectories,
* calculate terminal and equilibrium velocities for single particles and design and evaluate classifiers, elutriators and centrifuges,
* calculate sedimentation velocities for suspensions,
* calculate pressure drop in packed beds, describe the basic fluidisation phenomena,
* describe techniques for the storage and conveyance of particles and associated hazards,
* calculate filter performance for constant pressure and rate operation,
* describe the behaviour of fine particles and the electrical and surface effects that cause this behaviour.
*
Content:
Formation and characterisation of dispersed phases
* Crushing and grinding
* Fluid mechanics applied to deformable and non-deformable dispersed phases
* Settler thickener design: precipitation and coalescence
* Centrifugation: disk; decanter; solid bowl types
* Packed and fluidised beds
* Filtration
* Pneumatic and hydraulic conveying and other methods of transport for solids and slurries
* Colloids and emulsions
* Agglomeration and flocculation

CHEL0011: Computer programming

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop programming ideas from CE1 computing course and show some simulation examples, e.g. simultaneous ODE solving, of one/some of the laboratory experiments. To introduce the use of FORTRAN for dynamic simulation for the solution of non steady state processes. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* solve problems generated in the Mathematics course on numerical methods through the "in-house" programming route in FORTRAN.
*
Content:
Structure of numerical integration routines (brief revision of CE2.01)
* Use of subroutines, and methods for argument passing
* Use of dedicated simulation packages and their advantages versus programming
* Review of available programming routine Libraries
* Transfer of data between packages

CHEL0012: Industrial placement

Academic Year
Credits: 60
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: RT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To consolidate and complement the theoretical content of the University courses in Chemical Engineering with practical experience of industrial activity and practice in the process, bio-process and related industries. To encourage self development. To promote self confidence.

CHEL0016: Engineering thermodynamics 2

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX90 CW10
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To complete the teaching of core chemical engineering thermodynamics. After successfully completing this unit the student should
* understand the significance of and the means for estimating K values,
* be able to estimate physical properties of pure components and mixtures(with the aid of reference material),
* be aware of the need to question the validity of techniques used to estimate properties, especially when using computer packages,
* be able to apply the first and second laws of thermodynamics to solve problems of power cycles, compressors and refrigeration.
*
Content:
Prediction of physical properties and non-ideal vapour liquid equilibria, The determination of K values
* PVT relations, Equations of state: Van Der Waals, Redlich-Kwong, Benedict-Webb-Rubin, Virial equation, Compressibility factor , Pitzer's correlation
* Mixture combination rules
* Heat capacity of gases and liquids, Enthalpy and entropy as a function of temperature and pressure
* Standard heat of reaction, Maxwell's relations, Chemical potential, Gibbs-Duhem equation
* Fugacity, fugacity coefficient and fugacity in a mixture, Activity coefficient in liquid phase
* Excess thermodynamic functions, extension of binary experimental data to multi-component systems
* Steam and gas turbine power plant
* Refrigeration
* Compressors and expanders
* Nozzles and diffusers

CHEL0017: Biochemistry & electrical engineering

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX30 ES10 PR10 OT50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Biochemistry To give an introduction to the principles of biochemistry and how they influence the behaviour of biochemical processes. Electrical Engineering To provide a background from which to appreciate the role of electrical and electronic technology in chemical engineering.
Content:
Biochemistry
* Biochemical thermodynamics
* Coupling o degradative and synthetic reactions
* Introduction to metabolic pathways: regulations and control
* Concepts of membrane transport and its influence in cell growth
* Introduction to biochemical techniques and their potential for transfer to large scale. Electrical Engineering
* Ohm's law
* Kirchoff's laws
* Faraday's law
* Passive and active components
* Impedance
* DC and AC circuit theory
* Single and three phase power systems
* AC/DC conversion techniques
* Transformers and simple AC and DC machines
* Semi-conductors and semi-conductor devices
* Amplifiers, gates and memories
* Simple analogue and digital circuits
* A to D and D to A converters
* Transducers
* Instrumentation, computers and applications
* Interfacing real time data acquisition and data transmission
* Safety in hazardous environments: Zener barriers, intrinsic safety, area classification and codes of practice

CHEL0018: Transport phenomena 2

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To explain the underlying phenomena, design methods and principles for heat exchangers and also to introduce the Navier-Stokes equation along with basic laminar boundary theory. After successfully completing this unit the student should:
* be able to apply the continuity and the momentum equations along with basic laminar boundary theory to moving fluids,
* understand the mechanisms of heat and mass transfer by natural and forced convection,
* be able to perform outline design calculations for shell and plate and spiral heat exchangers,
* appreciate different types of condenser and reboilers and their application
* be able to apply heat transfer theory to the design of reboilers and condensers.
*
Content:
General equations of continuity and motion: applications, including order of magnitude analysis
* Inviscid flow, including 2-D potential flow
* Introduction to boundary layer flow: definition of boundary layer thickness, simple form of the momentum equation and approximate solution for a laminar boundary layer
* Separation and wake formation
* Flow at entry to a pipe
* Natural convection, including dimensional analysis and correlations for heat transfer
* Heat losses from pipes
* Forced convection: simple models and mechanisms, including Reynold's and film models
* j factor analogy
* Simultaneous transfer of heat and mass
* Heat exchanger selection and design, including various single phase units

CHEL0020: Communications 2 & further engineering applications

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR70 OR30
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide instruction and practice in techniques of engineering experimentation. To promote the application of the engineering principles covered in the lectures which have not been addressed in other practical work earlier in the course. To enhance the students' ability to communicate through the written and spoken word by practice in individual and team exercises. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* write procedures for safe working practices
* critically analyse data of variable quality from a variety of sources
Content:

* Interview skills
* Working in teams in industry The students will complete the following assignments in groups:
* BP Business Game - CD ROM based interactive computer business game;
* Work Permit for Heat Exchanger + Dismantle/Reassemble Plate Heat Exchanger;
* COSHH / Risk Assessments for Fermentation & Heat Exchanger;
* Fermentation Experiment;
* Heat Exchanger Experiment;
* Analyse pooled class data from Fermentation Experiment;
* Analyse pooled class data from Heat Exchanger Experiment.

CHEL0021: Process design 1

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To deal with the philosophy and methods of process development and design i.e. the formulation of the problems, development and evaluation of alternatives solutions based on technological requirements, economics, environmental and safety considerations and legislation. To consider safety and loss prevention with an introduction to the methods used in loss prevention i.e. 6 stages of assessment. To use a considerable number of case studies. After successfully completing the module, the student should be able to produce a solution to a design problem:
* taking into account the problem specification, the raw material requirements, energy requirements and simple energy integration for the design, codes of practise, standards and legislation,
* producing flow sheets, mass and energy balances, simple instrumentation and control algorithms,
* performing a capital costing based on factored estimates and an approximate manufacturing cost based on energy, utilities and raw material costs and including a sensitivity analysis. The student should also be able to:
* Perform a literature search on a specialist topic using modern computer-aided methods
* Prepare a review of the literature in a critical manner
*
Content:
Introduction to optimisation of systems
* Accounting for uncertainty in data
* Designing for future developments
* Codes of Practice and British Standards for design
* Case studies for detection and evaluation of hazards, Introduction to HAZOP with case study
* DOW or MOND Fire and Explosion Index, HAZAN studies and the implications of Risk
* Maintenance, Work permit systems
* Preventing emergencies in Process Industry and planning for handling emergencies.
* Designing for Inherent safety
* Introduction to various codes of practice: BSS's, legislation relating design and processing, COSHH regulations, CEMA regulations, Electricity Regulations.

CHEL0023: Reaction engineering 2

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 PR10 CW10
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with the ability to produce process engineering designs of ideal reactors where the rate of reaction is controlled by chemical kinetics. After successfully completing this unit the student should:
* be able to complete problems on heterogeneous catalytic reactors if they are supplied with global rate data.
* be able to apply a reaction engineering analysis to the controlled growth of micro-organisms in biological reactors.
* be able to use global or homogeneous kinetic expressions to formulate material and energy balances for batch, CSTR and plug flow reactors that exhibit ideal behaviour with reversible and multiple reaction steps.
* understand the essential features that control microorganism growth and design fermenters for batch, fed-batch and continuous cultivation.
*
Content:
Basic reactor designs: batch; CSTR; plug flow
* Application of stoichiometric tables
* Chemical equilibrium
* Definition of reaction rate; elementary reactions, and temperature dependence
* Mass and energy balances developed for ideal batch, CSTR and plug flow reactors
* Ideal batch reactor: constant volume, variable volume, variable temperature and pressure.
* Expansion factor: irreversible and reversible reactions.
* Performance comparison between batch, CSTR and plug flow.
* Optimisation: multiple reaction; parallel; series; series-parallel; selectivity and yield; optimum temperature; isothermal, adiabatic and non-adiabatic modes of operation; multiple reactions temperature effects
* Heterogeneous kinetics
* Microorganism growth kinetics and kinetics of product formation
* The effects of environmental variable such as Ph and temperature on performance.

CHEL0024: Basic process management & economics

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give a basic understanding of the economic parameters and methods for evaluating the costs and profitability of engineering projects, and the legal framework in which companies have to operate. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* make quick engineering estimates of chemical plant equipment and manufacturing costs,
* determine the profitability of simple projects using traditional and cash flow techniques,
* describe the legal framework in which companies are required to operate.
*
Content:
Interest relationships, Discount formulas
* Sources of investment capital. Profit and cash flow relationships. Payback period.
* Contribution and variable costing. Break-even production diagrams.
* Basis for rate of return concept, Minimum acceptable rate of return, risk factor.
* Profitability methods based on cash flow: cumulative cash flow curves, determination of NPV, DCF rate of return, EMIP, IRR, discounted break-even point.
* Capital cost estimation: short-cut methods e.g. ratio methods, use of cost indices, factored estimates, computerised cost estimation; introduction to detailed cost estimation, scale-up
* Manufacturing cost estimating: short cut methods and scale-up
* Optimal costing methods, incremental costing and profitability.
* Common / statute law with examples in Health & Safety at Work & Environmental Protection Act; structure of the courts
* law of contract, law of agency, sale of goods, law of partnership,
* joint stock companies: memorandum; articles of association; shares; debentures; board of directors
* commercial arbitration, trade union law, restrictive trade practices
* contract of service: duties of employer and employee

CHEL0026: Separation processes 2

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX90 PR10
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the concepts and terminology associated with mass transfer and show the importance of mass transfer using chemical engineering examples and draw analogies with heat transfer. To provide an overview of the processes of distillation and evaporation for separating two or more components. After successfully completing this unit the student should: · understand steady and unsteady state mass transfer models
*· be able to design mass transfer controlled unit operations and assess their performance
*· understand equilibrium controlled unit operations and be able to assess their performance
*· understand the use of graphical techniques in determining the performance of distillation columns
*· be able to describe distillation column control schemes and unsteady state operation effects
*· understand the concepts underlying the performance of tubular evaporators and be able to design single and multiple effect evaporators with different methods of feeding
Content:
Fick's law: equimolar and single component mass transfer across a fixed boundary layer
*· Use of dimensionless groups: characterisation of the effect of flow on mass transfer
*· Distillation, absorption and liquid-liquid extraction
*· Main models for a mass-transfer coefficient: i.e. the two-film, penetration and Higbie-Danckwerts
*· Simple correlations for mass transfer coefficients and their limitations.
*· Distillation: choice of operating pressure, azeotropic and extractive distillation
*· Solution methods for distillation with binary mixtures
*· Batch distillation: calculations and control
*· Multi-component distillation: short-cut methods, Economic and control considerations
*· Design of multi-stage contacting equipment, especially selection and design of distillation trays
*· Evaporation: examples of use, single and multiple effect, energy considerations
*· Introduction to Supercritical fluid extraction, phase diagrams, systems used and applications

CHEL0028: Chemical reaction engineering 3

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX90 CW10
Requisites: Pre UNIV0031, Pre CHEL0023

Aims & learning objectives:
To give a critical analysis of chemical and physical interactions in catalytic processes, to introduce analysis tools and models for a variety of reactors employing catalysts in solid form and to present the basis and value of residence time distribution (RTD) techniques. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* Analyse reaction, mass transfer effects and deactivation in catalytic processes
* analyse and design a wide variety of reactors
* to apply residence time distribution techniques.
Content:

* steps in catalytic reactions
* rate expressions for catalytic reactions: Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Ely-Rideal
* mass transfer in catalysis
* catalyst deactivation and regeneration
* analysis of reactor types: fixed bed, fluidised bed, slurry, monolith
* residence time distribution techniques and application to CSTR and PF reactors
* non-ideal flow models: partial stagnation, by-pass, short-circuiting, segregated flow, CSTR and PF reactors in series and parallel, laminar flow and axial dispersion models.

CHEL0029: Biochemical reaction engineering 3

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX90 CW10
Requisites: Pre CHEL0023

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an understanding of the various biological, reactor and process plant strategies that can be employed to produce biochemicals in a controllable and predictable process through the exploitation of bacteria, yeast and higher organisms. After successfully completing this unit the student should:
* be aware of the importance of biological considerations when assessing reactor strategies
* understand how and why when culturing living organisms, the predicted theoretical results often vary from those achieved in practice
* be able to assess and design a reactor for cell growth or to carry out an enzyme reaction.
Content:

* Revision of basic microbial metabolism, stoichiometry and energetics
* Power consumption and mixing in a stirred tank fermenter
* Oxygen transfer during a fermentation.
* Rheology of fermentation broths
* Micro-organism growth kinetics.
* Enzyme reactor kinetics.
* Cultivation of genetically modified organisms, improving reactor performance through genetics
* Structured modelling for biological reactions
* Sterile system design, biosafety and containment.

CHEL0030: Chemical separation processes 3

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the principles and practices involved in the selection and sequencing of complex separations, advance students' understanding of the principles and practices of multicomponent distillation, and introduce students to the roles of adsorptive and membrane methods as advanced separation processes for gas and liquid phase systems. After successfully completing this module, students should be able to understand the principles and practices, and to carry out calculations on the following: the selection and sequencing of separation processes, the design and operation of adsorptive- and membrane-based separation processes, and the design and operation of multistage multicomponent distillation.
*
Content:
Selection and evaluation of alternative separation process routes and sequences
* Selective adsorption; adsorbent materials, equilibria, kinetics; batch, cyclic and continuous processes
* Column dynamics; dilute, isothermal, equilibrium plug flow, axial dispersion, constant pattern
* Examples drawn from pressure swing and thermal swing separations of gases and liquids
* Membrane processes, modules and applications in the process industries
* Microfiltration and analysis of fouling in porous systems; design of reverse osmosis
* Principles and design of separation for gas separation and pervaporation membranes
* Electrodialysis and related operations
* Multicomponent vapour-liquid equilibria, bubble and dew points, flash calculations
* Design considerations for multicomponent fractionation; stagewise design for multicomponent distillation
* Advances in distillation technology

CHEL0031: Biochemical separation processes

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX90 CW10
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the main unit operations used in the separation of materials of biological origin. To provide an understanding of the role of each operation within a multi-unit process and how this is influenced by the properties of the process stream. To introduced and explore the use of quantitative performance equations for design purposes. After successfully completing this unit the student should:
* be aware of the main separation techniques available and how their choice is dependent on the nature of the bioproduct to be produced,
* be able to sequence a series of unit operations on the basis of their capacity and selectivity,
* be able to formulate quantitative design equations for sizing purposes (centrifuge, membrane, adsorber and chromatographic separator).
* understand how process data can be used to optimise the performance of a bioseparation sequence.
Content:
Properties of biochemicals which influence choice and availability of methods. Cell recovery. Influence of cell morphology and media composition on recovery. Cell disruption/release of intracellular products. General introduction to membrane processes, materials of construction and modes of operation. Flux in UF/MF effects of concentration, pressure, and temperature. Enhancement using hydrodynamic techniques. Chromatographic separations, review of techniques available Batch adsorption, prediction of equilibrium adsorbed design based on isotherm data Design of adsorption columns. Simplified models based on equilibrium assumption, kinetic models with and without an assessment of mass transfer coefficients. Prediction of breakthrough. Aqueous two phase extraction, field flow fractionation, electrophoresis Protein refolding systems and applications of genetic engineering to downstream processing Optimisation of separation process sequences, quantification of purity/recovery.

CHEL0032: Process control 3

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX60 OT40
Requisites: Pre UNIV0030, Pre UNIV0031

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students a wider appreciation of process control system applications and understanding of the design techniques,analysis and procedures for safe plant operation. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* determine the limits to stability of linear systems,also certain non-linear systems
* use frequency response and time domain techniques to design PID loops apply signal analysis and sampling techniques to obtain dynamic information for process identification
* solve noise problems with aid of appropriate filters
* devise digital control solutions assess instrumentation and control requirements for bioprocess systems.
Content:

* linearisation and state spoace representation
* stability of feedback systems:Routh Array,Root Locus
* advanced control strategies:Smith predictor,multiloop,feedforward control
* Fourier series,sampled data sytems,z-operator,sampling intervals
* Analogue and digital filters:Butterwoth,Chebychev,IIR,FIR
* Digital Control:z-transform,PID,deadbeat controllers
* PLC's,ladder networks
* Bioprocess control:instrumentation,control strategies
* Case studieds: on-line mass balancing,model-based FBC/FFC,muliproduct fermentation.

CHEL0033: Transport phenomena 3

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEL0026

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the principles and practices involved in selected areas of transport phenomena, to advance students' understanding of the principles of complex single phase flow, and to introduce students to the principles and applications of multiphase flows. After successfully completing this unit the student should:
* be able to describe a wide variety of non-Newtonian behaviour and carry out basic calculations,
* have an appreciation of viscous and turbulent flows including secondary flows,
* understand momentum, thermal and mass transfer behaviour in boundary layers and carry out basic calculations,
* be able to describe gas-liquid flows in pipes and mixing reactors,
* be able to carry out 1-D calculations of pressure drop and gas holdup for gas-liquid flows,
* be able to describe multiphase flow in petroleum reservoirs and methods of enhanced oil recovery.
Content:

* Non-newtonian fluids including Bingham plastics
* Application of Navier-Stokes equation
* Simple models for turbulent flow including universal velocity profile
* Prandtl-Taylor analogy, calculation of 1/7th power law
* Approximation for turbulent boundary layer, introduction to thermal and diffusion boundary layers
* Two-phase (gas-liquid) flow: flow patterns, basic equations and nomenclature
* Lockhart-Martinelli correlation
* Multiphase mixing reactors
* Introduction to petroleum reservoir engineering. Secondary and enhanced oil recovery methods.
* Multiphase flow in reservoir porous media
* EOR: gas injection processes and thermal recovery methods.

CHEL0034: Advanced process management & economics

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEL0024

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students an extended understanding of the economic evaluation of engineering projects, particularly involving the treatment of uncertainties and to gain a wider perspective of the business environment in which companies have to operate, from the practitioner's viewpoint. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* to use various methods for the economic evaluation of projects
* be able to assess uncertainty in economic predictions
* be able to read a company report and balance sheet
* understand how to control project costs using financial information
* know how a project is planned and the principles of critical path scheduling
* know models of company structure and operating style and how employees are managed
* know the legal framework in which companies, unions and employees operate; the major constraints imposed upon them through legislation and how it is developed, enabled and enforced
* understand corporate strategies for long term planning; the role of R & D and innovation
* understand the importance of marketing, total quality and customer needs.
Content:

* Feasibility analysis;interest and inflation rates
* Comparison of NPV,B/C,IRR
* Cash flow techniques and sensity analysis
* Effect of uncertainty on forecasts and decision making
* Cumulative probability curves
* Monte Carlo simulation;decision trees;Bayes strategies
* Critical path methods,CPM and PERT
* Total Quality;marketing
* Legal aspects:contracts,patents,European Law
* Project Management
* Company accounts
* R & D/Marketing interface
* Employee relations

CHEL0035: General

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To explore the wider role of the Chemical Engineer in society. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* make a reasoned and informed response to matters of general concern related to the practice of Chemical Engineering.
Content:
A seminar programme delivered by chemical engineering practitioners and researchers. The student is required to submit two essays during semester two, in preparation for the oral examination.

CHEL0038: Experimental project

Semester 2
Credits: 10
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To produce and carry out an independent work programme, making good use of the School of Chemical Engineering's extensive research facilities and experience.
Content:
A wide range of projects, experimental and theoretical/ computational, both chemical and biochemical engineering, will be on offer at the beginning of the winter term. The project is essentially broken into two parts. The initial stage, which takes place in the first semester, involves getting to know what is required and devising a work plan. During this period, you will be encouraged to discuss the project in more detail with the academic supervisor(s), along with, if relevant researchers and technicians. At the end of the semester a short, preliminary report must be submitted which includes: (i) outline of the project (ii) literature survey (iii) materials and methods, (iv) completed set of any necessary safety forms (e.g. COSHH assessments) and (v) experimental work programme (scheduled around the time available in the Spring term). An additional requirement during this semester, may be attendance at short-courses which will provide necessary enabling skills (e.g. use of specialized analytical equipment, microbial culture techniques). In the second semester, time will be time-tabled to carry out the project, although after discussion with both academic supervisors and technicians, it may be possible to carry out additional work during other times. However, all laboratory work must be carried out between 9:15 am and 17:00 pm, Monday to Friday. At the conclusion of the project you will need to produce and submit a detailed report. It should follow a similar format to the preliminary report, except two additional sections are required, (i) results and discussion and (ii) conclusions and recommendation for further work. The final requirement, is a poster presentation based on the project. This consists of six A4 sides and should give a lucid summary of the work carried out, by outlining key methods and results. The posters will be put-up during the first week after the Easter vacation, and subsequently assessed.

CHEL0040: Waste management

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX75 CW25
Requisites: Pre CHEL0021

Aims & learning objectives:
To give the student an awareness of the problems of "waste" (solid, liquid and gaseous), and the methods of managing waste to meet with the requirements of legislation, economic and environmental considerations. After successfully completing this course the student should:
* Be able to identify waste
* Determine the source of the waste
* Be able to formulate a scheme meeting legislative requirements for waste management for a process and where appropriate be able to suggest methods of reducing the quantity of waste by either more efficient processing, clean technology, waste recovery, recycle or reuse.
* Be able to identify the costs associated with a waste management scheme.
Content:
Hierachies of good waste management practise Authorities involved in waste i.e. Health and Safety Executive, Environmental Agency, Local Authorities Relevant legislation - the Pollution Act , EPA 1990, EPA 1995, Duty of Care etc. Identification, characterisation and documentation of wastes Records, costs, storage, licensing, future liability etc Outline treatment of Liquid solid and gaseous wastes Auditing of waste management systems in-house.

CHEL0041: Pollution control

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX75 CW15 ES10
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The course aims to introduce the technologies of air and water pollution control and the major environmental effects of pollution. After successfully completing this unit the student should:
* Know the operating and design principles of the major technologies and the pollutants which they are most effective at controlling, and be able to recommend appropriate control solutions to particular cases of pollution.
Content:

* Air pollutants and their effects
* Particulate removal: filters, scrubbers, electrostatic precipitators
* Chemical removal: scrubbers, fixed bed adsorbers, catalytic converters
* Water pollutants and their effects
* Chemical treatment: precipitation, ion-exchange, adsorption, catalytic oxidation, photocatalytic processes
* Physical treatment: sedimentation, flocculation, deep bed filtration
* Biological treatment: principles, suspended growth processes, fixed growth processes, aerobic and anaerobic processes, new technologies
* Combined processes and total systems.

CHEL0042: Environmental awareness

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX75 ES25
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop an appreciation of the complexity of environmental interactions and the ways in which our activities can impinge on the ecosystem as a whole. After successfully completing the unit the student should:
* Be aware of the macroscopic effects of industrial activities on the environment.
* Appreciate the complexity of environmental pathways, their effect in modifying the environmental impact of potential pollutants and the difficulties inherent in quantifying these effects.
* Have an understanding of how pollutants are transported and dispersed in the environment.
* Be able to conduct a life cycle analysis to predict the environmental effects of process design choices.
Content:
Introduction to the concepts of an integrated environment - the Gaia hypothesis. Biodiversity. Environmental pathways and endpoints. Contributions of chemical and biological processing to local environmental problems. Principles of toxicology. Health issues. Contributions of chemical and biological processing to global environmental problems. Energy conversion - renewable and non-renewable resources. Climate effects: global warming, ozone depletion, acid rain. Water quality. Behaviour of pollutants in the environment. Effects of pollutants on environmental quality. Mechanisms of pollutant transport and dispersion via air water and land. Life cycle analysis.

CHEL0043: Environmental management systems

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX75 CW25
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim is to provide an introduction to the principles and practices of environmental management systems and their component procedures in the context of the processing industries. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* describe the origins and structures of modern environmental management systems
* prepare EMS components for examples drawn from the processing industries
* formulate the EMS requirements for complex processes and large companies.
Content:

* origins and benefits of EMS; EMS elements; EMS loops
* comparisons of EMAS and ISO standards; informal systems
* company culture and commitment; preparatory reviews
* policy statements
* registers of environmental regulations
* register of environmental effects; process and site based assessments
* risk assessment and cost benefit analysis
* life cycle assessment; indicative assessment matrix; effects identification matrix
* objectives and targets
* management programme, manual, operational control and records
* environmental auditing and environmental reporting.

CHEL0044: Environmental monitoring & clean technology

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX75 ES25
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop an understanding of obtaining reliable measurements of potential pollutants in the enviornment and the role that process design plays in the development of clean technology. After successfully completing the unit the student should:
* Understand the technical problems associated with obtaining accurate measurements of pollutants in the environment.
* Appreciate the importance of appropriate sampling regimes.
* Appreciate the relationship between emission constraints and limits of detection.
* Be aware of the tools available for clean design and analysis of processes.
* Understand the kinetic and thermodynamic limitations on pollution prevention regimes.
Content:
Problems of implementing monitoring systems. Techniques for determining level of organic pollutants in potable water Techniques for determining level of inorganic pollutants in potable water Techniques for determining level of biological contaminants in potable water Techniques for monitoring air borne pollutants Monitoring of pollutants in soil. Commercial implications Legal implications Relationship between emission limits and limits of detection. Process waste diagrams and environmental mass balances. Design simulation and optimisation methods. Thermodynamic and kinetic limitations. Quantification of progress. Normalisation of data and indexing.

CHEL0045: Environmental research project

Semester 2
Credits: 20
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To produce and carry-out an independent work programme, of either an experimental or theoretical/ computational nature, based around environmental control and/or management themes and making good use of the Chemical Engineering's extensive research facilities and experience.
Content:


CHEL0046: Environmental impact assessment

Semester 2
Credits: 10
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: ES100
Requisites: Pre CHEL0043, Ex CHEL0071

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim is to introduce the principles and practices of environmental impact assessment in the context of a chemical engineering process development. After successfully completing this unit, the student should be able to:
* critically analyse the quality of a published Environmental Statement in the context of the objectives and legislative requirements of Environmental Assessment in the UK
* carry out selected individual steps involved in an EIA
* identify and critically analyse the roles of specialists in carrying out an EIA
* critically analyse arguments put forward to support and oppose a proposed chemical engineering process development.
Content:

* development and legislative background; implementation in the UK
* objectives and benefits
* the screening process; scale, location, type of development, decision-makers
* project characteristics and baseline studies; baseline conditions
* the scoping process; qualitative and quantitative methods
* desk and field surveys; statutory and non-statutory consultees
* impact identification; significant, direct and indirect impacts
* mitigation; uncertainty and risk management
* the environmental impact statement; decision-making
* monitoring and auditing.

CHEL0047: Environmental legislation

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX75 CW25
Requisites: Pre CHEL0021

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim is to advance student understanding of the principles and practices of environmental law as it pertains particularly to the process industries. After successfully completing this unit, the student should be able to:
* describe the UK and EU environmental legal frameworks
* analyse the influence of international opinion
* compare and contrast command and control legislation with modern alternatives
* analyse breaches of statutory duty
* describe the role of environmental assessment in the planning process
* prepare an IPC/IPPC authorisation for a simple process.
Content:

* principles of UK and EU environmental law, and the legislation-making process
* effect of European Directives
* influence of international opinion; treaties, conventions and protocols
* polluter pays, precautionary, proximity, and sustainable development principles
* regulatory regimes in the UK; command and control practices
* role of the Environment Agency
* guidance notes for prescribed processes and substances
* BPEO, IPC, IPPC, BAT and BATNEEC
* economic instruments, tradeable quotas, special taxes
* developing issues; regulation, payment, enforcement, management
* proportionality, consistency, transparency and targeting
* administrative action, criminal proceedings, civil proceedings
* sentencing and fines; liability.

CHEL0048: Transport phenomena 1

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce fluid flow and momentum transfer in pipes, channels and various devices and fittings. To discuss the principles of turbulent flow and flow measurement along with the physical properties of fluids. To introduce the mechanisms and modes of heat transfer, heat transfer situations and heat transfer equipment. After successfully completing this module the student should:
* understand the principles of fluid flow and momentum transfer and
* understand the mechanisms and modes of heat transfer.
Content:
Fluids:
* types of fluid - Newtonian and non-Newtonian
* Bernoulli, continuity and momentum equations
* application of basic equations
* pressure drop and power requirement
* pressure drop in pipes and fittings
* laminar and turbulent flow
* flow measurement using pitot tube, orifice and venturi meters
* flow in channels
* compressible flow Heat Transfer:
* heat transfer mechanisms
* introduction to conduction, thermal resistances in series and parallel, conduction through cylindrical walls
* introduction to convection, film theory, heat transfer coefficient correlations
* introduction to radiation, radiation between surfaces, furnace design
* heat exchangers, types, construction, design.

CHEL0049: Communications 1 with French

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the basic personal skills required by a professional chemical engineer and provide practice in applying these skills in their chosen language. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to: Take notes and listen effectively Structure and prepare written reports in an approved format. Adopt a stuctured approach to solve problems. Recognise personal strengths and weaknesses in themselves and others. Perform as a team member. Collate and interpret information to make well-structured formal presentations. Recognise the personal attributes required by industry. Prepare Application Forms Use basic techniques to enhance personal presentation during an interview. Use word processors and spreadsheets. Be able to access the intra and inter-net Use the Library facilities
Content:
Personal skills required by a professional engineer. Listening and note-taking techniques. Written communication skills and report structure. Team structure. Teamwork. Teamwork practice Effective technical presentations. Structure, style and delivery. Personal presentation practice. Industrial skill requirements. Invited industrial lectures. Application Forms. Structure and content. Form completion practice. Solve numerical problems using a Spreadsheet package on a computer. Prepare documents using a Word Processing package on a computer. Use the Campus Network and the World Wide Web for e-mail and data and information retrieval. Use the Library facilities.

CHEL0050: Communications 1 with German

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the basic personal skills required by a professional chemical engineer and provide practice in applying these skills in their chosen language. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to: Take notes and listen effectively Structure and prepare written reports in an approved format. Adopt a stuctured approach to solve problems. Recognise personal strengths and weaknesses in themselves and others. Perform as a team member. Collate and interpret information to make well-structured formal presentations. Recognise the personal attributes required by industry. Prepare Application Forms Use basic techniques to enhance personal presentation during an interview. Use word processors and spreadsheets. Be able to access the intra and inter-net Use the Library facilities.
Content:
Personal skills required by a professional engineer. Listening and note-taking techniques. Written communication skills and report structure. Team structure. Teamwork. Teamwork practice Effective technical presentations. Structure, style and delivery. Personal presentation practice. Industrial skill requirements. Invited industrial lectures. Application Forms. Structure and content. Form completion practice. Solve numerical problems using a Spreadsheet package on a computer. Prepare documents using a Word Processing package on a computer. Use the Campus Network and the World Wide Web for e-mail and data and information retrieval. Use the Library facilities.

CHEL0051: Communications 1 with Spanish

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the basic personal skills required by a professional chemical engineer and provide practice in applying these skills in their chosen language. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to: Take notes and listen effectively Structure and prepare written reports in an approved format. Adopt a stuctured approach to solve problems. Recognise personal strengths and weaknesses in themselves and others. Perform as a team member. Collate and interpret information to make well-structured formal presentations. Recognise the personal attributes required by industry. Prepare Application Forms Use basic techniques to enhance personal presentation during an interview. Use word processors and spreadsheets. Be able to access the intra and inter-net Use the Library facilities.
Content:
Personal skills required by a professional engineer. Listening and note-taking techniques. Written communication skills and report structure. Team structure. Teamwork. Teamwork practice Effective technical presentations. Structure, style and delivery. Personal presentation practice. Industrial skill requirements. Invited industrial lectures. Application Forms. Structure and content. Form completion practice. Solve numerical problems using a Spreadsheet package on a computer. Prepare documents using a Word Processing package on a computer. Use the Campus Network and the World Wide Web for e-mail and data and information retrieval. Use the Library facilities.

CHEL0052: Engineering applications laboratories with French & design project

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide instruction and practice in techniques of engineering experimentation. To expose students to items of process equipment. To introduce students to technical vocabulary in their chosen language. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* Describe the operation of process equipment e.g. double effect evaporator
* Design and construct experimental equipment e.g. pumping circuit.
* Estimate the accuracy of experimental data and calculated results
* Schedule experimental work to meet imposed deadlines.
* Compare and evaluate different measurement techniques and methods of operation
* Locate specific items on equipment from a PID diagram of the equipment e.g. valves on double effect evaporator.
* Read and understand simple technical texts in their chosen language
* Describe equipment and experimental results in their chosen language. Students having successfully completed this module will have acquired further abilities in working in teams, including division of labour, intra-team communication, time management and planning. Students will have experience in solving an open-ended problem, and have learnt how to synthesize material learnt from many courses in solving a real-life problem. Students will appreciate the opportunities to exercise creativity in engineering solutions. Experience in oral presentation of results to outside parties will be gained.
Content:
Four experiments will be carried out in the chosen language e.g. pumping circuit, flow measurement, mass transfer in bubble columns, double effect evaporator. The design project requires students to specify how a limited supply of reaction vessels, driers, heat exchangers, pumps and storage vessels can be used to produce a specified product mix using a series of recipes for the manufacture of several types of starch. Students will work in teams of 4 or 5 and each team will be asked to produce a schedule for a different product mix.

CHEL0053: Engineering applications laboratories with German & design project

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide instruction and practice in techniques of engineering experimentation. To expose students to items of process equipment. To introduce students to technical vocabulary in their chosen language. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* Describe the operation of process equipment e.g. double effect evaporator
* Design and construct experimental equipment e.g. pumping circuit.
* Estimate the accuracy of experimental data and calculated results
* Schedule experimental work to meet imposed deadlines.
* Compare and evaluate different measurement techniques and methods of operation
* Locate specific items on equipment from a PID diagram of the equipment e.g. valves on double effect evaporator.
* Read and understand simple technical texts in their chosen language
* Describe equipment and experimental results in their chosen language. Students having successfully completed this module will have acquired further abilities in working in teams, including division of labour, intra-team communication, time management and planning. Students will have experience in solving an open-ended problem, and have learnt how to synthesize material learnt from many courses in solving a real-life problem. Students will appreciate the opportunities to exercise creativity in engineering solutions. Experience in oral presentation of results to outside parties will be gained.
Content:
Four experiments will be carried out in the chosen language e.g. pumping circuit, flow measurement, mass transfer in bubble columns, double effect evaporator. The design project requires students to specify how a limited supply of reaction vessels, driers, heat exchangers, pumps and storage vessels can be used to produce a specified product mix using a series of recipes for the manufacture of several types of starch. Students will work in teams of 4 or 5 and each team will be asked to produce a schedule for a different product mix.

CHEL0054: Engineering applications laboratories with Spanish & design project

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide instruction and practice in techniques of engineering experimentation. To expose students to items of process equipment. To introduce students to technical vocabulary in their chosen language. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* Describe the operation of process equipment e.g. double effect evaporator
* Design and construct experimental equipment e.g. pumping circuit.
* Estimate the accuracy of experimental data and calculated results
* Schedule experimental work to meet imposed deadlines.
* Compare and evaluate different measurement techniques and methods of operation
* Locate specific items on equipment from a PID diagram of the equipment e.g. valves on double effect evaporator.
* Read and understand simple technical texts in their chosen language
* Describe equipment and experimental results in their chosen language. Students having successfully completed this module will have acquired further abilities in working in teams, including division of labour, intra-team communication, time management and planning. Students will have experience in solving an open-ended problem, and have learnt how to synthesize material learnt from many courses in solving a real-life problem. Students will appreciate the opportunities to exercise creativity in engineering solutions. Experience in oral presentation of results to outside parties will be gained.
Content:
Four experiments will be carried out in the chosen language e.g. pumping circuit, flow measurement, mass transfer in bubble columns, double effect evaporator. The design project requires students to specify how a limited supply of reaction vessels, driers, heat exchangers, pumps and storage vessels can be used to produce a specified product mix using a series of recipes for the manufacture of several types of starch. Students will work in teams of 4 or 5 and each team will be asked to produce a schedule for a different product mix.

CHEL0062: Academic-based research project

Semester 2
Credits: 30
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW90 OR10
Requisites: Ex CHEL0064

Aims & learning objectives:

* To plan and conduct a theoretical or experimental research project using academic research facilities.
* Students should be exposed to the nature of academic research, and develop skills in tackling unresolved science and engineering problems.
* The students will have the opportunity to develop advanced computation or experimental skills, for example in the preparation and analysis of samples, or mathematical modelling.
* Provide apportunities for appropriate presentation of the project.
Content:

* A wide range of projects normally will be available: computational, chemical, biochemical and environmental.
* Students should: devise a work plan, undertake the necessary background reading and preparation, prepare necessary materials, carry out appropriate safety assessments and carry out their work plan in consultation with their supervisor.

CHEY0001: Introductory Chemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Ex CHEY0007

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce current ideas of atomic structure, covalent bonding and coordination chemistry fundamental to more advanced chemistry topics. After studying this unit, students should be able to:
* Name the first 36 elements, their symbols and electronic configurations.
* Name the four quantum numbers and their allowed values.
* Draw radial and angular functions for s, p, d orbitals.
* Draw simple MO diagrams and use them to predict bond order and magnetic properties.
* Derive the shapes of molecules using the VSEPR method.
Content:
Bohr model of the atom, quantization, properties of waves, Schrödinger equation and its solutions, anuglar and radial functions, quantum numbers. The Periodic Table, Aufbau Principle, Hunds Rules; ionisation energy, electron affinity and electronegativity. Basic molecular orbital theory, application to homo- and heteronuclear diatomics. Introduction to coordination chemistry: shape, VSEPR, hybridization and isomerism.

CHEY0002: Kinetics & Mechanism 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Ex CHEY0007, Ex CHEY0008

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the concept of reaction mechanism in the context of key reactions of organic and inorganic chemistry. To provide a grounding in the measurement and analysis of reaction rates, and in the concepts of molecular kinetics. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Draw mechanisms for some of the fundamental reactions of organic chemistry,
* Describe the use of kinetic and stereochemical experiments to determine reaction mechanism.
* Predict chemical reactivity from knowledge of acid/base and nucleophile/electrophile properties.
* Analyse, interpret and account for reaction rate data and its temperature dependence.
* Describe the connection between molecular kinetic properties and measured macroscopic gas phase features.
Content:
Moles and molecules, formal charge, polarity. Acids, bases, electrophiles, nucleophiles. Resonance, conjugation, tautomerism. Reaction energy profiles, equilibria and rates; kinetic and thermodynamic control. Electrophilic addition to carbonyl compounds; addition/elimination for acyl derivatives. Rates of reaction: definition and analysis of rate law, order and rate constant, connection with mechanism. Temperature dependence of rates; rate-determining step, uni- and ter-molecular reactions. Molecular kinetics: ideal gas equation; calculation of pressure and temperature, internal energy, heat capacities and quantisation. Real gases, van der Waals equation, critical point.

CHEY0003: Functional Group Interconversions

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Ex CHEY0008

Aims & learning objectives:
The characteristic properties of functional groups (FG's) and methods for their interconvertion are the foundations of organic chemistry. The aim of this unit is to provide a sound grasp of these topics to form a basis for further of the subject. After studying this unit, students should be able:
* To recognise, give examples of, systematically name (IUPAC) and represent diagrammatically the various FG's.
* To explain the electronic structure, bonding, and shape of the various FG's and to extapolate this to describe the origins of reactivity of these groups.
* To describe the general properties, reactions and methods of synthesis for monofunctionalized organic compounds.
* To extend the above discussion to encompass aromatic counterparts.
* To explain the special stability of aromatic compounds and how this affects reactivity.
Content:
Properties, isomerision, synthesis and interconversion reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, haloalkanes, alcohols, ethers, amins, ketones, aldehydes, and carboxylic acids with their derivatives. To describe and account for the differences and similarities between the above groups and their aromatic counterparts.

CHEY0004: Equilibria in chemical systems

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Ex CHEY0007

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the basic chemical principles governing phase behaviour, chemical reactions and processes in terms of the thermodynamic properties of the components. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Define the three laws of thermodynamics and solve simple problems involving their application
* Define the relationship between Gibbs free energy and chemical equilibrium and calculate the latter from data under a range of conditions.
* Draw and interpret a range of phase diagrams and make predictions as to phase behaviour
* Account for the main types of intermolecular forces found in liquids and solutions
* Perform qualitative and quantitative analyses and problems involving thermodynamic data.
Content:
Definition of chemical systems and changes in internal energy and enthalpy. Calculation of U, H, S, G under a range of temp., pressure and composition conditions. Relation between free energy and equilibrium constants with examples drawn from chemical reactions, redox and electrochemical processes. Phase behaviour of solids, liquids and gases. Intermolecular forces in liquids and gases. Ideal and non-ideal gases and solutions. Emphasis will be placed on the solution of a rabge of types of problems involving the correlation and prediction of system behaviour from thermodynamic data.

CHEY0005: Introduction to solid state and main group chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre CHEY0001, Ex CHEY0007

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce inorganic solid state chemistry, modern ideas about chemical bonding and the chemistry of s- and p- block elements. After studying this Unit students should be able to:
* Define basic crystallographic concepts.
* Describe the main types of inorganic structures through cell-projection diagrams.
* Provide a theoretical treatment for lattice energies.
* Describe the basic principles of s- and p-block chemistry, including hydrogen.
* Use the redox properties of the s- and p-block elements to predict and rationalise chemical reactions.
* Describe the bonding and structures of selected interhalogen and noble gas compounds.
Content:
Solid state structures, radius ratio rule, cell projections for common structural types, lattice energy. Chemical bonding theory, shapes of molecules. The s-block elements, properties related to reactivity and size. H-bonding. Oxidation states of the p-block elements, stability, lone-pair effect, free energy (Frost) diagrams. Chemistry of the halogens and noble gases and their inter-relationship.

CHEY0006: Spectroscopy

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Ex CHEY0007

Aims & learning objectives:
The Unit will provide an introduction to the principles of molecular spectroscopy, developing from the basic quantum mechanics of simple molecules to the interpretation of spectra of complex molecules. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Define the terms wavefunction and eigenvalue.
* Relate physical models to quantisation of molecular and electronic energies.
* Predict the pure rotation and vibration-rotation spectra of linear diatomic molecules.
* Describe the origin of microwave, IR, NMR and electronic spectra.
* Identify organic species from IR, NMR and UV spectra.
Content:
Basic principles of quantum mechanics; wavefunctions, eigenvalues and operators. Introduction to electromagnetic radiation. Rotational spectroscopy; rigid rotor model. Vibrational spectroscopy. Linear ditomics and polyatomic molecules. Vibration-rotation spectroscopy. Electronic spectra of conjugated compounds. IR spectra of functional group containing compounds. Origins and applications of proton and carbon NMR spectra. Introduction to mass spectrometry.

CHEY0007: General chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX65 PR25 CW10
Requisites: Ex CHEY0001, Ex CHEY0004, Ex CHEY0009, Ex CHEY0010, Ex CHEY0011, Ex CHEY0012

This unit is not available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a broad introduction to the principles governing chemical reactivity and to illustrate these with a range of examples. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Analyse experimental data and classify reactions.
* Use thermodynamic principles to account for chemical reactivity
* Describe the determination of rates of chemical reactions
* Describe simple theories of bonding in compounds.
* Rationalise reaction and structural chemistry in terms of the bonding models
Content:
Introduction to thermodynamics and kinetics with a range of case-study examples to illustrate how the basic principles can be applied to real reactions. Chemical equilibria and coupled reactions. An introduction to atomic and molecular structure and bonding in compounds and how this is used to explain trends in structure and reactivity across the Periodic Table.

CHEY0008: Introductory organic chemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 PR20
Requisites:

This unit is not available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to the subject of organic chemistry as a basis for understanding molecular processes affecting other areas of sciences, with reference to the themes of structure and bonding, reactivity, mechanism and synthesis. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Account for the mechanism by which simple organic reactions occur
* Name and draw diagrammatically a selected range of organic compounds and functional groups
* Describe methods for the interconversion of selected functional groups
* Solve straightforward problems involving the material covered
Content:
Structure and bonding: Lewis theory, formal charge; resonance; hybridization conformation, configuration, chirality. Reactivity: chemistry of functional groups including alkanes, alkenes, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, thiols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, acyl halides, thioesters, amides, amines; aromatics. Mechanism: energy profiles, heterolyis, homolysis, acidity, basicity, nucleophilicity, electrophilicity, electrophilic addition, nucleophilic substitution, elimination; nucleophilic addition/elimination, electrophilic and nucleophilic aromatic substitution, kinetic vs. thermodynamic control.

CHEY0009: Foundation chemistry laboratory

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Co CHEY0010, Co CHEY0011, Co CHEY0012, Ex CHEY0007, Ex CHEY0008

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
This foundation course is designed to impart some of the essential basic techniques and skills in practical chemistry that will be important throughout the degree course. Interpretation of results obtained in the light of theories and concepts developed in other units will also be an aim. After following the Unit, students should be able to:
* Assemble and use straightforward apparatus for preparative and analytical chemistry
* Accurately report observations and measurements made in the laboratory
* Use PC's for communication and basic data analysis and use Library sources for finding chemical information
* Perform accurate analytical measurements using selected titrimetric and spectrophotometric methods.
* Prepare standard solutions and perform straifghtforward purification techniques such as recrystallisation
* Interpret results in terms of an appropriate theoretical framework and draw appropriate conclusions
* Quantitatively assess the significance of measurements made in the laboratory
Content:
A series of quantitative and qualitative experiments and exercises will be performed. These will illustrate some basic principles of volumetric and spectrophotometric analytical chemistry. Methods used will include acid-base and redox titrimetry, absorption and fluorescence spectrophotometry. The accuracy and limitations of thermochemical measurements will be explored. The use of these techniques in "real" situations will be used to develop an understanding of precision and accuracy in chemical measurements. Basic manipulative techniques such as crystallisation and purification of compounds will be performed. An introduction to using PCs and spreadsheets for analysing results, for e-mail and chemical simulation will be covered as will Library sources of data.

CHEY0010: Inorganic chemistry laboratory 1

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0009, Co CHEY0011, Co CHEY0012, Ex CHEY0008

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the basic techniques of synthetic and analytical inorganic chemistry. To foster a good scientific style in the presentation of data and to develop students' ability to manipulate and interpret scientific data. After studying this Unit students should be able to:
* Make careful observations of chemical reactions and explain them in terms of chemical equations.
* Perform straightforward synthetic and purification procedures
* Use volumetric glassware and balances in the correct manner.
* Manipulate and present scientific data in a clear and logical way, including the use of significant figures.
Content:
Analysis by titration, flame photometry and spectrophotometry; preparation of compounds selected from Group 14 - 17 elements and their reaction chemistry; ion-exchange chromatography; modelling ionic and covalent bonding.

CHEY0010: Inorganic chemistry laboratory 1

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0009, Co CHEY0011, Co CHEY0012, Ex CHEY0007

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the basic techniques of synthetic and analytical inorganic chemistry. To foster a good scientific style in the presentation of data and to develop students' ability to manipulate and interpret scientific data. After studying this Unit students should be able to:
* Make careful observations of chemical reactions and explain them in terms of chemical equations.
* Perform straightforward synthetic and purification procedures
* Use volumetric glassware and balances in the correct manner.
* Manipulate and present scientific data in a clear and logical way, including the use of significant figures.
Content:
Analysis by titration, flame photometry and spectrophotometry; preparation of compounds selected from Group 14 - 17 elements and their reaction chemistry; ion-exchange chromatography; modelling ionic and covalent bonding.

CHEY0011: Organic chemistry laboratory 1

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0009, Co CHEY0010, Co CHEY0012, Ex CHEY0007

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to the basic techniques of experimental organic chemistry. After studying the Unit, students should be able to
* Assemble and use basic apparatus for experimental organic chemistry
* Perform straightforward synthesis and purification methods
* Relate the mechanistic organic chemistry from lectures Units to the appropriate laboratory experiment.
Content:
Reactions of double bonds, electrophilic addition. Reactions involving the carbonyl group, to include; the aldol reaction, synthesis of esters and amides. Electrophilic aromatic substitution. Retrieval of information from the scientific literature.

CHEY0011: Organic chemistry laboratory 1

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0009, Co CHEY0010, Co CHEY0012, Ex CHEY0008

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to the basic techniques of experimental organic chemistry. After studying the Unit, students should be able to
* Assemble and use basic apparatus for experimental organic chemistry
* Perform straightforward synthesis and purification methods
* Relate the mechanistic organic chemistry from lectures Units to the appropriate laboratory experiment.
Content:
Reactions of double bonds, electrophilic addition. Reactions involving the carbonyl group, to include; the aldol reaction, synthesis of esters and amides. Electrophilic aromatic substitution. Retrieval of information from the scientific literature.

CHEY0012: Physical chemistry laboratory 1

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0009, Co CHEY0010, Co CHEY0011, Ex CHEY0008

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a basic training in laboratory skills for Physical Chemistry. To relate experimental work to the scientific theory behind the experiment and thus give a fuller understanding of the theory. After studying this Unit, the student should be able to:
* Use scientific apparatus with care and confidence
* Make essential observations accurately and estimate the possible errors.
* Produce a scientific report of their work.
* Gain a critical appreciation of the purpose, significance and limitations of any experimental study.
Content:
A series of experiments based on principles introduced during lecture units which may include: Determination of thermodynamic properties of chemical reactions using thermochemical and electrochemical approaches. Spectroscopic analysis of compounds to measure physical properties. Study of the rates of chemical reactions by a number of methods.

CHEY0012: Physical chemistry laboratory 1

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0009, Co CHEY0010, Co CHEY0011, Ex CHEY0007

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a basic training in laboratory skills for Physical Chemistry. To relate experimental work to the scientific theory behind the experiment and thus give a fuller understanding of the theory. After studying this Unit, the student should be able to:
* Use scientific apparatus with care and confidence
* Make essential observations accurately and estimate the possible errors.
* Produce a scientific report of their work.
* Gain a critical appreciation of the purpose, significance and limitations of any experimental study.
Content:
A series of experiments based on principles introduced during lecture units which may include: Determination of thermodynamic properties of chemical reactions using thermochemical and electrochemical approaches. Spectroscopic analysis of compounds to measure physical properties. Study of the rates of chemical reactions by a number of methods.

CHEY0013: Characterization methods

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre CHEY0006

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to a number of techniques for characterisation of chemical compounds. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Describe the principles underlining the techniques studied.
* Interpret and make calculations based on simple X-ray diffraction patterns.
* Interpret and predict NMR and ESR spectra from a number of nucleii.
* Obtain chemical information from more advanced 1H NMR spectral methods.
* Identify the fundamental processes that lead to absorption, emission and scattering of electromagnetic radiationfrom molecular species.
Content:
Overview of X-ray generation and use of filters. Crystal classes, lattices and unit cells. Bragg's Law. Uses of powder diffraction. General principles of NMR - magnetic properties of nuclei, sensitivity and abundance. Spectra of I = 1/2 nuclei. Chemical shifts and coupling constants. Problems with I1/2 nuclei. Interpretation of NMR spectra. Homotopic and diastereotopic protons. Exchange processes. Correlated spectra. The Nuclear Overhauser effect. Magnetic properties of the electron and the origin and interpretation of ESR spectra. Mass spectrometry. IR vibrational spectra of complex molecules. Scattering, rotational and vibrational Raman spectroscopy. Emission spectroscopy. The fate of steady states. Alternative emission processes.

CHEY0014: Synthesis of organic molecules

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre CHEY0003, Pre CHEY0008

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide the student with a working knowledge of important classes of organic transformations, including mechanisms. To give an overview of retrosynthetic analysis as a valuable method for the design of an organic molecule. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* account for the importance of selectivity in organic synthesis.
* demonstrate the important relationship between structure and reactivity for organic molecules.
* design syntheses of heterocyclic and alicyclic compounds from common starting materials
* apply retrosynthesis methods to a selected range of compounds
Content:
The principles of retrosynthesis. The use of carbon nucleophiles in retrosynthesis. Malonate ester synthesis and applications. Umpolung reagents. Alkene synthesis, including Wittig reaction. Oxidation reactions of alkenes and alcohols. Reduction reactions of ketones and other carbonyl compounds. Protecting groups and strategy in organic synthesis. Introduction to selectivity; substrate selectivity, regioselectivity. Chemoselectivity - oxidation and reduction. Stereoselectivity - diastereoselective and enantioselective synthesis. Conformation of cyclohexanes - the importance of stereochemistry to reactivity - carbohydrates. Description and synthesis of heterocycles. Routes to pyrroles, furan, thiophene, pyridine and indoles and their reactivity. Synthesis and reactivity of pyridines, quinolines and isoquinolines. Synthesis and reactivity of 3- and 4-membered ring heterocycles.

CHEY0015: Transition metal chemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre CHEY0005, Pre CHEY0007, Co CHEY0020

Aims & learning objectives:
After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Describe bonding models that can be applied to a consideration of the properties of transition metal compounds.
* Describe the basis of colour and magnetism in transition metal compounds.
* Appreciate the chemistry of transition metal compounds containing metal-carbon s- and p-bonds.
Content:
General properties of transition metal compounds. Bonding theories e.g. Crystal Field Theory and its applications and limitations. Multi-electron systems: Russell-Saunders coupling and its application to d-d electronic spectra and magnetochemistry. Explanation of structural and chemical properties of transition metal- ligand complexes particularly metal carbonyls. Organometallics - nomenclature, electron counting, hapticities. Metal-carbon s- and p-bonding and examples of each. Applications and uses of organometallic compounds. Reaction mechanisms in inorganic compounds.

CHEY0016: Interfacial chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Co CHEY0022

Pre CHEY0004 or CHEY0007 Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to the physical chemistry of interfaces and to demonstrate its significance in catalysis and colloid science. After studying this units, students should be able to:
* Describe and define the types of adsorption at solid surfaces
* Explain the qualitative and quantitative basis of catalysis and physical adsorption
* Define surface tension and solve simple problems involving its application
* Define and interpret the forces between two colloids
* Describe the different processes which control reactions at solid/liquid interfaces
Content:
Introduction to surfaces. chemisorption versus physisorption. adsorbed amounts. Types of isotherms: Langmuir Isotherm. determination of heat of adsorption,BET isotherm: Introduction to heterogeneous catalysis. Kinetics of catalysis. Langmuir Hinshelwood mechanism. Eley Rideal mechanism. Catalysis examples Modern surface science techniques. Molecular basis and consequences of surface tension. Colloid stability. Micellisation. Gibbs equation.reactions at solid/liquid interfaces. Mass transport, surface reactivity.

CHEY0017: Kinetics & mechanism 2

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Pre CHEY0002 or (CHEY0007 and CHEY0008) Aims & learning objectives:
To illustrate how the rate and mechanism of a chemical reaction can be understood in terms of the chemical structure of molecules. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Describe the synthetic chemistry of carbocations, anions and radical species and describe some of the mechanisms involved in their reaction.
* Describe some experimental methods for investigating reaction rate and mechanism.
* Account for the temperature dependence of reaction rates.
* Define the stereochemical implications of a range of common mechanisms.
* Summarise how the mechanism of a reaction may be found from structural and kinetic data.
Content:
Evidence for mechanisms and intermediates; principles for acceptability;. Solvent and substituent effects on equilibria. Rates for reactions of various kinetic orders, and kinetic treatment of more complex mechanisms. Theoretical treatments of reaction kinetics and examples of their application. Reactions in solution. Catalysis by acids and bases.; Nucleophilic catalysis. Stereochemistry and mechanism. Aspects of the chemistry of carbocations, carbanions, radicals, carbenes, nitrenes, and arynes. Experimental methods for fast reactions. Basic photochemical processes. Applications of photochemistry. New methods of studying reactions: molecular beams; infra-red chemiluminescence.

CHEY0018: Environmental aspects of chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Pre CHEY0005 OR CHEY0007 Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to various aspects of chemistry which have an impact on the environment. To promote an understanding of the major chemical processes contributing to the structure and stability of the biosphere. To provide an insight into the effects of human activities on the atmosphere. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* select appropriate techniques for the analysis of compounds or elements in a range of situations.
* describe the principles behind as well as the usefulness and significance of a selected range of analytical methods.
* describe factors affecting nuclear stability and outline selected applications of radioactive decay processes.
* describe qualitative and quantitative aspects of selected radioactive decay processes.
* account for the physical structure and composition of the atmosphere.
* describe natural and anthropogenic sources of N,O and halogen containing species and relate their reactivity to ozone forming and depleting reactions and to global warming.
Content:
Revision of basic analytical methods (titrimetry, spectroscopy) and statistical treatment of results. Electrochemical methods of analysis. Techniques for metals in the environment (AAS, AFS, ICP-MS). Chromatographic methods, with emphasis on applications for organics in the environment The nature, properties and applications of radioactivity and radioactive elements. Production and recycling of nuclear fuels. General features determining the composition of the biosphere. Major chemical cycles and dynamic versus thermodynamic control. Atmospheric chemistry and the roles of N, O and halogens in relation to ozone producing cycles and organic radicals.The Greenhouse effect.

CHEY0019: Structure & bonding in chemical systems

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to a range of tools that enable us to investigate a range of chemical properties and relate them to molecular structure and bonding. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* identify symmetry elements in and define the point group of a molecule
* fully assign the vibrational spectra (IR and Raman) using Group Theory
* Use Group Theory to draw MO diagrams for simple chemical species
* use quantum mechanical methods to generate and rationalise the structure and bonding in organic molecules.
* rationalise the reactivity of molecules in terms of sterochemical considerations
Content:
The concept of symmetry and symmetry operations and their use to generate point groups for molecular species. Group theory and vibrational spectroscopy. Solving the Schrodinger equation and the calculation of energy levels. Development of the variation method applied to diatomics and hydrocarbons. Calculation of electronic and bonding energies,the relationship between molecular orbitals, electron density and reactivity. Extensions to pericyclic reactions. Importance of frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) to cycloaddition reactions, endo selectivity of Diels-Alder reaction and FMO analysis of sigmatropic rearrangements. Stereochemical considerations in complex molecules.

CHEY0020: Inorganic chemistry laboratory 2

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0010, Co CHEY0021, Co CHEY0022, Co CHEY0023

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
To provide experience in synthetic inorganic chemistry and introduce a range of experimental techniques. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Perform straightforward syntheses of coordination and organometallic compounds.
* Analyse compounds using a number of physical methods.
* Deduce structural information from physical methods of analysis.
* Write a clear and concise account of the experimental work undertaken and the deductions made from it.
Content:
The experiments have been designed to illustate some of the important features of coordination and organometallic chemistry. Compounds will be prepared and information obtained from a number of physical methods including IR spectroscopy, NMR, UV/visible spectroscopy, atomic absorption, measurement of magnetic moment and thermal decomposition. Experiments illustrating specfic techniques such as column chromatography and photochemistry will also be performed.

CHEY0020: Inorganic chemistry laboratory 2

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0010, Co CHEY0015, Co CHEY0023

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
To provide experience in synthetic inorganic chemistry and introduce a range of experimental techniques. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Perform straightforward syntheses of coordination and organometallic compounds.
* Analyse compounds using a number of physical methods.
* Deduce structural information from physical methods of analysis.
* Write a clear and concise account of the experimental work undertaken and the deductions made from it.
Content:
The experiments have been designed to illustate some of the important features of coordination and organometallic chemistry. Compounds will be prepared and information obtained from a number of physical methods including IR spectroscopy, NMR, UV/visible spectroscopy, atomic absorption, measurement of magnetic moment and thermal decomposition. Experiments illustrating specfic techniques such as column chromatography and photochemistry will also be performed.

CHEY0021: Organic chemistry laboratory 2

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0011, Co CHEY0020, Co CHEY0022, Co CHEY0023

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to extend and develop laboratory skills and techniques necessary for competent practical organic chemists. To complement some of the lecture material presented in other Year 2 units and to provide experience in synthetic organic chemistry and, in particular, spectroscopic interpretation of structural features of componds. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* To recognise the relationship of the experiments to the lecture material presented in the other year 2 units.
* To interpret spectroscopic data of a wide variety and to relate this to the spatial, structural and chemical features of the compounds synthesised in the laboratory.
* To apply their experience in synthetic organic chemistry to other organic reactions.
* To demonstrate their practical skills and techniques to a good level of ability.
Content:
Experiments designed to illustrate the wide diversity of organic chemistry ranging from physical principles to organic synthesis and through to biological and natural product chemistry. These experiments will extend existing, and introduce new, skills and techniques to the students.

CHEY0022: Physical chemistry laboratory 2

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0012, Co CHEY0016, Co CHEY0020, Co CHEY0021, Co CHEY0023

Aims & learning objectives:
To build on existing physical chemistry techniques and reinforce lecture material. After studying this unit, students should be able to:
* Use spreadsheets to analyse data in a competent manner.
* Understand the importance of advanced experimental design and safety
* Perform sophisticated experiemental manipulation
* Evaluate complicated results in terms of the theory underlying the experiment
* Write coherent scientific reports on obtained data
Content:
6 self contained experiments to include: surface analysis, polymer viscosities, phase equilibria, electrochemical techniques, photochemistry and colloid science.

CHEY0023: Computational chemistry laboratory

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Co CHEY0020, Co CHEY0021, Co CHEY0022

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
A practical introduction to the use of computational packages for molecular modelling as tools for the solution of chemical problems. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Build and manipulate computational molecular models to assist interpretation of chemical structue, bonding and properties.
* Use computer packages to perform calculations to opitmise molecular geometry, determine atomic charges and electrostatic potentials, display molecular orbitals and normal modes of vibration.
* Analyse and interpret vibrational-rotational spectra for diatomic molecules.
* Index, interpret and perform simple calculations based on powder X-ray diffraction photographs of crystalline materials with rubic Bravais lattices.
* Use software packages to draw simple chemical structures and to access a chemical database
Content:
Molecular mechanics with NEMESIS: conformations of six-membered rings and peptides. Molecular orbital calculations with SPARTAN : qualitative MO theory and molecular vibrations. X-ray powder diffraction. Infra-red spectrum of HCI. Structure drawing with ISIS/Draw. Introduction to Beilstein electronic database.

CHEY0023: Computational chemistry laboratory

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Co CHEY0020

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
A practical introduction to the use of computational packages for molecular modelling as tools for the solution of chemical problems. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Build and manipulate computational molecular models to assist interpretation of chemical structue, bonding and properties.
* Use computer packages to perform calculations to opitmise molecular geometry, determine atomic charges and electrostatic potentials, display molecular orbitals and normal modes of vibration.
* Analyse and interpret vibrational-rotational spectra for diatomic molecules.
* Index, interpret and perform simple calculations based on powder X-ray diffraction photographs of crystalline materials with rubic Bravais lattices.
* Use software packages to draw simple chemical structures and to access a chemical database
Content:
Molecular mechanics with NEMESIS: conformations of six-membered rings and peptides. Molecular orbital calculations with SPARTAN : qualitative MO theory and molecular vibrations. X-ray powder diffraction. Infra-red spectrum of HCI. Structure drawing with ISIS/Draw. Introduction to Beilstein electronic database.

CHEY0024: Inorganic & computational chemistry laboratory

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0009, Pre CHEY0010

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry with Management programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
Two aspects of practical chemistry will be introduced in this Unit. It aims to demonstrate the utility of synthetic inorganic chemistry and the use of computational packages for molecular modelling as tools for the solution of chemical problems. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Build and manipulate computational molecular models to assist interpretation of chemical structue, bonding and properties.
* Use computer packages to perform calculations to opitmise molecular geometry, determine atomic charges and electrostatic potentials, display molecular orbitals and normal modes of vibration.
* Perform straightforward syntheses of coordination and organometallic compounds.
* Analyse compounds using a number of physical methods.
* Deduce structural information from physical methods of analysis.
Content:
Experiments designed to illustrate the important features of metal d-block chemistry coordination chemistry, organometallics and metal-metal bonded compounds. Interpretation of spectra. Computation techniques to be introduced will include Molecular mechanics, energy minimization and geometry optimization. Databases for chemical structures and chemical synthesis design.

CHEY0025: Physical & organic chemistry laboratory

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0011, Pre CHEY0012

This unit is only available to students on Chemistry with Management programmes. Aims & learning objectives:
To build on existing practical chemistry techniques and reinforce lecture material. After studying this unit, students should be able to:
* Use spreadsheets to analyse data in a competent manner.
* Understand the importance of experimental design and safety
* Evaluate complicated results in terms of the theory underlying the experiment
* Write coherent scientific reports on obtained data
* To interpret spectroscopic data of a wide variety and to relate this to the spatial, structural and chemical features of the compounds synthesised in the laboratory.
* To apply their experience in synthetic organic chemistry to other organic reactions.
* To demonstrate their practical skills and techniques to a good level of ability.
Content:
Experiments involving surface analysis, colloid science, and reaction kinetics requiring computer based analysis of results. Synthesis of organic compounds and interpretation of information obtained from physical methods.

CHEY0030: Chemistry of d- and f- block elements

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0015

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to more advanced aspects of and recent developments in coordination chemistry. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Demonstrate an understanding of how and why the coordination chemistry of the second and third row elements differs from that of the first row transition and f-block elements.
* Account for the considerable current research attention attracted by the heavier transition metals.
* Account for the bonding features relating to structural and reactivity patterns.
Content:
Ligand design - steric and electronic effects and extremes of coordination. Supramolecular coordination chemistry. Metal-metal bonds and cluster compounds. Bonding/reactivity patterns in selected d- and f-block examples. Polymerization using transition metal catalysts.

CHEY0032: Complex fluids

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0016

Aims & learning objectives:
To summarise the main factos which determine the physical properties of liquid crystals, surfactants and microemulsions. After studying this Unit, the students should be able to:
* Classify the main type of liquid crystalline mesophases.
* Describe the structures formed by amphiliphilic molecules in soluction and acount for their stablity.
* Draw and interpret the X-ray scattering from liquid crystalline structures.
* Account for the formation of microemulsions.
* Deduce basic structural information from small angle neutron scattering measurements.
Content:
Definitions of Complex fluids. Liquid crystal structures - nematic, columnar and smectic phaes. Scattering techniques. Optical properties of LC phases. Theories of LC phase formation. Self assembly. Spheres, rods and lamellar structures. Probing structure by neutron scattering, NMR, Microemulsions. Phase behaviour in colloidal suspension.

CHEY0033: Electrochemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0016

Aims & learning objectives:
This course provides an introduction to kinetic electrochemistry. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how electrode kinetics and mass transport phenomenon influence experimental electrochemical measurements. The course will provide a general overview of the applications of electrochemistry in the `real' world. After styding this Unit, students should be able to:
* Define the relationship between mass transport and electron transfer processes in electrochemical measurements.
* Analyse current-voltage behaviourfor potential step and cyclic voltammetry measurements.
* Identify the structure of the electrical double layer at charged metal solution-interfaces.
Content:
Introduction to electrode kinetics. Models of electron transfer. Theory. How voltage influences the rate constant for electronics reactions. Mass transport; convertion, diffusion and migration. Experimental techniques: voltammetry-cyclic and potential s tep measurements. Hydrodynamic systems - the rotating disc and dropping mercury electrodes. Microelectrodies. Devices for the investigation of rapid chemical reactions. The structure of the electrode/solution interface: the electrical double layer. Spectroelectrochemistry, infra red, UV/VIS and ESR. Fuel cells, solar cells and batteries.

CHEY0035: Asymmetric synthesis

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0014

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce some topics of current research interest to students with a specialised interest in organic chemistry and to explain the importance and history of new developments and their significance. After studying the Unit, students should be able to
* Quote examples of organic reactions in current use for synthesising industrially important compounds
* Describe methods for the control of stereochemistry of organic reactions
* Account for the synthetic methods used and the reaction mechanisms of the selected reactions
Content:
Introduction to and examples of asymmetric catalysis. Catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation. Asymmetric oxidations - epoxidation and dehydroxylation. Enantiopure Lewis acids. The use of auxilliaries to control the stereochemistry of organic reactions. SAMP and RAMP hydrazones; Evans auxilliaries in enolate alkylation reactions. Control of syn/anti stereochemistry in the aldol reaction. Stereoselective Diels Alder reactions in synthesis.

CHEY0036: Biopolymers

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0014

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an overview of biopolymer structures (protein, carbohydrate, nucleic acids) and biopolymer biosynthesis. To understand the relationship between proteins and DNA, how proteins are made, how DNA may be sequences and why this should be important.
Content:
Peptide chemistry and peptide sequencing and synthesis; monosaccharide and oligosaccharide chemistry, including stereochemistry; synthesis of disaccharides; brief resume of DNA and genes; the genetic code and gene malfunction; chemical synthesis of DNA; why it is important; definition of an oligonucleotide; chemical synthesis of oligonucleotides using solid phase techniques; DNA sequencing: definition; importance; two methods for sequencing DNA.

CHEY0037: Synthesis of medicinal compounds

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0014

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce and illustrate how advanced synthetic organic chemistry is used in the preparation of medicinally valuable compounds. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Use reterosynthetic analysis to plan synthetic routes to a range of complex target molecules.
* Define reagents and strategies for the assembly of defined stereochemical arrays.
* Design rational analogues, or modified compounds from given medicinal agents.
Content:
The unit will illustrate the complex relationship between organic chemistry and medicine. Several disease areas will be selected and compounds used to treat them considered. The focus of the unit will be the methods used to synthesise those compounds. Areas covered will include:- Prostaglandens, b-Lactams, ionophoro antibiotics and anti-cancer drugs.

CHEY0038: Neutron scattering for chemists

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0016

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to the theory and practice of modern neutron scattering as applied to chemical systems After studying this units, students should be able to:
* Define and describe scattering parameters for neutrons
* Describe typical neutron scattering experimental set-up
* Discuss the use of isotopic substitution and contrast variation
* Analyse small angle scattering data
* Discuss in detail neutron scattering from interfaces
Content:
Introduction:Why neutrons. Scattering theory. Properties of the neutron and production of high fluxes. Experimental detail - neutron spectrometers. Detection of neutrons. Coherent and Incohernet scattering. Elastic and inelastic scattering. Small Angle scattering. Neutron reflection.

CHEY0039: Computational chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0019

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to computational chemistry describing the range of chemical problems relating to inorganic and biological materials that are accessible to these techniques. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* demonstrate the relationship between interatomic forces and chemical properties and identify where computer simulation techniques can be used
* describe the usefulness and limitations of selected methods in a variety of chemical situations
Content:
Definitions of terms such as ensembles and periodic boundaries. Description of energy minimisation methods. Introduction to zeolite catalysts and the role of energy minimisation in understanding their properties. Introduction to molecular dynamics and its use in calculating thermodynamic and diffusion properties. The role of molecular dynamics in modelling diffusion. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques, including applications e.g. crystal growth. Use of empirical calculations in protein folding and extension to bioinformatic techniques.

CHEY0040: Chemistry research project 1

Semester 1
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: DS55 OR30 OT15
Requisites: Co CHEY0049

Only available to students on MChem Sandwich programmes Year 4. Aims & learning objectives:
To allow students to experience a practical research project typical of research in an academic environment. To further develop and reinforce the skills necessary for research work. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Demonstrate advanced experimental techniques appropriate to the chosen project
* Record experimental observations and data in an efficient manner
* Present results in a variety of formats and place them into context of other researchers' work
* Demonstrate the ability to plan and conduct an experimental programme
Content:
A research topic will be selected in conjunction with a supervising member of staff and a program of experimental work planned. In addition to the experimental aspects, appropriate library work will be conducted. Aspects of project planning, safety, report writing skills and oral presentations will be introduced as appropriate.

CHEY0042: Inorganic cages & clusters

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0015

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to the chemistry of main Group cages, clusters and inorganometallic compounds with special reference to the structure/electron count relationships found in boranes. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Predict the structure and reactivity of boranes, heteroboranes and metalloboranes.
* Describe recent advances in the field of Boron chemistry
Content:
PSEP theory (Wades rules). Isolobal theory. Synthesis and reactivity of boranes and metalloboranes. Transition metal boryls. Weakly coordinating anions. BNCT. Other selected main group cahes and clusters including Sintl ions. Compounds that deviate from Wades rules.

CHEY0043: Group work in practical chemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OT100
Requisites: Co CHEY0063

Only available to students in the Department of Chemistry Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to an extended piece of practical chemistry involving planning and executing experimental work and reporting the results in a number of formats. Other factors such as communication skills and teamwork will be emphasised. After completing this Unit, students should be able to:
* Demonstrate skills in planning and executing practical problems in Chemistry
* Work in a team - allocation and correlation of tasks and collection of data
* Present the results of an investigation in written report and poster formats
* Demonstrate experimental skills appropriate to the chosen project
Content:
Students will work in small groups on problems of an investigative nature selected from a list of available projects. A problem will be set and appropriate experimental protocols will need to be researched and designed. After completion of the work, a variety of reporting formats will be used (poster, report) to emphasise students' communication skills.

CHEY0043: Group work in practical chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Only available to students in the Department of Chemistry Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to an extended piece of practical chemistry involving planning and executing experimental work and reporting the results in a number of formats. Other factors such as communication skills and teamwork will be emphasised. After completing this Unit, students should be able to:
* Demonstrate skills in planning and executing practical problems in Chemistry
* Work in a team - allocation and correlation of tasks and collection of data
* Present the results of an investigation in written report and poster formats
* Demonstrate experimental skills appropriate to the chosen project
Content:
Students will work in small groups on problems of an investigative nature selected from a list of available projects. A problem will be set and appropriate experimental protocols will need to be researched and designed. After completion of the work, a variety of reporting formats will be used (poster, report) to emphasise students' communication skills.

CHEY0045: Introduction to chemical research

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: RT60 OR40
Requisites:

Only available to students on programmes in the Department of Chemistry Aims & learning objectives:
To allow students to briefly experience a practical research project typical of research in an academic environment. To further develop and reinforce the skills necessary for research work. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Record experimental observations and data in an efficient manner
* Report accurately the results of an experimental programme
Content:
A research topic will be selected in conjunction with a supervising member of staff and a short program of experimental work planned. In addition to the experimental aspects, appropriate aspects of planning, safety and report writing skills will be introduced as appropriate.

CHEY0045: Introduction to chemical research

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: RT60 OR40
Requisites:

Only available to students on programmes in the Department of Chemistry Aims & learning objectives:
To allow students to briefly experience a practical research project typical of research in an academic environment. To further develop and reinforce the skills necessary for research work. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Record experimental observations and data in an efficient manner
* Report accurately the results of an experimental programme
Content:
A research topic will be selected in conjunction with a supervising member of staff and a short program of experimental work planned. In addition to the experimental aspects, appropriate aspects of planning, safety and report writing skills will be introduced as appropriate.

CHEY0047: Advanced chemistry research project 1

Semester 1
Credits: 24
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: OR30 OT70
Requisites: Co CHEY0048

Only available to students on MChem (non-Sandwich) programmes Year 4. Aims & learning objectives:
To allow students to experience a practical research project typical of research in an academic environment. To further develop and reinforce the skills necessary for research work. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Demonstrate advanced experimental techniques appropriate to the chosen project
* Record experimental observations and data in an efficient manner
* Present results in a variety of formats and place them into context of other researchers' work
* Demonstrate the ability to plan and conduct an experimental programme
Content:
A research topic will be selected in conjunction with a supervising member of staff and a program of experimental work planned. In addition to the experimental aspects, appropriate library work will be conducted. Aspects of project planning, safety, report writing skills and oral presentations will be introduced as appropriate.

CHEY0048: Advanced chemistry research project 2

Semester 2
Credits: 18
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: OR30 OT70
Requisites:

Only available to students on MChem (non-Sandwich) programmes Year 4. Aims & learning objectives:
To allow students to experience a practical research project typical of research in an academic environment. To further develop and reinforce the skills necessary for research work. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Demonstrate advanced experimental techniques appropriate to the chosen project
* Record experimental observations and data in an efficient manner
* Present results in a variety of formats and place them into context of other researchers' work
* Demonstrate the ability to plan and conduct an experimental programme
Content:
A research topic will be selected in conjunction with a supervising member of staff and a program of experimental work planned. In addition to the experimental aspects, appropriate library work will be conducted. Aspects of project planning, safety, report writing skills and oral presentations will be introduced as appropriate.

CHEY0049: Chemistry research project 2

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: DS55 OR30 OT15
Requisites: Co CHEY0040

Only available to students on MChem Sandwich programmes Year 4. Aims & learning objectives:
To allow students to experience a practical research project typical of research in an academic environment. To further develop and reinforce the skills necessary for research work. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Demonstrate advanced experimental techniques appropriate to the chosen project
* Record experimental observations and data in an efficient manner
* Present results in a variety of formats and place them into context of other researchers' work
* Demonstrate the ability to plan and conduct an experimental programme
Content:
A research topic will be selected in conjunction with a supervising member of staff and a program of experimental work planned. In addition to the experimental aspects, appropriate library work will be conducted. Aspects of project planning, safety, report writing skills and oral presentations will be introduced as appropriate.

CHEY0050: The chemical literature

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: RT60 OR40
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the skills necessary in retrieving information from a variety of Chemical Literature sources and preparation of an in-depth report on a topic. After studying the Unit, students should be able to
* Recognise and use appropriate text and electronic sources of chemical information
* Assemble information from a number of sources into a coherent report
* Prepare and deliver an oral presentation using appropriate visual aids
Content:
In conjunction with a supervisor, a topic of recent research or other chemical significance will be selected. Several key references will be identified and the student will use these as a basis to prepare a detailed, critical survey of the area. In addition to `paper' sources, computer based data retrieval systems will be used. Students will prepare a written report and also a short oral presentation on the selected topic.

CHEY0050: The chemical literature

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: RT60 OR40
Requisites: Co CHEY0063

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the skills necessary in retrieving information from a variety of Chemical Literature sources and preparation of an in-depth report on a topic. After studying the Unit, students should be able to
* Recognise and use appropriate text and electronic sources of chemical information
* Assemble information from a number of sources into a coherent report
* Prepare and deliver an oral presentation using appropriate visual aids
Content:
In conjunction with a supervisor, a topic of recent research or other chemical significance will be selected. Several key references will be identified and the student will use these as a basis to prepare a detailed, critical survey of the area. In addition to `paper' sources, computer based data retrieval systems will be used. Students will prepare a written report and also a short oral presentation on the selected topic.

CHEY0053: Professional studies in chemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Ex CHEY0055, Ex CHEY0062

Only available to students on M.Chem programmes not involving industrial placement Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to a number of factors affecting the professional practice of Chemistry in the academic world. After studying the unit, students should be able to:
* DescribeUniversity policies on training and intellectual property rights
* Describe the environmental aspects of the work of the University
* Cost a research project and prepare a case for its support
* Describe some of the legislative, Governmental and economic factors affecting the University's performance
Content:
Students will be expected to research a range of the following factors within the University and complete a report describing policies in. Structural and economic factors of the modern academic structure in the UK; Industrial liason, Safety; Environmental impact of scientific activities; Intellectual property rights; costs of chemical research; personal and management skills.

CHEY0053: Professional studies in chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Ex CHEY0055, Ex CHEY0062

Only available to students on M.Chem programmes not involving industrial placement Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to a number of factors affecting the professional practice of Chemistry in the academic world. After studying the unit, students should be able to:
* DescribeUniversity policies on training and intellectual property rights
* Describe the environmental aspects of the work of the University
* Cost a research project and prepare a case for its support
* Describe some of the legislative, Governmental and economic factors affecting the University's performance
Content:
Students will be expected to research a range of the following factors within the University and complete a report describing policies in. Structural and economic factors of the modern academic structure in the UK; Industrial liason, Safety; Environmental impact of scientific activities; Intellectual property rights; costs of chemical research; personal and management skills.

CHEY0054: Industrial placement (Bsc hons)

Academic Year
Credits: 60
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: RT100
Requisites: Ex CHEY0055, Ex CHEY0058, Ex CHEY0060

Available for students on BSc sandwich courses in the Department of Chemistry. May also be available to Natural Science students depending on individual circumstances. Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with an opportunity to gain a years experience of working in a chemical company or related organisation. The placement will allow students to:
* Apply knowledge and skills gained at University to real applications of Chemistry and related areas
* Demonstrate a range of "key skills" such as team work, time and project management, oral and written communication
* Participate in an extended programme of experimental work and develop practical skills appropriate to the area of work.
Content:
A research project and/or training programme will be conducted in a company or organisation approved by the Department of Chemistry. The content will depend on the precise requirements of the placement company.

CHEY0055: Industrial placement (MChem)

Academic Year
Credits: 48
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OT100
Requisites: Co CHEY0062, Ex CHEY0054, Ex CHEY0058, Ex CHEY0060

Available only for students on M.Chem. with Industrial Training degree scheme. Students must also take CHEY0061 (Distance learning units). Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with an opportunity to gain a years experience of working in a chemical company or related organisation. During the placement, students will be expected to:
* Apply knowledge and skills gained at University to real applications of Chemistry and related areas
* Demonstrate a range of "key skills" such as team work, time and project management, oral and written communication
* Participate in an extended programme of experimental work and develop practical skills appropriate to the area of work.
* Participate in discussions concerning their work and contribute ideas as appropriate
* Prepare an oral presentation, a poster and an extended written report at appropriate times during the placement
Content:
A research project will be conducted in a company or organisation approved by the Department of Chemistry. The content will depend on the precise requirements of the placement

CHEY0056: Introduction to chemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Co MATE0004

Aims & learning objectives:
This course is designed for students without A-level chemistry who need to have some appreciation of chemical ideas to use in their major degree subject(s). It will provide a broad introduction to the principles governing chemical reactivity and to illustrate these with a range of examples.
Content:
Introduction to atomic structure and chemical bonding e.g. valency. Trends in structure and reactivity across the Periodic Table. The mole, chemical equations and chemical reactions. The emphasis will be on taking examples from the real world and explaining the chemical principles which underlie them.

CHEY0057: Introduction to practical chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: PR80 CW20
Requisites: Co CHEY0056

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce a range of practical chemistry techniques to students and to demonstrate how experimental work can be used to consolidate material presented in lectures.
Content:
A series of experiments to introduce basic analytical methods such as titrations, gravimetry and spectrophotometry, manipulation of glassware, straightforward synthetic procedures. Some supplementary material will be presented in workshops to reinforce ideas met in the previous lecture based unit.

CHEY0058: Study year abroad (Bsc hons)

Academic Year
Credits: 60
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment:
Requisites: Ex CHEY0054, Ex CHEY0055

Aims & learning objectives:
Please see the Director of Studies for detailed information about the Study Year Abroad.
Content:
12 months assessed study in an overseas University approved by the Department of Chemistry and including a major project involving chemical research.

CHEY0060: Study year abroad (MChem)

Academic Year
Credits: 54
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OT100
Requisites: Ex CHEY0054, Ex CHEY0055

Aims & learning objectives:
Please see the Director of Studies for detailed information about the Study Year Abroad.
Content:
12 months assessed study in an overseas University approved by the Department of Chemistry and including a major project involving chemical research.

CHEY0061: Distance learning units

Academic Year
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment:
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Please see the Director of Studies for more information about the topics to be studied.
Content:
Two 3 credit units will be selected from those available and will be studied by a variety of distance learning methods.

CHEY0062: Professional studies in chemistry (distance learning)

Academic Year
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: RT100
Requisites: Co CHEY0055, Ex CHEY0053

Only available to students on M.Chem programmes with industrial placement Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to a number of factors affecting the professional practice of Chemistry in the workplace. Consideration will be given to a range of situations encountered in modern chemical practice at the company on which they are on placement. After studying the unit, students should be able to:
* Describe the company policies on training and intellectual property rights
* Describe the environmental aspects of the work of their company.
* Cost a research project and prepare a case for its support
* Describe the market strategies and economic factors affecting the company's performance
* Describe the development of one of the company's major products
Content:
Students will be expected to research a range of the following factors within the placement company and complete a report describing company position and policies in. Structural and economic factors of the modern chemical industry; Safety; Environmental impact of the chemical industry; Intellectual property rights; costs of chemical research; personal and management skills.

CHEY0063: Chemistry research project

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OR40 OT60
Requisites: Co CHEY0043, Co CHEY0050

Only available to students on Chemistry programmes Year 3/4 Aims & learning objectives:
To allow students to experience a practical research project typical of research in an academic environment. To further develop and reinforce the skills necessary for research work. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Demonstrate advanced experimental techniques appropriate to the chosen project
* Record experimental observations and data in an efficient manner
* Present results in a variety of forms and place them into context of other researchers' work
* Demonstrate the ability to plan and conduct an experimental programme
Content:
A research topic will be selected in conjunction with a supervising member of staff and a program of experimental work planned. In addition to the experimental aspects, appropriate library work will be conducted. Aspects of project planning, safety, report writing skills and oral presentations will be introduced as appropriate.

CHEY0063: Chemistry research project

Semester 1
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OR40 OT60
Requisites: Co CHEY0043, Co CHEY0050

Only available to students on Chemistry programmes Year 3/4 Aims & learning objectives:
To allow students to experience a practical research project typical of research in an academic environment. To further develop and reinforce the skills necessary for research work. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Demonstrate advanced experimental techniques appropriate to the chosen project
* Record experimental observations and data in an efficient manner
* Present results in a variety of forms and place them into context of other researchers' work
* Demonstrate the ability to plan and conduct an experimental programme
Content:
A research topic will be selected in conjunction with a supervising member of staff and a program of experimental work planned. In addition to the experimental aspects, appropriate library work will be conducted. Aspects of project planning, safety, report writing skills and oral presentations will be introduced as appropriate.

CHEY0064: Supramolecular chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0015

Aims & learning objectives:
To look at chemistry `beyond the molecule' and how a variety of intermolecular interactions can be exploited in terms of molecular recognition both in solution and in the solid state. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* To describe some important examples of host-guest chemistry.
* To relate the self-organisastion of simple molecules to the wider aspects of chemistry.
* To highlight future applications of supramolecular chemistry.
Content:
Introduction to supramolecular chemistry - concepts of molecular recognition, self-assembly, complementarity and receptor-substrate relationships. Host-guest chemistry. Cation and anion recognition and molecular sensors. Catenanes and rotaxanes. Molecular machines and supramolecular catalysis. Ligand design - steric and electronic effects. Use of coordination to control shape. Helices, squares and grids. Coordination polymers. Hydrogen bonding - introduction, molecular recognition and crystal engineering. Weaker interactions - p-p stacking C-HO interactions and d¹º - d¹º interactions (aurophilicity).

CHEY0065: Advances in organic chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0014

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to advanced aspects of a topic of current interest in Organic Chemistry. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Lucidly and clearly outline the main features and give examples of the topic.
Content:
To be confirmed. A topic of current interest will be selected and treated in detail.

CHEY0066: Inorganic mechanisms & catalysis

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0015

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop an understanding of Inorganic reaction mechanisms and modern homogeneous catalytic processes. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Describe substitution reactions of 4- and 6- coordinate transition metal compounds.
* Account for electron transfer processes
* Appreciate catalytic cycles and the mechanisms that underpin them.
Content:
Reaction types - associative, dissociative, interchange. Trans- effect and solvent participation in reactions of 4 coordinate complexes. Eigen-Wilkins mechanism; inner and outer electron transfer. Simple markus theory. Organometallic mechanisms; Monsanto hydroformylation and hydrogenation reactions.

CHEY0067: Introduction to polymer chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This core unit will introduce the basic concepts needed to describe the synthesis and characterisation of a range of polymers in order to understand how their properties can be controlled. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Demonstrate an understanding of how polymer structure can be influenced by the methods of synthesis and how this affects material properties.
* Describe and explain methods for synthesis by step- and chain growth polymerization
* Perform a range of numerical problems concerning polymerization chemistry
Content:
Classification and types of polymers. Synthesis of polymers with examples taken from several different classes (addition, step-growth, ring opening, organometallic) with the emphasis on how physicochemical considerations influence the polymer structure. Characterisation of polymers (molecular weight and chain length, spectroscopy, thermal methods). Structure and morphology of polymers and how this influences properties. Polymer solutions and thermodynamics of polymer mixtures. A survey of recent applications taken from current research and industrial topics.

CHEY0068: Physical organic chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0017

Aims & learning objectives:
To revise some basic concepts in physical organic chemistry and develop a number of ideas used to correlate reactivity and mechanism in a range of otrganic reactions. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Describe some experimental tools for investigating reaction mechanisms and the use of some theoretical models for their correlation and interpretation
* Solve a range of problems involving numerical and mechanistic information
Content:
Energy changes in equilibria and reactivity. Transition states and saddle points. Activation parameters. Analysis of reaction coordinates. Principle of Least Nuclear Motion. Hammond Postulate. More O'Ferrall - Jencks diagrams. Rate - equilibrium correlations. Hammett equation as an example of a linear free-energy relatiionship. Signficance of s and r for reactivity and mechanism. Complex Hammett plots : change in mechanism vs. change in rate-determining step. Equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects. Primary and secondary effects and their significance. Heavy-atom effects. Solvent isotope effects.

CHEY0069: Advanced structural methods

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0013

Aims & learning objectives:
To describe and give examples of some modern techniques for investigating the structure of a range of inorganic molecules. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Describe the physical basis, limitations and information available from a range of structural methods such as X-Ray crystallography, NMR, NQR and Mossbaurer Spectroscopics.
* Solve a range of problems involving numerical and spectroscopic information
Content:
Brief introduction to crystallography. Crystal systems and lattices. Unit cells. Periodicity in lattices. Space group diagrams. Data collection procedures and solving crystal structures. Atomic scattering factors and structure factors. R factors. Revision of basic principles of NMR spectroscopy. Variable temperature and 2-D NMR. NMR of paramagnetic compounds. Quadrupolar nuclei, relaxation and linewidths. Origin of NQR spectra. Mossbauer spectroscopy - origins and problems. Isomer shift and quadupole splitting.

CHEY0070: New developments in organic chemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0014

Aims & learning objectives:
To describe some modern aspects of organic synthesis, including the control of stereochemistry and an introduction to medicinal chemistry After studying this Unit, students sould be able to:
* Understand the basic principles of organic chemistry taught in earlier modules.
* Explain how stereochemistry can be controlled in organic synthesis
* Discuss contemporary methods of drug discovery and medicinal chemistry
* Explain why combinatorial chemistry can benefit the drug discovery process
Content:
Stereochemistry of addition to carbonyl groups and alkenes. Directed reactions. Selectivity in hydroboration, epoxidation and hydrogenation. Selectivity in [3,3]-sigmatropic processes. An introduction to medicinal chemistry. The discovery and mode of action of sulfonamide drugs. Penicllins and the semi-synthesis of new antibiotics. The principles of combinatorial chemistry. The advantages of solid phase organic synthesis using resins.

CHEY0071: Organoelement chemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0014

Aims & learning objectives:
To describe some modern aspects of organic synthesis, including, the use of unconventional elements in synthesis. After studying this Unit, students sould be able to:
* Understand the basic principles of organic chemistry taught in earlier modules.
* Define the role of transition metals as catalysts in modern organic chemistry
* Describe some of the important organic reactions based on main group elements
* Integrate concepts from inorganic chemistry with a mechanistic understanding of organoelement chemistry.
Content:
Transition metal catalysed coupling reactions and carbonylation reactions. Catalytic reactions involving alkenes (especially the Heck reaction). Other applications of transition metals to organic synthesis. General aspects of organosilicon chemistry, The use of sulfur ylides in alkene formation. Organoboron and organophosphorus chemistry. Stereochemistry of addition to carbonyl groups and alkenes. Directed reactions. Selectivity in hydroboration, epoxidation and hydrogenation.

CHEY0072: Main group ring systems

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0015

Aims & learning objectives:
To consider the synthesis, structure, bonding and uses of main group ring compounds with particular emphasis on the transition from ionic to covalent systems. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Explain the solid state and solution structures of a range of main group ring compounds (i.e. those containing Li, Mg, Al, B, Si, P and S)
* Describe how these compounds are synthesised and how their structure and bonding varies
* Describe some uses of these compounds
* Interpret analytical data (e.g. NMR) in order to elucidate structures
Content:
The structure, bonding and synthesis of organolithium ring systems. A detailed examination of lithium amide and imide structures leading to a general theory of ring stacking and laddering. Comparison of Li, Mg and Al ring systems. A survey of the synthesis, structure and bonding of B-N, Si-N, P-N and S-N ring systems.

CHEY0073: Transition metal rings & clusters

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0015

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the basic principles of assembling basic structural units to form large molecular assemblies. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Explain how the structures of cages and clusters may be rationalised and predicted
* Discuss the methods of synthesis and characterisation of large molecule assemblies
* Interpret structural and spectroscopic data provided for molecular assemblies.
Content:
A description of the synthesis and structural characteristics of rings, cages, dendrimers, polymers and clusters that contain transition metals. Electron counting schemes in clusters. Simple methods of characterising dendrimers, polymers and clusters using NMR, IR and other spectroscopic techniques.

CHEY0074: Photochemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0016

Aims & learning objectives:
To revise the basic principles of photo chemistry taught in previous units and to introduce techniques for the study of and applications of photochemistry. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Account for the formation and decay of electronically excited states in molecules
* Describe modern instrumental methods for photochemical investigation
* Solve a range of quantitative problems in these topics.
Content:
Absorption and emission of light. Jablonskii scheme. Excited state kinetics and quenching. Experimental methods. Properties and reactions of excited states. Examples of photochemical processes including photosynthesis, photography, solar energy conversion and atmospheric photochemistry.

CHEY0075: Statistical thermodynamics

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre CHEY0016

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the basic principles and some applications of Statistical Thermodynamics After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Use basic statistical thermodynamic techniques to derive bulk properties of compunds from theoretical or spectroscopic data
* Assess the reliability of statistical approaches under different conditions
* Solve straightforward poroblems using the techniques introduced
Content:
Description of energy partition, the Boltzmann Distribution Law. and quantum statistics. Derivation of partition functions, their use to calculate properties and comparison with experimental techniques. Evaluation of equilibrium and rate constants. Statistical thermodynamics of solids. Introduction to lattice dynamics, definitions of phonons and phonon dispersion curves. Comparison of real materials with Debye and Einstein models.

CHEY0076: Applied chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW40 EX40 OT20
Requisites: Pre CHEY0003, Pre CHEY0004, Pre CHEY0005

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the chemical principles behind a number of commonly encountered "everyday" situations. The students' "transferrable skills" will also be developed. After studying the Unit, students should be able to:
* Describe the chemical principles underlying the examples chosen for study.
* Prepare and present a poster on a chemical topic
* To analyse information from a range of sources to prepare a summary report
* Appreciate some of the factors involved in the industrial and commercial practice of chemistry
Content:
The Unit will consist of discussion of a number of case studies. A number of products which are commonly encountered in everyday life will be selected and their preparation on an industrial scale discussed. Other factors relating to their use will be discussed as appropriate. Examples will include:
* Liquid crystals as displays - synthesis, development and application
* OTC pharmaceuticals - synthesis on an industrial scale, scale-up and IPR issues
* Detergents - synthesis, formulation, mode of action, environmental impact
* Organic polymers - textiles, packaging, recycling
* Agrochemicals - fertilizers, pesticides: synthesis, analysis, environmental issues
* Preparation of silicon based products for "high technology" uses In addition, the role of Professional bodies such as RSC and SCI will be described. The assessments will be designed to allow students to further develop presentational and other key skills related to their potential practice as professional chemists.

CHEY0077: Spectroscopy (NS)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW20 PR10 EX70
Requisites: Pre CHEY0007

Aims & learning objectives:
The Unit will provide an introduction to the principles of molecular spectroscopy, developing from the basic quantum mechanics of simple molecules to the interpretation of spectra of complex molecules. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Define the terms wavefunction and eigenvalue.
* Relate physical models to quantisation of molecular and electronic energies.
* Predict the pure rotation and vibration-rotation spectra of linear diatomic molecules.
* Describe the origin of microwave, IR, NMR and electronic spectra.
* Identify organic species from IR, NMR and UV spectra.
Content:
Basic principles of quantum mechanics; wavefunctions, eigenvalues and operators. Introduction to electromagnetic radiation. Rotational spectroscopy; rigid rotor model. Vibrational spectroscopy. Linear ditomics and polyatomic molecules. Vibration-rotation spectroscopy. Electronic spectra of conjugated compounds. IR spectra of functional group containing compounds. Origins and applications of proton and carbon NMR spectra. Introduction to mass spectrometry.

CHEY0078: Synthesis of organic molecules (NS)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW20 PR10 EX70
Requisites: Pre CHEY0008

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide the student with a working knowledge of important classes of organic transformations, including mechanisms. To give an overview of retrosynthetic analysis as a valuable method for the design of an organic molecule. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* account for the importance of selectivity in organic synthesis.
* demonstrate the important relationship between structure and reactivity for organic molecules.
* design syntheses of heterocyclic and alicyclic compounds from common starting materials
* apply retrosynthesis methods to a selected range of compounds
Content:
The principles of retrosynthesis. The use of carbon nucleophiles in retrosynthesis. Malonate ester synthesis and applications. Umpolung reagents. Alkene synthesis, including Wittig reaction. Oxidation reactions of alkenes and alcohols. Reduction reactions of ketones and other carbonyl compounds. Protecting groups and strategy in organic synthesis. Introduction to selectivity; substrate selectivity, regioselectivity. Chemoselectivity - oxidation and reduction. Stereoselectivity - diastereoselective and enantioselective synthesis. Conformation of cyclohexanes - the importance of stereochemistry to reactivity - carbohydrates. Description and synthesis of heterocycles. Routes to pyrroles, furan, thiophene, pyridine and indoles and their reactivity. Synthesis and reactivity of pyridines, quinolines and isoquinolines. Synthesis and reactivity of 3- and 4-membered ring heterocycles.

CHEY0079: Transition metal chemistry (NS)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW20 PR10 EX70
Requisites: Pre CHEY0007

Aims & learning objectives:
After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* Describe bonding models that can be applied to a consideration of the properties of transition metal compounds.
* Describe the basis of colour and magnetism in tranition metal compounds.
* Appreciate the chemistry of transition metal compounds containing metal-carbon s- and p-bonds.
Content:
General properties of transition metal compounds. Bonding theories e.g. Crystal Field Theory and its applications and limitations. Multi-electron systems: Russell-Saunders coupling and its application to d-d electronic spectra and magnetochemistry. Explanation of structural and chemical properties of transition metal- ligand complexes particularly metal carbonyls. Organometallics - nomenclature, electron counting, hapticities. Metal-carbon s- and p-bonding and examples of each. Applications and uses of organometallic compounds. Reaction mechanisms in inorganic compounds.

CHEY0080: Interfacial chemistry (NS)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW20 PR10 EX70
Requisites: Pre CHEY0007

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to the physical chemistry of interfaces and to demonstrate its significance in catalysis and colloid science. After studying this units, students should be able to:
* Describe and define the types of adsorption at solid surfaces
* Explain the qualitative and quantitative basis of catalysis and physical adsorption
* Define surface tension and solve simple problems involving its application
* Define and interpret the forces between two colloids
* Describe the different processes which control reactions at solid/liquid interfaces
Content:
Introduction to surfaces. chemisorption versus physisorption. adsorbed amounts. Types of isotherms: Langmuir Isotherm. determination of heat of adsorption,BET isotherm: Introduction to heterogeneous catalysis. Kinetics of catalysis. Langmuir Hinshelwood mechanism. Eley Rideal mechanism. Catalysis examples Modern surface science techniques. Molecular basis and consequences of surface tension. Colloid stability. Micellisation. Gibbs equation.reactions at solid/liquid interfaces. Mass transport, surface reactivity.

CHEY0081: Industrial placement (MChem - half year)

Academic Year
Credits: 24
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: RT34 OR33 OT33
Requisites:

Students must also take CHEY0061 (Distance learning units). Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with an opportunity to gain experience of working in a chemical company or related organisation. During the placement, students will be expected to:
* Apply knowledge and skills gained at University to real applications of Chemistry and related areas
* Demonstrate a range of "key skills" such as team work, time and project management, oral and written communication
* Participate in an extended programme of experimental work and develop practical skills appropriate to the area of work.
* Participate in discussions concerning their work and contribute ideas as appropriate.
Content:
A research project will be conducted in a company or organisation approved by the Department of Chemistry. The content will depend on the precise requirements of the placement. The placement will last a minimum of 24 weeks.

CHEY0082: Industrial placement (BSc - half year)

Academic Year
Credits: 30
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with an opportunity to gain experience of working in a chemical company or related organisation. The placement will allow students to:
* Apply knowledge and skills gained at University to real applications of Chemistry and related areas
* Demonstrate a range of "key skills" such as team work, time and project management, oral and written communication
* Participate in an extended programme of experimental work and develop practical skills appropriate to the area of work.
Content:
A research project and/or training programme will be conducted in a company or organisation approved by the Department of Chemistry. The content will depend on the precise requirements of the placement company. The placement will last a minimum of 24 weeks.

CHEY0083: Study period abroad (MChem - half year)

Academic Year
Credits: 24
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: RT34 OR33 OT33
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Students will gain experience of living and studying in a University outside the UK. They will have the opportunity to develop personal and linguistic skills in addition to developing their knowledge and understanding of chemistry and its applications. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* develop personal and interpersonal communication skills
* demonstrate the ability to work and interact effectively in a group environment in which cultural norms and ways of operating may be unfamiliar
* operate effectively with people from a different cultural background
* (where appropriate) improve their knowledge of the host language by attending classes therein and interacting with native speakers.
Content:
A period of up to 6 months will be spent in an approved University outside the UK. The precise programme of study will normally involve a project in a chemical science as well as attendance at appropriate other classes. The programme will vary considerably depending on the host University but will be largely related to the chemical sciences and will be agreed in advance with the Director of Studies. The academic level of the programme will be at a similar level to those taken by MChem students at Bath.

CHEY0084: Study period abroad (BSc - half year)

Academic Year
Credits: 30
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Students will gain experience of living and studying in a University outside the UK. They will have the opportunity to develop personal and linguistic skills in addition to developing their knowledge and understanding of chemistry and its applications. After studying this Unit, students should be able to:
* develop personal and interpersonal communication skills
* demonstrate the ability to work and interact effectively in a group environment in which cultural norms and ways of operating may be unfamiliar
* operate effectively with people from a different cultural background
* (where appropriate) improve their knowledge of the host language by attending classes therein and interacting with native speakers.
Content:
A period of up to 6 months will be spent at an approved University outside the UK. The precise programme of study will normally involve a short research project as well as attendance at appropriate other classes. The programme will vary considerably depending on the host University but will be agreed in advance with the Director of Studies.

ECOI0003: Core skills for economists: introduction to computing

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW25 OR25 EX50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the course unit is to familiarise students with University computing facilities and to explore the application of these facilities to economics and to empirical political data. Students should develop the spreadsheet skills to simulate the theoretical models they are learning about in economics and politics. They should also learn how to use the CAL resource WinEcon and how to use computers for accessing information.
Content:
The Unit reviews University facilities. The main part of the Unit uses an Excel spreadsheet package to develop skills in building small numerical models and in summarising and describing economic and political data. Basic skills: word processing, networking (Word, email, internet); presentation software (Powerpoint); spreadsheets (Excel); relational databases (Access). Applications: Microeconomic, Macroeconomic and political analysis using Excel; Data management and analysis.

ECOI0004: Core skills for economists: introductory data analysis

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW50 PR25 EX25
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to provide students with experience in the use of real statistical data in economics and to further develop their computing skills, including the use of Excel spreadsheets, and graphic representation of data. The learning objectives are that students should understand: (i) the meaning and reliability of data (ii) data sources (iii) the ways of summarising data.
Content:
The course unit will look at different sources of data, including national and international, published in e.g., The Blue Book, Economic Trends and by the International Monetary Fund; electronic data sources on CD Rom; data sources such as the Family Expenditure Survey and the British Social Attitudes Data. Definition and reliability of trade and national income and expenditure data. Difference between real and nominal data. Index numbers, calculation of and the inclusion of quality. Graphic representation of data: pie charts, histograms, time series plots, and scattergraphs. Tabular representation of data. Key texts: R. Mason, D. Lind and w. Marchal Statisitical Techniques in Business and Economics C. Johnson and S. Briscoe Measuring the Economy.

ECOI0005: Core skills for economists: Elementary mathematics

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to provide students without A-level Mathematics with the knowledge of elementary mathematics that is relevant to economics and to prepare them for the Core Skills: Mathematics unit (UNIV0036) in semester 2. Students should be able to: (i) understand elementary mathematical concepts; (ii) solve simple mathematical problems; (iii) apply mathematics to simple economic problems.
Content:
The course unit begins with a review of GCSE algebra, and students should read the book by P. Abbott Teach Yourself Algebra, useful for revision. Topics will include: variables and functions; coordinates and graphs; powers and indices, exponential and logarithmic functions; linear equations; quadratic equations; simultaneous equations; sequences and series; differentiation, maxima and minima; integration. Key text: T. Bradley and P. Patton Essential Mathematics for Economics and Business. Other texts: Ian Jacques Mathematics for Economics and Business. Chris Birchenhall and Paul Grout Mathematics for Modern Economics.

ECOI0006: Introductory microeconomics

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES40 EX40 OT20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: The Unit is designed to provide an introduction to the methods of microeconomic analysis, including the use of simple economic models and their application. Students should gain an ability to derive conclusions from simple economic models and evaluate their realism and usefulness. Learning Objectives: By the end of the course unit students should be able to understand and apply basic microeconomic principles to the economic decisions of households and firms under a variety of market conditions. They should be able to use these principles both to describe and to appraise these decisions. They should be competent in the verbal, diagrammatic and basic mathematical concepts and techniques used in introductory microeconomics. Additional provision is made for those students without A Level Economics. The Unit is supported by the CAL package WinEcon.
Content:
An introduction to economic methodology; the concept of market equilibrium; the use of demand and supply curves, and the concept of elasticity; elementary consumer theory, indifference curves and their relationship to market demands; elementary theory of production, production possibilities and their relationship to cost curves; the output decisions of perfectly and imperfectly competitive firms and industries; supply curves; the idea of general competitive equilibrium; the efficiency properties of competitive markets; examples of market failure. Key texts: Richard G. Lipsey and K. Alec Chrystal 'An Introduction to Positive Economics'. Jean Soper and Phil Hobbs (eds) 'The WinEcon Workbook'. M. L. Katz and H.S. Rosen 'Microeconomics'. Alan Griffiths and Stuart Wall 'Applied Economics: An Introductory Course'.

ECOI0007: Introductory macroeconomics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES40 EX40 OT20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: The Unit is designed to provide an introduction to the methods of macroeconomic analysis, including the use of simple macroeconomic models and their application in a UK policy context. Students should gain an ability to derive conclusions from simple economic models and evaluate their realism and usefulness in policy making. Learning Objectives: By the end of the course unit students should be able to understand and apply basic macroeconomic principles to the economic decisions of the policy-maker. They should be able to use these principles to both describe and appraise these decisions as well as to understand how macroeconomic problems arise. They should be competent in the verbal, diagrammatic and basic mathematical concepts used in introductory macroeconomics, providing a suitable platform for the more advanced study of this subject in future years. Additional provision is made for those students without A Level Economics. The Unit is supported by the CAL package WinEcon.
Content:
The circular flow of income and expenditure; national income accounting; aggregate demand and supply; the components and determinants of private and public sector aggregate expenditure in closed and open economies; output and the price level in the short- and long-run; monetary institutions and policy; inflation and unemployment; the balance of payments and exchange rates; economic growth, the Kondratieff. Key texts: Richard G. Lipsey and K. Alec Chrystal 'An Introduction to Positive Economics'. Jean Soper and Phil Hobbs (eds) 'The WinEcon Workbook'. M.J. Artis (ed) 'The UK Economy: a Manual of Applied Economics'. Alan Griffiths and Stuart Wall 'Applied Economics: An Introductory Course'.

ECOI0008: The modern world economy 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX70 OT30
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: The aim of this Unit is to equip students with an historical, institutional and descriptive understanding of economic issues and institutions in a global context. The Unit is appropriate for specialist students of economics and will support and provide a relevant policy context for first year units in introductory micro and macroeconomics. The Unit is also appropriate for non-specialist students, who may wish to take only one or two course units in economics, and will introduce them to some of the central principles of economics via the policy questions and institutional arrangements which confront modern economies. Learning objectives: By the end of the course unit, students should be able to develop an informed commentary on both academic and more popular arguments on: 1. Patterns of growth and development at national, regional and global levels. 2. The role of multilateral corporations in the global economy. 3. The impacts of globalisation on the workforces of both developed and developing economies. 4. The scope for national economic policies within the globalised economy.
Content:
Growth and development in the world economy since the Second World War; patterns of international trade and investment; the role of multi national corporations; employment and income distribution in the world economy; limitations on national policy effectiveness; international economic institutions and the regulation of international trade, investment and finance. Key text: Peter Dicken, 'Global Shift'.

ECOI0009: The modern world economy 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES30 EX70
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This Unit is a continuation from ECOI0008 The Modern World Economy 1. Its aim is to provide students with an understanding of the economic issues which have affected various regions of the world in the post second world war period. It is designed to be accessible to both specialist and non-specialist students of economics. Learning objectives: By the end of the course unit students should be able to understand: 1. The determinants of economic activity in selected regions of the world economy. 2. The reasons why there are significant differences in this activity among such regions. 3. The policy issues which confront nations within these regions.
Content:
The course unit comprises three regional studies: the European Union, Transitional Economies of East and Central Europe, East Asia. European Union: The development of economic integration in Europe; static and dynamic effects of economic integration; trade creation and diversion and the economics of customs unions; factor mobility and the common market; fiscal and monetary harmonisation; optimum currency areas and the European Monetary System; the role of the European Central Bank and the problem of Europe-wide macroeconomic policy. Transitional Economies: Central planning, operation and failure; the state of transition today; expanding the European Union to embrace Central and Eastern Europe. East Asia: Interpretations of the East Asian "miracle" (pre-1997); causes and consequences of the current crisis; longer term prospects for sustainable development. Key texts: D. Swann 'The Economics of the Common Market'. James Forder, ' Both Sides of the Coin: The Arguments Against the Euro and EMU'. F. McDonald, 'European Economic Integration'. D. Dyker (ed), 'The European Economy'. D. Gros and A., 'Steinherr Winds of Change'. Grahame Thompson (ed), 'Economic Dynamism in the Asia-Pacific World Bank The East Asian Miracle'.

ECOI0010: Intermediate microeconomics

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX50 OT50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course unit covers the core concepts and methods of microeconomic analysis, using some mathematics in modelling and explication, in conformity with modern intermediate micro texts. It is supported by a course unit in Mathematical Economics, where single honours Economics students will acquire a more rigorous mathematical approach. The aim of this unit is to enable students to deepen their analytical ability in microeconomics so that they can use theory to generate predictions and explanations with respect to economic phenomena. The learning objectives are that by the end of the course unit, students should be able to tackle economic problems with the sustained application of (mainly neo-classical) economic principles and be familiar with recent contributions to the subject. Manipulation of short problems under test conditions allows the demonstration of economic insight. The course unit is essential for anyone wishing to undertake further study of the economics of industry, labour, environment and other sectoral economic issues.
Content:
The course will cover the theory of consumer behaviour, the theory of the firm in a competitive situation, industrial organisation and imperfect competition, the theory of factor markets, the economics of uncertainty and information, welfare economics and general equilibrium theory. Key texts: H. Varian,'Intermediate Microeconomics'. D. Laidler and S. Estrin,'Introduction to Microeconomics'.

ECOI0011: Intermediate macroeconomics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX50 OT50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course unit covers the core concepts and methods of macroeconomic analysis, with some use of mathematics where appropriate. Exposition in lectures will be mainly verbal and diagrammatic; single honours Economics students will acquire a more rigorous mathematical treatment of some topics in the unit in Mathematical Economics. The aim is to enable students to deepen their analytical ability in macroeconomics so that they can analyse more complex theoretical and policy problems. The learning objectives are that by the end of the course students should be able to demonstrate an ability to understand, manipulate and use for policy analysis a series of small general equilibrium models. In addition by showing an ability to answer problems under test conditions to exhibit an active problem solving engagement with the material.
Content:
Topics include intertemporal budget constraints; money and the demand for money; monetary policy, aggregate demand and output; inflation and business cycles; fiscal policy; labour markets; exchange rates and financial markets; the international monetary system. Key texts: M. Burda and C. Wyplosz,'Macroeconomics: a European Text'. R.J. Barro and V. Grilli,'European Macroeconomics'.

ECOI0012: Economic thought & policy 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims of the Unit:
* To familiarise students with a range of primary source texts written by major economists from the late eighteenth to late nineteenth century.
* To stimulate an interest and knowledge base in the historical development of economics in Britain.
* To convey the relevance of the economics of earlier writers to an understanding of present day economic thought and debate. Learning Objectives: Students will have developed an understanding of the economic models and contributions to policy of a number of major economists in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and the context within which these models were relevant. Students will have acquired "first hand" knowledge through reading primary sources.
Content:
The historical development of economic thought and policy from the beginning of the industrial revolution in the eighteenth century to the emergence of neoclassical economics. The main economists considered are Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, J.S. Mill and Jevons. Key texts: Primary sources Ekelund and Hebert,'A History of Economic Theory and Method'. R. Heilbroner,'The Worldly Philosophers'.

ECOI0013: Economic thought & policy 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX50 ES50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This Unit extends the aims and objectives of Economic Thought and Policy 1 (ECOI0012) by considering the influence of late nineteenth and early twentieth century economists on the development of economic ideas and policy.
Content:
The main economists considered are Marshall, Pigou, Pareto, Wicksell, Myrdal Ohlin, Hayek and Keynes. The course unit is organised around four broad topic areas: The development of welfare economics from Marshall onwards; The competitive model and increasing returns to scale; Money, business cycles and effective demand in the 1920s and 1930s; Keynesian and post-Keynesian macroeconomic policy. Key texts: G.L.S. Shackle,'The Years of High Theory'. Ekelund and Hebert,'A History of Economic Theory and Method'. David Laidler,'Fabricating the Keynesian Revolution'. Primary sources.

ECOI0014: Money & finance

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to provide an introduction to the analysis of financial behaviour, and to use this analysis to explain and evaluate recent trends in UK financial markets, institutions, and policy within the context of European monetary and financial integration. The learning objective is that, at the end of the course, students should be able to i) understand the roles of financial markets and the institutions that participate in them, ii) analyse the effects of changes in financial market structures on market behaviour, iii) analyse the effects of government financial policy on the workings of financial markets.
Content:
Risk and return: financial instruments and their pricing; financial intermediation; money and capital markets; the foreign exchange market; deposit- and non-deposit-taking financial institutions; government borrowing, the regulatory regime, and the role of the central bank. Key texts: P.G.A. Howells and K. Bain,'The Economics of Money, Banking and Finance: a European Text'. C.A.E. Goodhart,'Money, Information and Uncertainty'. M. Artis and M. Lewis,'Money in Britain'.

ECOI0015: Economics of industry

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit is to examine industry and the policy context within which it operates, with particular reference to the UK. The emphasis is in part on providing a descriptive account of the key features of industrial structure and in part on providing an account of theoretical models which can be used to explain the behaviour of firms and industries. Learning Objectives: Students will have acquired familiarity with key topics in industrial economics such as pricing theory, advertising, innovation and the analysis of market structure and barriers to entry and be able to apply these concepts to contemporary industrial developments. Students will have gained an understanding of industrial and competition policy.
Content:
The Unit provides a descriptive review of contemporary industrial structure and of the relationship between industry in the UK, Europe and beyond. It reviews the two main paradigms for analysing industry, namely the Structure-Conduct-Performance model and the New Industrial Economics. It applies microeconomic theory to explain why firms exist and how they select price, output and marketing strategies. It examines the role played by government policy in the operation and regulation of industry. Key texts: Stead, Curwen and Lawler,'Industrial Economics'. Jacobson and Andreosso-O'Callaghan,'Industrial Economics and Organisation: A European Perspective'. George, Joll and Lynk,'Industrial Organisation'.

ECOI0016: Economics of social policy

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to build on students` knowledge of microeconomic principles and apply and extend it within the context of social policy. Students will acquire an understanding of what economics has to say about some of the major areas of social policy. Efficiency and equity issues within this important area will be stressed. Learning objectives include the possession of a sound grasp of how economics can illuminate areas of social policy, and the demonstration of analytical ability by applying economic principles to social policy problems.
Content:
The course unit introduces some of the main issues that economists emphasise when they discuss social policy. The lectures are divided into two groups. In the first we look at some of the basic ideas which economists have used to analyse social policies. We discuss politico-social theories and the role of the state; the concepts of equity and efficiency; the economic justifications for intervention; the economics of insurance, and the measurement of economic welfare and poverty. In the second group we look at some of the main economic issues in six different areas of social policy: financing the welfare state; education; health; housing; poverty, and pensions. Key texts: N. Barr,'The Economics of the Welfare State'. Le Grand, Propper and Robinson,'The Economics of Social Problems'.

ECOI0017: Labour economics

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW20 EX80
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this unit is to provide a sustained application and extension of predominantly intermediate microeconomic theory to the labour market. Learning objectives are that students should gain a critical appreciation of the impact of market forces, institutions and regulations within labour markets. The general desirability of government intervention of various types into this area of the economy is a key question students should be able to tackle by the end of the course unit.
Content:
Labour is the most important single factor of production and the analytical and empirical study of the labour market constitute the content of this course. Topics covered will include: "New" household economics; labour supply and demand and the effects of taxation on labour supply; human capital investment; the distribution of earnings; discrimination and segmentation; economic models of trade unions; search, vacancy and unemployment analysis; minimum wage legislation. Key texts: Bosworth, Dawkins and Stromback,'The Economics of the Labour Market'. J.P. Jacobsen,'The Economics of Gender'.

ECOI0018: Mathematical economics

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW20 EX80
Requisites: Pre UNIV0036

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to equip students with an understanding of, and an ability to use, mathematical methods in economics. Students will learn both the fundamental quantitative techniques essential to an economist and how to apply these techniques to a range of economic questions. Learning objectives: By the end of the course unit students should be able to (1) apply the Lagrangian technique to a wide variety of constrained optimisation problems; (2) apply linear algebra techniques to analyse the comparative statics of economic models; (3) analyse the dynamic processes underlying time-series economics. The unit supports and extends the course units in intermediate micro and macroeconomics.
Content:
The course unit begins with a detailed analysis of the Lagrangian method and its applications: constrained optimisation for the household and the firm; the concept of duality; labour supply choices and optimisation over time; optimisation under uncertainty; expected utility theory and attitude to risk. It then covers linear algebra techniques and applications; solving systems of equations; the quadratic form, second order conditions and the Hessian matrix; comparative statics. The course unit ends by analysing the use of difference and differential equations in economic dynamics. Key texts: C. Birchenhall and P. Grout,'Mathematics for Modern Economics'. A.C. Chiang,'Fundamentals of Mathematical Economics'.

ECOI0019: Introduction to econometrics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX50 CW50
Requisites: Pre UNIV0037

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit is to provide a simple introduction to econometric methods for students who have some knowledge of statistical hypothesis testing and regression. Students will undertake econometric work of their own using Excel and Microfit and will be able to perform simple econometric analyses of data.
Content:
Topics covered include: the nature of econometrics, multiple regression, dummy variables; muticollinearity; heteroskedasticity; autocorrelation, simultaneous equation models and stationarity. Key texts: D. Gujarati,'Essentials of Econometrics'. P. Kennedy,'A Guide to Econometrics'.

ECOI0020: Econometrics 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX70 OT30
Requisites: Pre ECOI0019

Aims & learning objectives:
Knowledge of econometrics is an essential part of the toolkit of any economist and econometric techniques are used in a wide range of disciplines, including management, statistics and biological sciences. The aim of this Unit is to build on the second year work in ECOI0019 and present a rigorous account of econometrics. Learning Objectives: Students should gain an ability to critically evaluate econometric work done by others, in e.g. journals, as well as increase their ability to do their own empirical work. By the end of the semester students will be more confident in their use of matrix algebra, the language of econometrics, and its application to econometric problems. They will have undertaken empirical work using computer packages such as RATS and LIMDEP. The emphasis is on both theory and applications in equal measure.
Content:
The Unit follows Johnston's classic text to a large extent. Specific topics include: ordinary least squares; measures of goodness of fit; two stage least squares; serial correlation; heteroscedasticity; lag structures; errors in variables; measurement errors and Monte Carlo simulation. Key texts: Jack Johnston and John Dinardo,'Econometrics'. A. Koutsoyiannis,'Econometrics'. Pindyck and Rubinfeld,'Econometric Models and Economic Forecasts'. Cuthbertson, Hall and Taylor,'Applied Econometric Techniques'.

ECOI0021: Econometrics 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX70 OT30
Requisites: Pre ECOI0020

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to build on the work done in the first semester course unit ECOI0020 Econometrics 1 taking the analysis of econometrics to a higher level. The emphasis is therefore on introducing the students to a wide range of different techniques currently in use in econometrics, enabling them to critically evaluate econometric work done by others, as well as increasing their ability to do their own empirical work. The emphasis is on both theory and applications in equal measure. Learning Objectives: By the end of the semester students will understand a wide variety of econometric techniques and be able to undertake their own econometric analysis making use of those techniques. They will have undertaken empirical work using RATS and LIMDEP. Students should also have the capacity to expand their own knowledge and ability under their own initiative once they have graduated. By the end of the course they will be competent to pursue a masters in this area, but will also have learnt material which will be valuable in a commercial environment.
Content:
The Unit follows Johnston's classic text to a large extent, although going beyond that in significant areas. Specific topics include: maximum likelihood; nonlinear least squares; Box Jenkins and ARIMA forecasting; stationarity and cointegration; error correction models; evaluating forecasts; limited dependent variable analysis - binomial, probit, and logit. Key texts: Jack Johnston and John Dinardo,'Econometrics'. Koutsoyiannis,'Econometrics'. Pindyck and Rubinfeld,'Econometric Models and Economic Forecasts'. Cuthbertson, Hall and Taylor,'Applied Econometric Techniques'.

ECOI0023: Social change and development

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX50 ES50
Requisites: Pre ECOI0077

Aims & learning objectives:
Aim: To introduce students to some of the key concepts and methods used in the social analysis of change and international development, grounding theoretical exploration in practical approaches to particular issues. Learning objectives: Students should learn how the key concerns of sociology (social structure and social relations) and social anthropology (culture) can be used to extend understanding of the process involved in social change and international development. By the end of this course unit students should be equipped critically to discuss the concepts and practice of social change drawing on the analytical traditions of sociology and social anthropology and the experience of a range of contexts in Africa, Asia and Latin America. This course unit builds on the foundations laid in ECOI0077 Introduction to International Development. It focuses on development as something that happens: social change. This complements ECOI0043 Governance and the Policy Process in Developing Countries, which considers development as something which is done: policy and programme intervention.
Content:
Social change and development as essentially contested: both as concepts and as forms of practice. A way of ordering the world by contrasts: in time - tradition/modernity; and space - first/third world; and in time as space - modern=western. Models of social change and the implication of sociology and anthropology in these. Interrogating notions of identity, tradition and modernity: in colonialism; in notions of city and countryside; poverty and progress; health and reasoning; cultures of production and exchange. The dynamics of social change: in divisions of labour and within households. Issues around agency, consciousness and social/political action. The implications of globalization and the post-colonial order. Key text: Roger Keesing,'Cultural Anthropology: A Contemporary Perspective'. Nancy Scheper-Hughes, 'Death Without Weeping: The Violence of Everday Life in Urban Brazil'.

ECOI0024: Economics of development 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES40 OR10 EX50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit is to relate economic theory to debates over the determinants of global poverty, and over the prospects for economic development and poverty reduction in low and middle income countries (LMICs), particularly of South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. The learning objectives of the course unit are that students should acquire an improved understanding of:
* the economic performance and prospects of LMICs;
* how the economies of LMICs interact with those of high income countries (HICs);
* the nature and determinants of global poverty, and the prospects for poverty reduction;
* the relevance of theory to the analysis of the economic problems and prospects of LMICs;
* the relationship between economics and other social science disciplines relevant to the analysis of the economic problems and prospects of LMICs - particularly sociology, anthropology and political science. Students who are interested in issues of economic development are advised to take the second semester course unit in Economics of Development 2 (ECOI0025) and/or Economics of Transition (ECOI0026).
Content:
The following topics will be covered: classical models of agrarian transformation and industrialisation; the current status of development economics; economic development, institutions and culture; evaluation of economic liberalisation; economic development and demography; strategies for poverty reduction. Key texts: G.M. Meier (ed),'Leading Issues in Economic Development'. A.P Thirlwall,'Growth and Development'. J.G. Copestake,'Theories of Economic Development'. (on www.bath.ac.uk/deid/j.g.copestake).

ECOI0025: Economics of development 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES40 OR10 EX50
Requisites: Pre ECOI0024

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to provide an in-depth understanding of selected topics in the economies of developing countries, beyond that provided by ECOI0024 Economics of Development 1. The objectives are to show students how to apply economic theory to the problems of developing countries and how to assess empirical evidence on these issues.
Content:
The course interleaves lectures with seminars in which students will make presentations on selected topics. The course covers the following topics: growth theory and the performance of developing economies; household economics and intra-household allocation; rural factor markets; stabilisation; liberalisation and structural adjustment; population. Key texts: D. Ray,'Development Economics'. R. Jha,'Macroeconomics for Developing Countries'.

ECOI0026: Economics of transition

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES20 EX80
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aims of the Unit are to use economic analysis to understand the changes which are taking place in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, and to develop a critical awareness of the problems which have beset transition, and an appreciation of their possible solutions. The learning objectives include the students being able to describe the process of transition; to demonstrate an awareness of the role played by the legacy of planning in the present state of transition; and to show the weaknesses in present policies and to outline how progress might be possible.
Content:
Topics covered will include the planned economy and legacy of planning under communism; the speed and sequencing of adjustment to market economy; institutional change; privatisation; financial markets; the labour market; foreign trade; growth and inflation; public finance issues. Key texts: D. Gros and A. Steinherr,'Winds of Change'. M. Lavigne,'The Economics of Transition: from Socialist Economy to Market Economy'. Mark Knell (ed),'The Economics of Transition: Structural Adjustments and Growth Prospects in Eastern Europe'.

ECOI0027: International monetary economics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES20 EX80
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit is to present a fairly rigorous account of the material that relates to monetary aspects of an open economy. Students will gain a critical appreciation of the theoretical tools used in this important area of economics and a robust analytical framework for the interpretation of policy. The learning objective is that, at the end of the course unit, students will understand the way in which economic theory can be applied to issues such as (i) the use of fiscal and monetary policies in open economies; (ii) UK balance of payments policy; (iii) the workings of the foreign exchange market; (iv) the European monetary system and the issue of UK membership. Although the unit can be studied as a self-contained module, it forms part of a specialist stream in International Economics, with ECOI0034 International Trade.
Content:
The course unit emphasises debate mainly at the theoretical level, by generally contrasting a Keynesian real side approach with a more classically inspired monetary approach. Specific topics include: the nature and significance of the balance of payments; parity concepts; the efficient markets hypothesis; devaluation; open economy macroeconomics; flexible versus fixed exchange rates; the foreign trade sector, Europe and international policy co-ordination. Key texts: L.S. Copeland,'Exchange Rates and International Finance'. P. Hallwood and R. MacDonald,'International Money and Finance'. K. Pilbeam,'International Finance'.

ECOI0028: Economic growth & natural resources

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES20 EX80
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit is to provide a fairly sophisticated account of theories of economic growth and of natural resource use, leading on to a discussion of the concept of sustainable development. Though the course draws on some techniques of dynamic optimisation, the emphasis is on economic intuition and empirical relevance rather than rigorous mathematical proof. Learning objectives: By the end of the course unit students should be able to critically appraise the analytical models and empirical evidence used by economists relating to: 1. the causes of differences in long-term comparative growth performance across countries and regions 2. the determinants over time of the available stocks and prices of various natural resources, such as fossil fuels, metals, fish and timber 3. the efficiency and equity of various ways of managing natural resources, including the implications of these for biodiversity 4. the likelihood of economic growth being sustainable in the long-term taking into account the effects of population growth, technical progress and natural resource depletion. Although the unit can be studied as a self-contained module, it forms part of a specialist stream in the Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment, with ECOI0029 Environmental Economics.
Content:
The course unit covers the following topics: The neo-classical model of growth and the empirical record; savings and optimal growth; endogenous growth; depletion of exhaustible resources; management of renewable resources; intergenerational equity; sustainable development. Key texts: Perman, Ma and McGilvray,'Natural Resource and Environmental Economics'. Hanley, Shogren and White,'Environmental Economics'. Charles I. Jones,'Introduction to Economic Growth'.

ECOI0029: Environmental economics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit is to provide an economic perspective on environmental regulation and on the management of natural resources. Students will gain an understanding of the economic framework that is used to identify effective solutions to problems of environmental resource use and externalities. The unit will also provide an understanding of the application of environmental economics to important policy issues. The learning objectives of the unit include knowledge of the economic tools used to value environmental impacts and natural resource use and to design cost effective methods of controlling pollution and avoiding misuse of the natural environment. The need to reconcile the objectives of economic development with environmental conservation will be explained, as will some international aspects of environmental protection. This will give students an understanding of the issues and theory behind environmental policy as well as an academic grounding appropriate for undertaking more advanced study in the field of environmental economics. Although the unit can be studied as a self-contained module, it forms part of a specialist stream in the Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment, with ECOI0028 Economic Growth and Natural Resources.
Content:
The course unit will discuss the welfare economic basis of environmental economics and why market systems do not provide adequate environmental protection. It will go on to study different methods of valuing the environment and on regulating it in a national context. Finally it will deal with the theme of environment and development, and the idea of sustainable development. Key texts: Perman, Ma and McGilvray,'Natural Resource and Environmental Economics'. Hanley, Shogren and White,'Environmental Economics'.

ECOI0030: Advanced microeconomics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to build on intermediate microeconomics and to introduce some of the theory that underlies much of the more recent academic research. Learning objectives: By the end of the course unit students will have acquired: (i) an understanding of the scope of modern microeconomics and its applications, (ii) an ability to read and understand current literature in microeconomics and (iii) an ability to use advanced microeconomic concepts in analysing specific issues.
Content:
The course unit covers topics that deal with three inter-related issues: decision making under uncertainty; the strategic behaviour of economic actors; the use of information. Topics will include: expected utility theory; game theory; asymmetric information; screening and signalling - theory and applications. Key text: J. Hirshleifer and J.G. Riley,'The Analytics of Uncertainty and Information'.

ECOI0031: Advanced macroeconomics

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to build on second year macroeconomics and to help students to achieve a critical understanding of recent macroeconomic research on key issues such as unemployment, inflation and the business cycle. Learning objectives: By the end of the course unit students should be able to evaluate new contributions to the macroeconomic literature, including policy research carried out by government and independent economists.
Content:
Business cycles and unemployment in the main "schools" of macroeconomics; new classical theory, unemployment and the equilibrium business cycle; the real business cycle and critiques and modifications of it; multiplier-accelerator and the treatment of upper and lower turning points; welfare losses due to the business cycle, empirical evidence; the Layard-Nickell model of unemployment; nominal wage and price rigidity and unemployment; job search, benefits and unemployment duration; efficiency wages and unemployment; insiders, outsider, hysteresis, and the natural rate; modern treatments of the Phillips curve. Key texts: B. Snowdon and H.R. Vane,'A Macroeconomic Reader'. Hartley, Hoover and Salyer,'Real Business Cycles: A Reader'. Layard, Nickell and Jackman,'The Unemployment Crisis'.

ECOI0032: Final year research project 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
These course units can only be taken together, and form a two semester period of study on a single topic of the student's choice. The aim of the research project units is that students will learn how to design and carry out research on a specific economic question. Students who have taken ECOI0046 Research and Presentation Skills will be building on and developing skills acquired in the second year. Students on the degree Programme in Economics and Politics may select a topic which relates to political science, but will be encouraged to demonstrate skills of economic and political analysis. Learning objectives: Students should gain insights into the development of sustained analysis, hypothesis formation and 'testing'. In the first Semester the work will involve independent study supported by workshops in which students will make presentations of their research, developing transferable skills valuable in the labour market. In the second Semester students will work under the guidance of a supervisor.
Content:
The topic will be chosen by the student. Students will be required to make a 15 minute presentation of their work, in early December, which should cover the rationale for the topic chosen and a critical appraisal of the literature relating to it. Thereafter, students will work under the guidance of their supervisor, submitting the finished project by the end of the first week of the summer term.

ECOI0033: Final year research project 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
These course units can only be taken together, and form a two semester period of study on a single topic of the student's choice. The aim of the research project units is that students will learn how to design and carry out research on a specific economic question. Students who have taken ECOI0046 Research and Presentation Skills will be building on and developing skills acquired in the second year. Students on the degree Programme in Economics and Politics may select a topic which relates to political science, but will be encouraged to demonstrate skills of economic and political analysis. Learning objectives: Students should gain insights into the development of sustained analysis, hypothesis formation and 'testing'. In the first Semester the work will involve independent study supported by workshops in which students will make presentations of their research, developing transferable skills valuable in the labour market. In the second Semester students will work under the guidance of a supervisor.
Content:
The topic will be chosen by the student. Students will be required to make a 15 minute presentation of their work, in early December, which should cover the rationale for the topic chosen and a critical appraisal of the literature relating to it. Thereafter, students will work under the guidance of their supervisor, submitting the finished project by the end of the first week of the summer term.

ECOI0034: International trade

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES20 EX80
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit is to provide an economic perspective on issues relating to international trade. The learning objective is that, at the end of the course unit, students will understand the way in which economic theory can be applied to issues such as (i) why countries engage in international trade (ii) how the pattern of trade flow is determined (iii) why countries adopt trade restraints (iv) why countries join customs unions. Although the unit can be studied as a self-contained module, it forms part of a specialist stream in International Economics, with ECOI0027 International Monetary Economics.
Content:
After an introduction to basic concepts, the topics discussed will include: comparative advantage; the gains from trade; adjustment costs; the Heckscher-Ohlin-Samuelson model; the specific factors model; theories of intra-industry trade; the costs of protection, smuggling, trade taxes as a revenue source; the optimum tariff; export subsidies; international cartels, quotas and voluntary export restraint; international integration; multinational enterprises and the welfare effects of the international movement of factors of production. Key texts: Brenton, Scott and Sinclair,'International Trade: A European Text'. N. Vousden,'The Economics of Trade Protection'. Markusen, Melvin, Kaempfer and Maskus,'International Trade: Theory and Evidence'. B. Sodersten and G. Reed,'International Economics'.

ECOI0035: Public expenditure & public choice

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit is to provide an economic perspective on decisions which are made with respect to government expenditure programmes. The learning objective is that at the end of the course unit students will be able to (i) understand the theoretical basis of techniques such as cost benefit analysis (ii) be able to advise on 'shadow pricing' (iii) be able to assess how well any cost benefit analysis has been carried out (iv) understand how microeconomic theory can be applied to the process of decision making on public expenditure programmes (v) be able to assess the importance of new literature concerning the 'public choice' approach. Although the unit can be studied as a self-contained module, it forms part of a specialist stream in Public Finance, with ECOI0036 The Economics of Taxation.
Content:
The course unit begins with a review of welfare economics (public expenditure analysis is applied welfare economics). Market failure and the rationale for government intervention is assessed. The impact of alleged 'failings' in the political process is also assessed. The behaviour of voters, political parties, bureaucrats and pressure groups is analysed using microeconomic theory. The growth of the public sector is considered in terms of both market and government failure. Techniques for public sector appraisal are discussed. Key texts: J. Cullis and P. Jones,'Public Finance and Public Choice'. D. Mueller,'Public Choice II'.

ECOI0036: Economics of taxation

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit is to provide an economic perspective on taxation and an understanding of the criteria which can be used to assess different taxes. The learning objective is that, by the end of the course unit, students will be able to appraise tax reform against a set of criteria (which include efficiency and equity). For example, students will understand and assess how taxes affect: (i) resource allocation (ii) incentives to work and save (iii) the allocation of corporate investment and (iv) the income distribution. Although the unit can be studied as a self-contained module, it forms part of a specialist stream in Public Finance, with ECOI0035 Public Expenditure and Public Choice.
Content:
The course unit begins with an analysis of the welfare costs of taxation. Tax incidence is discussed. The effect of tax on work effort, saving and risk taking is explored (and, in particular, the claims of 'supply-side economists' are assessed). Tax expenditures (e.g. tax relief for charitable giving) are appraised. Tax evasion and policy to deter tax evasion is discussed. International taxation is considered. The choice between taxation and government borrowing is examined. Key texts: J. Cullis and P. Jones,'Public Finance and Public Choice'. C.V. Brown and P.M. Jackson,'Public Sector Economics'. G. Myles,'Public Economics'. R. Jha,'Modern Public Economics'.

ECOI0037: Macroeconomic modelling

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Economics
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit is to provide a thorough grounding in the practice, techniques and limitations of macroeconomic modelling. The course unit will review the use of simple macroeconomic models and their application in a policy context as well as the more sophisticated models used by the Treasury, for example. Learning objectives: By the end of the course unit students should be able to understand how to build a macroeconomic model and use it in the forecasting/policy arena. Having gained such knowledge they will then be in a position to understand the process behind modelling and forecasting which will allow them to critically evaluate such material within a commercial or policy environment.
Content:
The first part of the Unit will teach the student the principles of model building, in the following stages: model specification; model simulation; model testing; forecasting; industry models. The second part of the Unit looks at optimal policy making using macroeconomic models. The third part of the Unit looks at specific macroeconomic models, particularly of the UK economy, together with the problems model builders face and the direction in which they have been moving in recent years. Finally we will deal with the types of models theoretical economists build when attempting to model the real world. Key texts: J. Hudson and Dymiotou-Jensen,'Modelling a Developing Country: A Case Study of Cyprus'. K. Wallis (ed),'Models of the UK Economy'. Pindyck and Rubinfeld,'Econometric Models and Economic Forecasts'.

ECOI0038: Advanced econometrics 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre ECOI0020, Pre ECOI0021

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit, and the follow-on second semester unit Advanced Econometrics 2, is to extend the student's knowledge of econometrics to a very high and rigorous level. The language is a combination of matrix algebra and maximum likelihood. The emphasis is on both theory and applications in equal measure. The course unit concentrates on both time series analysis and cross section analysis. Students will be expected to use RATS, LIMDEP and SPSSX in their empirical work.
Content:
Topics covered include: maximum likelihood; limited dependent variable analysis; three stage least squares; full information maximum likelihood; recently developed tests for time series analyses; stationarity; cointegration; splines; seemingly unrelated regressions; spectral analysis; switching regimes models. Key texts: Jack Johnston and John Dinardo Econometrics Fomby, Hill and Johnson Advanced Econometrics G. Chow Econometrics G. Maddala Limited Dependent and Qualitative Variables in Econometrics

ECOI0039: Advanced econometrics 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre ECOI0038

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit, which continues from ECOI0038 Advanced Econometrics 1, is to extend the student's knowledge of econometrics to a very high and rigorous level. The language is a combination of matrix algebra and maximum likelihood. The emphasis is on both theory and applications in equal measure. The course unit concentrates on both time series analysis and cross section analysis. Students will be expected to use RATS, LIMDEP and SPSSX in their empirical work.
Content:
Topics covered include: VAR models; switching regimes models; limited dependent variables; ARCH and GARCH models; specification tests; Hendry's general to specific modelling approach; Box-Cox models; spectral density analysis; generalised method of moments; eigenvalues, multicollinearity and principal components; Johansen's technique for estimating cointegrating vectors. Key texts: Jack Johnston and John Dinardo Econometrics Fomby, Hill and Johnson Advanced Econometrics G. Chow Econometrics G. Maddala Limited Dependent and Qualitative Variables in Econometrics

ECOI0040: International relations 1: A history of international relations theory

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX50 ES50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to provide students with an understanding of the main concepts, theories and perspectives used to study international relations, and to introduce them to the historical development of those aspects of international relations theory that are relevant today. By examining how different types of historical international systems have existed in the past, what caused wars to occur and what helped to maintain peace, students will have a better idea of the causes of conflict and cooperation today. Learning objectives: By the end of this course unit students should be able to do the following:
* identify the main perspectives of international relations
* explain the key Western thinkers and their ideas which contributed to the main perspectives on international relations
* explain how the key thinkers, ideas and concepts are related to the development of different historic international systems. Although the unit can be studied as a self-contained module, it forms part of a specialist stream in international relations with ECOI0041.
Content:
An historical survey of the main theories of international relations and the main historical state-systems in which they arose: the Greek-state system, the middle ages, the Renaissance and the emergence of the modern state system. The course unit examines a series of important, enduring questions in international relations theory about international systems: (1) what were the origins of different international systems; (2) what factors contributed to order and stability; and (3) what factors promoted not only disorder and instability, but also system-wide change, the change to to an entirely different type of international system. Key texts: Michael Doyle,'Ways of War and Peace: Realism, Liberalism, and Socialism'. Torbjorn Knutsen,'A History of International Relations Theory'. Joseph Nye,'Understanding International Conflicts: An Introduction to Theory And History'.

ECOI0041: International relations 2: contemporary international relations

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX50 ES40 OR10
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aims of this Unit are to provide students with an understanding of how contemporary thinkers have contributed to the main perspectives of international relations; to consider the impact of globalisation on international relations; to show how international conflict has changed in the twentieth century, particularly since the end of the Cold War; to provide students with an understanding of how diplomacy has changed in the twentieth century. Learning objectives: By the end of the course unit students should be able to:
* critically evaluate the main perspectives of international relations
* explain the impact of the end of the Cold War on global security
* explain what international relations scholars mean by globalisation, and critically evaluate what impact it has had on international relations
* explain how the changing nature of international conflict has posed new challenges for humanitarian organisations in developing countries Although the unit can be studied as a self-contained module, it forms part of a specialist stream in international relations with ECOI0040.
Content:
Topics include how International Relations has changed since the end of the Cold War, the State, and non-state actors, the balance of power, problems of diplomacy, international organisation, war and international conflict, nationalism, religion and international stability and international political economy. A set of themes emerge from these topics that are ethical in nature: the relationship between order and justice, state sovereignty and humanitarian intervention, the nature and meaning of international obligation in a society of sovereign states, the idea of universal human rights and cultural relativism, and ways of maintaining international order: the balance of power, international regimes, and new approaches to global governance. Key texts: J. Goldstein,'International Relations'. C. Kegley and E. Wittkopf,'World Politics: Trend and Transformation'. Gordon Graham,'Ethics and International Relations'.

ECOI0042: Politics of developing countries: ethnicity, religion and nationalism

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX50 ES40 OR10
Requisites: Pre ECOI0078

Aims & learning objectives:
Two of the most important developments at the end of the Twentieth Century are the global spread of democracy and the resurgence of religion, ethnicity and nationalism in politics. Therefore the aim of the Unit is to provide students with an understanding of the ongoing saliency of ethnicity, religion and nationalism to the politics of selected post-communist and developing countries. The learning objectives are that by the end of the course unit students should be able to:
* critically evaluate the role of ethnicity, religion and nationalism in the main perspectives of development
* understand the role of religion and revolution in South Africa, Poland and Latin America
* understand the role of Islam in different types of Muslim countries
* understand how religion challenges the secular state in India, Turkey, Algeria and Egypt. Although the unit can be studied as a self-contained module, it forms part of a specialist stream in the Policy Process and Politics of Development with ECOI0043 Governance and the Policy Process in Developing Countries and ECOI0080 Policy and Politics.
Content:
Introduction to the politics of developing countries; the concepts of ethnicity, religion and nationalism; the transition to democracy; the consolidation of democracy. Case studies of: Poland, Yugoslavia, South Africa, Turkey, India, Algeria, Egypt and Latin America. Key texts: J. Esposito and J. Voll,'Islam and Democracy'. Jeff Haynes,'Religion and Politics in the Third World'. Jeff Haynes,'Religion in Global Politics'. David Westerlund (ed),'Questioning the Secular State'.

ECOI0043: Governance and the policy process in developing countries

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX50 ES40 OR10
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to provide an explanation of the dynamics of governance and the workings of the policy process in developing countries. The learning objectives are that students should develop a critical undetstanding of the policy process in the developing country context, applying and extending their knowledge of the key concepts of power and the institutions through which it is expresed. This unit can be studied as a self-contained module, which complements in particular ECOI0023 Social Change and Development. It also forms part of a specialist stream in the Policy Process and Politics of Development with ECOI0042 The Politics of Developing Countries: Religion, Ethnicity and Nationalism and ECOI0080 Policy and Politic.
Content:
Good governance: the genesis of the concept, its practical implication. State, non-state and civil society actors in development. Policy formulation and implementation in developing countries; policy networks; the roles of external doners; corruption. Institutionalizing good governance, promoting inclusionary practice. Key texts: Grindle and Thomas,'Public Choices and Policy Change: The Political Economy of Reform in Developing Countries'. Turner and Hulme,'Governance, Administration and Development'. R. Rhodes,'Understanding Governance'. Wuyts, Marc. Mackintosh, Maureen and hewitt, Tom (eds),'Development Policy and Public Action. Oxford: Oxford University Press/Open University. R Grillo and R L Stirrat (eds) 1997. Discourses of Development. Anthropological Perspectives. Oxford: Berg.

ECOI0045: Placement

Academic Year
Credits: 60
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment:
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The placement period enables the student to gain valuable practical experience.
Content:
Please see the Director or Studies or course tutor for details about individual placements.

ECOI0046: Research & presentation skills for economists

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES40 OR30 RT30
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this course unit is to provide students with an environment within which they can develop skills of individual and collaborative research, report preparation, and group presentation of an economic topic using Powerpoint. The learning objectives are (1) that students will have acquired the capacity to undertake research on topics of current interest in economic policy which draw on a range of knowledge acquired in other level 2 course units; (2) that students will have worked effectively as members of a small team and will have contributed their fair share; (3) that students will have enhanced their skills in designing and making presentations which will be transferable to the workplace.
Content:
Topics will be assigned to students who will work in groups of 5 or 6; they will be policy focused topics, related to one or more of the other units being studied, for example, in monetary, fiscal, industrial, or environmental economics.

ECOI0047: Mathematics for public finance

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0048: Computing statistics & econometrics

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0049: Tax administration & comparative taxation

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0050: Policy theory & process

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit will establish a theoretical framework necessary for the analysis of policy.
Content:
1. Introduction 2. Politics and the analysis of policy 3. Theories of the State 4. Theories of power 5. State, market and community 6. Interest groups and lobbies and policy communities 7. International context.

ECOI0051: Microeconomics of taxation

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0053: Fiscal dissertation workshop

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0054: Cost benefit analysis with environmental & other applications

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: EX50 ES50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
1.To equip students with an understanding of the principles of CBA and project appraisal, enabling a critical evaluation of appraisal reports. To provide foundational material for those seeking to undertake their own appraisal exercises. 2. To develop these skills in the context of environmental and other case studies.
Content:
1. The course is designed to contrast CBA and project appraisal in a way that isolates the theoretical underpinnings of both. The theme of the material is that the problem addressed in both literatures is very similar although there are significant differences of emphasis. Techniques for measuring costs and benefits and for introducing equity weights into the analytical framework are central to the course. 2. Evaluation of environmental and other case studies and preparation of an outline appraisal for a selected environmental project.

ECOI0055: Taxation of international trade

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0057: Theory of public enterprise

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0058: The state, fiscal policy and development

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0059: Economics of development

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0060: International development: contested themes

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To familiarise students with a history of ideas about development, and to introduce them to major paradigms within which change has been explained. Also to provide an opportunity for participants to share conception of the development process.
Content:
Development ideology and practice; development studies; a post-colonial discipline; dependency and globalisation; actors' struggles; donor fashions.

ECOI0061: Sociology & social anthropology of development

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0062: Public administration

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0063: Policy theory & the politics of developing countries

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: ES50 EX50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aim: To establish the political theoretical frameworks necessary for the analysis of policy and then to introduce the wider concepts, ideas and questions that are fundamental to the study of politics in developing countries Learning objectives: · to ensure that students are familiar with key concepts from political science necessary for the analysis of policy · to make them aware of a range of 'actors' in the policy process and place them in theoretical context · to develop an awareness in the students of the relevance of the concepts to development policy · to allow students to critically evaluate the ways in which Western political theory has been applied to developing countries · to make them aware of the main issues in defining the transition to democracy and in its consolidation in developing countries · to develop an awareness of the impact of religion and ethnicity on notions of nationhood and political stability.
Content:
(part i) Politics and policy analysis; Theories of the state; Theories of power; Organisations and Institutions; Street-level bureaucrats; Organised interests and civil society: (part ii) State and society in the Third World; Democracy and political participation; Political culture and political stability; Culture and economic and political development; Ethnicity and politics; Religion and politics.

ECOI0064: Development studies seminar series 1

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0065: Gender & development workshop

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0066: Development dissertation workshop 1

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0067: Globalisation, development & international relations

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: EX50 CW50
Requisites:



ECOI0068: Regional specialism

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: ES80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Regional Specialism is to allow study fellows the opportunity to develop a more in depth understanding of key issues in a particular region of the developing world. This is regarded as an important element of the programme objectives both for those intending to go on to do work in development and for those who have research interests.
Content:
Regional Specialisms on offer will depend in part upon demand and upon staff availability, but are likely to include most of the following: South Asia, Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and Eastern Europe. Within each region on offer there will be three parts to the unit. Part 1 comprises an introduction to the major economic, social, andpolitical trends in a particular region and their influence on contemporary development issues. This introduction includes some opening lectures and discussions of key issues and debates based on an extensive bibliography especially compiled for each unit. This then evolves into further directed background reading on identified contemporary development issues in the region. Part 2 comprises individual or small group tutorials aimed at helping each study fellow to identify a substantive essay topic of their own choice. These topics are likely to draw on material that is covered (without a particular regional focus) in other Semester 2 units, such as 'Globalisation, Development and International Relations', 'Rural and Urban Livelihoods', and the 'Management of Development' (e.g. the implementation of administrative reform; the role of women in agriculture; or intra-regional cooperation), and apply this general material to a particular region (e.g. admin reform in Sub-Saharan Africa; the role of women in Indian agriculture; intra-regional cooperation in Latin America). In this way the Regional Specialism option provides a way for study fellows to develop regional expertise in particular regions by applying skills and training gained from other units. Part 3 comprises a series of seminar presentations, including a seminar paper of approx. 1,000 words, give by study fellows themselves. As the explanation of Part 2 indicates, the seminar presentation in Part 3 will illustrate one or more of the general issues from the other courses during the second semester with reference to their chosen regional specialism. The seminar paper and presentation are reviewed by the staff, and is developed through further tutorial contact, into an extended essay.

ECOI0069: Rural & urban livelihoods

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0070: Environmental management & sustainable development

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: EX50 CW50
Requisites:



ECOI0071: Management of development

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0072: Development studies seminar series 2

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0073: E1 International economics 1

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0074: E1 International economics 2

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0075: Development research

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0076: Computing skills

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0077: Introduction to international development

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit is to introduce students to the major issues in international development. The learning objectives are that students should: 1. Learn to 'think sociologically' about international development issues 2. Have some knowledge of the development of capitalism and the nation-state system and the ways in which these have interacted to produce problems of poverty, international debt and violence 3. Appreciate the different contributions to understanding development made by different social science disciplines 4. Understand the ideological arguments between the major development paradigms.
Content:
From mercantilism to globalisation; the current structure of the world economy and polity; the diversity of poor country trajectories; disciplinary approaches to international development; development paradigms; wealth and poverty; trade, debt and the international financial institutions; violence; gender relations; the environment; development and the development industry. Key texts: Peter Preston,'Development Theory'. Diana Hunt,'Economic Theories of Development'. Ankie Hoogvelt,'Globalisation and the Postcolonial World'. Katy Gardner & David Lewis,'Anthropology, Development and the Post-modern Challenge'. Andrew Boyd,'An Atlas of World Affairs'.

ECOI0078: Developing countries in world politics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the Unit is to give students an introduction to the main personalities and events in the international arena since 1945 which have contributed to the present position of developing countries in the current global order. Learning objectives: By the end of the course unit students should be able to identify the main personalities and events in world politics and explain their influence on the politics and economics of developing countries. They should be able to explain the role of developing countries in the origins and development of the Cold War, and have an appreciation of the main debates about the Cold War.
Content:
The emergence of the League of Nations and the United Nations system; Bretton-Woods; Developing Countries in the Cold War; India and South Asia: Independence and Partition; Southeast Asia and Peasant Revolutions; African independence and the South African liberation struggle; the Middle-East: Arab nationalism and oil wealth; Latin America: revolution and dictatorship. Key texts: Peter Calvocoressi,'World Politics Since 1945'. Geir Lundestad,'East, West, North, South: Major Developments in International Politics Since 1945'. J. Dunbabin,'The Post-Imperial Age: The Great Powers and the Wider World'.

ECOI0079: Economics of politics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to apply introductory microeconomic theory to analyse political behaviour. Students will investigate the extent to which a rational choice model sheds insight on political behaviour and political institutions. Thus, the intention is to provide students with an integrative link between their understanding of economic theory and political science. The learning objective is that by the end of the course students will be able to apply introductory microeconomic theory to analyse political behaviour. They will be able to use microeconomics to explain and predict why governments prefer one policy option to another. They will be able to assess the costs involved in democratic decision making processes. They will be able to identify and assess alleged 'failings' of the political processes and associated prescriptions.
Content:
The course unit begins with a review of microeconomic welfare theory. This is applied to explain and predict the behaviour of politicians, bureaucrats, voters and pressure groups. The implications of adopting different collective decision making rules are investigated. Case studies are used to illustrate theory. Assessment is offered of the public choice school's assertion that government failure leads to an excessively large public sector. Key texts: K.A. Shepsle and M.S. Bonchek,'Analyzing Politics: Rationality, Behavior and Institutions'. J. Cullis and P. Jones,'Public Finance and Public Choice'.

ECOI0080: Policy & Politics

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES50 EX50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to provide an understanding of the concepts and methods which can be employed in the analysis of economic and international development policy. The intention is to provide students with an integrative link between their understanding of economic theory and political science, via a grounding in the principles of policy analysis. Learning objectives: By the end of this course unit students should be able to provide an informed analysis of economic policy processes; understand the role and limitations of rational techniques in policy formulation and appraisal; understand the main factors likely to affect policy implementation in a range of contexts. Students may develop a specialist stream in policy analysis by selecting the second semester unit in Governance and the Policy Process in Developing Countries ECOI0043.
Content:
Introduction to policy analysis; the analysis of policy in the context of theories of the state; power and policy; ideology and policy: the case of privatisation; models of policy decision-making; techniques in the policy process: the case of cost-benefit analysis; policy and its implementation; analysing policy in an international context; analysing policy in other cultures. Key texts: M. Hill,'The Policy Process in the Modern State'. M. Hill (ed),'The Policy Process: A Reader'. C. Hood,'Explaining Economic Policy Reversals'. B. Hogwood,'Trends in British Public Policy'.

ECOI0081: Economic organisation of the European Community

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 ES20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this course unit is to apply introductory microeconomic and macroeconomic principles to a range of European policy areas. The learning objective is that students will have enhanced their understanding of European economic issues begun in The Modern World Economy and to demonstrate the value of theoretical analysis.
Content:
The following topics will be covered: EU trade policy and the economics of customs unions; Common Agricultural and Fisheries Policies of the EU; fiscal harmonisation and EU budgetary policy; EU environmental policy; EU industrial and competition policy; European Monetary Union and exchange rate arrangements. Key texts: T. Hitiris,'European Union Economics'. M.J. Artis and N. Lee (eds),'The Economics of the European Union'. A. El-Agraa (ed),'The European Union'.

ECOI0082: Green taxation

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: EX50 CW50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To understand the theory and practice of using taxation and related instruments to correct for miscalculations of environmental and natural resources and to assist in the achievement of sustainable development.
Content:
Defining and measuring environmental externalities; the design of environmental and natural resource taxation under different market structures; comparing the efficiency and equity effects of green taxes and other instruments; general equilibrium models and the double dividend argument; the intertemporal dimension and sustainable use of resources.

ECOI0083: Economics of public expenditure & public debt

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0085: Economies of the public sector in developing & transitional economies

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0086: Social expenditure & income distribution

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0087: Environmental dissertation workshop

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0089: Environmental economics

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: EX50 CW50
Requisites:



ECOI0092: Environmental impact analysis

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0093: Life cycle analysis

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0094: Extended essay

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0095: Integrating environmental workshop & exam

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:



ECOI0096: Development dissertation work

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0098: Development studies extended essay

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0100: Dip development studies project

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0102: Dip ESPP extended essay

Semester 2
Credits: 30
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:



ECOI0104: Dip fiscal studies extended essay

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0105: Core issues in development studies 2

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0106: Policy & practice

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ECOI0107: Policy theory

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit provides students with an introduction to the broader theories and paradigms which have developed to understand the processes of policy formation and implementation in modern societies.
Content:
Paradigms of policy analysis: rational choice, institutionalism, etc Policies and principles: liberal, social democratic and communitarian Morality and utility: tradeoffs and hard choices.

ECOI0108: Policy process

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
In this unit we are concerned with the analysis of the policy process. The aims and learning objectives are to: understand the wider socio-economic contraints as well as the political ideologies and power domains within which policies are formulated; explore the various types of decision making process; develop analytical skills and gather a set of conceptual tools with which to analyse and understand how policies are made (or are not made) and implemented (or not).
Content:
Models of decision-making (rationalism and incrementalism, mixed scanning, garbage can model, "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches from decision to implementation: street level bureaucracy Institutions, organisations and organisational constraints Interest groups, lobbies and policy communities, conclusion: linking political theory and policy process analysis.

ECOI0109: International development: poverty & policy

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: ES75 OR25
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Introduction to the different ways in which poverty has entered the debates over how development assistance should be organised.
Content:
Conceptualising and measuring poverty; social exclusion; human needs; anti-poverty action; case studies.

ECOI0110: Economics of social policy

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Postgraduate Taught Unit Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this Unit is to build on the student's knowledge of microeconomic principles and apply and extend them within the context of social policy. Students will acquire an understanding of what economics has to say about some of the major areas of social policy. Efficiency and equity issues within this important area will be stressed.
Content:
The course unit introduces some of the main issues which economists highlight when they discuss social policy. The lectures are divided into two groups. In the first we look at some of the basic ideas which economists have used to analyse social policies. We discuss politico-social theories and the role of the state; the concepts of equity and efficiency; the economic justifications for intervention; the economics of insurance, and the measurement of economic welfare and poverty. In the second group we look at some of the main economic issues in six different areas of social policy: financing the welfare state; education; health; housing; poverty, and pensions. Key texts: N. Barr, The Economics of the Welfare State Le Grand, Propper and Robinson, The Economics of Social Problems

ECOI0111: Politics of developing countries

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aim: To introduce the concepts, ideas and questions that are fundamental to the study of politics in developing countries Learning objectives: · to allow students to critically evaluate the ways in which Western political theory has been applied to developing countries · to make them aware of the main issues in defining the transition to democracy and in its consolidation in developing countries · to develop an awareness of the impact of religion and ethnicity on notions of nationhood and political stability.
Content:
State and society in the Third World; Democracy and political participation; Political culture and political stability; Culture and economic and political development; Ethnicity and politics; Religion and politics.

EDUC0001: Exploring effective learning

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim is to review the student's own learning in order to identify approaches to learning which are effective and to develop a better understanding of the learning process in the context of study in Higher Education. The objectives are that students should understand better their own learning and be able to identify effective learning strategies; they should be able to debate and discuss critically their own learning
Content:
The nature of learning; what is learnt (skills, knowledge, values etc.); learning styles; learning in groups; autonomy in learning; communication as part of the learning process; study skills; presentation skills; time management; assessment and being assessed.

EDUC0001: Exploring effective learning

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit is intended for those students who wish to explore their own learning and to develop strategies for improving it. The unit reviews learning in lectures, tutorials, seminars etc and assessment as encountered by students in higher education. Starting from the students own approaches to learning it considers more effective ways based on experience and research.
Content:
The nature of learning; what is learnt (skills, knowledge, values etc.); learning styles; learning in groups; autonomy in learning; communication as part of the learning process; study skills; presentation skills; time management; assessment and being assessed. This is the recommended unit for those wishing to do one education unit in the year, outside their degree programme.

EDUC0002: Learning: Theory & context

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit will consider more theoretical aspects of learning. It will consider theories of learning and their application in particular situations including schools, colleges, universities and lifelong learning. It will also explore the implications of new technologies for learning and the impact of visual literacy on learning.
Content:
Learning theories; information processing; experiential learning; metacognition; reflection; language and learning; memory. Contexts for learning: schools, further education, higher education, distance and open learning, the workplace, lifelong learning. It is advisable to have done EDUC0001 before this unit, but it is not a requirement. However, Natural Science students must have taken EDUC0001 in order to undertake this unit.

EDUC0002: Learning: Theory & context

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit will consider more theoretical aspects of learning. It will consider theories of learning and their application in particular situations including schools, colleges, universities and lifelong learning. It will also explore the implications of new technologies for learning and the impact of visual literacy on learning.
Content:
Learning theories; information processing; experiential learning; metacognition; reflection; language and learning; memory. Contexts for learning: schools, further education, higher education, distance and open learning, the workplace, lifelong learning. It is advisable to have done EDUC0001 before this unit, but it is not a requirement. However, Natural Science students must have taken EDUC0001 in order to undertake this unit.

EDUC0003: Education in society

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit will consider the role of education in society. It will be based on an assessment of the purposes of education and of educational organisations such as schools, colleges and universities. It will consider government policies towards education; how these policies are formed and what they mean in practice. Examples will be drawn from the UK and wider.
Content:
Aims and purposes of education in different societies and through time; the politics of education; the role of state in education policy and practice: national curricula, national development plans, centralised and decentralised systems, the relationship between education and culture; the hidden curriculum; vocationalism; educational alternatives; Europeanisation and globalisation.

EDUC0003: Education in society

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit will consider the role of education in society. It will be based on an assessment of the purposes of education and of educational organisations such as schools, colleges and universities. It will consider government policies towards education; how these policies are formed and what they mean in practice. Examples will be drawn from the UK and wider.
Content:
Aims and purposes of education in different societies and through time; the politics of education; the role of state in education policy and practice: national curricula, national development plans, centralised and decentralised systems, the relationship between education and culture; the hidden curriculum; vocationalism; educational alternatives; Europeanisation and globalisation.

EDUC0004: Educational institutions as organisations

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit considers educational institutions as organisations. It will look at how these institutions are organised around their key purposes. It will consider key organisational issues such as curriculum design and implementation, equal opportunities, staff development, measuring and identifying effectiveness, ways of improving the quality of provision; the learning institution.
Content:
Schools/colleges/universities as organisations; purposes of the organisations and the practical implications; curriculum purposes and design; equalising opportunities: class, gender, race etc; curriculum strategies: setting, banding, streaming, differentiating, learning support/special needs, pastoral care, assessment, cross-curricular elements; measuring/identifying effectiveness and approaches to improvement; the culture of the teacher: staff development/professional development issues; open learning, lifelong learning, access to learning and accreditation of learning.

EDUC0004: Educational institutions as organisations

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit considers educational institutions as organisations. It will look at how these institutions are organised around their key purposes. It will consider key organisational issues such as curriculum design and implementation, equal opportunities, staff development, measuring and identifying effectiveness, ways of improving the quality of provision; the learning institution.
Content:
Schools/colleges/universities as organisations; purposes of the organisations and the practical implications; curriculum purposes and design; equalising opportunities: class, gender, race etc; curriculum strategies: setting, banding, streaming, differentiating, learning support/special needs, pastoral care, assessment, cross-curricular elements; measuring/identifying effectiveness and approaches to improvement; the culture of the teacher: staff development/professional development issues; open learning, lifelong learning, access to learning and accreditation of learning.

EDUC0005: Science education in practice

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit considers teaching and theories of teaching within the context of science education. The unit includes practical activities within a teaching context which are designed to illustrate the underlying theories. The unit considers issues such as curriculum, assessment, purposes, elements of instructional design and the role of the teacher.
Content:
The relationship between teaching and learning; issues related to designing a curriculum for science: why teach science, how do we learn science, elements of science teaching, conceptual nature of science learning; designing a science curriculum; implementing an aspect of a science curriculum and evaluating it; assessing learning in science. This unit is intended for science, engineering and mathematics students who may be interested in a career in teaching.

EDUC0006: Issues in science education

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit considers key issues in science education. Examples include: the purposes of science education, public understanding of science, how science is learnt, science learning in relation to practical experience, assessment of science learning, equal opportunities in science education.
Content:
The issues will change from time to time, examples include: Theories of learning science, their practical implications and value to the science educator, for example, constructivism and Cognitive Acceleration through Science Education (CASE); the nature and role of practical experience in science learning; equal opportunities in science education; the purposes of science education in for example, the public understanding of science; the nature of science in National Curricula.

EDUC0085: Research methods 1

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0086: Research methods 2

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0087: MA seminar programme 1

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0088: MA seminar programme 2

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0089: Introduction to educational management

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0090: Introcuction to education management

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0093: Management of innovation

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0094: Equal opportunities in educational management

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0095: Educational technology & development 1

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0096: Educational technology & development 2

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0097: Assessment

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0098: Evaluation

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0099: Information technology

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0100: Curriculum studies

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0101: Approaches to comparative and international education

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0102: Methods of educational enquiry

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0103: Education in an international context

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0104: Issues in international primary education

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0105: School effectiveness

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0106: School improvement

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0108: Forgeign language teaching

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0109: Education in an international context

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0110: Language issues in education: language & learning

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0111: Current issues in environmental education

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0112: Current issues in environmental education

Academic Year
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0113: Environmental education: the management of change

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0114: The management of change

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0115: Undergraduate certificate in education

Academic Year
Credits: 60
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment:
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Students will complete the study associated with the Postgraduate Certificate in Education.
Content:
The content is identical to that taught on the Postgraduate Certificate in Education. Students must comply with the requirements for entry onto PGCE including a satisfactory interview before they may opt for the UGCE year. Please see the Director of Studies for further information. There is an expectation that students wishing to take the UGCE year would complete, at least, EDUC0005 in their second year.

EDUC0116: Primary education: aspects of learning

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0117: Action research

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



EDUC0120: The teaching of literature

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ELEC0001: Fields & waves

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students an understanding of electromagnetism so that they can calculate fields, forces and induced emfs in and around simple geometries of current carrying conductors and appreciate the concept of electromagnetic wave propagation in cables.
Content:
Electrostatics: Charge separation and the electrostatic field; definition of electric flux, flux density and field strength; insulating materials; permittivity, dielectric losses, breakdown. Gauss' theorem and the calculation of electric field strength and capacitance. Magnetism: introduction to the magnetic field; forces between current- carrying conductors; definition of B, H and permeability; Amperes circuital law, the effect of magnetic materials; the Biot Savart law applied to a circular circuit and cylindrical solenoid. Displacement current. Calculation of field values in simple geometries. Electromagnetism: Faraday's law and electromagnetic induction. Definitionand calculation of self and mutual inductance. The simple transformer and generator. Energy storage in the e.m. field and forces in electromechanical transducers. Introduction to waves & wavepropagation Wave propagation along coaxial cables; characteristic impedance and reflections for loss less lines.

ELEC0003: Software & computing 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX60 CW40
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a basic understanding of the use of computers to solve problems, make calculations and display the results in examples relevant to science and engineering. At the end of the course students will be able to create straightforward programs to implement algorithms and display the results graphically.
Content:
The MATLAB programming environment. MATLAB as an interactive calculator; constants, variables and arithmetic. Creating simple MATLAB programs; editing and filing. Loops and iteration; summation of series, recurrence and recursion. Other control structures. Functions; local and global scope of variables. Solving ordinary differential equations; Euler's method, built in facilities of MATLAB, modelling simple dynamic systems, displaying results graphically. Representation and manipulation of numeric data; sign and magnitude, twos complement and floating point notation, range and precision, bit manipulation. Arrays and subscripts; sorting and filtering, object based programming with examples. Matrices, matrix arithmetic, masking, vector calculations. Images and colour maps. Case studies: Fractals, finite differences, calculation of electrical potentials. Advanced graphics; graphical objects, their properties and manipulation.

ELEC0004: Electronic devices & circuits

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the electrical properties of semiconductor materials, based on atomic and crystal structure. To develop the behaviour of electronic components formed from the semiconductor materials. To provide the design techniques for incorporating these devices into electronic circuits. At the end of this module students should be able to: understand and explain the basis of electrical conduction in materials and devices and use this to explain the circuit behaviour of semiconductor devices; to design practical circuits based on these devices, such as rectifier circuits, small signal amplifiers, etc.
Content:
Atomic theory: atoms, crystals, energy band structure and diagrams, electrical conduction in solids. Semiconductors: intrinsic, p & n type doping, extrinsic semiconductors, conduction processes (drift and diffusion). Devices: p-n junctions, metal-semiconductor junctions, bipolar junction transistors, field effect transistors, p-n-p-n devices. Circuits: diode circuits, rectification, clamping and limiting, thyristors and controlled rectification. BJT circuits, biasing, amplifier configurations, FET circuits. General principles of amplification: small signal equivalent circuits, frequency response.

ELEC0005: Digital electronics 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the design and operation of logic systems including combinational and sequential logic circuits. To illustrate the applications of these circuits in digital subsystems and systems and to appreciate the advantages of the alternative methods of implementation. At the end of this module students should be able to: manipulate Boolean expression including minimisation by algebraic and graphical techniques; design basic combinational and sequential digital circuits from functional specifications.
Content:
Combinational logic: the binary system, Boolean algebra and gates, logic maps, minimisation. Applications: adders, subtractors, comparators, parity circuits, multiplexers, encoder/decoder circuits. Programmable logic implementations: ROM, PLA & PAL structures and implementation of logic circuits. Sequential logic: synchronous and asynchronous circuits, latches and flip-flops, registers and counters. State machines and design methods, internal state reduction, state assignment methods.

ELEC0006: Microprocessors & embedded systems

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students an understanding of modern microprocessors and the use of these devices as embedded sub-systems within engineering applications. To introduce the hardware building blocks used in the construction of microprocessor based systems. To detail the function of common peripheral devices used within embedded microprocessor applications. To introduce the fundamentals of machine code and real-time programming in embedded microprocessor applications. To provide some specific case studies of the use of embedded microprocessors, particularly micro-controllers and intelligent instrumentation. At the end of this module students will be able to identify and explain the function of all the parts that make up a microprocessor. Design simple transducers to measure electrical and mechanical quantities using embedded microprocessors. Determine which peripherals should be used to support embedded microprocessors used for control and instrumentation applications. Demonstrate an understanding of how high level language programs are encoded into machine-code. Write simple time critical code for embedded microprocessor applications.
Content:
Concepts of microprocessor hardware building blocks including; registers, arithmetic and logic units (ALUs), special function units such as floating point units (FPUs), control unit and central processing unit (CPU) bus. Details of how the basic building blocks within a microprocessor communicate and synchronise their activities. Interfacing embedded microprocessors to external peripheral devices using the microprocessor bus. Basic external bus structures and protocols, including synchronous, asynchronous and fully-interlocked asynchronous. External devices, including random access memory (RAM), read only memory (ROM), timers, parallel and serial ports, mass storage devices, analogue to digital converters (ADCs) and digital to analogue converters (DACs). Real-time programming methodology. The hierarchy between high-level language programs and machine code. Using interrupts, polling and hardware/software hand-shaking in real-time programming environments. Case studies of embedded microprocessor systems, including simple digital controllers (digital heating system and motor speed controllers) and intelligent instrumentation.

ELEC0007: Circuit theory

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students a basic introduction to electrical circuit theory, and provide them with an understanding of how to use circuit element models as a means of analysis and design as required by many other course modules. To further introduce them to transform methods of analysis and to mathematically model a circuit by means of a transfer function. After completing this module students should be able to solve steady-state problems in both d.c. and a.c. circuits, involving concepts of voltage, current, impedance and power, using a range of circuit theorems and phasor diagrams. Students should also understand frequency dependent concepts such as resonance and magnetic-coupling. Finally students should be able to use Laplace transforms to solve the transient response of simple RL, RC, and RLC circuits, together with the frequency response of corresponding transfer functions.
Content:
D.C. circuits, independent and dependent voltage and current sources, Ohms Law, Kirchoffs Law, series and parallel circuits, power. Nodal and Mesh analysis, node and loop equations for circuits containing independent voltage and current sources. Circuit Theorems, linearity, superpostion, Thevenin, Norton, maximum power transfer. A.C. circuits, capacitors and inductors, series and parallel combinations, sinusoids and phasor diagrams, the 'j' operator, impedance and admittance, instantaneous and average power, effective and R.M.S. values. Circuit Theorems, application of previous circuit theorems. Resonance, series and parallel, Q factor, bandwidth, universal resonance curve. Magnetically Coupled Circuits, self and mutual inductance, the simple transformer, power balance. Laplace Transforms, basic introduction to, and application of, Laplace transforms to the transient analysis of RLC circuits, transfer functions, pole-zero diagrams.

ELEC0008: Linear systems & signals

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the principles and importance of signal processing and systems and to illustrate these principles with typical applications. At the end of this module students should be able to: distinguish between continuous and discrete-time signals; construct and use mathematical models of simple signals; explain the interaction between time and frequency domains; describe the importance of, and general limitations of, digital signals; calculate the time and frequency responses of a simple digital filter; describe the role of poles and zeros in determining a filter response; demonstrate the connection between measured system signals and system performance; analyse graphically system performance through Laplace domain pole/zero diagrams; use the concept of feedback on system performance; identify system performance criteria such as stability, response speed, damping and steady-state error.
Content:
Performance of simple first and second order dynamic systems: Natural frequency of oscillation, damping and bandwidth for performance measures, system performance representation on Laplace domain pole/zero diagrams. Close loop control for system performance modification: Root locus diagrams for analysing effects of close loop controllers, design of simple closed loop control systems. Laplace domain transfer function for an electromechanical system example. Signal models: complex phasor, multi-frequency signals, Fourier series: continuous and discrete-time signals, properties of power, energy; analogue-digital conversion, sampling theorem, quantisation noise. Signal processes, introductory treatment of: linear systems, frequency response, impulse response; frequency description of sampled signals; filters, their use, lowpass/highpass/bandpass bandstop, digital and analogue filter characteristics.

ELEC0012: Quality & design

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX50 CW50
Requisites: Co ELEC0011

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the concept of quality and its importance in professional engineering. After completing the course, the students will be able to explain the relevance of fitness for purpose, undertake a basic needs analysis, comment on the importance of accepted standards and define the role of a professional engineer.
Content:
Quality, BS 4887, BS 5750, ISO 9000. Techniques to develop the understanding of Quality. Quality control and assurance. Needs analysis, target specification, design specification and performance specification. Standards management. Quality in design, quality in production. Production organisations. The design, construction and evaluation of a practical electrical/electronic system.

ELEC0013: Energy distribution & utilisation 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a thorough understanding of the operation of the principal types of a.c. machines and to provide models for the calculation of machine performance. To give an understanding of the design of electrical machines. To develop the fundamental concepts of power system operation. To introduce power conversion techniques by examining power semi-conductor switching circuits and analysing problems associated with their practical implementation. On completion of the unit students will be able to: calculate the performance of 3-phase transformers, induction machines and synchronous machines; carry out analyses of symmetrical and asymmetrical fault conditions in power systems, explain the principles of protection; explain the basic operating principles and perform simple analyses of common power-electronic systems including line-frequency rectifiers, d.c. to d.c. convertors and d.c. to a.c. invertors.
Content:
The per-unit notation. Single and 3-phase transformers: construction, operation, connections, relevant calculations, harmonics. Three-phase induction machines: construction, operation, equivalent circuits, characteristics, starting methods, transients. Three-phase synchronous machines: construction operation and action of round rotor, salient pole and reluctance types; equivalent circuits, phasor diagrams; elementary treatment of transients. Two port network representation of transmission lines, per unit system, fault analysis: symmetrical components and phase-frame analysis; introduction to power system protection. Power semiconductor devices; introduction to the conduction, switching characteristics and drive requirements of diodes, thyristors and power transistors. Line frequency power convertors; introduction to single and three-phase rectifier circuits operating with resistive and inductive loads. d.c. to d.c. power convertors; introduction to switched-mode power supplies and the principles of operation of step-down and step-up convertors.

ELEC0014: Electronic design

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the design process by taking a requirement through to a prototype device. After completing the unit, students should be able to: write a design specification for a product; carry out a top-down systematic design; identify and specify interface requirements for sub-systems; and generate working circuits from conceptual circuit diagrams. The use of CAD systems for the analysis of circuits will be an important feature of this work.
Content:
Product Design: Preparation of specifications; definition of systems and sub-systems. Design Management: introduction to project management techniques; design and documentation control. Realiability methods: FMEA, FTA, reliability estimating. Design exercise: working in groups to produce a working prototype of a small system using electronics for monitoring, control, measurement or signal processing.

ELEC0016: Mechanical science

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To model and analyse some relevant mechanical problems that occur in various fields of electrical engineering. After completing this unit it should be possible to: set up and solve equations that represent static and dynamic systems; perform calculations on vibrating systems and rotating systems with unbalance.
Content:
Review of first year material: force systems and solution of problems in two and three dimensional, statics, friction and dynamics using force-mass-acceleration, work-energy or impulse-momentum. Examples of translational and rotational motion of rigid bodies; dynamometer measurements, motion of self-propelled vehicles, drives incorporating gears, flywheels. Vibrating systems; free and forced vibrations, damping. Control of vibration; balancing of rotating machinery, whirling of flexible shafts, isolation of vibrating bodies.

ELEC0017: Communication principles

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the basic principles of communications and to provide a good understanding of the techniques used in modern electronic communication systems. At the end of this module students should be able to explain and analyse the basic methods of generation and detection of modulated signals; calculate the available power of a modulated signal; analyse the operation of first and second order phase locked loops; understand the function of source, channel and line coders in digital transmission systems and the limitations imposed by restricted bandwidth and signal to noise ratio; describe the characteristics and relative performance of the various digital modulation schemes.
Content:
Communication systems and channels, media characteristics. Attenuation and distortion. Physical sources and statistical properties of electrical noise. Evaluation of noise: signal-to-noise ratio, noise figure, noise temperature. Classification of communication services and systems. Modulation systems: methods of generating and detecting modulated signals, quadrature modulation, FDM. Phase lock loops. Radio transmitter and receiver architecture. Functional elements of a digital communications system. Source entropy and coding. Bandwidth, signalling rate and multi-level signals. SNR/bandwidth trade-off. Spectrum shaping and intersymbol interference. BER and error control. Digital signal formats, spectral properties, clock encoding and recovery. Digital modulation generation and detection of ASK, FSK, PSK, DPSK and QPSK.

ELEC0018: Control system design

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students a basic understanding of a wide range of control system design techniques, both approximate graphical methods and exact numerical solution techniques. The methods taught will include ways to deal with all commonly met situations in controlling electro-mechanical systems (time variant systems, systems with badly known parameters, systems with non-linearities and time delays). At the end of this module, students should be able to design forward path and feedback path compensation networks for multiple input, single output systems. They should appreciate how assumptions about the plant model and its order can affect the accuracy of the solutions obtained using graphical design techniques in the frequency domain. They should be able to understand how feedback leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to plant parameter values. They should be able to determine the equivalent small signal linear model for a system that includes more than one non-linearity. They should be able to analyse the effects of a single non-linearity at any point within an otherwise linear multiple loop control system.
Content:
Design in the time and frequency domain: the use of graphical analysis and design methods that are used in control including root locus, Nyquist and bode design techniques. State-space representation: concepts including the matrix form of state equations, leading to state and output feedback using state equation methods. Design for sensitivity, robust control: basic concepts of sensitivity, analysis and design of control systems to take account of sensitivity of the controller to parameter plant variations. Design of systems with non-linearities: small signal linearisation, quasi-linearisation, the phase-plane and the describing function method used to analyse systems with time delay, dead-zone, clip limits, relay action and hysteresis.

ELEC0019: Digital signal processing 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the basic techniques of DSP and to illustrate these techniques with practical applications. At the end of this module students should be able to: use the DFT and FFT operations; understand the causes of spectral leakage and its alleviation; appreciate the difficulties of obtaining the spectrum of a time-varying signal; understand the filter design problem and the classical approximations; understand the properties of linear phase and phase shift FIR filters; design such filters using standard procedures; understand the structure and properties of IIR filters; design such filters using impulse invariance and bilinear techniques; use the amplitude descriptors of random signals; appreciate the benefits of averaging random signals; apply the foregoing to practical situations.
Content:
Digital spectral analysis: applications and targets; principles of the DFT and FFT; effect of finite window, spectral leakage and its estimation; leakage reduction with shaped time windows; analysis of time-varying signals, uncertainty; performance of some typical spectral analysers. Digital filter design: approximation functions, Butterworth/ Chebyshev/ Bessel/ Elliptic; FIR, properties, linear phase, phase shift, differentiator; design techniques, Fourier series, frequency sampling; use of Kaiser, Parks-McClellan methods; IIR, properties; design techniques, impulse invariance, bilinear transformation; implementation issues. Random signal amplitude properties; ensemble and random variable; cdf, pdf; moments, variance; averaging with independent samples. Applications: spectral analysis of noise-free waveforms, including modulated signals; use of filters in communications and in measurement; detection of baseband digital data signals in noise; radar detection probabilities; quantisation noise in analogue-digital conversion.

ELEC0020: Electronic circuits & systems

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To enable students to design a wide range of linear and non-linear feedback circuits based on operational amplifiers, filters, waveform generators and comparator circuits. To extend the concept of feedback to oscillator circuits. To examine the design of integrated operational amplifiers and the impact of practical of devices on circuit performance. To introduce different types of power amplifier. To study stabilised voltage and current supplies. After completing this module the student should be able to: design linear and non-linear feedback amplifier circuits using operational amplifiers and understand the impact of the limitations of the amplifiers on circuit performance; design LC,RC and crystal oscillator circuits; design simple class A, B, AB, C and D amplifiers and understand how to use commercial series regulators and switched mode regulators.
Content:
Linear system design: ideal operational amplifier feedback circuits, summing junctions, buffers, integrators, differentiators, logrithmic amplifiers; non-ideal operational amplifier characteristics, finite gain and input impedance, bandwidth and slew rate, frequency stability, stability of cascaded op-amp circuits with overall feedback; active filter design, Salen Key circuit, Butterworth, Bessel and Chebyshev filters. Quasi-linear circuits: ideal diodes, comparators, Schmitt triggers, monostables and waveform generators, analogue switches (A/D and D/A converters). Discrete component implementation of IC operational amplifier circuits: bipolar transistor and FET small-signal equivalent circuits of differential amplifiers and direct-coupled amplifiers, active loads, level shifting circuits, op-amp output amplifiers. Oscillators: basic principles, Wein bridge, Hartley, Colpitts and RC oscillators, crystal equivalent circuit, crystal oscillators. Power amplifiers: basic circuits and conversion efficiency of class A, B, AB, C and D amplifiers, complementary-symmetry and quasi-complementary-symmetry amplifiers. Power supplies: Zener diode shunt voltage regulator, band-gap references, series regulator circuits, 78XX and op-amp based series regulator, swtiched-mode regulators.

ELEC0021: Digital electronics 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The course provides a foundation for the design of asynchronous sequential logic circuits using formal design methods and the implementation of these circuits using the different families of logic IC is introduced. The implementation of sequential logic is extended to microprocessors and the aim is to enable students understand the architecture of microprocessors and to design and implement simple real-time microprocessor systems. Students should be able to design a wide range of asynchronous logic circuits using finite state-machine methods and to implement them with the most appropriate family of SSI and MSI logic gates. They should be able to describe the operation of a microprocessor in terms of its general architecture and understand how microprocessors can be programmed and used in a variety of real-time applications.
Content:
Asynchronous sequential circuits: finite state machine description; primitive flow tables; internal state reduction, merging and row assignment problems; essential hazards and races. Logic IC families: TTL, CMOS, ECL and I2L, etc.; input conditions, signal levels, noise margins, switching times, power dissipation and gate loading. Computer architecture: the Von Neuman architecture, CPU, volatile and non-volatile memory (ROM, SRAM, DRAM, EPROM etc.), peripheral devices. General purpose microprocessors: architecture, arithmetic and logic units, program control sequences, microcode, register organization. Control: exception processing, interupts, resets and CPU initialisation, software traps. Bus control: synchronous/asynchronous bus timing diagrams, multiplexed bus. Real-time microprocessor systems: machine code programming; address decode-read/write operations, etc.; analogue and digital input/output; interupt driven I/O vs polled I/O; case studies of various 8/16 bit microprocessors.

ELEC0022: Applied electromagnetics 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students an understanding of how electromagnetic field solutions are determined in a number of engineering problems. To introduce the basic concepts behind the description of electromagnetic waves. After completion of this module students should be able to determine the stored energy and power flow and power loss in an electromagnetic field problem. Calculate voltage, current, and input impedance of simple transmission line circuits, and determine components for matching circuits, either using a Smith chart or by algebraic manipulation. Determine the basic reflection and transmission properties of plane waves at electromagneitc boundaries. Describe the radiation and circuit properties of simple antennas. Calculate the power budget for simple radiating transmission and radar systems. Determine characteristic impedance and phase constant and power flow in rectangular waveguide.
Content:
Electromagnetic fields: field definitions and the Maxwell equations; general solution to the Maxwell equations; energy in fields and circuits, power flow and the Poynting Vector; boundary conditions. Transmission lines: basic concepts; propagation constant and characteristic impedance; phase velocity, group velocity and signal distortion; line voltage, current, impedance and power flow; reflection and transmission; Smith Chart calculations; load matching and circuit examples. Plane waves: the plane wave solution; polarisations; propagation in dielectrics, lossy dielectrics and conductors, and the skin depth; reflection and transmission at a boundary (normal and oblique incidence); propagation examples. Antennas: antenna parameters and system characterisation by the Friis and radar equations; small dipole and loop antennas; phased array and radiating aperture antennas. Waveguides: waveguides modes of propagation; power flow and power loss, comparison with coaxial cables; waveguide passive devices.

ELEC0023: Software & computing 2

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop skills in writing good quality software using the ANSI C programming language. To provide an understanding of the principles of structured programming. To provide an appreciation of the importance of good software structure and documentation. After completing the course, the student should be able to (i) to design and implement C language functions and programs according to a given specification, (ii) to locate and correct sematic and syntactic errors in a given C language program, (iii) to produce well structured software having good layout and documented with appropriate comments, and (iv) to explain various aspects of the C language such as scope or type conversion rules.
Content:
Fundamentals: character set, identifiers, keywords, fundamental data types, constants, variables, arrays, declarations, statements, #defines, operators and expressions. Compiling and running a C program. Data input and output: use of the C library of standard functions, interactive programming. Control statements: conditional execution and looping statements in C. Correct usage of these statements in structured programming. Functions: defining, accessing and passing arguments to functions. Prototypes. Modular programming. Arrays: defining, processing and passing arrays to functions. Multidimensional arrays. Strings and string processing. Pointers: declaring pointers. Passing pointers to functions. Relationship between pointers and arrays. Operations on pointers. Dynamic memory allocation. Advanced use of pointers. Structures and Unions: defining and accessing structures. User-defined data types. Pointers to structures. Self-referential structures: linked lists, trees. Unions. Low-level programming: description of support offered by C, such as register variables, bitwise operations, use of bit fields. Standards: differences between ANSI and K & R standards for the C language. The C++ programming language.

ELEC0027: Digital signal processing 2

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To enable students to use the techniques for measurement and analysis of random signals. To introduce the concepts of adaptive signal processing. To review some issues of signal processing architecture. After completing this unit, the student should be able to: use the autocorelation function and spectral density measures of random signals, in typical instrumentation applications; appreciate some of the difficulties in obtaining the spectrum of a random signal; describe the basis of adaptive filtering, with applications; appreciate some of the issues involved with choosing a DSP configuration.
Content:
Random Signal Descriptors: Autocorrelation function and power spectral density, cross-correlation function. Application to averaging and spectrum analyser. Spectral Estimation: Averaged periodograms, Welch's method, parameter estimation. Application to voice processing (LPC), detection of signal in noise. Adaptive Processing: Wiener filter, LMS principle. Application to removal of interference, adaptive equalisation, echo cancellation. DSP Architectures: DSP devices, their structure and performance. Multi-rate processing, decimation, interpolation, spectral zoom.

ELEC0028: Software & computing 3

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX75 CW25
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students an understanding of the most important concepts and principles of the development of large software systems (programming 'in the large'). To enable students to modularise problems using the object-oriented approach, and to write formal software specifications. To enable students to write object-oriented software modules in C++. After completing this course, the student should be able to: Explain the stages in the software development cycle. Determine procedures for testing a given specification or implementation of software. Given a description of a problem, modularise the problem and identify the data abstractions that would be required to solve this problem. Given a suitable problem description, generate the corresponding formal specification. Explain the concepts and principles underlying the design of software for real-time (reactive) systems. Explain the concept and importance of safety-critical software. Explain the concepts underlying the object-oriented programming paradigm. Use object-oriented methods to develop C++ language programs.
Content:
The software life cycle. Formal specification. Modularisation. Real-time systems. Safety-critical systems. Software testing. Object-oriented programming in C++.

ELEC0029: Digital networks & protocols

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give users an understanding of the principles and current practice employed in digital information networks. To indicate the directions of future development in network technology. To enable a network user to estimate performance. Students should be able to: understand the broad principles of the ISO 7-layer model of a network and be able to apply it: compare the different forms of network topology and means of multiple access; compare the characteristics and application areas of WANs, LANs, and MANs; describe the broad operation of V24, X25, TCP/IP, ISDN, ATM network protocols; appreciate the complex demands of internet working and some current solutions; discuss the need for network management structures and signalling networks (CSS7) and describe some simple ones; describe the operation and evaluate broad performance measures of contention and token-passing LAN protocols, over ring and bus topologies; calculate the performance of various ARQ data link control strategies; calculate the performance of simple queuing structures as applied to digital network nodes.
Content:
Overview: Applications and services, sources of information, transmission media. The ISO 7-layer model. Switching (circuit, message, packet), network structures (WAN, MAN, LAN). WANs: The PSTN, access networks, trunks & multiplexing, V24 modem access, X25 packet network, ISDN developments, BISDN and ATM. Network supervision and management, CSS7 control network. LANs: Characteristics, topologies, Ethernet, token-passing, performance calculations. Interworking: Hubs, bridges, switches, routers and gateways. MANs: Characteristics, FDDI, DQDB. Data Link Control: Synchronism, error detection, frame protocols, ARQ operation, performance comparisons of stop-and-wait, go-back-N, selective repeat. Traffic Analysis: Poisson arrival statistics, the Erlang. Simple queuing models, M/M/1,M/D/1, M/G/1. Application to packet switch and simple network.

ELEC0031: Digital communications

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to more advanced topics in digital communication systems. On completion of the course, the student should be able to understand the main operating features of digital communication systems, including the relative performance of the various modulation methods, the efficiency of error detection and correction methods and the security of encryption systems.
Content:
Digital modulation techniques: review of binary modulation and demodulation; QPSK, OQPSK, MSK; QAM and trellis coded modulation. Channel coding: linear block codes for error detection and correction; cyclic codes and shift register generation and detection; Hamming, BCH, RS and Golay codes. Convolution coding: definition, generation and distance properties of convolution codes; Viterbi decoding with hard and soft decisions; sequential and feedback decoding; interleaving. Spread spectrum techniques: overview and pseudonoise sequencies; direct sequence and frequency hopping systems; synchronisation. Encryption and decryption: cipher systems and secrecy; practical security; stream encryption; public key cryptosystems.

ELEC0032: Microwave engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course introduces students to the engineering techniques and approaches required at microwave and millimetre wave frequencies (1-100 GHz). This includes circuit design concepts using matrix formulations and in particular the scattering matrix representation. The different transmission line technologies which are available at these frequencies are examined and the advantages/disadvantages and applications of each are discussed. Passive and active components are introduced and the use of each in microwave sub-system design is outlined. Examples of such sub-systems are amplifiers, phase shifters, detectors, mixers, filters, etc., suitable for use in MICs and MMICs. After completing this unit the student should be able to appreciate the various technologies available for high frequency design and circuit realisation and be able to select the appropriate technology for a particular application. In addition the student should be able to design a variety of circuit elements and sub-systems, analyse the performance of these and be able to meet the engineering specifications for particular sub-system and system design.
Content:
Matrix description of microwave circuits: ABCD or chain matrix, Z and Y matrix, scattering matrix; circuit conditions of reciprocity, symmetry and losslessness. Transmission line technologies: waveguides and discontinuities; planar transmission lines (microstrip, coplanar line, slotline, etc.) and discontinuities; dielectric lines; applications of different types of line. Couplers and hybrids: waveguide couplers (2-hole and multi-hole); parallel microstrip line couplers; branch line, rat-race and power divider structures. Passive devices: lumped impedance elements; microwave filters-transmission line and quasi-lumped element types; bias networks. Diodes: device equivalent circuits; detector diode current sensitivity, tangential signal sensitivity; mixer circuits - single diode, balanced and image rejection. Control circuits: limiters, attenuators, switches, phase shifters - reflective diode and switched path, switched filter. Amplifiers: reflection amplifier, transistor amplifier; gain, stability and matching networks.

ELEC0033: Power electronics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Aims: to analyse examples of high-frequency switched-mode power electronic systems and introduce control methods and applications. Objectives: after completing this unit, students should be able to explain the operation of a range of power-converter circuits and discuss typical applications; model and analyse power converters to characterise steady-state and dynamic performance; compare attributes of different converter operating modes and control methods; and identify salient limitations imposed on converter operation by practical component imperfections.
Content:
Power semiconductor devices: salient device imperfections, application at high switching-frequency. Unisolated DC-to-DC switched -mode converters: common circuits their characteristics and applications, continuous and discontinuous modes of operation. Isolated DC-to-DC switched-mode converters: common circuits their characteristics and applications, transformer model and reset requirement. DC-to-DC converter dynamic modelling and control: small signal modelling, closed-loop controller design. Active power-factor correction systems: limitations of passive methods, examples of active correction circuits.

ELEC0034: Electrical machines & drives

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To understand the operation of stepping motor and switched-reluctance drives and the design of windings used in induction motor drives. To appreciate the essential features of electrical machine design. To understand the way in which electrical machines and power supplies interact in variable-speed industrial and traction drives and to appreciate the constraints imposed by each of the components. To be able to perform calculations to assess the design and performance of typical industrial and traction drive systems.
Content:
Stepping motors: types, construction and action, static and dynamic characteristics and development of models. Switched reluctance motors: construction and action, torque calculation, rotor position sensing and power supplies. Three-phase induction machines: types of windings and design aspects. Rating of machines for industrial drives: heating effects, duty cycles. Outline the design of electrical machines: output equation, specific loadings and other constraints. Vehicle motion and traction duty cycles: description of electrical traction, dynamics of vehicle motion and vehicle movements. Traction motors: d.c., induction and synchronous machines; requirements peculiar to traction and comparison of types. D.C. drives: description, d.c. to d.c. and a.c. to d.c. drives. A.C. drives: description, induction and synchronous machine drives using voltage-source and current-source invertors, d.c. fed invertor traction drives.

ELEC0035: Design exercise

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with an opportunity to use the latest CAD facilities in areas of their interest and to engage in design using these facilities. On completion of the unit, students should be able to use the particular CAD suite with ease to carry out design and analysis exercises.
Content:
The detailed programme will vary to suit the needs of the different programmes of study and the interests of the particular students. Each student will be given one or more designs to evaluate and improve using in-house CAD facilities and either in-house or commercial software as appropriate.

ELEC0036: Project - 3rd year (Sem 1)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with an opportunity to develop further their ability to define, plan and execute a technical project under limited supervision, but with individual responsibility for the outcome. On completion of the unit students should be able to accept responsibility for delegated tasks within a project area, plan a scheme of work and complete it to a standard expected of a young professional engineer. The student should be able to develop innovative solutions to problems and produce designs which meet the requirements of the project.
Content:
Students will choose a title from a list of topics offered by the department. The project solution may be implemented in hardware or software or a combination of both. Students will be expected to follow through the accepted problem solving route beginning with the identification and specification of the problem and proceeding to proposals for solution, analysis of alternatives, implementation of chosen solution and final proving and acceptance testing. The production of a planned timetable of goals and milestones will be expected and the final report should contain evidence that the plan has been adhered to, or modified, as necessary. An early viva will be conducted by the internal examiner, who is not the project supervisor, and an end-of-project viva will be conducted by two other members of academic staff. A written report on the background to the project, together with a project plan and literature review, will be submitted part way through the project and then incorporated into the main project report which will be submitted on completion of the project.

ELEC0037: Computer graphics including multimedia applications

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with a theoretical and practical knowledge of 2D and 3D computer graphics. To enable them to apply such knowledge in computer aided design, multimedia environments and scientific visualisation. After completing this module, students should be able to: Describe algorithms for constructing 2D and 3D graphics primitives on a raster device and also explain the underlying principles; use matrices to transform objects in 2D and 3D space; explain and describe ways of projecting 3D objects onto a 2D screen; compare and contrast 3D rendering and shading techniques; describe and compare various standard graphic file formats used in multimedia environments.
Content:
Two-dimensional graphics: Low level line-drawing, polygon-filling, circle-drawing, curve-drawing algorithms. Clipping. 2D transformations: translation, rotation, scaling, reflection. Three-dimensional graphics: 3D object representation. Homogeneous coordinate system. 3D transformations: translation, rotation, scaling, reflection. Parallel and perspective projections. 3D clipping. Rendering three-dimensional objects: Hidden surface algorithms. Lighting models, shading algorithms. Anti-aliasing. Graphics in multimedia environments: Study of various graphics file formats used in multimedia applications.

ELEC0038: Principles of optoelectronics

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To present and explain: the physical principles of a range of optical materials and devices; the concepts and analysis of optical waveguides and some guided wave passive and active optical devices such as modulators, couplers, switches, LEDs and lasers, leading to the elements of integrated optical circuits. To prepare students to cope readily with the complexities and details of ''real'' and advanced devices. After completing the unit the student should have: a clear understanding of modal propagation of optical signals in cylindrical (fibre) and dielectric slab optical waveguides relating to passive and active semiconductor optical devices; a good knowledge of the ideas and rules of stimulated and spontaneous; emission/absorption (with emphasis on semiconductor media) that form the basis for lasers and optical detectors; a working knowledge of typical semiconductor lasers and LEDs and a familiarity with the operation of recent, advanced device structures.
Content:
Overview of optical communication systems. Review of the laws of reflection and refraction. Representation of optical gain/loss as a medium with complex refractive index. Waveguide couplers and optical spatial switches; mirrors and modal reflectivity; high and antireflection coatings. Analysis of the Fabry-Perot resonator in the context of passive and active optical devices. Review of semiconductor theory: energy band diagrams; carrier transport; recombination processess; p-n junctions, Fermi and quasi-Fermi levels. Principles of laser action: emission and absorption of radiation; inversion population in discrete atomic systems and in semiconductors; concepts relating to quantum well material. Semiconductor lasers and LEDs; heterojunction material and device structure; operational principles and typical characteristics. Schemes for direct and indirect modulation. Optical detectors: photon absorption and photoconductivity; diode photodetectors and improved structures - PIN and avalanche photodiode; quantum efficiency and responsivity; introduction to noise in detectors. Description of advanced devices introduction to integrated optical circuits.

ELEC0039: Power system analysis

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with an insight into, and a basic understanding of, analytic methods applied to power system analysis. After completing this unit, students should be able to: perform a multi-node load flow analysis and exercise an informed choice over the solution technique; explain the techniques of dc power transmission including its benefits compared to ac transmission and demonstrate an understanding of the use of dc transmission worldwide; conduct a simple stability study and explain the influence of AVR and governor types on system stability; analyse transients on power systems caused by switching operations or faults for both single and multi-phase situations, and hence be able to specify insulation requirements.
Content:
Load flow analysis: network matrix representation, Gauss-Seidel and Newton-Raphson solution techniques. AC/DC conversion: converter types, dc transmission, advantages compared to AC transmission. Basic stability considerations: machine inertia, equal area criterion, effect of AVRs and governors. Overvoltages: switching and fault overvoltages, Bewley Lattice diagrams, switchgear principles, current chopping, insulation coordination. Modal component theory: wave propagation in multiphase networks.

ELEC0040: Power system protection

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with an insight into, and a basic understanding of, power system protection applications and modern digital relaying techniques. After completing this module, students should be able to: divide a power system network into manageable units suitable for protection; design a non-unit protection scheme for distribution feeders and determine appropriate relay settings; explain the characteristics and limitations of protection primary transducers; design a distance protection scheme for transmission line circuits; explain the design and operation of digital transmission line protection.
Content:
The protection overlay: Protection and metering transducers. Fuses. Overcurrent protection: relay types, operating characteristics and equations, grading, applications. Differential protection: voltage balance and circulating current schemes, biased characteristics and high impedance schemes. Applications to the protection of transformers, feeders and busbars. Distance protection: basic principle, block average comparator, zones of protection, residual compensation, power swing blocking. Digital Protection: Relay hardware. Digital signal processing in protection relays. Digital distance protection. Digital differential protection.

ELEC0041: Control engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an understanding of the design of closed loop controllers in the time domain and their practical implementation. To introduce students to the practical issues involved in the design and implementation of discrete time controllers using microprocessors and z-domain design techniques. After completing this module, students should be able to: calculate the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of any linear continuous time plant, use the above to determine the observability and controllability of plant dynamic modes and design controllers to change the modal frequencies. describe any linear continuous time system that is to be controlled using a discrete time controller in the z-domain. design unity feedback discrete time controllers to meet a range of performance specifications for step and ramp input functions.
Content:
Design of linear systems in the time domain, observability and controllability. Simple modal synthesis. Digital control methods, micro controllers and their application. Real time computational methods in control.

ELEC0042: Project engineering

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with an understanding of project management and to define the projects objectives, plan the enterprise, execute it and bring it to a successful conclusion for all parties involved. After completing this module, students should be able to: define the projects objectives and the roles of the key participants; produce a project plan; design and control management procedures; and explain the procedures required to bring that project to a successful conclusion.
Content:
Project definition: Principal types of project. Project outline. Roles of key participants. Defining objectives. Project planning: Defining sub-projects. Time scheduling. Costings. Defining resource requirements. Standard planning techniques. Computer planning techniques. Risk assessment and analysis. Project control: Quality standards. Setting milestones. Progress monitoring. Management information systems. Variance analysis. Communications handling. Changes to specification. Corrective action. Project completion: Customer acceptance. Project audits. Final reports.

ELEC0043: Fundamentals of electromagnetic compatibility

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to the fundamentals of EMC. After completing this module students should be able to: demonstrate and understand the terminology used in EMC; explain the cause of interference in terms of the interaction of charges, currents and fields; identify interference problems and suggest solutions; demonstrate the use of EMC principles for interference free design.
Content:
Revision of electromagnetic field theory. EMC terminology, electromagnetic emissions (EME), electromagnetic susceptibility (EMS), electromagnetic interference (EMI). Sources of disturbances, man made sources, natural sources. Levels of EMC, component, circuit, device, system. Coupling paths, common impedance, capacitive coupling, inductive coupling, radiation, electric dipole (small), magnetic dipole (small), radiation through an aperture. Common mode and differential mode signals, filtering. Properties of conductors, DC and AC current flow, skin depth, AC resistance, inductance (internal and external). Shielding. Inductive crosstalk, capacitive crosstalk, near end crosstalk. Effect of nearby conducting plane. Parasitic effects in components, resistors, capacitors, inductors, transformers. Protective earth and signal reference, earth loops. Effect of ESD. Choice of signal reference and cabling. Testing, regulations. Measuring the electromagnetic environment.

ELEC0044: An introduction to intelligent systems engineering

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of major intelligent system techniques. To show how to apply intelligent system techniques to solve engineering problems. After completing this module, the student should be able to: construct a simple rule based expert system; explain the major components of a fuzzy logic system and conduct fuzzy inference; describe the major type of neural networks and their learning algorithms; construct multilayer neural networks for pattern classification; apply a simple genetic algorithm to solve optimization problems.
Content:
Expert Systems (ES): major characteristics of expert systems; techniques; rule-based expert systems; knowledge acquisition; applications. Fuzzy Logic (FL): fuzzy set theory; fuzzy inference; fuzzy logic expert system; fuzzy control. Neural Networks (NS): artificial neurons and neural networks. Learning process: error-correction learning; Hebbian learning; Boltzmann learning; competitive learning; supervised/unsupervised learning. Perception and multilayer perception; self-organising Kohonen networks; Hopfield neural networks; practical implementation and applications. Genetic Algorithms (GA): adaptation and evolution; a simple genetic algorithm; genetic algorithms in optimization; genetic algorithms in control.

ELEC0045: Advanced logic design

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop design methodologies for 'realistic' sequential logic controllers and data path systems based on programmable logic components and microcontrollers and to examine the architecture of microcontrollers. Students should be able to use a number of design techniques including ASM, MDS and RTL to design complex sequential logic circuits and to be able to implement the design using a variety of programmable devices, including: PALs, PLAs and PLDs etc. Students should be able to understand the relationship between the architecture of a sequential logic circuit and that of a microcontroller and how microcontrollers can be used to implement sequential logic problems.
Content:
Overview of traditional design methods for synchronous and asynchronous sequential circuits. Design methods for state machine controllers: VEM diagram method for combinational logic problems. Mnemonic documented state machine method (MDS) of sequential logic design. Algorithmic state machine method (ASM) of sequential logic design. Linked state machines. Implementation of state machine controllers: ROM, PLA, PAL, PLD methods of implementation. Use of PAL tables and PALASM. Data Path Systems: Architecture of data path systems. Use of ASMs in data path systems. Register transfer language method of designing data path systems. Implementation of data path systems: (a) data path, (b) data path controller. Microcontrollers: Counter and shift register based programmable controllers. Concepts and architecture of programmable controllers. Program controllers with fixed instruction sets. Programmable sequence controllers with sub-routine facility. Use of commercial microcontrollers in the implementation of state machine controller problems.

ELEC0046: Neural network applications in engineering systems

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The students are expected to gain a practical understanding of the application of neural networks to engineering system problems. The students will be expected to understand every stage of the development of a neural network solution from choosing an architecture to determining appropriate feature extraction and implementation technology. After completing this module, students should be able to: identify different neural network architectures including Kohonen, multi layer perception and auto associative types; choose an appropriate architecture for particular engineering tasks; identify hardware and software implementations of artificial neural networks; understand training rules used for neural networks and carry out calculations associated with the generalised back propagation delta training rule.
Content:
Sensor layer neural networks, cognitive layers in neural systems, general neural network system architecture. Speech recognition, Kohonen feature maps, language and vision systems, multi-layer image recognition: the neocognition. Security systems, applications in power systems. Alternative hardware implementations, future applications, limitations on current neural network technology.

ELEC0047: Design & realisation of integrated circuits

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course covers all aspects of the realisation of integrated circuits, including both digital, analogue and mixed-signal implementations. Consideration is given to the original specification for the circuit which dictates the optimum technology to be used also taking account of the financial implications. The various technologies available are described and the various applications, advantages and disadvantages of each are indicated. The design of the circuit building blocks for both digital and analogue circuits are covered. Computer aided design tools are described and illustrated and the important aspects of testing and design for testability are also covered. After completing this module the student should be able to take the specification for an IC and, based on all the circuit, technology and financial constraints, be able to determine the optimum design approach. The student should have a good knowledge of the circuit design approaches and to be able to make use of the computer aided design tools available and to understand their purposes and limitations. The student should also have an appreciation of the purposes of IC testing and the techniques for including testability into the overall circuit design.
Content:
Design of ICs: the design cycle, trade-offs, floorplanning, power considerations, economics. IC technologies: Bipolar, nMOS, CMOS, BiCMOS, analogue, high frequency. Transistor level design: digital gates, analogue components, sub-circuit design. IC realisation: ASICs, PLDs, gate arrays, standard cell, full custom. CAD: schematic capture, hardware description languages, device and circuit modelling, simulation, layout, circuit extraction. Testing: types of testing, fault modelling, design for testability, built in self test, scan-paths.

ELEC0049: Optical communication systems

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre ELEC0038

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a background to current practices in the design and specification of optical (fibre) based communication systems, sub-systems and key components. The student should gain an understanding of the main types of optical communication system and the decisions that must be taken by the engineer for the most appropriate selection of components in the development of (i) a very high capacity trunk network, (ii) a metropolitan area network and (iii) an optical fibre local area network.
Content:
Overview of optical communication systems. Basic components and modulation methods. LEDs vs lasers, attenuation and dispersion, detector responsivity. Optical Sources: LEDs and lasers, review of the development of laser structures. Structures for single wavelength operation. Modulation response of lasers. Optical Fibres: Types of fibre. Simple ray model, numerical aperture, number of modes, intermodal dispersion and fibre bandwidth. Chromatic and waveguide dispersion - causes and effect on fibre bandwidth. Fibre manufacturing methods; attenuation and dispersion characteristics of modern fibre - impact on the choice of optical source and detector. Fibre jointing and interconnections. Optical Detector Principles: Structure and operation of: p-n junction photodetectors, p-i-n detectors, avalanche photo-detectors, detectors for operation at 1.3mm and 1.55mm wavelengths, heterostructure detectors. Quantum limit. Responsivity and noise of p-i-n and APD detectors. Optical receiver structures, noise figures and bandwidths. Non-coherent detector systems. Noise performance of heterodyne and homodyne receivers - effect of modulation method. System Design: Point-to-point link analysis. Bit-error-rate calculations due to receiver noise, power budget analysis. Real-time budget analysis. Simple passively coupled optical fibre LANS - effect of coupling losses on power budget. Optical Network Standards: SDH and SONET standards for trunklinks, FDDI local area network standard and DQDB metropolitan area network standard - optical standards and network protocols.

ELEC0050: Radio communication and radar systems

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students an understanding of the key parameters and trade-offs needed to set up a wireless link in a variety of applications (e.g. Fixed wireless links, mobile links and radar systems). To introduce the basic concepts of the antenna as a system element and the inclusion of propagation factors. After completion, students should be able to: understand the main factors influencing the propagaion of radio waves in terrestrial and space systems; understand the operation and use of antennas; calculate power and noise budgets for radio and radar links in various environments; appreciate the various types of signal fading and appropriate methods for reducing the effects of fading; calculate the basic operating parameters of pulse and CW radar systems, and appreciate the methods to improve radar resolution.
Content:
Introductory concepts, plane and spherical waves, the isotropic radiator. Antenna properties; gain, beam-pattern or gain-function, polarisation. Transmitting and receiving definitions of antenna gain; solid angle, effective aperture, aperture efficiency. Gain-beamwidth approximation for focused systems. Free-space path loss or spreading loss, link power budgets. Antenna temperature and noise power budgets. Calculation of system noise termperature including antenna noise. Example signal and noise power budgets in radiocommunications. Brief review of the properties of the radio spectrum from ELF to EHF. Summary of environmental influences from the Earth's surface and atmosphere. Characterisation of the Earth's surface in terms of dielectric properties and roughness. Characterisation of the Earth's atmosphere in terms of temperature, ionisation and composition. Radiowave propagation: propogation in the earth's atmosphere, tropospheric refraction, reflection and scintillation, gaseous absorption, scattering and absorption from hydrometers. Effects of ionosphere. Propagation over the Earth's surface, reflection and diffraction, the Fresnel equations. Clearance criteria, Fresnel zones. Fading channels, representation of fading channels, the Rayleigh phasor, Ricean and log-normal fading, physical origins. Systems availability and outage. Use of diversity. Introduction to radar systems: The radar equation for point and volume targets. Radar cross section. Operation of pulse, doppler, CW and FMCW systems. Introduction to radar signal processing. Ambiguity functions and false alarm rates.

ELEC0051: Satellite and mobile communications systems

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre ELEC0030

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an overview of the evolution and current status of satellite and terrestrial links in the provision of integrated communications services in the digital era. To illustrate with examples drawn from satellite and terrestrial networks, techniques for network access and network management. On completion the student should be able to understand the main operating features of digital satellite and digital terrestrial cellular radio systems; be able to carry out simple capacity calculations and appreciate the key differences between TDMA and CDMA multiple access methodologies. The student should also have an insight into emerging technologies for the provision of a range of integrated digital services via radio networks.
Content:
Overview of developments in digital radio networks for fixed and mobile services. Convergence between broadcast systems and other fixed services. Integrated service provision, generic service classes. Introduction to satellite systems for fixed and mobile services. Orbits and converage, satellite and payload design, Earth and satellite geometry, propagation factors, interference, antennas, modulation, coding and multiple-access techniques, including FDMA, TDMA, CDMA. Link budgets, including use of on-board processing. Frequencey re-use in multiple-spot-beams. Introduction to terrestrial systems, including cellular mobile systems and wireless LANs. Developments in the use of high altitude platforms for multi-media services. Frequency re-use in cellular mobile systems, modulation, multiplexing and multiple-access schemes. Cellular Radio Interfaces: AMPS, GSM and IS54 TDMA systems, IS95 CDMA spread-spectrum systems. Message formats and network access protocols.

ELEC0052: Project - 4th year (Sem 1)

Semester 1
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop further the skills of practical project engineering and where possible to give students experience of working on realistic engineering problems in small groups. On completion of the unit students should be able to accept responsibility for delegated tasks within a project area, plan a scheme of work and complete it to a standard expected of a young professional engineer. The student should be able to develop innovative solutions to problems and produce designs which meet the requirements of the project.
Content:
Students will choose a title from a list of topics offered by the department. The project solution may be implemented in hardware or software or a combination of both. Students will be expected to follow through the accepted problem solving route beginning with the identification and specification of the problem and proceeding to proposals for solution, analysis of alternatives, implementation of chosen solution and final proving and acceptance testing. The production of a planned timetable of goals and milestones will be expected and the final report should contain evidence that the plan has been adhered to, or modified, as necessary. An early viva will be conducted by the internal examiner, who is not the project supervisor, and an end-of-project viva will be conducted by two other members of academic staff. A written report on the background to the project, together with a project plan and literature review, will be submitted part way through the project and then incorporated into the main project report which will be submitted on completion of the project.

ELEC0053: Digital video & audio

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX75 CW25
Requisites: Pre ELEC0031

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the theory and practice of digital video and audio in Information Processing Networks. After completion of the unit students should be able to: understand the representation of digital video signals, and the compression and communications techniques for digital video in networks; write software for the processing of digital video in Multimedia Applications; understand the effects of system performance on the Quality of Service of a digital video system; understand the basic principles of human auditory perception, and its influence on digital audio processing; understand current technologies for sampling, representation and reconstruction of audio information; understand and apply methods for digital audio compression.
Content:
Digital Video: Concepts and standards, broadcast requirements and standards. Compression techniques for multimedia: Motion JPEG and other intraframe techniques, H32X, MPEG, motion prediction, interpolation and other interframe techniques. Emerging technologies: Object based coding, motion analysis, multiresolution techniques, video description languages, software codecs, MPEG-IV. Quality of Service issues: Redundancy, intra/inter coding, data loss and error correction. Human Auditory Perception: Bandwidth and dynamic range, temporal and frequency masking, critical bands. Speech and audio signals. Current digital audio technologies: companding, sampling, error correction and interpolation. Audio Compression methods and standards. Audio with video in Information Processing Networks - synchronization, delay and Quality of Service.

ELEC0054: Digital image processing

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX75 CW25
Requisites: Pre ELEC0031

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the theory and practice of digital image processing, with particular emphasis upon standards for image coding and transmission. After completing this unit, students should be able to: explain the elements of human visual perception, image processing, quantization and of colour images; explain the use of the two dimensional discrete Fourier and Cosine transforms in image processing; solve problems concerning the enhancement of digital images by spatial or frequency domain techniques; solve problems concerning the restoration of degraded images by various standard techniques including inverse filtering and Wiener filtering; explain the elements of lossless and lossy data and image compression, and image compression standards. Compress and decompress simple data streams using basic techniques.
Content:
Images and image sensors: Monochrome and colour vision. Sampling, reconstruction and quantization. Filtering: Moving average filtering. Edge enhancement. Fourier domain filtering. Segmentation: Segmentation by shade or hue. Segmentation by texture. Feature extraction. Enhancement and Restoration: Inverse filtering. Wiener filtering. Registration and estimation. Colour: HSV processing. Enhancement and restoration. Segmentation. Image coding: Lossless coding. Transformations. Quantization. Entrophy coding. Progressive coding. Standards for coding and transmission of images.

ELEC0055: Power system planning

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre ELEC0039

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the main techniques for load forecasting and planning in power systems. After completing this module, students should be able to: Carry out short & long term forecasts for power systems. Conduct reliability and load flow studies. Understand and apply techniques for stability and contingency studies.
Content:
Short and long term forecasting. Reliability and unit commitments. Loadflow and short circuit studies for system planning. Voltage regulation of distribution systems. System outages and contingency analyses. Probabilistic load flow studies. Transient stability of large systems. Load dynamics and simulation for power system severe emergencies. Short and long term stability studies. System contingency analysis. Loss of generation and load shedding techniques. Criteria of voltage stability.

ELEC0056: Power system control

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre ELEC0039

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the main methods used in power system control and the issues involved in the control of extended power systems. To introduce some modern control techniques. After completing this module, students should be able to: apply modern control methods in power systems.
Content:
Application of modern control methods in power systems; digital and fuzzy control techniques. hierarchical and decentralised methods. The concept of automatic generation control in large systems, economical dispatch and load/frequency control.

ELEC0057: Power electronics & drives

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre ELEC0034

Aims & learning objectives:
To understand the operation of the types of power-electronic supplies which are currently used in d.c. and a.c. drive systems. To study the use of permanent-magnet and induction machines in industrial and traction drives. To gain an appreciation of the remote electromagnetic effects that are caused by switching converters. To be able to perform calculations to assess the overall performance of typical drive systems and to estimate their electromagnetic effects on the environment.
Content:
Converter power supplies: rectification and inversion, effect of transformer impedance, regulation and overlap. PWM power supplies: variable frequency converter types, analysis of waveforms and spectra. Practical aspects of inverter implementation, managing sources of distortion, control circuits, power stage design. Small-scale machine and drive systems: brushless d.c. machines and their use for computer peripheral drives and vehicle drives. Steady state and transient analysis of machines and power converters. Field oriented control schemes. Review of electromagnetic interference from power electronic converter fed drives. Power converter modulation and analysis of supply current harmonics in converter-fed drives.

ELEC0058: Numerical methods in cad

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre MATH0102

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to numerical methods used to simulate engineering problems. After completing this unit, students should be able to: use the numerical methods covered in the unit to solve example applications; design programs to implement numerical algorithms.
Content:
Solution of linear equations: Gauss-Jordan elimination. Pivoting. Gaussian elimination. Back-substitution. LU decomposition. Sparse linear systems. Skyline solvers. Iterative methods. Steepest descent. Conjugate gradient method. Pre-conditioned conjugate gradients. Non-linear systems of equations: root finding; one dimensional functions; bisection; secant method; Newton-Raphson; multidimensional Newton-Raphson. Time dependent problems: single step time marching schemes; forward difference, backward difference, midpoint difference, general theta scheme. Stiff systems. Stability. Application of time stepping schemes to circuit modelling. Optimisation (minimization or maximization of functions): one dimensional search. Downhill simplex method in multi-dimensions. Simulated annealing. Evolutionary models.

ELEC0059: Finite element analysis

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: EX100
Requisites: Pre ELEC0022

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with an understanding of some of the finite element methods for solving common partial differential equations, with particular regard to electromagnetics. To enable them to use finite element computer packages with some understanding and to develop their own methods when necessary.
Content:
The trial solution method and its relationship with finite element methods. The collocation, subdomain collocation, least squares and Galerkin methods of optimisation. One and two dimensional shape functions. One and two dimensional finite element methods. Deriving and using magnetic scalar and magnetic vector potentials in representing magnetic field problems. How symmetry may be exploited in 2D electromagnetic field problems. How quantities of engineering interest such as force and inductance can be derived from the potential solution. How a simple 2D finite element package works.

ELEC0060: Project - 3rd year (Sem 2)

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

A continuation of ELEC0036.

ELEC0061: Project - 4th year (Sem 2)

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

A continuation of ELEC0052.

ELEC0062: Industrial placement

Academic Year
Credits: 60
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide practical experience in the application and usefulness of knowledge and skills gained at the University, by working in a relevant industrial environment.
Content:
The content varies from placement to placement. In choosing the placement, the University will try to ensure that the project offers adequate opportunities for the student to demonstrate competence in a least six of the eleven assessed categories: application of academic knowledge; practical ability; computational skill; analytical and problem solving skill; innovation and originality; time management; writing skills; oral expression; interpersonal skills; reliability; and development potential.

ELEC0063: MEng year abroad

Academic Year
Credits: 60
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To assist the student develop personal and interpersonal communication skills and to develop the ability to work and interact effectively in a group environment in which cultural norms and ways of operating may be very different from those previously familiar. To develop an understanding of the stresses that occur in working in a different culture from the UK, and to learn to cope with those stresses and work efficiently. To develop the self-confidence and maturity to operate effectively with people from a different cultural background. To develop the ability to operate at a high scientific level in the language of the country concerned; this would include oral communication and comprehension as well as reading and writing.
Content:
It is assumed that the student abroad will accomplish work equivalent to 60 University of Bath credits (10 units). Details of these are necessarily left to negotiation with individual University, students and the Bath Director of Studies. A project should be completed either abroad or during the Summer semester/term at Bath.

ELEC0064: Basic power system engineering

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ELEC0065: Advanced power system protection

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ELEC0066: Power system operation

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ELEC0067: Power system modelling

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ELEC0068: Distribution system engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ELEC0069: HVDC and FACTS

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ELEC0070: Contract engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ELEC0071: Foundations of digital communications

Semester 1
Credits: 0
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment:
Requisites:



ELEC0072: Communications & electrical systems

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students a basic understanding of three important modern engineering systems: communications systems, electrical power systems and machines and drives systems. At the end of the unit, students will be able to explain the components of a communications system, describe the range and classification of communications services, perform bandwidth, time and power calculations for an end-to-end communications links; describe the structure of a modern power system and its major components, perform simple three phase calculations, explain the need for, and provision of, control in a power system; describe the construction, action and characteristics of d, induction and other machine types and their method of utilisation in drive systems, perform simple calculations on machines and convertors.
Content:
Introduction to modern telecommunications, telecommunications services, telecommunications networks, telecommunications signals, properties of communications channels, measures of information, an end-to-end transmission example, communications resources; bandwidth, time and power. Simple power system economics, the need for transmission and distribution systems, energy conversion, energy consumption, introduction to three phase theory, power engineering conductors and insulators, power system control, faults and protection systems. Overview of electrical machines. Power electronic converters: choppers, controlled rectifiers, inverters, switching devices. Dc motors: characteristics, base speed, 4-quadrant operation and regenerative braking; thyristor and chopper-fed drives; servo drives. Induction motors: characteristics; inverter-fed drives and control techniques.

ELEC0077: Electronics & electrical drives

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop the basic techniques of circuit analysis and explain the concept of alternating currents in electrical circuits. To introduce the method of operation and application of semi-conductor devices. To give an understanding of the basic principles of electromagnetism. To provide an overall view of the methods of converting electrical energy to linear or rotary mechanical energy. To give an understanding of how the characteristics of a drive system can depend upon the combination of the electromagnetic device, the electronic drive circuit and the control technique. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Solve simple electrical circuit problems. Appreciate the essential features of operation of semi-conductor devices, and their use in simple digital and analogue circuits. Understand simple operational amplifier techniques. Select appropriate drives for simple applications. Understand the basic operation of DC motors and three phase induction motors, including speed control and starting methods.
Content:
Direct and alternating voltages and currents. Ohm's Law, Kirchoff's laws and Thevenin's theorem. Resistance, capacitance and inductance, concept of impedance, power and reactive power. Balanced three phase systems. Basic characteristics of diodes, zener diodes, light emitting diodes, photosensitive devices and transistors. The application of semi-conductor devices in simple analogue and digital circuits. Introduction to operational amplifiers. Electromagnetic induction, Faraday's and Ampere's laws. Operating characteristics of shunt, series, compound DC motors and three phase induction motors. Calculation of simple speed-torque-power relationships. Starting and speed control of motors, stepper motors and their indexing techniques. Concepts of motor control circuits including the thyristor.

ELEC0079 Communications systems & computing
Credits: 6


ENAP0001: Introduction to materials science & engineering 1A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Pre GCSE level or above: Chemistry & Physics or combined science; and A level: Chemistry or Physics Aims & learning objectives:
Materials Science applies principles of physics and chemistry to materials of engineering interest. This is the first part of a two semester course which aims to be of general interest, and to show students its scope and philosophy.
Content:
(i) What are materials? How are they used? An introduction to the various categories of materials - polymers, metals, ceramics and natural materials. A comparative overview of their price, availability and mechanical properties followed by an introduction to the manufacturing processes that can be applied to them. (ii) Materials for Microelectronics Outline of the history of electronic device development from the thermionic valve to the silicon chip. Semiconducting materials properties and relationship to basic electronic structure. The transistor. Integrated circuits. The manufacture of modern integrated circuits. The importance of materials quality and purity to the semiconductor industry.

ENAP0002: Crystal structure and determination

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the techniques for concise representation of atomic arrangements in crystalline materials. To present the basic rules governing the crystal structures adopted by both elements and simple compounds. To introduce X-ray diffraction and its role in determining crystal structure. On completion, the student should be able to: describe simple crystal structures using standard crystallographic notation and terminology; represent crystal planes and directions using standard notation and perform simple calculations; identify the key features of a given material which are responsible for its observed crystal structure; explain X-ray diffraction from a crystal lattice and the information that can be obtained from powder and back reflection patterns.
Content:
Crystallography: Lattices, unit cells and cell centring, crystal systems, Bravais lattices, symmetry. Lattice planes and directions, notation and calculation of interplanar spacing and angles. Crystal Chemistry: Structures of metals, CCP, HCP and BCC, interstitial sites in metal structures. Factors governing ionic structures, coordination numbers and polyhedra, radius ratio rules, polarisation effects, Pauling's rules. Factors governing covalent structures. Examples of structures, AX and AX2 compounds, carbon, Perovskite, SiO2 structures and phase transitions. Crystallinity in polymers: Evidence for crystallinity, structures of polymers, single crystals, spherulites, factors influencing crystallinity. X-ray techniques: generation of X-rays, characteristic and continuous radiation. X-ray scattering and absorption. X-ray diffraction, powder patterns, determination of lattice parameters, structure factor and diffraction intensities. Single crystal diffraction, Laue back reflection technique. Crystal Chemistry: Structures of metals, CCP, HCP and BCC, interstitial sites in metal structures. Factors governing ionic structures, coordination numbers and polyhedra, radius ratio rules, polarisation effects, Pauling's rules. Factors governing covalent structures. Examples of structures, AX and AX2 compounds, carbon, Perovskite, SiO2 structures and phase transitions, silicates. Crystallinity in polymers: Evidence for crystallinity, structures of polymers, single crystals, spherulites, factors influencing crystallinity. Students must have A-level Physics or Chemistry in order to undertake this unit.

ENAP0004: Materials chemistry

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Pre A-level Chemistry or equivalent, or if not see co-requisites Aims & learning objectives:
To revise and extend knowledge of the principles of physical chemistry, as applied to materials. On completion, the student should have sound understanding of the following key concepts: enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy and their inter-relationships, phase equilibria, electrochemistry, surface and solution physical chemistry, diffusion and chemical kinetics.
Content:
The unit is divided into the following sections (with approximate durations): 1. Thermodynamics (10 lectures) 2. Phase equilibria (4 lectures) 3. Electrochemistry (2 lectures) 4. Surface physical chemistry (2 lectures) 5. Chemical kinetics (2 lectures) 6. Diffusion (2 lectures)

ENAP0005: Introduction to materials science & engineering 1B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Materials Science applies principles of physics and chemistry to materials of engineering interest. This is the second part of a two semester course which aims to be of general interest, and to show students its scope and philosophy.
Content:
(i) Can strength and stiffness of materials be explained in terms of atomic structure? Concepts of strength and elastic modulus; the atomic and molecular constitution of different types of material. Primary and secondary bonding; potential energy curves for ionic, covalent and van der Waals bonds. Structure and 'bond density'; relation between potential energy curves and modulus; Hooke's law;. Relation between P.E. curves and strength; brittle strength; surface cracks; toughening; fibres & whiskers. (ii) Short contributions giving a broader flavour of Materials Science. (a) Timber Wood is a natural, cellular, renewable material which in the form of sawn lumber, engineered timber composites or panel products is used world wide in numerous structural applications to the same extent as steel by weight. The microstructure and mechanical properties of timber are examined and case studies are presented on the manufacture of glue-laminated (glulam) structures and the environmental credentials of timber compared with steel. (b) Renewable energy resources in the UK In the UK we benefit from renewable resources for the supply of energy in the form of wind, solar and wave power, biomass, landfill gas, hydroelectric power and more inaccessible resources such as hot rocks. (c)Degradation of materials Most materials interact physically or chemically with their environment, resulting in changes in structure and composition. These changes often result in the reduction (or degradation) of important properties, such as strength, which may limit the effectiveness of a material in its application, for example as a load-bearing component. Key topics in the degradation of materials are introduced, including aqueous and high-temperature corrosion of metals, dissolution of ceramics and radiation damage in polymers. A case study of the oxidation of nuclear reactor graphites will be presented. (d) Composite materials -An introduction to the concepts of making and using composites materials, present an indication of how their properties may be determined, some typical applications for these materials (e) Ceramics - Inorganic solids, mainly consisting of oxides, which are produced by heating the source materials at high temperature below their melting points in order to densify the compact. The product is usually chemically and thermally stable ; it exhibits desirable properties such as strength, hardness and abrasion resistance.

ENAP0006: Crystal imperfections

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX60 CW20 PR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the concept of crystal imperfections, in particular point defects and dislocations. To describe the principal characteristics of such defects and illustrate their behaviour. On completion the student should be able to: describe the principal types of point and line defects; understand how they move and interact; relate aspects of macroscopic materials properties to microscopic defect behaviour.
Content:
Imperfections in crystals: Point defects in elements and compounds, thermodynamics of point defects, diffusion mechanisms, origin of non-equilibrium point defect concentrations. Influences of point defects on materials properties. Theoretical shear stress. Geometry of dislocations, the Burgers vector and Burgers circuit, edge, screw and mixed dislocations. Dislocation glide, force acting on a dislocation, Peierls-Nabarro stress. Dislocation climb. Techniques for the observation of dislocations. Elastic properties of dislocations, strain energy, line tension. Dislocation intersections and jogs. Dislocations in FCC crystals, perfect and imperfect dislocations, Shockley and Frank partials, Thompson's tetrahedron, dislocation reactions. Origin of dislocations, point defect condensation, Frank-Read source, multiple cross-slip, misfit dislocations and growth-induced dislocations. Barriers to dislocation motion.

ENAP0007: Mechanics of materials

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the mathematical techniques used to describe the response of materials to applied loads. On completion, the student should be able to: perform calculations relating deformations and states of stress in solid materials to the loads applied, for a number of simple cases.
Content:
Forces on a structure and their distribution and measurement. Tension and compression stress and strain, Hooke's law, strain energy in a deformed solid. Two-dimensional stress and Mohr's circle of stress. Two- and three-dimensional stress/strain relationships, hydrostatic stress and bulk modulus. Plane stress and plane strain. Plastic yielding of isotropic solids: the von Mises and Tresca failure criteria. Stress distributions around a hole of circular or elliptical shape and qualitative treatment of the stress concentration at a sharp notch. Stress distribution in simple components, compatibility of strains and equilibrium of stress. Tension of elastic homogeneous and non-homogeneous rods. Tension of circular shafts. Symmetric bending of homogeneous and composite elastic beams. Thin-walled and thick-walled cylinders under pressure. Deflection curves of elastic beams. Twisting of shafts. Inelastic bending and residual stress. Elastic failure: the Euler theory of buckling.

ENAP0008: Materials processing 1B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX60 CW20 PR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To acquaint students with the physical principles involved in common manufacturing processes, to establish the link between processing route and internal structure of materials. On completion, the student should be able to: describe the main features of common manufacturing processes for metals; explain the variations in macro- and microstructure produced by the different processes; discuss the advantages and limitations of competing processes.
Content:
Processing from the Liquid State: structure and properties of castings, effect of process variables on casting quality. Residual stresses. Processing from the Solid State: Rolling, extrusion, drawing, pressing and forging. Deformation characteristics, the effect of temperature and deformation rate on micro and macrostructures. Superplasticity. Quality control during processing. Effect of processing on material properties and structure. Machining: brief survey of conventional and specialised methods. Quality of machined surfaces, 'machinability', advantages and disadvantages. Joining Processes: solidification in weld metal, residual stresses, chemical reactions, contaminants; fusion and solid state processes, brazing and soldering, adhesive bonding. Non-Destructive Testing: dye penetrant, x-ray, magnetic particles, ultrasonic, optical holography, acoustic emission.

ENAP0009: Metals & alloys

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre ENAP0002

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the principles of alloy constitution and show their application to the thermal and mechanical treatment of engineering alloys. On completion, the student should be able to: identify common types of alloy phase, their characteristics and their interactions; interpret simple binary phase diagrams; describe and explain the effects of commercial heat treatments on steels and light alloys.
Content:
Microstructure of metals, grain refinement, influence of grain size on mechanical properties, the Petch equation; microstructural and mechanical effects of cold-working and annealing; applications and limitations of pure metals. Alloys: Solid solutions, factors determining solubility, effect of composition on properties, intermediate phases and phase structure. Phase diagrams of binary systems, invariant reactions, precipitation from solution. Equilibrium microstructures in simple systems of commercial interest; Al-Si, Cu-Ni, Cu-Zn, Cu-Al, Fe-C, cast irons. Departures from equilibrium, coring and undercooling. Normalised and annealed steels. Non-equilibrium structures; age-hardening systems, steels, quenching and hardenability, tempering, selected alloy steels.

ENAP0010: Electronic structure & materials properties

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Pre [Mat. Sci. 1st Yr.] or[ Maths A level and(Chemistry A level or Physics A level)] Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a coherent quantum-mechanical treatment of the behaviour and role of electrons in solids. To introduce the concepts of: wave-particle duality; quantum mechanical uncertainty and wave functions. To provide a quantum mechanical description of bonding and electrical conduction in solids.
Content:
Classical theory of electrical conduction in metals, Ohm's Law, thermal conductivity, electronic specific heat and the failure of classical theory. DeBroglie wave length, wave-particle duality, Heisenberg uncertainty principle, Schroedinger wave equation. Electrons in an infinite potential well, quantum states, quantum numbers, energy levels, density of states, the free electron model, Fermi energy, k-space, the Fermi surface. Properties of free electron metals. Qualitative solution of the Schroedinger equation for hydrogen, wave functions and quantum numbers; atomic orbitals. Bonding between atoms; linear combination of atomic orbitals; hybridisation; s and p bonds; delocalisation; structure of molecules. Students must have A-level Mathematics and A-level Physics or Chemistry in order to undertake this unit.

ENAP0011: Mechanical properties of materials

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre ENAP0007

Aims & learning objectives:
To extend the mathematical description of the effects of loads upon materials, and to relate their mechanical behaviour to their internal structures. On completion, the student should be able to: convert between tensor and orthodox descriptions of elastic behaviour; characterise time-dependent effects in the deformation of materials; recognise the interaction of time and temperature effects.
Content:
Elasticity: cohesion and bonding, energy-distance curves and Hooke's Law, departures from linear elastic behaviour, elastic properties derived from bond energies. Elasticity theory of crystals, stress and strain tensors, elastic anisotropy, symmetry. Elastically isotropic solids, technical elastic moduli, measurement of moduli. Anelasticity: cyclic stressing and internal friction. thermoelastic effect, Snoek effect, other mechanisms. Specific damping capacity, logarithmic decrement, loss tangent. Viscoelasticity: viscous flow, linear viscoelasticity, spring and dashpot models. Creep and stress relaxation behaviour. Physical mechanisms of viscoelastic behaviour. The glass transition temperature. Time-temperature superposition, master curves for creep compliance and stress relaxation modulus. Effect of molecular architecture and chemical composition on viscoelastic properties. Dynamic viscoelasticity, the complex modulus, dynamic loading of Voigt and Maxwell models, standard linear solid and generalised models, master curves. Moduli and loss tangent as functions of frequency and temperature. Inter-relation of viscoelastic parameters. The effect of polymer structure and crystallinity on dynamic behaviour, mechanical spectroscopy. Non-linear viscoelastic behaviour.

ENAP0012: Materials processing 2

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX60 CW20 PR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To extend the student's knowledge of processing / structure / property relationships in materials, in particular to include polymer and ceramic processing. On completion, the student should be able to: assess materials processing routes using objective criteria such as production rate, dimensional accuracy, flexibility; be aware of techniques for the surface modification of materials.
Content:
Polymer Processing; Newtonian and power flow, Poiseuille equation, rheometry. Injection moulding and extrusion of thermoplastics, die design and quality control, blow moulding, calendering and pressure forming of polymer sheet. Transfer and pressure moulding of filled and unfilled thermosetting and thermoplastic polymers. Ceramic processing: production of powders: purity control, cold and hot compacting, sintering. Relative merits of powder methods for metals and ceramics.

ENAP0013: Ceramics & glasses

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre ENAP0002

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the application of constitutional and kinetic principles to the manufacture and exploitation of ceramics and inorganic glasses. On completion, the student should be able to: understand the nature of ceramics and glasses on the basis of their structures and properties; describe the relationship between various classes of ceramics and their applications.
Content:
Classification of Ceramics. What is a ceramic? Revision of crystal structures and forces with specific reference to the scientifically and technologically important ceramic materials. Source of ceramic materials and production methods. General properties of ceramics, mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, magnetic and electrical. The nature of brittle ceramics and the use of statistics for mechanical design. Classification of ceramics, traditional, refractories, advanced ceramics, both structural and functional to include examples of technological importance. Strengthening and toughening of ceramics. Precursor materials, powder manufacture and powder processing. Ceramic forming methods, wet and dry. Drying of ceramic powder compacts. Densification and sintering, both solid and liquid phase. Hot pressing. Reaction bonding. Pyrolytic deposition. Use of phase diagrams. Structural chemistry of the common glasses. Networks and network modifiers. The glass transition temperature, viscosity, thermal optical and electrical properties. Special glasses, their technology and use. Electrical properties, ionic and electronic conduction, Switching glasses. Lenses, fibre optics, thermal and mechanical properties, glass to metal seals. Stress relief, toughened glass, surface effects, ion exchange and implantation. Composite applications. Glass ceramics.

ENAP0014: Polymers

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre ENAP0002

Pre Mathematics AS Level or MATH0103 and MATH0104; and Chemistry AS Level or CHEY0056 and CHEY0057 Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the principles of polymer science with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to polymers as practical engineering materials.
Content:
Homopolymers, copolymers,linear, crosslinked, tacticity, plastics, rubbers, fibres, molecular weight. The versatility of polymers the length of chains: molecular weight Molecular weight definitions, determination molecular motion & the glass transition Glass transition temperature effect of structure. Molecular motion: nature of vitrification Viscoelasticity effect of temperature rate and structure - Crystallinity. Morphology effect of molecular structure Where do polymers come from? - polymerisation Polymerisation classification. Examples and mechanisms of step and chain polymerisation. Kinetics of radical polymerisation Step polymerisation. Carothers equation. Molecular weight distribution, copolymer equation. The dramatic properties of rubber Elastomers. Chemical nature, vulcanisation Stereospecific polymerisation, kinetic theory of rubber elasticity The environmental dimension Additives. Fillers, plasticisers, antistatic agents. Degradation: thermal, ultra-violet, stabilisers.

ENAP0015: Physical methods of analysis

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre ENAP0010

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the physical principles employed in a variety of instrumental techniques for materials analysis, particularly those based on diffraction and on spectroscopy. On completion, the student should be able to: describe methods of forming an image by electromagnetic waves; recognise the scope and limitations of optical and electron microscopy in their various forms; discuss the interactions which take place when a material is exposed to electromagnetic radiation or high energy electrons how these can be used to establish the chemical composition or structure of the material .
Content:
Electromagnetic waves: e-m spectrum, generation of e-m waves. Lasers. Polarization. Superposition of waves, interference. Huygens' wave construction, diffraction from a single aperture, diffraction grating. Optical Microscopy: resolving power, depth of field, lens aberrations. Spectroscopy: emission and absorption spectra. Optical, infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence analysis. Electron Microscopy and Analysis: Electron waves, interaction of electrons with matter. Transmission electron microscope.. Electron diffraction, analysis of diffraction patterns. Methods of specimen preparation, applications. Scanning electron microscope, resolving power, image contrast. Applications. Electron probe microanalysis, Detection of X-rays, X-ray spectrometers and solid state detectors, qualitative analysis, applications. Surface analysis techniques: Auger analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

ENAP0016: Dissertation 2B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES80 OR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a self-instruction exercise in the seeking, retrieval, organisation and presentation of information in a technological field. On completion, the student should be able to: write an extended critical discussion of a given subject area; make an oral presentation of the relevant material.
Content:
An introduction to an essential research technique - the retrieval and assessment of information from the scientific literature. Each student is assigned a specific subject area and with the help of a supervisor prepares an extended essay based on a critical review of the literature. An oral presentation is to be made at a conference within the School.

ENAP0017: Physical properties of materials

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX60 CW20 PR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the methods of statistical mechanics. To provide a coherent explanation of the thermal properties of crystalline electrically insulating solids. To explain the magnetic and dielectric properties of materials and their optimization for particular engineering applications.
Content:
Thermal Properties: Elements of statistical mechanics, Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution: introduction to lattice vibrations, quantisation. Debye temperature, specific heat, thermal conductivity, phonons, thermal expansion. Magnetic Properties: Dipole moment of atomic orbitals, quantisation, dipole moment of atoms in solids, spin-orbit coupling, orbital quenching, crystalline field anisotropy, exchange, spontaneous magnetisation, ferromagnetism. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy, magnetisation energy, domains, Bloch walls, magnetisation process, hysteresis, domain wall pinning, soft and hard materials. Permanent magnets and transformer cores. Ferrimagnetism, ferrites magnetic recording. Dielectrics: Dielectric constant, dielectric breakdown. Capacitors, Ferroelectricity, properties of perovskite dielectrics, piezoelectricity, applications and materials. Pyro-electricity, infrared detection.

ENAP0018: Dislocation & deformation processes

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To present a detailed treatment of the micromechanisms of deformation in the main categories of materials, encompassing effects of temperature, load pattern and environment. On completion, the student should be able to: discuss theoretical "strengthening mechanisms" in metals and alloys, and their ability to account for mechanical behaviour over a wide range of conditions; describe mechanisms of large-scale deformation in amorphous and semicrystalline polymers; use concepts of fracture mechanics and probability to account for the strengths of brittle materials.
Content:
Plastic deformation of metals: revision of dislocation theory. High temperature deformation, creep mechanisms, structural changes. Effect of cyclic loading, structural changes and appearance of fracture surfaces, the fatigue limit, crack initiation and growth. Plastic deformation of polymers: large scale deformation and flow in amorphous and semi-crystalline polymers, cold drawing and molecular orientation, effect of temperature and strain rate. Mechanics and physics of fracture: theoretical cleavage strength, the real strength of brittle solids, the conditions for ductile/brittle transition; Griffith's treatment of thermodynamics of fracture, Orowan's extension to non-ideally-brittle solids. Work of fracture, stress distribution at the tip of cracks. Fracture mechanics, critical stress intensity and strain energy release rate. Plane strain and plane stress, KIc as an engineering design parameter, measurement of KIc. Statistical analysis of failure, flaw-size distributions, weakest link model. Environmental effects, slow crack growth in glasses and polymers, K/V diagrams, environmental stress cracking.

ENAP0019: Electrical and magnetic properties of materials

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To explain the magnetic and dielectric properties of materials and their optimization for particular engineering applications. To provide a coherent quantum-mechanical treatment of the behaviour and role of electrons in solids. To provide the theoretical background for the treatment of electrons in semiconductors that is employed in MATE0037, Semiconductor microtechnology.
Content:
Magnetic Properties: Dipole moment of atomic orbitals, quantisation, dipole moment of atoms in solids, spin-orbit coupling, orbital quenching, crystalline field anisotropy, exchange, spontaneous magnetisation, ferromagnetism. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy, magnetisation energy, domains, Bloch walls, magnetisation process, hysteresis, domain wall pinning, soft and hard materials. Permanent magnets and transformer cores. Ferrimagnetism, ferrites magnetic recording. Dielectrics: Dielectric constant, dielectric breakdown. Capacitors, Ferroelectricity, properties of perovskite dielectrics, piezoelectricity, applications and materials. Pyro-electricity, infrared detection. Classical theory of electrical conduction in metals, Ohm's Law, thermal conductivity, electronic specific heat and the failure of classical theory. DeBroglie wave length, wave-particle duality, Heisenberg uncertainty principle, Schroedinger wave equation. Electrons in an infinite potential well, quantum states, quantum numbers, energy levels, density of states, the free electron model, Fermi energy, k-space, the Fermi surface. Electrical conduction in a free-electron metal, electron scattering, resistivity of pure and impure metals. Nearly free electron model, Bragg reflections, energy gaps, zone boundaries, Brillouin zones, band overlap, semi-conductors and insulators.

ENAP0020: Engineering materials chemistry

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre ENAP0004

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit, which builds on principles established in MATE0004 (Materials Chemistry), aims to introduce the thermodynamic and kinetic basis for the understanding of structural changes in materials, and of material / environment interactions. On completion, the student should have detailed knowledge and understanding of: the thermodynamics of oxidation-reduction reactions, equilibria between binary phases, binary phase diagrams, stability of phases in thermodynamic terms.
Content:
The unit is divided into the following sections (with approximate durations): 1. Advanced thermodynamics including(5 lectures) solution thermodynamics 2. Derivation and interpretation of Gibbs' phase rule(5 lectures) 3. Ellingham diagrams for oxides(4 lectures) 4. Surface physical chemistry (3 lectures) 5. Diffusion (3 lectures) 6. Phase transformations, including nucleation and kinetics(4 lectures).

ENAP0021: Project dissertation

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES80 OR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a thorough preparation for the final year experimental project. On completion, the student should be able to: write an extended literature review in the field of his project, and define its objectives; present a detailed experimental programme to achieve these objectives; make an oral presentation based on the above.
Content:
An introduction to the planning of a research programme. Each student is assigned a specific project, and with the help of a supervisor prepares an extended critical review of the literature, and plans an experimental programme in the relevant area.

ENAP0022: Materials selection in engineering design

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To co-ordinate previous studies of structural materials, first by an introduction to the classes of engineering materials followed by consideration of composite materials. Examination of the selection of materials for real engineering applications follows. On completion, the student should be able to: describe the various types of engineering materials, fibre composites, their manufacture and characteristics; discuss theoretical models for strength and stiffness of composites; describe the overall process of engineering design, and the place in it of materials selection; deduce from standard test results the materials information required for design; analyse materials requirements and propose solutions to the selection problem in specified design situations.
Content:
Introduction to engineering materials, composites and their applications in engineering. Nature of engineering materials, of fibre composite materials, manufacturing processes, elastic behaviour; elements of classical thin laminate theory, strength, toughness; the use of commercial software for designing with composites. The design process; the designer and materials selection. Design aspects of elastic properties, strength and fracture toughness. Design procedures for creep in metals and plastics, extrapolation methods. Fatigue, master diagrams for design purposes, damage accumulation laws, application of fracture mechanics, designing against fatigue. Non-destructive evaluation of materials and component quality. Selection of a manufacturing process. Formalised procedures for materials selection.

ENAP0023: Surfaces & interfaces

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX75 CW25
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Students will be introduced to techniques for the observation, manipulation and control of solid surfaces on the nanometre scale and to some fundamental aspects of the science of adhesion. After participating in the course, students should be familiar with the physical principles and instrumentation associated with scanning probe microscopy, and be aware of a range of its application in science and nanotechnology. They should also understand the importance, and underlying scientific principles of crystal engineering through the control of crystallisation behaviour. They will be encouraged to integrate their knowledge and understanding of other units throughout the Materials Science and Engineering course, and will have had experience of reading original literature and of presenting their own views of it orally to their peers.
Content:
The structure and nature of crystalline surfaces. Basic surface crystallography, reconstruction and relaxation, overview of surface characterisation techniques.Nanoscale observation and manipulation of solid surfaces. Scanning probe microscopy, principles and methods, scanning tunnelling microscopy, force microscopy and variants. Applications: characterisation, atomic and molecular manipulation, nanoscale surface modification for data storage, nanoscale electronic devices. Crystal engineering through control of surface processes. Technological importance of crystallite properties, crystalline imperfections, impurity effects, tailor-made additives.Practical surfaces of engineering materials. Adhesion: strength of an adhesive bond, mechanical properties and interfacial forces. Study of some original literature in the area of interfaces, polymers and adhesion.

ENAP0024: Degradation of engineering materials

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre ENAP0004, Pre ENAP0020

Aims & learning objectives:
Building on MATE0024 (Materials Chemistry), and developing ideas covered in MATE0020 (Engineerimg Materials Chemistry), the aim of this unit is to cover key aspects of the degradation of engineering materials, mainly metals and alloys but also ceramics and polymers. The main degradation processes considered are thermal, physico-chemical and particle / wave irradiation. The effects of these degradation processes on materials properties are considered. Method of protection are also described. On completion students should have detailed understanding and knowledge of the degradation of engineering materials, and how degradation impacts on the processing and use of materials in engineering applications.
Content:
The unit is divided into the following sections (with approximate durations): 1. Degradation of metals and alloys: Cool aqueous corrosion(12 lectures) Hot corrosion(4 lectures) 2. Degradation of ceramics:(4 lectures) 3. Degradation of polymers:(4 lectures) 4. Case study:(2 lectures incorporated into one of the above sections).

ENAP0025: Materials engineering

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To make the student aware of issues of current scientific and professional interest across the field of materials engineering. On completion, the student should be able to: discuss critically, topics of current interest, identifying their underlying principles and commenting upon their significance, both technical and social.
Content:
Research Colloquia. This part of the course consists of talks by experts in their fields on advanced aspects of the science and engineering of materials which complement and extend the more formal curriculum of the lecture courses.

ENAP0026: Project

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: PR80 OR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide experience in the performance of an extended research programme, involving assimilation of the relevant literature, planning and execution of experimental work, analysis of results, and the drawing and reporting of conclusions. On completion, the student should be able to: exploit information sources to familiarise himself with a new subject area; identify critical parameters in an experiment, measure and analyse them; recognise and account for factors limiting the precision of experimental measurements; write an extended report in acceptable style describing his findings; make a clear oral presentation of the project.
Content:
The student will carry out an experimental research project which is timetabled for one full day per week. This will be done under the guidance of a member of staff. In many cases the project will be part of a wider programme involving graduate students and research staff, so that the student will gain experience of research team work.

ENAP0027: Environmental studies: A crisis in material resources? B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX75 CW25
Requisites: Co ENGR0001

Aims & learning objectives:
To achieve an understanding of environmental aspects of the science and technology of engineering materials, to use this knowledge to illuminate the broad questions as to whether there is an environmental 'crisis', whether there are limits to growth, and whether there can be sustainable development, and to develop defensible positions on these issues.
Content:
Engineering materials feature strongly in many environmental conflicts and debates. The development of civilization and wealth creation depend on the availability of raw materials resources. The global distribution of these resources is uneven and historically it has led to territorial and financial disputes. The extraction of materials by mining and quarrying leaves physical scars on a monumental scale and there are often additional problems of environmental contamination and subsidence which result from these activities. The purification of raw materials and manufacturing processes cause a wide spectrum of environmental problems including atmospheric pollution and poisoning of water courses. At the end of the useful life of manufactured objects the potential for recycling must be considered to minimise environmental impact. Topics will be examined within the framework of:
* The environmental issue or concern
* Materials considerations
* Environmental outcome Examples of topics: materials resources, materials properties, glass, cement, asbestos, metals, environmental degradation, polymers Seminar programme combined with a student extended essay to encourage students to integrate the syllabus content and to develop their own views on the relation between environmental science and the wider social and economic context.

ENAP0028: Biomedical & natural materials

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course aims to give an appreciation of a range of topics that relate to the structure and properties of natural materials and the way in which natural and synthetic materials are linked at the interface between medicine and engineering.
Content:
1. Biological materials The importance of the structure/properties relationship in 'engineering' materials. Mechanical properties - units and definitions. Stress, strain, Young's modulus, density, specific mechanical properties, toughness, elastic and viscoelastic deformation, damping. The principal hard and soft tissues in the body and their main anatomical functions: bone, teeth, cartilage, tendons & ligaments, skin, arterial wall, cervical tissue. Chemical and physical compositions: main chemical constituents - hydroxyapatite, dentine and enamel, aminoacids and mucopolysaccharides, proteoglycans (proteins), collagen, elastin. Crystalline and amorphous structures, polymers and composites. Performance of natural materials under stress: brittleness and toughness, yielding (plastic behaviour), fatigue, creep (viscoelasticity), rubbery behaviour, damping. Efficiency of bone structures. Mechanical response of hard and soft tissues in terms of their structures. 2. Prosthetics Use of biomaterials for replacement and repair of hard and soft tissues. Functional considerations - forces on joints, cyclic loading, wear and tear, body environment Materials used for implant purposes - metals, alloys, ceramics, polymers, composites Applications in the fields of orthopaedics, cardiovascular, dental, ocular, drug delivery and wound healing Evaluation of biomaterials - biocompatibility testing, corrosion, wear, deterioration. Students must have A-level Physics or Chemistry in order to undertake this unit. Natural science students must take MATE0030 in conjunction with this unit.

ENAP0030: Introduction to materials for sports science

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX40 CW20 ES20 PR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To understand the science underlying the use of materials in applications used in sport. To appreciate the nature of the physical stresses imposed on materials, both natural and artificial, and how the materials react to stresses. To explore the use of high technology advanced materials in sports applications.
Content:
An introduction to mechanical properties: the nature of elastic stress and elastic strain. The elastic limit. Types of stress and strain. Elastic compliance. Plastic deformation and fracture. Energy absorption during loading and fracture, energy release. Specific stress and specific strain. Compare and contrast metals, ceramics and polymers as sporting materials. The limitations of homogeneous materials. Composite materials and why they are used in sport. The law of mixtures for composite materials. Natural and artificial composites; several examples of each, outlining the structure and properties. Comparison of natural composites ( wood, bone, skin etc) with artificial composites. Case studies of sports equipment , e.g. sport shoes, football studs, racquets, vaulting pole, sports bicycle; the method of construction and the performance advantages that ensue.

ENAP0031: Study year abroad

Academic Year
Credits: 60
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment:
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Please see Director of Studies for further information about the Aims & Learning Objectives of the Study year abroad.

ENAP0032: Industrial training

Academic Year
Credits: 60
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment:
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objective: Please see the Director of Studies for more detailed information about the Aims & Learning Objectives of the Industrial training year.

ENAP0033: Project dissertation (MEng)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Undergraduate Masters
Assessment: ES80 OR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Please see the Director of Studies for further information about this unit which is designed for MEng students and enables them to undertake an extended research project.

ENAP0037: Semiconductor microtechnology

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide detailed coverage of the science and technology exploited in semiconductor electronic devices. On completion, the student should be able to: treat quantitatively the electrical characteristics of semiconducting materials and simple devices; describe the manufacture and characteristics of semiconductor devices and have a quantitative appreciation of the limitations imposed and effects caused by impurities and materials imperfections.
Content:
Revision of nearly-free electron model, electron effective mass, electrons and holes, contact potentials. Intrinsic semiconductors; Fermi level, carrier concentration, mobility, conductivity, temperature dependence, recombination and trapping, carrier diffusion. Extrinsic semiconductors; P type and N type impurities, Fermi level, carrier concentration, conductivity, temperature dependence. The P-N junction; 'built-in potential', carrier diffusion, depletion layer, forward and reverse bias. The junction transistor, field effect transistor, semiconductor surface potentials, surface effect devices, other simple semiconductor devices. Crystal purification and growth, epitaxy. Doping and dopant profiles. Oxidation and photolithography. Metallization and packaging. Very large scale integration (VLSI), MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) and bipolar technologies. Photoemissive materials and devices. Light emitting diodes, photoconductivity and devices. Semi-conductor lasers.

ENAP0038: Engineering materials & properties

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre MECH0026

Aims & learning objectives:
To co-ordinate previous studies of structural materials, first by a detailed consideration of composite materials and afterwards by examining the selection of materials for real engineering applications. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Describe the various types of fibre composite materials, their manufacture and characteristics. Discuss theoretical models for strength and stiffness of composites. Describe the overall process of engineering design, and the place in it of material selection. Deduce from standard test results the materials information required for design. Analyse materials requirements and propose solutions to the selection problem in specified design situations.
Content:
Introduction to composites and their applications in engineering. NATURE OF FIBRE COMPOSITE MATERIALS. Manufacturing processes. Elastic behaviour. Elements of classical thin laminate theory, strength, toughness. The use of commercial software for designing with composites. THE DESIGN PROCESS: the designer and materials selection. Design aspects of elastic properties, strength and fracture toughness. Design procedures for creep in metals and plastics. Extrapolation methods. FATIGUE: master diagrams for design purposes, damage accumulation laws, application of fracture mechanics, designing against fatigue. Non destructive evaluation of materials and component quality. Selection of a manufacturing process. Formalised procedures for materials selection.

ENAP0039: Technology of the modern world

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX70 ES30
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the unit is to give non science/engineering students an appreciation and understanding of some of the key technologies that underpin modern society.The learning objectives will include:
* An appreciation of the contribution of Science and Engineering to quality of life in modern society
* An understanding of key areas of technology which enable advanced economies to function.
* The importance of power generation, its production and transmission in sustaining core services.
* ·Understanding large engineering structures, and concepts.
Content:

* Short history of technology
* Role of technology in modern society
* Provision of major services, electricity, water, gas, communications
* Electricity generation (Coal/Oil, Nuclear, Hydro, Solar and alternative), transmission and storage, use of electricity, power applications, chemical, electronic
* Transport, land, sea, and air
* Automobile engines, reciprocating petrol and diesel, "environmentally friendly systems"
* Aircraft engines and turbines
* Communications, speech, paper and writing. Coded communication - flags and semaphore, telegraph. Electronic communication - telephone, radio, TV; coded electronic communication - FAX machines, digital systems
* Transistors and integrated circuits - what are they?
* Large engineering structures, bridges, tunnels, buildings - from pyramids to skyscrapers!
* Role of engineering materials
* Manufacturing processes, examples such as oil and gas, minerals, steel production, cement.

ENAP0040: Materials science 1

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop a lively interest in the available range of building materials, founded on an understanding of their microstructure and properties and their practical advantages and limits.
Content:
Building materials. Resources, usage and cost.. Mechanical properties; stress, strain, strength stiffness, strain energy, toughness. Bonding and Packing of Atoms The periodic table. Primary (ionic, covalent, and metallic) and secondary (dipolar) bonding. Packing of equal and unequal size atoms. Imperfections in crystals. Point and line defects, grain boundaries. Metals and Alloys Iron and steel; phase diagram for Fe-C system, Heat treatment of steels. Alloy steels. Other metals. Glass, Ceramics and Concrete Glass structure, composition. and properties. Volume-temperature relationships. Traditional and engineering ceramics. Sheet silicates. Clay bodies. Manufacture of cement. Special cements. Setting and strength of concrete. Stone as a building material. Polymeric Material and Wood Polymerisation. Amorphous and crystalline polymers. Thermosets and thermoplastics. Structure and deformation of the wood cell. Properties of timber and its products.

ENAP0041: Materials science 2

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course develops from the introductory ideas of structure of materials presented in the first year and uses those ideas to show how the basic mechanics and physical properties of constructional materials are determined by their molecular and crystaline nature. The course forms a basis for the further development of an understanding of design aspects of materials at the macroscopic rather than the atomic level. The course identifies a number of aspects of the behaviour of building materials of specific importance to the engineer, with emphasis being on problems of design and selection of materials for given service conditions.
Content:
1. Classification of engineering materials according to type and properties. 2. Elastic behaviour, linear and non-linear. The elastic moduli, anisotropy; elastic properties of crystals and poly-crystals; composite materials, rubber elasticity. 3. Viscoelastic behaviour and time dependent effects. 4. Strength of engineering materials. Theoretical and actual strengths of solids; improving the strength of real materials. Problems of designing with brittle materials. 5. Longer term effects. Fatigue and creep (introductory). 6. Durability of metals and plastics. Corrosion and environmental attack (introductory). Engineering design The process of engineering design in relation to materials evaluation and selection; relevance of measured properties to service conditions. Short-term mechanical effects Time-dependent behaviour of metals , plastics, concrete, timber; creep and fatigue; combined effects of fatigue and corrosion. Long term chemical behaviour Durability and ageing; changes in material properties in service conditions. Corrosion and protection of metals and alloys; environmental degredation of plastics; chemical degredation of concrete - sulphate attack, conversion of HAC etc.; biodeterioration of timber and protection methods; flammability and fire damage to building materials. Long term stability of adhesives and adhesive bonds.

ENAP0042: Introduction to Electrical Engineering Materials

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to materials types, microstructures and properties. To show the influence of materials selection on the design and manufacture of components or structures. To provide an understanding of the properties of magnetic, dielectric and insulating materials.
Content:
Atomic structure and interatomic bonding; structure of crystalline solids; metals, alloys, ceramics, polymers, glasses; microstructure, control of microstructure, outline of manufacturing methods; mechanical properties of materials, ductility, dislocations, brittle fracture; selection of materials, design.Origins of magnetism, ferromagnetism, domain formation, magnetisation, hysteresis, hard and soft magnets, permanent magnet materials, transformer core, eddy current loss; ferrimagnetism, ferrites, ferrite applications; electrical insulation, insulator materials, breakdown phenomena; capacitor types, dielectric properties, ferroelectrics, capacitor selection; piezoelectric materials, piezoelectric ceramics, PZT, applications, quartz, crystal resonators.

ENAP0043: Introduction to materials science and engineering (NS), 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW80 PR20
Requisites:

Pre GCSE level or above: Chemistry & Physics or Combined Science; and A-level Chemistry or Physics Aims & learning objectives:
Materials Science applies principles of physics and chemistry to materials of engineering interest. This is the first part of a two semester course which aims to be of general interest, and to show students its scope and philosophy.
Content:
(i) What are materials? How are they used? An introduction to the various categories of materials - polymers, metals, ceramics and natural materials. A comparative overview of their price, availability and mechanical properties followed by an introduction to the manufacturing processes that can be applied to them. (ii) Materials for microelectronics. Outline of the history of electronic device development from the thermionic value to the silicon chip. Semiconducting materials properties and relationship to basic electronic structure. The transistor. The importance of materials quality and purity to the semiconductor industry.

ENAP0044: Introduction to materials science and engineering (NS), 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW80 PR20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Materials Science applies principles of physics and chemistry to materials of engineering interest. This is the second part of a two semester course which aims to be of general interest, and to show students its scope and philosophy.
Content:
(i) Can strength and stiffness of materials be explained in terms of atomic structure? Concepts of strength and elastic modulus; the atomic and molecular constitution of different types of material. Primary and secondary bonding; potential energy curves for ionic, covalent and van der Waals bonds. Structure and 'bond density'; relation between potential energy curves and modulus; Hooke's law. Relation between P.E. curves and strength; brittle strength; surface cracks; toughening; fibres & whiskers. (ii) Short contributions giving a broader flavour of Materials Science. (a) Timber wood is a natural, cellular, renewable material which in the form of sawn lumber, engineered timber composites or panel products is used world wide in numerous structural applications to the same extent as steel by weight. The microstructure and mechanical properties of timber are examined and case studies are presented on the manufacture of glue-laminated (glulam) structures and the environmental credentials of timber compared with steel. (b) Renewable energy resources in the UK. In the UK we benefit from renewable resources for the supply of energy in the form of wind, solar and wave power, biomass, landfill gas, hydroelectric power and more inaccessible resources such as hot rocks. (c) Degredation of materials. Most materials interact physically or chemically with their environment, resulting in changes in structure and composition. These changes often result in the reduction (or degredation) of important properties, such as strength, which may limit the effectiveness of a material in its application, for example as a load-bearing component. Key topics in the degredation of materials are introduced, including aqueous and high-temperature corrosion of metals, dissolution of ceramics and radiation damage in polymers. A case study of the oxidation of nuclear reactor graphites will be presented. (d) Composite materials. An introduction to the concepts of making and using composites materials, present an indication of how their properties may be determined, some typical applications for these materials. (e) Ceramics. Inorganic solids, mainly consisting of oxides, which are produced by heating the source materials at high temperature below their melting points in order to densify the compact. The product is usually chemically and thermally stable; it exhibits desirable properties such as strength, hardness and abrasion resistance.

ENAP0045: Materials processing 1 (NS)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW20 EX80
Requisites:



ENAP0046: Metals and Alloys (NS)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW20 EX80
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the principles of alloy constitution and show their application to the thermal and mechanical treatment of engineering alloys. On completion, the student should be able to: identify common types of alloy phase, their characteristics and their interactions; interpret simple binary phase diagrams; describe and explain the effects of commercial heat treatments on steels and light alloys.
Content:
Microstructure of metals, grain refinement, influence of grain size on mechanical properties, the Petch equation; microstructural and mechanical effects of cold-working and annealing; applications and limitations of pure metals. Alloys: Solid solutions, factors determining solubility, effect of composition on properties, intermediate phases and phase structure. Phase diagrams of binary systems, invariant reactions, precipitation from solution. Equilibrium microstructures in simple systems of commercial interest; Al-Si, Cu-Ni, Cu-Zn, Cu-Al, Fe-C, cast irons. Departures from equilibrium, coring and undercooling. Normalised and annealed steels. Non-equilibrium structures; age-hardening systems, steels, quenching and hardenability, tempering, selected alloy steels.

ENAP0047: Mechanical properties of materials (NS)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW20 PR20 EX60
Requisites:

Pre Maths (A-level or M1a) and Physics or Chemistry A-level Aims & learning objectives:
To extend the mathematical description of the effects of loads upon materials, and to relate their mechanical behaviour to their internal structures. On completion, the student should be able to: convert between tensor and orthodox descriptions of elastic behaviour; characterise time-dependent effects in the deformation of materials; recognise the interaction of time and temperature effects.
Content:
Elasticity: cohesion and bonding, energy-distance curves and Hooke's Law, departures from linear elastic behaviour, elastic properties derived from bond energies. Elasticity theory of crystals, stress and strain tensors, elastic anisotropy, symmetry. Elastically isotropic solids, technical elastic moduli, measurement of moduli. Anelasticity: cyclic stressing and internal friction. thermoelastic effect, Snoek effect, other mechanisms. Specific damping capacity, logarithmic decrement, loss tangent. Viscoelasticity: viscous flow, linear viscoelasticity, spring and dashpot models. Creep and stress relaxation behaviour. Physical mechanisms of viscoelastic behaviour. The glass transition temperature. Time-temperature superposition, master curves for creep compliance and stress relaxation modulus. Effect of molecular architecture and chemical composition on viscoelastic properties. Dynamic viscoelasticity, the complex modulus, dynamic loading of Voigt and Maxwell models, standard linear solid and generalised models, master curves. Moduli and loss tangent as functions of frequency and temperature. Inter-relation of viscoelastic parameters. The effect of polymer structure and crystallinity on dynamic behaviour, mechanical spectroscopy. Non-linear viscoelastic behaviour.

ENAP0048: Materials processing 2 (NS)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To extend the student's knowledge of processing / structure / property relationships in materials, in particular to include polymer and ceramic processing. On completion, the student should be able to: assess materials processing routes using objective criteria such as production rate, dimensional accuracy, flexibility; be aware of techniques for the surface modification of materials.
Content:
Polymer Processing; Newtonian and power flow, Poiseuille equation, rheometry. Injection moulding and extrusion of thermoplastics, die design and quality control, blow moulding, calendering and pressure forming of polymer sheet. Transfer and pressure moulding of filled and unfilled thermosetting and thermoplastic polymers. Ceramic processing: production of powders: purity control, cold and hot compacting, sintering. Relative merits of powder methods for metals and ceramics.

ENAP0049: Ceramics & glasses (NS)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW20 EX80
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the application of constitutional and kinetic principles to the manufacture and exploitation of ceramics and inorganic glasses. On completion, the student should be able to understand the nature of ceramics and glasses on the basis of their structures and properties; describe the relationship between various classes of ceramics and their applications.
Content:
Classification of Ceramics. What is a ceramic? Revision of crystal structures and forces with specific reference to the scientifically and technologically important ceramic materials. Source of ceramic materials and production methods. General properties of ceramics, mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, magnetic and electrical. The nature of brittle ceramics and the use of statistics for mechanical design. Classification of ceramics, traditional, refractories, advanced ceramics, both structural and functional to include examples of technological importance. Strengthening and toughening of ceramics. Precursor materials, powder manufacture and powder processing. Ceramic forming methods, wet and dry. Drying of ceramic powder compacts. Densification and sintering, both solid and liquid phase. Hot pressing. Reaction bonding. Pyrolytic deposition. Use of phase diagrams. Definitions for glass, volume-temperature relationship, glass transition temperature, types and composition of oxide and other glasses. Structural chemistry of the common glasses, network formers and modifiers, intermediates, Zachariasen's rules, radial distribution functions. Nucleation and growth, phase separation, Pyrex, Vycor, glass ceramics. Optical properties, refractive index, transparency, coloured glass, special optical glasses, lenses, fibre optics case study. Electrical properties, ionic and electronic conduction, industrial applications. Mechanical properties, glass to metal seals, stress relief, toughened glass, ion exchange annealing. Manufacture of glass, recycling glass, slow-release glasses, nuclear waste encapsulation.

ENAP0050: Polymers (NS)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW20 PR20 EX60
Requisites:

Pre MATE0052 (Mt2.2/A); Maths AS or M1a; Chemistry AS or C1a Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the principles of polymer science with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to polymers as practical engineering materials.
Content:
Homopolymers, copolymers, linear, crosslinked, tacticity, plastics, rubbers, fibres, molecular weight. The versatility of polymers the length of chains: molecular weight Molecular weight definitions, determination molecular motion & the glass transition Glass transition temperature effect of structure. Molecular motion: nature of vitrification Viscoelasticity effect of temperature rate and structure - Crystallinity. Morphology effect of molecular structure Where do polymers come from? - polymerisation Polymerisation classification. Examples and mechanisms of step and chain polymerisation. Kinetics of radical polymerisation Step polymerisation. Carothers equation. Molecular weight distribution, copolymer equation. The dramatic properties of rubber Elastomers. Chemical nature, vulcanisation Stereospecific polymerisation, kinetic theory of rubber elasticity The environmental dimension Additives. Fillers, plasticisers, antistatic agents. Degradation: thermal, ultra-violet, stabilisers

ENAP0052: Crystal structure and determination (NS)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW20 PR20 EX60
Requisites:

Pre Maths (AS or M1a) and Chemistry (AS or C1a) Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce the techniques for concise representation of atomic arrangements in crystalline materials. To present the basic rules governing the crystal structures adopted by both elements and simple compounds. To introduce X-ray diffraction and its role in determining crystal structure. On completion, the student should be able to: describe simple crystal structures using standard crystallographic notation and terminology; represent crystal planes and directions using standard notation and perform simple calculations; identify the key features of a given material which are responsible for its observed crystal structure; explain X-ray diffraction from a crystal lattice and the information that can be obtained from powder and back reflection patterns.
Content:
Crystallography: Lattices, unit cells and cell centring, crystal systems, Bravais lattices, symmetry. Lattice planes and directions, notation and calculation of interplanar spacing and angles. Crystal Chemistry: Structures of metals, CCP, HCP and BCC, interstitial sites in metal structures. Factors governing ionic structures, coordination numbers and polyhedra, radius ratio rules, polarisation effects, Pauling's rules. Factors governing covalent structures. Examples of structures, AX and AX2 compounds, carbon, Perovskite, SiO2 structures and phase transitions. Crystallinity in polymers: Evidence for crystallinity, structures of polymers, single crystals, spherulites, factors influencing crystallinity. X-ray techniques: generation of X-rays, characteristic and continuous radiation. X-ray scattering and absorption. X-ray diffraction, powder patterns, determination of lattice parameters, structure factor and diffraction intensities. Single crystal diffraction, Laue back reflection technique.

ENAP0053: Composites/fracture of materials

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites: Pre ENAP0011

Aims & learning objectives:
(a) The course introduces the theory and practice of reinforcement of a matrix material with a stiff secondary phase, with the emphasis on fibre-reinforced plastics. The student will be able to appreciate and model how the properties of the composite can be predicted from the properties of the constituent materials. Micro-mechanics of stress transfer and fracture will be included as well as the estimation of macroscopic behaviour and manufacturing methods. (b) To present a detailed treatment of the micro-mechanisms of fracture. conditions; develop the understanding of fracture mechanics and its use in design of engineering materials, prediction of fatigue parameters. Use concepts of fracture mechanics and probability to account for the strengths of brittle materials.
Content:
(a) History and categorization of composites into particle- and fibre-reinforced systems. Nature of fibre reinforcement (glass, carbon, Kevlar and whiskers) and matrix materials (thermosets, thermoplastics and metal alloys). Comparison of mechanical properties with other engineering materials. Longitudinal and transverse moduli of FRPs, Rule of Mixtures, determination of modulus of elasticity at any angle. Strength of composites parallel and perpendicular to fibres, Krenchel coefficients. Load transfer in composites, interfacial shear, critical fibre lengths, critical aspect ratio. Inter-laminar shear strength. Toughness of composites, Cook-Gordon effect, fracture energy of cross-laminated composites. Fatigue and creep of composites, S-N curves, residual strength, damage mechanisms. Engineering applications for composites, fabrication, joining and repair. Designing with composites, application of software. (b) Effect of cyclic loading, structural changes and appearance of fracture surfaces, the fatigue limit, crack initiation and growth. Mechanics and physics of fracture: theoretical cleavage strength, the real strength of brittle solids, the conditions for ductile/brittle transition; Griffith's treatment of fracture, Orowan's extension. Stress concentration and distribution at the tip of cracks. Fracture mechanics, critical stress intensity and strain energy release rate. Plane strain and plane stress, KIc as an engineering design parameter, measurement of KIc. Fatigue and life prediction. Statistical analysis of failure in brittle materials, flaw-size distributions, weakest link model. Environmental effects, slow crack growth, K/V diagrams, environmental stress cracking. Fracture mechanisms and fracture appearances, micro-mechanisms, fracture maps

ENAP0054: Composites/fracture of materials (NS)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW20 PR20 EX60
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
(a) The course introduces the theory and practice of reinforcement of a matrix material with a stiff secondary phase, with the emphasis on fibre-reinforced plastics. The student will be able to appreciate and model how the properties of the composite can be predicted from the properties of the constituent materials. Micro-mechanics of stress transfer and fracture will be included as well as the estimation of macroscopic behaviour and manufacturing methods. (b) To present a detailed treatment of the micro-mechanisms of fracture. conditions; develop the understanding of fracture mechanics and its use in design of engineering materials, prediction of fatigue parameters. Use concepts of fracture mechanics and probability to account for the strengths of brittle materials.
Content:
(a) History and categorization of composites into particle- and fibre-reinforced systems. Nature of fibre reinforcement (glass, carbon, Kevlar and whiskers) and matrix materials (thermosets, thermoplastics and metal alloys). Comparison of mechanical properties with other engineering materials. Longitudinal and transverse moduli of FRPs, Rule of Mixtures, determination of modulus of elasticity at any angle. Strength of composites parallel and perpendicular to fibres, Krenchel coefficients. Load transfer in composites, interfacial shear, critical fibre lengths, critical aspect ratio. Inter-laminar shear strength. Toughness of composites, Cook-Gordon effect, fracture energy of cross-laminated composites. Fatigue and creep of composites, S-N curves, residual strength, damage mechanisms. Engineering applications for composites, fabrication, joining and repair. Designing with composites, application of software. (b) Effect of cyclic loading, structural changes and appearance of fracture surfaces, the fatigue limit, crack initiation and growth. Mechanics and physics of fracture: theoretical cleavage strength, the real strength of brittle solids, the conditions for ductile/brittle transition; Griffith's treatment of fracture, Orowan's extension. Stress concentration and distribution at the tip of cracks. Fracture mechanics, critical stress intensity and strain energy release rate. Plane strain and plane stress, KIc as an engineering design parameter, measurement of KIc. Fatigue and life prediction. Statistical analysis of failure in brittle materials, flaw-size distributions, weakest link model. Environmental effects, slow crack growth, K/V diagrams, environmental stress cracking. Fracture mechanisms and fracture appearances, micro-mechanisms, fracture maps.

ENAP0055: Properties of materials- laboratory unit 1

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: RT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop practical and organisational skills for research. To introduce the principles of report writing and materials properties. On completion, the student should be able to produce structured laboratory reports on engineering properties, microstrucutre, corrosion and fracture behaviour of materials in hand-written or computer format.
Content:
Introduction to writing laboratory reports including presentation, structure, style and treatment of experimental results. Demonstration of workshop practice. A series of 4 laboratory practicals, working in groups of 2-4 students which introduce the following aspects of materials properties:
* Engineering Properties
* Microscopy
* Corrosion
* Fracture

ENAP0056: Processing of materials- laboratory unit 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: RT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop the principles of processing of materials, report writing, analysis of experimental results and develop practical and organisational skills for research. On completion, the student should be able to interpret experimental results and produce structured laboratory reports on the processing of materials in hand-written or computer format.
Content:
A series of 4 laboratory practicals, working in groups of 2-4 students which introduce the manufacture and processing of materials namely:
* Metal Shaping & Plastic Flow of Metals
* Ceramic Fabrication
* Interfacial Morphology
* Behaviour of Glass Near Tg

ENAP0057: Characterisation of materials- laboratory unit 3

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: RT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop the principles of characterisation of materials, analysis of results, report writing using computer packages and develop practical and organisational skills for research. On completion the student should be able to interpret materials characterisation data and produce structured laboratory reports using standard computer packages (e.g. Excel and Word).
Content:
A series of 4 laboratory practicals, working in groups of 2-4 students which introduce the concepts of characterisation of materials namely:
* Metallography
* Characterisation of Polymers
* Electrical Properties of Materials
* Spectroscopy

ENAP0058: Introduction to the mechanical & electrical properties of materials

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX80 CW20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to materials types, microstructures and properties. To show the influence of materials selection on the design and manufacture of components or structures. To provide an understanding of the properties of magnetic, dielectric and insulating materials.
Content:
Atomic structure and interatomic bonding; structure of cystalline solids; metals, alloys, ceramics, polymers, glasses; microstructure, control of microstructure, outline of manufacturing methods; mechanical properties of materials, ductility, dislocations, brittle fracture; selection of materials, design. Origins of magnetism, ferromagnetism, domain formation, magnetism, hysteresis, hard and soft magnets, permanent magnet materials, transformer core, eddy current loss; ferrimagnetism, ferrites, ferrite applications; electrical insulation, insulator materials, breakdown of phenomena; capacitor types, dielectric properties, ferroelectrics, capacitor selection; piezoelectric materials, piezoelectric ceramics, PZT, applications, quartz, crystal resonators.

ENAP0061: Aerospace Materials

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

This unit is only for students registered on engineering or science degrees. Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the unit is to give engineering students an understanding of the nature of aerospace materials and how this determines their successful application in aerospace structures and machines. The learning objectives will include:-
*An appreciation of the properties of engineering materials and how they arise.
*An understanding of key areas of manufacturing technology which allow fabrication of the critical engineering component.
*The importance of the correct choice of material and the factors limiting the service life of the component.
*The significance of the manufacturing route in determining the economics and engineering viability of the component.
*Methods for fault detection and life prediction.
Content:
Introduction, history and classification of aerospace materials. Materials for airframes-Aluminium Alloys; manufacturing route, heat treatments, properties, joining techniques. Titanium Alloys. Super-plastic forming. Diffusion bonding. Production, properties and applications Stainless and Maraging steels. Properties, fabrication and applications. Alloys and components for aeroengines. Manufacturing processes, properties, applications and failure modes. Steel, Titanium alloys, Honeycombs, High temperature alloys. Polycrystalline, directionally solidified and single crystal blades. Future technology. Thermal barrier coatings. Principles, processing and performance. Long Fibre Composites. Critical Fibre length. Aerospace manufacturing processes. Types of fibre and matrix. Composite honeycombs. Composites and design. Comparison of carbon fibre composites and aluminium alloys. Laminate analysis/ design. Material coupling. Failure criteria (strength and stiffness). Repair Systems. Metal matrix Composites. Degradation processes and control. NDT, its role in quality control and in in-service inspection of aircraft. Review of types of defect found in aircraft and their hazards. X-ray inspection, sources, recording, sensitivity, radiation safety. Dye penetrant crack detection. Ultrasonic testing, ultrasonic wave propagation and reflection. Transducers, coupling. A-scan, b-scan, c-scan, shear wave and surface wave inspection techniques. Electrical methods, eddy current, potential drop, magnetic methods. Special inspection problems posed by composite materials. "The ageing aircraft programme".

ENGR0001: Environmental studies: A crisis in material resources? A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX85 CW15
Requisites: Co ENAP0027, Co MATE0027

Aims & learning objectives:
Through a study of the science and technology of some renewable energy sources, students are encouraged to consider the broad questions as to whether there is an environmental 'crisis', whether there are limits to growth, and whether there can be sustainable development, and to start to develop defensible positions on these issues.
Content:
Energy The thermodynamics of power generation - 2nd Law of Thermodynamics considerations. Combustion of fossil fuels - effects on the environment: greenhouse effect, acid rain. The need to conserve fossil fuels: nuclear and alternative forms of energy. The possible future contribution and cost of some of the following energy alternatives. (i) Solar energy: various forms of solar collector, power generation from the concentration of solar energy; direct generation of energy. (ii) Wind energy: types of generator, horizontal and vertical axis, survey of existing machines and their performance, future developments. (iii) Wave energy: survey types of wave machine including those under development; methods of converting motion of wave machines into electricity;; the current funding situation; effects on the environment. (iv) Tidal energy: review of schemes, existing (e.g. La Rance) and proposed (e.g. Severn and Mersey): technical and environmental problems. (v) Geothermal energy: power generation from hyper-thermal fields, exploration, geological conditions necessary; review of current production (e.g. New Zealand, Japan), problems associated with high mineral content. Lower temperature sources: district heating schemes. Hot dry rock schemes: current state of the art, future possibilities. (vi) Biomass: current contributions, particularly in Third World countries; conversion of sugar into alcohol as petrol replacement (Brazil). Seminar programme combined with a student exercise such as a case study to encourage students to integrate the syllabus content and to relate the science and technology of environmental relevance to a wider social and economic context. Students must have Chemistry A-level or undertaken CHEY0056 & CHEY0057.

ENGR0002: Environmental studies: The earth as an ecosystem A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX68 CW32
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop an understanding of the role that process design and development play in pollution prevention and clean technology
Content:
Hierarchies of good environmental practices. Waste minimisation methodology. Waste elimination, minimisation, and recycling. Engineering aspects of waste reduction at source. Benefits and challenges of advanced treatments. Technological change in new and existing processes. Implications arising from changes in products and raw materials. Recycling methods (on-site and off-site), Re-use and reclamation. Waste to energy processes. Quantification of wastes and effluents. Process waste diagrams and environmental mass balances. Design simulation and optimisation methods. Thermodynamic and kinetic limitations. Quantification of progress, Normalisation of data and indexing. Seminar programme Seminars are intended to encourage students to integrate the syllabus content and to relate it to a wider social and economic context. Students must have undertaken ENGR0001 or CHEY0008 & CHEY0008.

ENGR0003: Process design 2

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: OR10 OT90
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The second year project is carried out in collaboration with an industrial partner and is intended as an introduction to a systematic approach to chemical engineering design. To give the student a practical grounding in the mechanical design of plant and in particular of pressure vessels according to BS5500. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* Compare alternative routes by technical/economic reasoning
* Prepare a specification sheet for the design of an individual unit
* Prepare a process and instrumentation diagram (P&I) for a single unit
* Plan and organise the use of group time
* perform an outline mechanical design of a pressure vessel and know, in principle, how to use a commercial software package for this purpose.
* write a specification and communicate with the specialist who would do the detailed design.
Content:
Introduction, stress and strain, temperature and pressure effects
* Selection of material, corrosion allowances and wall thickness.
* Safety factors, cracks, plastic region.
* Flanges and gaskets; types of welds.
* Stress concentrations, openings and branches.
* Bending and supports, thin wall theory.
* Vessel ends e.g. flat, hemispherical, torispherical.
* Weight loads, wind loads, vessel supports.
* How to use a commercial software design package.
* Laboratory class: use of strain gauges and measurements on a container.
* Use of a CAD package for mass & energy balances and accessing the physical property data bank,
* Use of a CAD packages to predict thermodynamic data,
* Working as a team,
* Project planning,
* Use of short-cut techniques in unit design,
* Making process decisions,
* Exploring the consequences of alternatives with and without the use of CAD,
* Consideration of energy integration and optimisation, cost estimates and preliminary hazard analysis.

ENGR0004: Design project 3

Semester 2
Credits: 15
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce legislation governing the environment and the use of genetically modified organisms and how this affects engineers in managerial, operational and design roles. To provide information on the properties and uses of materials. To prepare a preliminary group report for the design project. To enable students to demonstrate that:
* they are capable of developing an integral systems approach to chemical engineering and of applying the principles of chemical and/or biochemical engineering to the design of a process,
* they have creative and critical skills, and are able to make choices and decisions in areas of uncertainty,
* they can work together in a team, and also alone,
* they can communicate effectively the results of their work in the form of written reports that include drawings.
Content:
introduction to environmental legislation and factors that have an influence
* control of liquid discharges and air emissions
* integrated pollution control (IPC)
* environmental assessments and statements
* introduction to regulations governing the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs)
* biosafety and containment of GMOs
* introduction to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) with respect to bioprocess plant
* materials of construction for chemical and bioprocess plant
* preparation of a preliminary technical and economic appraisal of a process where safety and
* environmental issues form an integral part of process screening
* preparation of an outline process flowsheet
* Market survey, Review of alternatives
* Physical and chemical property data
* Creation and synthesis of flowsheet
* Safety and operability
* Environmental issues
* Capital and operating costs
* Unit specification sheets, Flowsheets, Engineering drawings and sketches
* Executive summary
* Demonstration of viability
* Individual unit design
* Application of rigorous methods
* Mechanical design
* Outline of control and P & I diagrams

ENGR0005: Case studies in environmental impact assessment & lifecycle analysis

Semester 2
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Postgraduate
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop an understanding of the key issues in the application of LCA and EIA through short, intensive case-study based sessions involving a high degree of study-fellow inolvement, interaction and independently-researched project work.
Content:
Various and variable case studies, including, for example: materials and the environment, thermal regeneration of activated carbon; sustainable communities.

ESML0001: French written & spoken language 1A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To stimulate the production of authentic and accurate written and spoken French; to provide a grounding in French grammatical and syntactic structures; to revise, broaden and consolidate grasp of lexis and grammatical structures; to extend awareness of style and linguistic register; to develop skills in translation from French into English; to practise receptive and communicative skills.
Content:
(a) Translation: varieties of register, written translation from French into English, introduction to essay writing. (b) Grammar/creative writing: introduction to résumé, systematic practical grammar course, introduction to CALL multimedia, development of lexis. (c) Spoken Language: comprehension, text recreation, controlled oral production, course-related conversation sessions.

ESML0002: French written & spoken language 1B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0001

Aims & learning objectives:
To stimulate the production of authentic and accurate written and spoken French; to provide a grounding in French grammatical and syntactic structures; to revise, broaden and consolidate grasp of lexis and grammatical structures; to develop awareness of style and linguistic register; to develop skills in translation from French into English; to practise receptive and communicative skills.
Content:
(a) Translation: varieties of register, written translation from French into English, introduction to essay writing, dictée. (b) Grammar/creative writing: introduction to résuméé, systematic practical grammar course, development of lexis, prose translation, text comparison. (c) Spoken Language: comprehension, text recreation, controlled oral production, course-related conversation sessions.

ESML0003: French cultural studies 1A: Styles & genres in French culture

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to a wide range of modern French literature, film and art, as a basis for the detailed study of poetic, narrative and dramatic technique, and to explore a variety of critical approaches. To encourage students to study texts in a number of different ways, and to help them to develop the confidence to reach and express their own critical responses.
Content:
The language of poetry: metaphor, music and image as meaning. The language of art: form, meaning and the nature of representation. The language of film: basic techniques and critical theories, questions of point of view, the relationship of literature and film. The language of theatre: the role of the interpreter, questions of performance.

ESML0004: French cultural studies 1B: Changing viewpoints in the novel

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0003

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to a wide range of modern French literature, film and art, as a basis for the detailed study of poetic, narrative and dramatic technique, and to explore a variety of critical approaches. To encourage students to study texts in a number of different ways, and to help them to develop the confidence to reach and express their own critical responses.
Content:
Prose narrative and the novel: reading strategies and the role of the reader; questions of the narrator and point of view; the nineteenth-century novel as an introduction to French culture and society after 1850; self-reflexive fiction in the twentieth century.

ESML0005: French politics & society 1A: Introduction à la politique et à la société françaises

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the study of French politics and society from the 1930s to1945.
Content:
A chronological survey of France since the 1930s which examines issues including: the decline of rural France; politics in the inter-war period; the Popular Front; the Second World War, Occupation and Resistance. Seminars provide a forum for discussion and consolidation of lectures as well as providing study skills session for note taking and writing historical commentaries.

ESML0006: French politics & society 1B: Introduction à la politique et à la société françaises

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0005

Aims & learning objectives:
By the end of this semester students should have a solid background in 20th Century France, understand some of the key aspects of French politics and society, and have acquired essential analytical and writing skills in French.
Content:
Post-war expansion; decolonization; changes in French society since 1945; the coming of the Fifth Republic; May 1968; and the victory of the Left in 1981 together with contemporary French politics and society. Seminars provide a forum for discussion and consolidation of the lectures as well as providing study skills sessions for argumentative essay writing.

ESML0007: French written & spoken language 2A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0002

Aims & learning objectives:
To continue the production of authentic and accurate written and spoken French; to provide further work in French grammatical and syntactic structures; to revise, broaden and consolidate grasp of lexis and grammatical structures; to extend awareness of style and linguistic register; to develop skills in translation from French into English; to practise receptive and communicative skills.
Content:
(a) Translation: varieties of register, written translation from French into English, extempore translation, cloze tests. (b) Grammar/creative writing: introduction to guided essay, systematic practical grammar course, development of lexis. (c) Spoken Language: comprehension, text recreation, controlled oral production, course-related conversation sessions.

ESML0008: French written & spoken language 2B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX54 CW20 OR26
Requisites: Pre ESML0007

Aims & learning objectives:
To continue the production of authentic and accurate written and spoken French; to provide further work in French grammatical and syntactic structures; to revise, broaden and consolidate grasp of lexis and grammatical structures; to extend awareness of style and linguistic register; to develop skills in translation from French into English; to practise receptive and communicative skills.
Content:
(a) Translation: varieties of register, written translation from French into English, extempore translation, cloze tests, dictée. (b) Grammar/creative writing: introduction to guided essay, systematic practical grammar course, development of lexis, text comparison. (c) Spoken Language: comprehension, text recreation, controlled oral production, course-related conversation sessions.

ESML0009: French cultural studies 2A: Violence & disintegration

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0004

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an introduction to major artistic and literary movements of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, whose theories are fundamental to contemporary cultural thought; to develop further the comparative study of genres begun in the First Year; to increase the awareness of the language of the visual image, including painting and photography,and develop students' confidence in forming and expressing critical responses.
Content:
A comparative analysis of the work of selected writers and artists within the following movements: Symbolism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Fauvism, Cubism, Surrealism.

ESML0010: French cultural studies 2B, option 1: Conflicting realities: film in France in the 1920s & 1930s

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0009

Aims & learning objectives:
To build on the experience of Cultural Studies by applying the expertise gained so far to Conflicting Realities: Film in France in the Twenties and Thirties
Content:
Through comparing and contrasting surrealist and poetic-realist films, this option will provide an understanding of the development and language of film, its history and critical theory. Films to be studied will include Un chien andalou (Buñuel, 1929), La Règle du jeu (Renoir, 1939) and Le Jour se lève (Carné, 1939).

ESML0011: French politics & society 2A: Les années Mitterrand

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0006

Aims & learning objectives:
To build on and develop understanding of key structures and institutions of French political life, introduced in Year 1. To evaluate elements of change and continuity in the 1980s and 1990s using the framework of the Mitterrand presidency. To encourage students to take notes and extract relevant information from written and audio-visual material in French; to discuss topical political, social and economic issues in French in seminars; to build up a student 'log' over the course of the term, comprising lecture and seminar notes, and notes from preparatory and background reading, which will be of use in revision for the examination.
Content:
(a) Lectures: Introduction - les grands evenements; film François Mitterrand, une vie a l'epreuve du pouvoir; Approches de la culture politique en France; la construction de la Nation a travers la culture - les grands travaux; Pouvoir Presidentiel et elections legislatives 1981-1995; l'evolution des themes politiques pendant les deux septennats; l'immigration; la France et l'Europe; Mitterrand et l'economie. (b) Seminars: François Mitterrand, l'homme et son image; l'apres-Mitterrand; les elections presidentielles de 1995; le chomage et l'exclusion; la position; la position de la France a la fin des annees Mitterrand.

ESML0012: French cultural studies 2B, option 2: First person camera: French cinema & the auteur tradition

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0009

Aims & learning objectives:
To build on the experience of Cultural Studies by applying the expertise gained so far to First Person Camera: French Cinema and the Auteur Tradition
Content:
This option will explore the nature of first person viewpoint in film, in relation to the auteur theory and will focus upon the depiction of personal childhood memory in films such as Zèro de conduite (Carnéé, 1933), Les 400 coups (Truffaut, 1959) and Au Revoir les enfants (Malle, 1987).

ESML0013: French written & spoken language 4A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0008

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop advanced skills in the comprehension and production of written French; To provide a structured but informal context for the development of a variety of advanced oral skills. To exploit competence in written and oral French developed during the first two years of the course and, where appropriate, during the third year placement in France (or equivalent).
Content:
Written Language: translation from French into English; summarization and re-writing (in French); language commentary (in French); analysis of style and register (contemporary social, political, literary). Spoken Language: explication and debate, through lector-led group discussion and individual presentation. Material covers a wide range of political, social, cultural subjects, within the context of current French concern.

ESML0014: French written & spoken language 4B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX38 CW17 OR27 OT18
Requisites: Pre ESML0013

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop advanced skills in the comprehension and production of written French. To provide a structured but informal context for the development of a variety of advanced oral skills. To exploit competence in written and oral French developed during the first two years of the course and, where, appropriate, during the third year placement in France (or equivalent). By the end of the unit, students should be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with native speakers of French on social, political and cultural topics, orally and in writing in a broad range of appropriate registers and in both professional and social contexts.
Content:
Written Language: translation from French into English; summarization and re-writing (in French); language commentary (in French); analysis of style and register (contemporary social, political, literary). Spoken Language: explication and debate, through lector-led group discussion and individual presentation, focusing on and in preparation for the requirements of the final oral examination. Material covers a wide range of political, social, cultural subjects, within the context of current French concern.

ESML0015: French national option F1: La France et l'Europe

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0011

Aims & learning objectives:
To examine the relations between France and the wider European area (including the former USSR) in the post-war world, with specific emphasis on developments since the late 1980s. The general focus will be the broad field of international relations which will be narrowed down to three specific and inter-related areas: economic and commercial interests; foreign policy and diplomacy; military policy and security. The unit will examine the tensions which have always existed in French policy towards Europe between a nationalist and an internationalist impulsion. In the three areas noted above, protectionism, individualism and national independence have constantly vied with liberalism, international cooperation and alliance solidarity. These dichotomies go beyond the traditional right/left divide in French politics and have always run as a deep fissure within both the broad left and the broad right. At the same time, since the end of the 1980s, France has been faced with a new dichotomy; whether to prioritise the deepening of the Community of 12 (the Maastricht process) or, on the contrary, to pursue the old Gaullist vision of a broader Europe "from the Atlantic to the Urals". Particular emphasis will be placed throughout the course on the complex but crucial role played by Franco-German relations.
Content:
Four hours will be devoted to each of the following: 1. The historical background to France's relations with Europe. 2. France and the EEC (1958-85). 3. French foreign and defence policy (1958-89). 4. France, the Single Market and Maastricht. 5. French European security policy since the fall of the Berlin Wall. Taught in French.

ESML0016: French national option F2: La France urbaine

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0011

Aims & learning objectives:
To study the importance of urban life in contemporary debate on social issues and French national identity, using authentic French material (including film and video); to use a variety of disciplinary sources to explore urban life in France, especially urban sociology, anthropology, political sociology and policy studies; to examine cultural representations of French urban life. The unit aims to give students a deeper understanding of social issues in France today; to develop reading, listening and discussion skills in the French language.
Content:
Approaches to urban studies; urban policy; "la banlieue'"; politics and towns; the "new towns" policy; violence and urban life; media representations of urban life; case studies. Taught in French.

ESML0016: French national option F2: La France urbaine

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0011

Aims & learning objectives:
To study the importance of urban life in contemporary debate on social issues and French national identity, using authentic French material (including film and video); to use a variety of disciplinary sources to explore urban life in France, especially urban sociology, anthropology, political sociology and policy studies; to examine cultural representations of French urban life. The unit aims to give students a deeper understanding of social issues in France today; to develop reading, listening and discussion skills in the French language.
Content:
Approaches to urban studies; urban policy; "la banlieue'"; politics and towns; the "new towns" policy; violence and urban life; media representations of urban life; case studies. Taught in French.

ESML0017: French national option F3: La femme en France au vingtième siècle

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW33 ES67
Requisites: Pre ESML0011

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to various aspects of feminist thought and to situate some of the main debates within feminism. Through a series of theme-based seminars, to analyse women's involvement in events of the 20th century in France, notably the two World Wars and the suffragist and feminist movements. The 20th Century has brought significant social change and this course will seek to evaluate the extent to which these changes were gendered . By the end of the course students should have gained a better understanding of gender issues within contemporary French society. (Note: the second year option on Women in France is not a pre-requisite, although students who attended that option will find that this is an opportunity to pursue their interests).
Content:
The first couple of weeks will be devoted to exploring a range of feminist ideas. Then we will move into discussions based on student presentations around a series of themes related to women's lives. These might include: women and war; suffragism, feminism and women's activism; women and violence; politics and power; representations of women; women in ethnic minorities. Taught in French.

ESML0017: French national option F3: La femme en France au vingtième siècle

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW33 ES67
Requisites: Pre ESML0011

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to various aspects of feminist thought and to situate some of the main debates within feminism. Through a series of theme-based seminars, to analyse women's involvement in events of the 20th century in France, notably the two World Wars and the suffragist and feminist movements. The 20th Century has brought significant social change and this course will seek to evaluate the extent to which these changes were gendered . By the end of the course students should have gained a better understanding of gender issues within contemporary French society. (Note: the second year option on Women in France is not a pre-requisite, although students who attended that option will find that this is an opportunity to pursue their interests).
Content:
The first couple of weeks will be devoted to exploring a range of feminist ideas. Then we will move into discussions based on student presentations around a series of themes related to women's lives. These might include: women and war; suffragism, feminism and women's activism; women and violence; politics and power; representations of women; women in ethnic minorities. Taught in French.

ESML0019: French national option F5: French comedies from Molière to Beaumarchais

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0009

Aims & learning objectives:
The unit is for those who wish to familiarize themselves with and enjoy some of the classic comedies which have become central to French cultural consciousness and can still be guaranteed to fill a theatre even today. It is also intended to appeal to those whose principal motivation is that they find these texts funny. Most important, it requires absolutely no prior knowledge of the literary background or the historical context. The aims of the course are to introduce the social, political and historical background of the texts and to examine those aesthetic and dramaturgical considerations which are so often inextricably linked with the background. In particular, to explore through these texts the development away from a rigid and hierarchized social structure towards the struggle for individuality and liberty which is often identified with the Revolution. Students will also notice faint glimmerings of a shift towards female emancipation.
Content:
MOLIERE: L'Avare, Le Malade imaginaire; MARIVAUX: Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard, Les Fausses Confidences; BEAUMARCHAIS: Le Barbier de Séville, Le Mariage de Figaro. These plays are all in prose. Anyone curious to look at a verse play could choose Molière's Les Femmes Savantes or Regnard's Le Légataire universel which are not, however, formally on the syllabus. First-time readers may find it helpful to read the two Beaumarchais plays in the order stated.

ESML0020: French national option F6: French autobiography

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0009

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this unit will be to trace the evolution of autobiographical writing in France throughout the modern period and to examine the ways in which writers have explored the themes of personal identity, memory, reality and imagination and the polarity between public and private history.
Content:
History of autobiography and autobiographical theory; theories of selfhood and identity; the powers of memory, nature and culture in the development of personality, with reference to a range of texts reflecting the development of autobiographical writing in French. Students will be expected to prepare seminar papers on writers or topics of their choice.

ESML0022: French national option F8: Specialist language - translation A

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0008, Co ESML0023

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the techniques of documentary translation from French to English in a number of specialized registers.
Content:
Introduction to professional translating, glossaries, house style, translation critique.

ESML0023: French national option F8: Specialist language - translation B

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX50 CW50
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the techniques of documentary translation from French to English in a number of specialized registers.
Content:
Introduction to professional translating, glossaries, house style, translation critique.

ESML0024: French national option F9: Specialist language - interpreting A

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the techniques of interpreting.
Content:
Introduction to professional interpreting: liaison, consecutive and simultaneous.

ESML0025: French national option F9: Specialist language - interpreting B

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: OR100
Requisites: Co ESML0024

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the techniques of interpreting.
Content:
Introduction to professional interpreting: liaison, consecutive and simultaneous.

ESML0026: French national option F10: Surrealism

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0009

Aims & learning objectives:
To explore the idea of Surrealism as a revolutionary movement; to examine the aims and achievements of the Surrealists; to encourage individual involvement and response through an analysis of a wide variety of 'texts'.
Content:
An analysis of the theories and practice of surrealism and their expression through literature, art, and film. Set 'texts' will include L Aragon, Le Paysan de Paris; A Breton, Manifestes du Surréalisme; Nadja; A Breton & P Soupault, Les Champs magnétiques; L Buñuel; Un chien andalou; L'Age d'or; P Eluard, Mourir de ne pas mourir; S Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams.

ESML0027: French national option F11: La persuasion et la propagande

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0011

Aims & learning objectives:
To examine the respective roles of persuasion and propaganda in French society today, parallels being drawn also with other countries. Where does persuasion end and propaganda begin? How do today's politicians market themselves to the electorate? Have the techniques changed over the years?
Content:
After initial work on the definitions of the evolution of persuasion and propaganda, students pass onto investigations of particular areas of debate, events or political parties in a contemporary context. Their findings are presented as seminar contributions. Taught in French.

ESML0028: French national option F12: Environnement, société, développement

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0011

Aims & learning objectives:
Environmental issues regularly appear in the news and increasing numbers of people currently attach great importance to them. However, the issues themselves are rarely clear-cut; they are subject to competing interpretations and to conflicts of interest, indicating a need for critical distance in the treatment of the subject. Within a context of open-ended evaluation, the aim of this course is to explore environmental issues in terms of their political, social and economic dimensions and to assess their importance. Most of the work will concentrate on discussing developments in France today, but as by their very nature environmental questions go beyond national boundaries, the course will take the international dimension into account.
Content:
The major themes to be surveyed are: (1) the ideas behind environmentalism and political ecology; (2) green politics in France today; (3) environmental policy-making in France and the EU; (4) the environment, business behaviour and green consumerism; (5) the impact of environmentalism on French society today. Students have the opportunity to focus on a suitable mix of themes which particularly interest them. Taught in French.

ESML0029: French national option F13: Culture et identité dans la France contemporaine

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0011

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit will examine the relationship between identity and culture at times of social and political change. It will explore the way in which the identities of different social groups are expressed within the economic, political and cultural contexts of contemporary France. The aim is to examine elements of the French identity taking into account students' own experience of France and its diversity. The unit will pay particular attention to the construction of identities through cultural forms such as museums, language, literature, music, film and the media.
Content:
Introductory lectures will familiarize students with various theoretical approaches to the study of both culture and identity. Students will then examine the social and cultural frameworks for thinking about the question of what it means to be French. Seminars and case studies will examine themes such as heritage, memory, migrations, nation, tradition and popular culture. Taught in French.

ESML0030: German written & spoken language 1A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The unit pursues a dual aim. (1) To refresh and consolidate students knowledge and understanding of grammatical structures; to enable them to apply the acquired skills to the production of coherent and fluent written composition; to introduce them to a variety of German texts dealing with appropriate contemporary issues. (2) To improve students communicative and listening skills (oral/aural) and to expand their vocabulary so that they are able to express themselves clearly in everyday as well as in academic contexts as appropriate; to enable students to formulate their own ideas and to interact effectively in German and to adjust flexibly to various situations by using a suitable register.
Content:
(1) In respect of i. the consolidation of German language structures: this unit focuses on the various classes of words, their declension and their function within the phrase/ sentence; ii. written communication: a variety of linguistic skills are developed by means of translation into and from German and essay writing in German (2) Spoken language classes may consist of free discussions with the entire group, interactive exercises (e.g. role play, small-group discussions, one-to-one exchange of ideas). Austrian and German video material and newspaper articles form the basis for discussion and assessment, whilst improving awareness of contemporary life in the German-speaking world.

ESML0031: German written & spoken language 1B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0030

Aims & learning objectives:
The unit builds on ESML0030, pursuing the same dual aim. (1) To refresh and consolidate students knowledge and understanding of grammatical structures; enable them to apply the acquired skills to the production of coherent and fluent written composition; to introduce them to a variety of German texts dealing with appropriate contemporary issues. (2) To improve students communicative and listening skills (oral/aural) and to expand their vocabulary so that they are able to express themselves clearly in everyday as well as in academic contexts as appropriate; to enable students to formulate their own ideas and to interact effectively in German and to adjust flexibly to various situations by using a suitable register.
Content:
(1) In respect of i. the consolidation of German language structures: this unit focuses on complex grammar points and German syntax; ii. written communication: a variety of linguistic skills are developed by means of translation into and from German and essay writing in German. (2) Spoken language classes may consist of free discussions with the entire group, interactive exercises (e.g. role play, small-group discussions, one-to-one exchange of ideas). Austrian and German video material and newspaper articles form the basis for discussion and assessment, whilst improving awareness of contemporary life in the German-speaking world.

ESML0032: German cultural studies 1A: Kultur der Weimarer Republik

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the culture of the Weimar Republic in its socio-political context, in particular through close study of representative texts and films. To make students aware of the formal characteristics and expressive potential of forms of cultural production such as autobiography, film and short story. To develop their analytical capacities and self-confidence in the evaluation of works of culture.
Content:
Will include the study of a) Texts: Ernst Toller, Eine Jugend in Deutschland, Franz Kafka, Erzahlungen; b) Film: Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari.

ESML0033: German cultural studies 1B: Drittes Reich und Nachkriegsjahre (1933-61)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0032

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to significant aspects of German culture in the period 1933-61 through a close study of representative texts and films seen in their socio-political context. To make students aware of the formal characteristics and expressive potential of forms of cultural production such as the short story, the novel, autobiography, drama, poetry and the film. To enable students to develop their critical capacities and their ability to reach well-reasoned conclusions in their evaluation of works of culture.
Content:
Lectures will introduce students to the principal features of German cultural life during the Third Reich and in the immediate post-war years. Seminars will be devoted to critical analysis of selected texts and films which are representative of the period.

ESML0034: German politics & society 1A: Deutschland und Österreich 1918-1939

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
We will trace the most important political, social and economic developments in inter-war Germany and Austria. At the same time, students will get practice in German comprehension, speaking and writing. Students should learn to follow straightforward lectures in German and take notes from them; understand vocabulary and concepts relevant to the history of the period; make short oral presentations in German and facilitate seminar discussion as part of a panel.
Content:
i) Weimarer Republik (1918-1933) a. Deutschland zwischen Krieg and Diktatur b. Die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung in der Weimarer Republik c. Der Aufstieg der NSDAP ii) Das Drittes Reich (1933-1945) a. Ein Überblick über die wichtigsten Entwicklungen zwischen 1933 und 1945 b. Umgestaltung von Staat und Gesellschaft im nationalsozialistischen Deutschland iii) Die Erste Republik Österreich a. Gründung und Festigung der Republic (1918 - 1926) b. Der Weg in die Krise c. Bürgerkrieg und autoritärer Städndestaat. Taught in German.

ESML0035: German politics & society 1B: Von der doppelten Staatsgründung bis zum Mauerbau

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0034

Aims & learning objectives:
To convey in German the most significant political and social developments from 1945 to 1963; to give students practice in understanding lectures in German and taking notes, to introduce relevant vocabulary and concepts, and to assist students in discussing and writing on the above issues in German.
Content:
i) Westdeutschland: Adenauer-Ara (1945-1963) a. Die Politik des Allinerten (1945-1949) b. Das Grundgesetz c. Konrad Adenauer und 'Kanzlerdemokratie' d. Die Entwicklung der westdeutschen Gesellschaft in den 50er jahren ii) Ostdeutschland: vom Aufbau zum Mauerbau (1945-1961) a. Vorgeschichte and Gründung der DDR b. Der Volksaufstand vom 17 Juni 1953 c. Entwicklungen in der DDR 1953-1961. Taught in German.

ESML0036: German written & spoken language 2A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0031

Aims & learning objectives:
To build on knowledge (grammatical accuracy and range of vocabulary) and writing skills acquired in Year 1. Having successfully completed this unit, students should be able, at the appropriate level, to: translate texts (German to English); summarize English texts into German and write short essays expressing a personal opinion on a given topic.
Content:
German to English translation, English to German summarisation, German essay-writing in response to text-based questions.

ESML0037: German written & spoken language 2B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX54 CW20 OR26
Requisites: Pre ESML0036

Aims & learning objectives:
To build on knowledge (grammatical accuracy and range of vocabulary) and writing skills acquired in Year 2 semester 1. Having successfully completed this unit, students should be able, at the appropriate level, to: translate texts (German to English) with an increased awareness of nuance of meaning; summarize English texts (as wide-ranging in topic and style as time and circumstances permit) into German and write short essays with good grammatical awareness and fluency of style, and to translate a dictated English text into German.
Content:
German to English translation, English to German summarisation, German essay-writing in response to text-based questions; extempore German-to-English translation.

ESML0038: German cultural studies 2A: Kultur in der Bundesrepublik von 1961 bis zur Gegenwart

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0033

Aims & learning objectives:
To study the development of cultural life in the German Federal Republic over the years when the two German states were separated by the Berlin Wall. To refer in detail both to proseworks and films produced during this period and to more recent works taking stock of divided Germany from a post-unification perspective. To focus on a number of key cultural phenomena of these years: (i) personal experiences of life in the West, and especially in West Berlin, after the building of the Wall; (ii) the challenge to the self-confidence of the Federal Republic represented by the events of 1968 and their aftermath; and (iii) the struggle for gender equality in the context of the 1970s and 1980s.
Content:
A framework of lectures will provide an overview of this era from the West German perspective and an introduction to the work of the authors and film-makers to be studied. The seminars will focus on the analysis of representative works of the period and the changing post-unification view of its significance. Works to be studied are likely to include Heinrich Böll, Die verlorene Ehre der Katharina Blum, Peter Schneider, Der Mauerspringer, Margarethe von Trotta, Die bleierne Zeit and Schneider/von Trotta, Das Versprechen.

ESML0039: German cultural studies 2B, option 1: Max Frisch und die Schweiz

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0038

Aims & learning objectives:
To enable students i) to acquire a critical awareness of cultural and political developments in Switzerland in the twentieth century with particular reference to the period 1933-1974, and ii) to reach firmly based conclusions about the nature and validity of Max Frisch's critique of Swiss society in this period.
Content:
Lectures will introduce students to the work of a major writer, Max Frisch, and place it within the context of major political and cultural developments in 20th Century Switzerland. Seminars will be devoted to critical analysis of representative texts by Frisch. Taught in German.

ESML0040: German cultural studies 2B, option 2: Berlin als Kulturmetropole 1918-1933

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0038

Aims & learning objectives:
To assess the importance of Berlin as a cultural metropolis during the Weimar Republic. To examine the significance of theatre and cinema as centres of creative innovation and political debate, and to identify new methods being used by prose writers to describe the often overwhelming experience of city life. To examine the cliché of Berlin as a 'decadent' city in the light of subsequent literary and cinematic evidence.
Content:
A framework of lectures will provide the cultural and political context within which Berlin's importance during this period is to be assessed, and give an overview of the work of the writers and film-makers to be studied more closely in seminars. The seminars themselves will allow students the opportunity to analyse key fictional, theatrical and cinematic works of the period (e.g. Brecht/Weill, Die Dreigroschenoper, Kästner, Fabian, Lang Metropolis and Ruttmann Sinfonie einer Großstadt) and to take a critical look at the image of Berlin provided by works such as Fosse's Cabaret. Taught in German.

ESML0041: German cultural studies 2B, option 3: Ideologie und Kultur im Dritten Reich

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0038

Aims & learning objectives:
To examine the principal elements of Nazi ideology and their transmission by means of the Gleichschaltung (coordination) of the media, literature, film and art. Also to assess the role played by the intelligentsia with reference to a liberal conservative (Ernst Wiechert) and members of the resistance (Jan Petersen, Hans und Sophie Scholl).
Content:
Will include the study of a) Texts: extracts from the prose writing of Hitler and Arthur Dinter, examples of Nazi song, Ernst Wiechert, Der weisse Buffel, and resistance fiction and poems. b) Films: Das blaue Licht, Hitler: eine Karriere, Die Weisse Rose. Taught in German.

ESML0042: German politics & society 2A: Geteiltes Deutschland 1961-1989

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0035

Aims & learning objectives:
To study relations between the two German states from the Hallstein-Doktrin, through Brandt's Ostpolitik to the collapse of the GDR and unification; to analyse the main features of the economic and social system of each of the two German states; to build on the vocabulary and concepts previously acquired and to assist students in discussing and writing on the above issues at an advanced level of German.
Content:
i) DDR: vom Mauerbau bis zur deutschen Einigung a) Aspekte der DDR-Identitat (Politische Kultur, Alltag und Stasi) b) BRD und DDR: ein kritischer Systemvergleich c) Frauen und Soziale Sicherheit d) Das Jahr der Wende ii) BRD: vom Mauerbau bis zur deutschen Einigung a) Deutsch-deutsche Beziehungen b) 1968 und die Folgen c) Kohl-Ara (1982-1989)

ESML0043: German pols & soc 2B opt 1: Lebensumbruche und Integrationsprozesse in Deutschland seit der Wende

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0042

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this unit is to explore how German society, state, politics and economy have evolved since the collapse of the GDR and German unification, with emphasis on the new Bundeslander. The learning objectives are to develop an awareness and understanding amongst students of the key issues relating to the process of German Unification and to enable them to articulate this in both spoken and written German.
Content:
Subjects for close study include the formal process of unification; social, political and economic change in the new Bundeslander, the different experiences and mentalities in eastern and western Germany and the persistence of die Mauer im Kopf, GDR nostalgia; the lasting effects of the activities of the GDR's state security (Stasi and Vergangenheitsbewaltigung); the transformations experienced by various social categories (e.g. youth, women, the elderly, foreigners) in the wake of unification. Taught in German.

ESML0044: German politics & society 2B, option 2: Berlin von der geteilten stadt zur neun haupstadt

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0042

Aims & learning objectives:
To examine the social and political experience of life in both halves of Berlin between 1945 and 1989, as a microcosm of the effects of the division of Germany on its population. To take full account of the changes which have taken place in the city since the collapse of the GDR and which have brought about its reinstatement as the capital of Germany.
Content:
Subjects for close study include: everyday life in both halves of the city during the Cold War; propagandist portrayals of life in the 'other' half of the city; the changes brought about by détente in the 1970s and 1980s; the unification process and resistance to it in East Berlin; the physical reconstruction of Berlin since 1989; problematic aspects of Berlin's transition to capital city; the 'Mauer im Kopf' as a continuing phenomenon of the 1990s. Taught in German.

ESML0045: German politics & society 2B, option 3: Popmusik und jugenkultur

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0042

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this unit is to explore how German popular music reflects and responded to political and social developments in Germany over the last four decades. Popular music and popular culture are introduced as the object of academic analysis and a mirror of contemporary German (youth) culture.
Content:
The study of German politics and history from the perspective of the manifold protest movements provides the basis for the analysis of the lyrics of popular music from Heintje to Die Prinzen and Pur. We will conclude with the analysis of the Berlin-centred Techno-Movement as a phenomenon expressing the Zeitgeist of the 1990s.

ESML0046: German politics & society 2B, option 4: Die Frau in der deutschen Gesellschaft

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0042

Aims & learning objectives:
The course aims at encouraging awareness of gender as a social variable which must be taken into account just as we take account of class, race, geography and generation when examining the social and political life of Germany. It will examine how gender differences and attitudes towards gender roles affect the roles and representations of women in German society today. The purpose of this unit is to enable students to express themselves both in written and spoken German on issues relating to gender in the political and social structures of German society, to acquire relevant concepts and to demonstrate a basic understanding of the academic treatment in Germany of the issues involved.
Content:
The course will examine the changes which 'Frauenbilder' and the 'Frauenrolle' have undergone and highlight certain aspects of woman's role in society today. In this context, it will look at the specific experience of women in contemporary Germany, focusing on questions of rights, legislation, equal opportunities on the one hand, and on the representation of women in economic, social, cultural and political structures on the other. Taught in German.

ESML0047: German politics & society 2B, option 5: Der Deutsche Sozialstaat

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0042

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this unit is to explore the social impact of processes of economic globalisation on unified Germany. Students are made familiar with the historical evolution of the 'Modell Deutschland' and its transformation in the 1990s.
Content:
In its first half the unit covers the evolution of the German welfare system and the emergence of the so-called 'nivellierte Mittelstandsgesellschaft'. In the second half we will concentrate on the management of new phenomena like mass-unemployment, 'neue Armut', economic competition from newly industrialising countries, drastic cuts in the social welfare provision etc.

ESML0048: German written & spoken language 4A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0037

Aims & learning objectives:
To refine students' ability to translate competently from German into English in a variety of contemporary registers. To develop their summarisation skills so that they are able to produce a précis in sophisticated German of a complex English text on a subject of broad contemporary interest. To enable students to write coherent, well-argued and grammatically correct essays in German in response to issues raised in complex German texts. To enhance students' knowledge of the spoken language acquired during their year abroad so that they are able to converse fluently on contemporary issues and deliver sophisticated oral presentations on topics of their choice.
Content:
Written language: (a) Translation from German into English is the focus of one of the two weekly hours. The main emphasis in this semester will be placed on dealing with texts written in more colloquial registers. (b) The second weekly hour is devoted to the production of German in summarisation and essay-writing exercises. In this semester particular attention will be devoted to developing essay-writing skills. Spoken language: The emphasis is on project work carried out both on a group and an individual basis, with the chosen topics of an appropriately complex and controversial nature.

ESML0049: German written & spoken language 4B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX38 CW17 OR27 OT18
Requisites: Pre ESML0048

Aims & learning objectives:
To refine students' ability to translate competently from German into English in a variety of contemporary registers. To develop their summarisation skills so that they are able to produce a précis in sophisticated German of a complex English text on a subject of broad contemporary interest. To enable students to write coherent, well-argued and grammatically correct essays in German in response to issues raised in complex German texts. To enhance students' knowledge of the spoken language acquired during their year abroad so that they are able to converse fluently on contemporary issues and deliver sophisticated oral presentations on topics of their choice.
Content:
Written language: (a) Translation from German into English is the focus of one of the two weekly hours. The main emphasis in this semester will be placed on translating texts written in more formal registers. (b) The second weekly hour is devoted to the production of German in summarisation and essay-writing exercises. In this semester particular attention will be paid to developing summarisation skills. Spoken language: As before, project work will be carried out both on a group and an individual basis. Additional emphasis will now be placed on developing students' presentational skills in preparation for their oral examination.

ESML0051: German national option G2: Deutsche Schriftsteller im Exil

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0038

Aims & learning objectives:
To consider the effects of exile on the life and work of selected German writers who emigrated during the period of fascist rule in Germany; to analyse the reception of those writers in their countries of exile and in the divided Germany of the 1950s and 1960s,to enable students to evaluate the contribution of émigré writers to twentieth-century German culture.
Content:
Students are asked to purchase the following texts (available in paperback): Stefan Heym, Der Fall Glasenapp; Anna Seghers, Der Ausflug der Toten Mädchen; Lion Feuchtwanger, Moskau 1937. Students are also asked to view the following films, copies of which will be made available on video: Hangmen also Die (dir. Fritz Lang); The Seventh Cross (dir. Fred Zinnemann). Taught in German.

ESML0052: German national option G3: Umbau 21: Bundesrepublik Deutschland am anfang des 21. Jahrhunderts

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX50 CW25 OT25
Requisites: Pre ESML0042

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of the unit is to explore the challenges unifed Germany has to confront after the Kohl era and at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Processes like the collapse of communism, German unification, economic globalisation, etc., necessitate a fundamental rethinking of Germany's established political practices and institutions.
Content:
The option will analyse the major challenges to (a) Germany's political system, (b) Germany's economic system, (c) Germany's social system, and (d) Germany's role in Europe and international politics. We will discuss possible paths of societal modernisation and the strategies used by the political leadership. Taught in German.

ESML0053: German national option G4: Kultur und Politik in der ehemaligen DDR

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites:

Students must have taken either ESML0038, or ESML0042. Aims & learning objectives:
This unit will examine the development of literature and film in the political context of the GDR to provide an overview of the development of literature and film in the political context of the GDR and to assess the distinctive qualities of the GDR culture. It will take full account of the way in which perspectives on GDR culture have changed since German unification. Through the close study of a number of key texts and films it will identify some major thematic concerns of the period following the rejection of socialist realism as a cultural doctrine.
Content:
Lectures will provide an overview of the key events in the GDR's cultural history and highlight problems involved in dealing with GDR culture from today's perspective. Seminars will focus on representative literary texts and films of the period between 1961 and 1989, including works by Christa Wolf, Günter de Bruyn, Volker Braun, Frank Beyer and Konrad Wolf.

ESML0056: German national option G6: Mensch - Natur - Technik

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites:

Students must have taken either ESML0038, or ESML0042. Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the debate on technology and social modernisation in contemporary German culture and to explore the role of literature and film in posing practical and ethical questions about man's relationship with the natural environment. The main part of the course will consist of seminar presentations and discussion of texts and films.
Content:
Texts: Wilhelm Raalse, Pfisters Mühle, Max Frisch, Homo Faber; Jurij Koch, Der Kirschbaum; Carl Amery, Der Untergang der Stadt Passau; Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Der Untergang der Titanic; Christa Wolf, Störfall. Films: Veit Harlan, Die goldene Stadt; Werner Herzog, Aguirre. Taught in German.

ESML0058: German national option G8: Gender und transformatsionzprozesse in Deutschland

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0042

Aims & learning objectives:
To permit a systematic study of significant processes of social change in contemporary Germany which have become intensified by Germany's unification process, European integration and the pressures of the global market. The unit will examine primarily the impact of processes of social transition and transformation on the identity, social position and opportunities of women both as citizens affected by institutional and structural reform and as agents of change. Selected areas will be analysed chiefly through the prism of gender, but other dimensions will also be explored. An examination of both old and new challenges to traditional gender role attributions and a study of gender as a social variable and a social determinant provides the chief analytical framework in which issues such as the withdrawal of the welfare state, economic and political reform, changing patterns of employment, technological advance, mobility of labour and patterns of migration will be discussed.
Content:
A comparative analysis of the goals, achievements and limitations of the women's movement as a social movement in the old Federal Republic with women's position in the former GDR will provide the background against which current debates about reform and redefinition within the women's movement in Germany will be examined. In the light of this historical perspective and of more recent developments in the new Federal states opportunities and perspectives for women's political participation and the development of strategies for social and institutional reform will be examined. The unit will cover topics such as: The first German women's movement, its goals, achievements and objectives; women in Nazi Germany and in the post war period of reconstruction and consolidation; impact, opportunities and perspectives of the new women's movement in the 1960's; a comparision with the position of women in the GDR; the 'Wende' and Germany's unification process; the period of transition and transformation since 1990; counting the cost and identifying perspectives and strategies for the future. Taught in German.

ESML0058: German national option G8: Gender und transformatsionzprozesse in Deutschland

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0042

Aims & learning objectives:
To permit a systematic study of significant processes of social change in contemporary Germany which have become intensified by Germanys unification process, European integration and the pressures of the global market. The unit will examine primarily the impact of processes of social transition and transformation on the identity, social position and opportunities of women both as citizens affected by institutional and structural reform and as agents of change. Selected areas will be analysed chiefly through the prism of gender, but other dimensions will also be explored. An examination of both old and new challenges to traditional gender role attributions and a study of gender as a social variable and a social determinant provides the chief analytical framework in which issues such as the withdrawal of the welfare state, economic and political reform, changing patterns of employment, technological advance, mobility of labour and patterns of migration will be discussed.
Content:
A comparative analysis of the goals, achievements and limitations of the women's movement as a social movement in the old Federal Republic with women's position in the former GDR will provide the background against which current debates about reform and redefinition within the women's movement in Germany will be examined. In the light of this historical perspective and of more recent developments in the new Federal states opportunities and perspectives for women's political participation and the development of strategies for social and institutional reform will be examined. The unit will cover topics such as: The first German women's movement, its goals, achievements and objectives; women in Nazi Germany and in the post war period of reconstruction and consolidation; impact, opportunities and perspectives of the new women's movement in the 1960's; a comparision with the position of women in the GDR; the 'Wende' and Germany's unification process; the period of transition and transformation since 1990; counting the cost and identifying perspectives and strategies for the future. Taught in German.

ESML0059: German national option G9: Die Massenmedien in Deutschland

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
to develop an understanding of the principles of mass communication and an awareness of the common features of European mass media and peculiarities to the German system; to develop an appreciation of the implications of technological advances in this field, particularly vis-à-vis the perspective of global communications.
Content:
theory of communication and mass communication; structure and character of the media; historical developments in the German media (pre-1945; FRG; GDR); legal aspects of the media environment; media ethics; funding and inter-media competition; new media - from Btx to the Internet in one generation; media as a political tool; the impact of German unification on the media of both former German states. Taught in German.

ESML0060: Italian written & spoken language 1A (ab initio)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To give students a systematic grounding in the fundamental structures of Italian grammar, and to enable them to employ those structures correctly in short written texts within a communicative context, and orally in a variety of practical and everyday situations. Aural comprehension and oral communication skills are developed thanks to the use of audio-visual material and constant contact with native speakers. The objective is to bring students to an intermediate level of knowledge of Italian.
Content:
Written Language: The study of the basic morphological aspects of Italian grammar will be based on a textbook, with additional use of specially prepared material. Students complete a graded series of exercises in grammar and are introduced to brief translation passages. Spoken Language: conversation groups, role-playing, paired activities, supervised audio-visual activities, also leading to written practice in communicative contexts.

ESML0061: Italian written & spoken language 1B (ab initio)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0060

Aims & learning objectives:
To consolidate the knowledge acquired in Semester 1, to complete the study of Italian grammar and syntax, to widen students' general vocabulary, to introduce them to the vocabulary of the press and contemporary writing, and to extend their aural comprehension/oral skills to a larger number of situations and contexts through contact with native speakers and the use of audio-visual material. The objective is to bring students to 'A' level standard by the end of the semester.
Content:
Written Language: The study of Italian grammar will be completed through the textbook already used in the Semester 1 module and will be integrated with handouts covering the more complex topics in Italian grammar and syntax such as the subjunctive, the gerund, and the sequence of tenses. Students work on grammar exercises and prose/translation passages drawn from contemporary sources. Spoken Language: conversation groups, role-playing, paired activities, supervised audio-visual activities leading to more creative and contextualised written assignments, continue in this module.

ESML0062: Italian written & spoken language 1A (post A level)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To consolidate students' existing knowledge of Italian grammar and syntax, and to enable them to deploy these structures correctly in written texts and exercises. Aural comprehension and oral communication skills in practical contexts are developed through the use of authentic audio-visual material and class contact with native speakers.
Content:
Written Language: a grammar text is used to revise the fundamentals of the language and as a basis for regular exercises. Translation texts are used to familiarise students with contemporary written Italian, in particular the language of the press and modern narrative. Spoken Language: conversation groups, role-playing, supervised audio-visual classes provide practice in the spoken language and are used as a stimulus for creative written work.

ESML0063: Italian written & spoken language 1B (post A level)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0062

Aims & learning objectives:
To expand students' knowledge of Italian grammar and syntax and to enable them to deploy these structures fluently and effectively in the production of written texts and exercises. Aural comprehension and oral communication skills are further extended through the use of advanced audio-visual material and class contact with lectors.
Content:
Written Language: more complex grammatical problems are studied with the aid of specially prepared handouts and explored through regular exercises. Excerpts from the Italian press and other authentic sources are used to expand writing skills in more formal contexts. Spoken Language: the oral activities from Semester 1, such as supervised audio-visual practice and role-playing, will continue and equip students with more sophisticated communicative skills for more formal contexts.

ESML0064: Italian cultural studies 1A: Introduction to Italian cultural history

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to some of the key periods in Italian cultural history. To study the emergence of the Neorealist movement in Italian cinema and narrative and to analyse its political and social significance. To familiarise students with the basic concepts of narrative in film and literature.
Content:
The artistic and intellectual development of Italy since the Renaissance and its importance for contemporary Italian society. The Neorealist cinema, the key films of this movement, their narrative techniques and their critical reception.

ESML0065: Italian politics & society 1A: Italian foundation history (1860-1914)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To teach Italian economic, social and political history from Unification to the First World War in the context of European and international developments. To enable students to develop critical and analytical skills for an understanding of the study of history with particular reference to Italian history. To make students familiar with essential political terminology in Italian.
Content:
The Unification of Italy. The difficult construction of a sense of nationhood. Political liberalism and the emergence of the transformist variant of parliamentary politics. The division between 'legal Italy' and 'real Italy' in the nineteenth century. Industrialisation and the emergence of organised labour. Political Catholicism, anarchism and socialism. Economic liberalism and protectionism. The rise of nationalism. Italy between neutrality and intervention.

ESML0066: Italian cultural studies 1B: Italian writing of the 19th and 20th centuries

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW33 ES67
Requisites: Pre ESML0064

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to the main developments in Italian prose and poetry in the 19th Century and to analyse a number of short contemporary texts. To teach students to develop their critical and analytical skills.
Content:
Lectures will cover selected prose and poetry by the major 19th Century writers and will introduce students to issues in women's writing. The seminars will concentrate on contemporary short stories by men and women writers.

ESML0067: Italian politics & society 1B: Italian fascism

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0065

Aims & learning objectives:
To teach Italian history from the origins to the collapse of fascism in the context of European and international developments. To further develop skills in historical analysis and to introduce students to theories of democracy and totalitarianism. To make students familiar with cultural, sociological, political and economic interpretations of fascism.
Content:
Italy in the First World War. The 'biennio rosso' and the origins of fascism. Mussolini's rise to power. The creation of a fascist dictatorship. Fascism and national identity. Church and State under fascism. Economic crisis and fascist economic policies. Foreign policy. The alliance with Hitler. Italy in the Second World War. The fall of Mussolini, the armistice and the Resistance movement. Interpretations of fascism.

ESML0068: Italian written & spoken language 2A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Students must have taken either ESML0061, or ESML0063. Aims & learning objectives:
To broaden students' command of contemporary written Italian with greater emphasis on resolving complex grammatical points; to build on the communication skills acquired in the Year 1, and to improve oral proficiency and aural comprehension.
Content:
Written Language: prose and translation exercises from a variety of literary and non-literary texts; general essays. Spoken Language: role-playing, paired and group activities, dictation, summarisation of audio-visual texts in Italian, reading, conversation classes.

ESML0069: Italian written & spoken language 2B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX54 OR26 CW20
Requisites: Pre ESML0068

Aims & learning objectives:
To build on students' linguistic competence as acquired in Semester 1. To expand students' vocabulary in social and cultural areas and to develop sensitivity to style and register.
Content:
Written Language: prose and translation exercises from a variety of literary and non-literary texts; general essays. Spoken Language: role-playing, paired and group activities, dictation, summarisation of audio-visual texts in Italian, reading, conversation classes.

ESML0070: Italian cultural studies 2A: Italian writers of the early 20th Century

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0066

Aims & learning objectives:
To build on the textual and cultural awareness acquired in Year 1 and to provide an overview of Italian cultural production from the beginning of the 20th Century. To develop students' critical awareness of the main intellectual debates of the century.
Content:
This core module will be based upon key examples of Italian 20th Century novel, poetry, and short story, from the primo Novecento to the Fascist period. Lectures and seminars will address literary as well as social/political developments, such as the Southern question, Fascism, and women's issues.

ESML0071: Italian politics & society 2A: Italy since 1945

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0067

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a historical overview of the main political and social events of the post-war period in Italy. To equip students with the appropriate analytical skills to permit a critical evaluation of the period.
Content:
The course will pay attention to the following areas: the period of reconstruction; the effects of the Cold War on Italy's domestic affairs; collective movements of the l960s and l970s; the political system; the major political parties.

ESML0074: Italian written & spoken language 4A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0069

Aims & learning objectives:
To refine students' competence in written and spoken Italian; to extend the range of terminology and linguistic registers, including the political and economic. To perfect students' skills in translating texts from and into Italian in a variety of registers. To develop their summarisation skills and enable them to express complex ideas and arguments in writing. To draw upon students' periods of residence in Italy in order to strengthen oral fluency and conversational skills.
Content:
Written Language: prose, translation, summarisation (in Italian); analysis of style and register (contemporary social, political and literary). Spoken Language: précis-writing, presentations, lector-organised discussion and debate on issues linked to Year 4 Options and Italian current affairs.

ESML0075: Italian written & spoken language 4B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX56 CW17 OR27
Requisites: Pre ESML0074

Aims & learning objectives:
To further develop and consolidate students' skills in translating complex texts from and into Italian, and in developing a sophisticated argument in the form of a long essay in Italian. To enable students to converse competently and fluently and to deliver sophisticated oral presentations in Italian on social, political and cultural topics.
Content:
Written Language: prose, translation, and essay writing classes based on excerpts from the press, contemporary writers and specialised journals. Spoken Language: Oral presentations, lector-organised discussion and debate on political, social and cultural topics.

ESML0077: Italian national option IT2: The novel, the cinema & Italian society

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0070

Aims & learning objectives:
To examine how cinema and narrative have cross-fertilized to produce an artistically satisfying critique of Italian society. The unit will focus on three literary texts and their reworking by leading directors. Attention will be given to the narrative techniques appropriate to each medium, to novel and film theory, to the problems of adaptation and to the recurring theme of the relationship between the individual and the political system in Italy.
Content:
Tomasi di Lampedusa Il Gattopardo, Alberto Moravia Il conformista and Leonardo Sciascia Il contesto. Adaptations by Luchino Visconti, Bernardo Bertolucci and Francesco Rosi. Taught partly in Italian.

ESML0078: Italian national option IT3: Scrittrici Italiane del ventesimo secolo

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0070

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide students with a general overview of 20th century Italian women's writing, an in-depth knowledge of four texts by major Italian women writers, an awareness of gender issues, and an understanding of the way in which the narrative text functions. The unit will look at the place of women in Italian literature both as objects of representation and producers, through an analysis of texts which illustrate the changes in the material and cultural situation of women which have occurred in Italy during this century. Students will be encouraged to make use of different modes of textual analysis, including feminist theory.
Content:
Grazia Deledda, Cosima (1937), Mondadori (1986); Dacia Maraini, Donna in guerra (1975), Einaudi, (1997); Francesca Sanvitale, Madre e Figlia (1984), Einaudi, (1994); Elsa Morante, Aracoeli, Einaudi, (1982). Taught partly in Italian.

ESML0079: Italian national option IT4: Women in Italian society

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0071

Aims & learning objectives:
The role and position of women in post-war Italy has undergone substantial change. These changes have explicitly and implicitly challenged a number of core Italian institutions and practices - the Family, the Church and the hegemony of the political parties to define the political agenda and to establish modes of political organization. This unit aims to examine transformation in women's lives during the post-war period. It will discuss the extent to which cultural, political and social factors affect women's changing aspirations.
Content:
The course will focus on the following areas: women and the family, women and the family, women and work, the women's movement, women in the political sphere and ethnic minority women. Taught partly in Italian.

ESML0081: Russian written & spoken language 1A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To consolidate knowledge of basic grammar, broaden vocabulary and improve aural comprehension. To develop fluency in spoken Russian at the level of everyday conversation.
Content:
Prose and essay composition; translation into English; grammar revision; conversation. Students must be qualified in Russian to approximately A-level standard.

ESML0082: Russian written & spoken language 1A (ab initio)

Semester 1
Credits: 12
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide a systematic grounding in the Russian language. To introduce students to the main structures of Russian grammar and basic vocabulary. To develop good pronunciation and intonation.
Content:
The Colloquial Russian course with extensive use of specially prepared explanatory material along with exercises and drills from a variety of sources; pronunciation, intonation and conversation practice; language laboratory work.

ESML0083: Russian cultural studies 1A: Introduction to Russian culture (post A level)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To acquaint students with some key texts of 19th century Russian literature and improve translation skills.
Content:
Set texts will normally be chosen from A S Pushkin, The Queen of Spades and selected lyric poetry; I S Turgenev, First Love; A P Chekhov, The Seagull. Students must be qualified in Russian to approximately A-level standard.

ESML0084: Russian written & spoken language 1B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0081

Aims & learning objectives:
To further consolidate knowledge of basic grammar, broaden vocabulary and improve aural comprehension. To further develop fluency in spoken Russian at the level of everyday conversation.
Content:
Prose and essay composition; translation into English; grammar revision; conversation.

ESML0085: Russian written & spoken language 1B (ab initio)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0082

Aims & learning objectives:
To continue a systematic grounding in the Russian language up to approximately A-level standard. To ensure that students acquire a firm grasp of the main structures of Russian grammar and of basic vocabulary, and are able to express themselves in a variety of contexts. To develop the ability to take part in simple everyday conversation. To develop reading ability to the point at which less complex works of literature can be read with the aid of a dictionary.
Content:
The Colloquial Russian course with extensive use of specially prepared explanatory material along with exercises and drills from a variety of sources; pronunciation, intonation and conversation practice; language laboratory work.

ESML0086: Russian cultural studies 1B: Introduction to Russian culture (ab initio)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites: Pre ESML0082

Aims & learning objectives:
To familiarise students with literary Russian and introduce them to classical pre-Revolutionary literature. To read (in Russian) and discuss a well-known literary text.
Content:
Lectures on the history of Russian literature; reading and discussion of Chekhov's Lady with a Little Dog.

ESML0087: Russian politics & society 1A: Russia before 1917 - Directed study

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Students must take ESML0088 at the same time as this unit. Aims & learning objectives:
To permit post A-level students of Russian (and others requiring a six-credit unit) to make a more detailed study of topics covered in Russian Politics and Society 1B (ESML0088).
Content:
As for Russian Politics and Society 1B (ESML0088).

ESML0088: Russian politics & society 1B: Russia before 1917

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To offer an outline history of Russia focusing on the geopolitical, social and cultural factors which shaped its development and to examine in detail the problems posed by industrial development and social change in the late 19th and early 20th centuries culminating in the revolution of 1917. To introduce some classic literary texts to illuminate the moral and political dilemmas of the 19th century. To develop skills in historical analysis.
Content:
The first Russian states and the rise of Moscow; modernization and westernization in 1680-1855. Reform and reaction under Alexander II (1855-1881); Russian society in the mid-19th century as reflected in Turgenev's Fathers and Children; industrialization and its impact on society; the emergence of a revolutionary movement; dilemmas of Russian revolutionaries as reflected in Lenin's What is to be Done?; Dostoevsky's critique of 19th century Russian social values in Crime and Punishment; ethnic minorities and national movements in the Russian Empire before 1917; women and the women's movement before 1917; Chekhov's depiction of peasant life at the end of the 19th century; the revolution of 1905 and the granting of a constitution by Nicholas II; the successes and failures of constitutional rule 1906-1914; the First World War and the collapse of the imperial regime.

ESML0089: Russian written & spoken language 2A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0084, Pre ESML0085

Students must have taken either ESML0084, or ESML0085. Aims & learning objectives:
To deepen knowledge of Russian grammar, expand lexis and develop translation skills in several registers. To give students practice in expressing themselves in writing. To improve aural comprehension and to begin to develop fluency in spoken Russian at the level of everyday conversation.
Content:
Written Language: systematic review of Russian grammar with exercises and drills drawn from a variety of sources; translations into Russian and English with discussion of grammatical points, lexis etc. Essay writing in Russian with discussion of stylistic points and vocabulary. Spoken Language: small group conversation on a range of themes; role-playing; task-based use of audio-visual material. To assist vocabulary acquisition, work in written and spoken language will be organised around themes of geography & peoples and culture & recreation.

ESML0090: Russian cultural studies 2A: Russian literature from Chekhov to Zoshchenko

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0083, Pre ESML0086

Students must have taken either ESML0083, or ESML0086. Aims & learning objectives:
To present an overview of Russian literary development in these years; to encourage the development of skills in literary analysis and criticism.
Content:
Three writers (studied in key works): Chekhov, Blok, Zoshchenko

ESML0091: Russian politics & society 2A: Soviet Russia 1917-1985

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To examine the character and evolution of the communist political and social order from 1917 to 1985. To develop skills in historical and political analysis and essay and seminar techniques.
Content:
The establishment of Bolshevik power under Lenin 1917-1921; the New Economic Policy and the struggle for power in the Communist Party in the 1920s; Stalin's drive for industrialization and rule by terror in the 1930s-40s; the USSR in the Second World War; reform and its limits under Khrushchev and Brezhnev in the 1950s-70s; the structure and problems of the Soviet political system in the early 1980s.

ESML0092: Russian written & spoken language 2B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX54 CW20 OR26
Requisites: Pre ESML0089

Aims & learning objectives:
To deepen knowledge of Russian grammar, expand lexis and develop translation skills in several registers. To give students practice in expressing themselves in writing. To improve aural comprehension to the point at which the gist of a TV news item can be understood and to develop fluency in spoken Russian at the level of everyday conversation.
Content:
Written Language: systematic review of Russian grammar with exercises and drills drawn from a variety of sources; translations into Russian and English with discussion of grammatical points, lexis etc. Essay writing in Russian with discussion of stylistic points and vocabulary. Spoken Language: small group conversation on a range of themes; role-playing; task-based use of audio-visual material. To assist vocabulary acquisition, work in written and spoken language will be organised around themes of social issues, history and politics.

ESML0093: Russian cultural studies 2B: Soviet Russian literature & cinema in the 1920s & 1930s

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0090

Aims & learning objectives:
To present an overview of Russian literary development in these years; to encourage the development of skills in literary analysis and criticism.
Content:
Two writers (studied in key works): Olesha, Akhmatova. Films by Eisenstein.

ESML0094: Russian politics & society 2B: Reform & reconstruction in Russia since 1985

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0091

Aims & learning objectives:
To examine the reform and collapse of the communist order between 1985 and 1991 and the ensuing problem of economic and political reconstruction. To develop skills in historical and political analysis, and essay and seminar techniques.
Content:
The origins, development and failure of Gorbachev's reform programme 1985-91; ethnic and social developments in the post-Stalin USSR and their bearing on the collapse of communism; the Russian Federation and its neighbours after the disintegration of the USSR; Yeltsin's attempt to build democracy and a market economy in Russia; the role and position of women in the late Soviet and post-Soviet eras.

ESML0095: Russian written & spoken language 4A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0092

Aims & learning objectives:
To consolidate knowledge of Russian grammar, further expand lexis and further develop translation skills. To enable students to translate modern literary Russian and non-technical academic and journalistic Russian, into English. To enable students to translate selected English passages into Russian, and to express ideas and arguments in writing. To improve fluency in spoken Russian.
Content:
Written Language: translation into and from Russian and discussion of grammatical points, lexis etc. Conversation and audio-visual classes. Spoken Language: discussion of selected topics on a range of themes (ecology, social issues, feminism etc).

ESML0096: Russian written & spoken language 4B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX56 CW17 OR27
Requisites: Pre ESML0095

Aims & learning objectives:
To consolidate knowledge of Russian grammar, further expand lexis and further develop translation skills. To enable students to translate modern literary Russian and non-technical academic and journalistic Russian, into English with minimal use of a dictionary. To enable students to translate selected English passages into idiomatic Russian, and to express complex ideas and arguments in writing. To develop fluency in spoken Russian.
Content:
Written Language: translation into and from Russian and discussion of grammatical points, lexis etc. Conversation and audio-visual classes. Spoken Language: discussion of selected topics on a range of themes (culture, politics in Russia etc).

ESML0099: Russian national option R2: The twentieth century Russian novel

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX67 ES33
Requisites: Pre ESML0093

Aims & learning objectives:
The novel is arguably Russia's greatest contribution to European culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. This unit concentrates on some of the greatest prose works of the 20th century examining them in their socio-political context and exploring the human effects of the cataclysms and conflicts of the last 70 years of Russian history.
Content:
Among the works to be studied are the following (subject to availability in print): M Bulgakov, Master i Margarita
*; E Zamiatin, My; A Solzhenitsyn, Odin den' Ivana Denisovicha; B Pasternak, Doktor Zhivago
*; Iu. Olesha, Zavist'; N Ostrovskii, Kak zakalialas' stal'.
*As these novels are fairly long, you are advised to read them before the start of the academic year.

ESML0101: Russian national option R4: Gorbachev & Perestroika

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0094, Pre HASS0005

Students must have taken either ESML0094, or HASS0005. Aims & learning objectives:
To investigate political and social developments in the years 1985-1991 in greater depth than in ESML0094.
Content:
Origins of perestroika; glasnost and democratization; nationalities issues and conflicts; the collapse of communism.

ESML0102: Russian national option R5: Politics in post-communist Russia

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0094, Pre HASS0005

Students must have taken either ESML0094, or HASS0005. Aims & learning objectives:
To examine the dilemmas of economic and political reconstruction and of external relations posed by the collapse of the communist political order in Russia, and efforts to resolve these problems since August 1991. To develop skills in political analysis and seminar techniques.
Content:
Political institutions and actors in Russia in August 1991; dimensions of the crisis surrounding the collapse of Soviet communism; theoretical approaches to transition; first steps of the political leadership; reform and political conflict; dilemmas of foreign policy; political elites; civil society; political culture; 1993 Constitution; elections and party formation; legal order and corruption; local government; federalism and ethnic politics; gender politics; prospects.

ESML0103: Europe 1A: Introduction to European studies

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To begin an exploration of the historical and cultural identity of Europe; to introduce basic political concepts (nationalism, imperialism, communism and fascism) in a European historical context; to introduce cultural studies as a discipline in the context of European culture in the first half of the twentieth century.
Content:
Defining Europe - history, languages and culture; nations and empires in 19th Century Europe; the First World War; communism and fascism in interwar Europe; the Second World War; studying European culture; images of war in 20th Century Europe.

ESML0104: Europe 1B: Europe since 1945

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To compare the experience of Eastern and Western Europe since 1945; to introduce students, in this context, to analysis of the political structure and culture of liberal democracies and to analysis of the structures and problems of modern economies; to examine the interaction of culture and politics in post-war Europe.
Content:
Europe in the Cold War era; politics and culture in post-war Europe; economic and social change in Western Europe; liberal democratic politics in Europe - elections and party systems; political culture; the rise and fall of European communist states and command economies; economic and political problems in the age of globalisation; postmodernism in European culture.

ESML0105: Europe 2A: Politics of the European Union

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To introduce students to key theories of European integration; to trace the development of the E.C. from the 1950s to the present; to examine issues of contemporary relevance to European integration. Students will develop an awareness and understanding of European integration issues and be able to discuss them on the basis of background knowledge attained during lectures and readings.
Content:
Theories of European integration; the origins of the E.C.; the Rome Treaty and the Single Act; Britain and the E.C; the road to Maastricht; the institutions of the E.C. and E.U.; the democratic deficit; the 1996 Inter Governmental Conference; the E.U. as a world actor; monetary union; citizenship and "the people's Europe"; the E.U., Eastern Europe and enlargement; the future of the E.U.

ESML0107: European option E1: Intellectuals & identity in contemporary Europe

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an overview of nationalism in various twentieth-century European contexts and of the role of intellectuals (both literary authors and social/political commentators) in influencing debates on issues such as national identity. The changes in post-1989 Central and Eastern Europe will provide a focus for the latter part of the unit.
Content:
The work of intellectuals such as Barzini, Konwicki, Grass, Arendt and Foucault.

ESML0108: European option E2: Politically committed European culture: the end of an era?

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX67 CW33
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To provide an historical understanding of the development of politically committed culture (literature and film) in the post-1945 era in both Eastern and Western Europe. To take account of the factors which led to the growing disillusionment on the part of creative intellectuals regarding the value of their efforts to bring about socialism with a human face: the dominance of Stalinism during the Cold War, the crushing of reform movements in Eastern Europe (especially the Prague Spring in 1968), general scepticism in Western Europe since the 1960's regarding the value of committed culture. To study some examples of the post-engagement culture in Eastern Europe and Russia since the collapse of communism. The close study of works by leading authors of the post-1945 period will provide the focus for the seminars which form the core of the unit.
Content:
Introductory lectures on the issue of commitment and French, German, Italian, Czech and Russian attitudes to it. A selection from the following range of works: A dossier of Camus's writing, De Sanctis: Bitter Rice; Wolf: The Quest for Christa T., Solzhenitsyn: One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, Kundera: The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Perec: Things; Sciascia: Candido; Klíma: Waiting for the Dark, Waiting for the Light, Makanin: Baize Table with Decanter.

ESML0109: French cultural studies 2B, option 7: Camus & the Algerian question

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0009

Aims & learning objectives:
To build on the experience of Cultural Studies by applying the expertise gained so far to an analysis of Camus and the Algerian question, 1948-1960.
Content:
This option will examine the social and moral dilemmas posed by the French colonization of Algeria, as exemplified in the life and work of Camus. Analysis of texts such as L'Exil et le royaume, La Chute and Le Premier homme will be used to explore Camus's ambivalent relationship with his native country, and the conflicting demands of political evolution and personal authenticity.

ESML0110: European option E3: European film 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Co ESML0111

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop an understanding of the nature and role of cinema in contemporary Europe, through the study of concepts of personal, national and European identity, and the detailed analysis of a wide range of European films
Content:
This course will focus upon film as personal statement, and will analyse selected works of directors in West and East Europe with specific reference to questions of identity, memory, autobiographical narrative and point of view.

ESML0111: European option E4: European film 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Co ESML0110

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop further the understanding of the nature and role of contemporary European film by tracing the relationship between personal memory and identity, and history and ideology; to examine the concept of myth and identity.
Content:
In this course the personal visions of directors in West and East Europe will be analysed within the broader context of history, ideology and myth. Areas for investigation include the comparative and shared histories of European film; the legacy of the Third Reich; women and history; marginal identities; ideology; film and contemporary European society.

ESML0112: French cultural studies 2B, option 8: Images of conflict: the French at war

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0009

Aims & learning objectives:
To build on the experience of Cultural Studies by applying the expertise gained so far to an analysis of Images of Conflict: the French at War.
Content:
This option will examine the French experience of warfare in the twentieth century, as expressed in literature and film. The principal focus will be on the period from 1940 to the early 1960s, and will include the themes of armed conflict, occupation, exile, war crimes, and colonial war. Examples for analysis will include novel, drama, poetry and film.

ESML0115: French economic & industrial environment

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW50 ES50
Requisites: Co ESML0120

Aims & learning objectives:
to introduce students to the economic contexts in which firms in France operate, to analyse the causes of economic growth and industrial development in the post-war period and to introduce students to the language of the French business environment.
Content:
economic growth and development in the post-war period (1945-1973); recession and structural changes in the 1970s; economic performance and public policies in the 1980s and 1990s; industrial policy: concentration, nationalisation, privatisation, small firms; foreign trade in goods and services. Classes are conducted in French.

ESML0116: French written communication A

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW40 PR40 EX20
Requisites: Co ESML0117

Aims & learning objectives:
To heighten student awareness of linguistic difficulties encountered in written communication; to promote proficiency in the comprehension and production of texts in French with reference to subject covered in the core and interface units; to introduce students to the techniques of summarisation, abstraction of argumentation and comparative text analysis.
Content:
Materials used in the course are drawn from across a range of socio-economic and legal texts drawn from the French press, with reference also to English press material, and from other sources. Exploitation of these texts is aimed at increasing student awareness of presentational differences of the same material, soundness and elaboration of arguments etc., and the application of these lessons to written communication in general. Specific exercises include: summarisation; translation: points and pitfalls; comparative text analysis: language, style, presentation; elaboration of argumentation; elements of grammar.

ESML0117: French aural comprehension/oral communication 1A

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX25 PR50 CW25
Requisites: Co ESML0116, Co ESML0125

Aims & learning objectives:
to develop receptive (aural) and communicative (oral) skills in the French language so that by the beginning of the second year these skills can be applied to a business context.
Content:
Audio-visual exercises are used to exploit topical news items of a social, economic, political and cultural nature recorded from satellite television broadcasts. Exercises are designed initially to give students maximum exposure to spoken French in a variety of registers with a view to improving both comprehension skills and the ability to select and organise key points from the AV material used. Subsequently, exercises are aimed at improving student ability to present ideas orally in French to other members of the student group. A variety of exercises are employed: summarisation and role-play strategies, speed tests and fictional reconstructions from television images without sound. Classes with a French native speaker supplement these exercises by developing student skills in oral communication in French.

ESML0118: German business environment 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This unit aims to introduce students to key concepts of the German economic environment. In the second half it will focus on aspects of the integration of the former East into the economy of the West.
Content:
The unit first concentrates on the period of post-war economic reconstruction, in particular on aspects of the 'economic miracle' and the social market economy. Then the emphasis will shift towards the reconstruction of the economy in East Germany following unification. Special emphasis will be on the role of the 'Treuhand', the question of private property, ecological 'Altlasten'. Finally we will discuss the impact of processes of economic globalisation on the German economy.

ESML0119: German written & spoken communication 1

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: PR40 CW40 OT20
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
The unit pursues a dual aim. 1. To improve students' communicative and listening skills (oral/aural) and to expand their vocabulary so that they are able to express themselves clearly in everyday as well as in business contexts as appropriate; to enable students to formulate their own ideas and to interact effectively in German and to adjust flexibly to various situations by using a suitable register. 2. To refresh and consolidate students' knowledge and understanding of grammatical structures. Increasingly students should be in a position to apply the acquired skills to the production of coherent and fluent written composition; to introduce students to a variety of German texts dealing with appropriate contemporary issues.
Content:
1. Classes may consist of free discussions with the entire group, interactive exercises (e.g. role play, small-group discussions, one-to-one exchange of basis for discussion and assessment whilst improving awareness of contemporary life in the German-speaking world. 2. In respect of i. the consolidation of German language structures this unit focuses on the various classes of words, their declension and their function within the phrase/sentence, ii. written communication a variety of linguistic skills are developed by means of translation into and from German and guided composition in German.

ESML0120: French legal environment

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES80 OT20
Requisites: Co ESML0115

Aims & learning objectives:
to introduce students to the underlying principles of French law, to outline the legal framework within which firms in France operate in specific domains and to introduce students to French legal terminology
Content:
introduction to the French legal system; company law; droit des obligations (contracts and tort); consumer protection legislation; labour law; competition law. Classes are conducted in French.

ESML0121: French written communication B

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW40 PR40 EX20
Requisites: Co ESML0122

Aims & learning objectives:
To continue and advance student awareness of linguistic difficulties encountered in written communication in unit Written Communication A, promoting further proficiency in the comprehension and production of texts in French with reference to subjects covered in the core and interface units; to introduce students to the techniques of summarisation, abstraction of argumentation and comparative text analysis.
Content:
Materials used in the course are drawn from across a range of socio-economic and legal texts drawn from the French press, with reference also to English press material, and from other sources. Exploitation of these texts is aimed at increasing student awareness of presentational differences of the same material, soundness and elaboration of arguments etc., and the application of these lessons to written communication in general. Specific exercises include: summarisation; translation: further points and pitfalls; comparative text analysis: language, style, presentation; elaboration of argumentation; further elements of grammar

ESML0122: French aural comprehension/oral communication 1B

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX25 PR50 CW25
Requisites: Pre ESML0117, Co ESML0121

Aims & learning objectives:
to develop receptive (aural) and communicative (oral) skills in the French language so that by the beginning of the second year these skills can be applied to a business context.
Content:
Audio-visual exercises are used to exploit topical news items of a social, economic, political and cultural nature recorded from satellite television broadcasts. Exercises are designed initially to give students maximum exposure to spoken French in a variety of registers with a view to improving both comprehension skills and the ability to select and organise key points from the AV material used. Subsequently, exercises are aimed at improving student ability to present ideas orally in French to other members of the student group. A variety of exercises are employed: summarisation and role-play strategies, speed tests and fictional reconstructions from television images without sound. Classes with a French native speaker supplement these exercises by developing student skills in oral communication in French.

ESML0123: German business environment 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre ESML0118

Aims & learning objectives:
to provide students with an introduction to the structure of the German economy and the organisation of major economic interest groups; to introduce students to the legal system in the Federal Republic of Germany which governs the relationship between the state and its citizens with particular emphasis on the implications of the constitutional framework on the organisation of business; to familiarise students with relevant language and concepts, to assist students in writing in German about the relevant areas.
Content:
i. The German economy a) the structure of the German economy b) interest groups within the German economy ii. The German legal environment a) the constitutional framework of business b) aspects of change in the legal environment of German business

ESML0124: German written & spoken communication 2

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX30 CW20 PR20 OR30
Requisites: Pre ESML0119

Aims & learning objectives:
The unit builds on German Written Communication 1, pursuing the same dual aim. 1. To improve students' communicative and listening skills (oral/aural) and to expand their vocabulary so that they are able to express themselves clearly in everyday as well as in business contexts as appropriate; to enable students to formulate their own ideas and to interact effectively in German and to adjust flexibly to various situations by using a suitable register. 2. To refresh and consolidate students' knowledge and understanding of grammatical structures. Increasingly students should be in a position to apply the acquired skills to the production of coherent and fluent written composition; to introduce students to a variety of German texts dealing with appropriate contemporary issues.
Content:
1. Classes may consist of free discussions with the entire group, interactive exercises (e.g. role play, small-group discussions, one-to-one exchange of ideas). Austrian and German video material and newspaper articles form the basis for discussion and assessment whilst improving awareness of contemporary life in the German-speaking world. 2. In respect of i. the consolidation of German language structures, this unit focuses on complex grammar points and German syntax; ii. written communication a variety of linguistic skills are developed by means of translation into and from German and guided composition in German.

ESML0125: French written communication in the business context A

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX60 CW40
Requisites: Pre ESML0121, Co ESML0117

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop more advanced skills in contemporary written communication with regard to the business dimension of written communication in order to prepare students for industrial placements in a French company during their year abroad.
Content:
Materials used in the course are drawn from across a range of socio-economic and legal texts drawn from the French press, with reference also to English press material, and European Community and other documents. Exploitation of these texts is aimed at increasing student awareness of presentational differences of the same material, soundness and elaboration of arguments etc. Students are instructed in the drafting of commercial correspondence in addition to work on CVs and accompanying documentation. Specific exercises include: Commercial correspondence: terminology and its application; language, style, development/elaboration of argumentation; specific grammatical problems.

ESML0126: French aural comprehension/oral communication in the business context 2A

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 2
Assessment: PR50 CW50
Requisites: Pre ESML0121, Pre ESML0122

Aims & learning objectives:
to develop receptive (aural) and communicative (oral) skills in business contexts.
Content:
Students are given specific assignments aimed at improving aural comprehension of spoken language, based on video and audio material relevant to the world of business and to the European business environment in particular. Oral and interpersonal communication skills are practised in various situations commonly experienced in the world of business, especially telephone skills, job interview techniques and presentation exercises. Classes are conducted in French.

ESML0127: German language in the business context A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 2
Assessment:
Requisites: Pre ESML0124

Aims & learning objectives:
The unit pursues a dual aim. 1. To improve students' communicative and listening skills and to expand their vocabulary, especially in economic, business and professional contexts. To enable them to converse accurately, fluently and in an appropriate register. 2. To develop more advanced skills in contemporary written communication with specific reference to material used in the core and interface courses; to focus on the business dimension of written communication in order to prepare students for industrial placements in a German company during their third year abroad. The unit will familiarise students with written communication tasks appropriate to the world of business and management in Germany.
Content:
1. Classes may consist of aural comprehension exercises by using videos of current (business) affairs, usually taped from German/Austrian television. This may include summarisation, answering of questions and discussion of the topics presented to them. Also office skills simulations, such as answering the telephone, form a part of these classes. There are also free discussions which involve either a larger group or smaller sub-groups. 2. Written communication materials consist primarily of socio-political and business texts. Exploitation of these texts is aimed at familiarising students with specific issues from the German business context. Specific exercises include: comparative/text analysis, acquisition of business terminology, business communication: correspondence, reports, CVs, surveys, statistics, summarisations.

ESML0128: French written communication in the business context B

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW40 EX60
Requisites: Pre ESML0125, Co ESML0129

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop more advanced skills in contemporary written communication with regard to techniques of summarisation, abstraction of argumentation and comparative text analysis and with reference to the subjects covered in the core and interface courses whilst maintaining a focus on the business dimension of written communication.
Content:
Materials used in the course are drawn from across a range of socio-economic and legal texts drawn from the French press, with reference also to English press material, and European Community and other documents. Exploitation of these texts is aimed at increasing student awareness of presentational differences of the same material, soundness and elaboration of arguments etc., and the application of these lessons to written communication in general. Specific exercises include: Terminology and its application; summarisation; textual analysis: language, style, development/elaboration of argumentation; specific grammatical problems.

ESML0129: French aural comprehension/oral communication in the business context 2B

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX40 OR40 PR10 CW10
Requisites: Pre ESML0126, Co ESML0128

Aims & learning objectives:
to develop receptive (aural) and communicative (oral) skills in business contexts.
Content:
Students are given specific assignments aimed at improving aural comprehension of spoken language, based on video and audio material relevant to the world of business and to the European business environment in particular. Oral and interpersonal communication skills are practised in various situations commonly experienced in the world of business, especially telephone skills, job interview techniques and presentation exercises. Classes are conducted in French.

ESML0130: German comparative employee relations B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: ES67 CW33
Requisites: Pre UNIV0003

Aims & learning objectives:
To convey in German the most significant developments in relations between management and institutions representing worker interests (trade unions and works councils) and to give students practice in preparing and giving seminar presentations in German and to improve their writing skills in German.
Content:
Industrielle Beziehungen in Deutschland a) Die Entwicklung der Gewerkschaften b) Gewerkschaften und Betriebsr?te c) Die Zukunft der Tarifautonomie d) Betriebliche Interessenvertretung im vereinigten Deutschland

ESML0131: German language in the business context B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX CW
Requisites: Pre ESML0127

Aims & learning objectives:
The unit pursues a dual aim: 1. To build on the oral and aural German skills acquired in German Language in the Business Context A. The purpose of the unit is to enable students to improve their communicative and listening skills and to expand their vocabulary, especially in economic, business and professional contexts. The unit will improve accurate conversation skills at a more advanced level of German and improve both fluency and awareness of appropriate language registers for the business context. 2. To build on the skills and written language proficiency achieved in German Language in the Business Context A. The purpose of the unit is for students to develop more advanced skills in contemporary German written communication with specific reference to both the national and the European business environment. Students will be familiarised with more complex written communication tasks appropriate to the world of business and management. The unit will introduce students to more academic texts on business issues in the German context.
Content:
1. Classes will consist of aural comprehension exercises by using videos of current (business) affairs, usually taped from German/Austrian television. This may include summarisation, answering questions and discussion of topics presented to them. Students will practice office and negotiating skills as well as free discussions which involve either a larger group or smaller sub-groups. 2. Written communication materials consist primarily of socio-political and business texts. Exploitation of these texts is aimed at aiding students' understanding of German national and European perspectives of issues in the business world as well as the acquisition of relevant terminology and language registers. Specific exercises include: writing reports, summarisations and essays on a business or economic topic; consolidation and expansion of business terminology, problem-solving in the business environment.

ESML0132: French international marketing communications A

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop students' understanding of the applications of the principles of marketing from their Second Year and ally it to their own experience on placement, passing on to the international context. It also aims to place the marketing function within social and organisational networks of communication.
Content:
The unit is in two parts. The first (in English over six weeks) provides for an introduction to the general principles of international marketing (structural, legal etc). The second (in French) examines marketing as part of the communications process. i. The International Marketing Environment: Economic, social, political and legal constraints Regional markets Globalisation versus internationalisation ii. Marketing Communications: The communications process; persuasion and propaganda Cultural influences, universals and their effects

ESML0133: French written & oral communication in the international business context A

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0128, Pre ESML0129

Aims & learning objectives:
To enhance French written and oral skills within the international business context.
Content:
All classes focus on material and topics relevant to the international business context. Materials used in the unit are drawn from across a variety of registers (e.g. business, political, advertising etc.) found in French-language publications, but with reference also to English material, as well as European Union material and corporate communications. Students are encouraged to use materials and experience from their placement year in business. Exploitation of these texts and materials is aimed at increasing presentational skills within a framework of sound and well-elaborated argumentation. In addition to written communication skills, classes with the lector stimulate the development of oral communication skills. Exercises in written communication classes include: transposition of English texts into appropriate registers for a given context, e.g. report writing, professional advice etc.; commentary in French of the linguistic and situational features of texts; elaboration of arguments etc.; specific grammatical problems. Exercises in oral communication (language) classes include: presentations (individual and group) on prepared topics; development of interpersonal skills required in meetings and negotiations; reports in French on business and political items from French audio-visual material; specific grammatical, phonetic or other linguistic problems.

ESML0135: German written & oral communication in the international business context 1

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Pre ESML0131

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this unit is keep up the level of linguistic fluency achieved during the year abroad. Special attention is paid to oral presentation and discussion skills, to methods of comparative text analysis, techniques of summarisation, abstraction of argumentation, commentary, specialised translation etc. Students are encouraged to follow economic trends in Germany through regular reading of relevant newspapers.
Content:
Classes focus on material and topics relevant to the international business context. The emphasis will be on issues of European economic integration and problems related to the globalisation of economic processes. Certain linguistic excercises will also make use of English texts as a further source of information.

ESML0136: French international marketing communications B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX60 CW40
Requisites: Pre UNIV0028, Ex MANG0063

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop students' understanding of the applications of the principles of marketing from their Second Year and ally it to their own experience on placement, passing on to the international context. It also aims to place the marketing function within social and organisational networks of communication.
Content:
The unit builds on unit French International Marketing Communications A by examining the application of theory to specific products & campaigns in case study, in addition to theory & practice in other applications of the Marketing Communications mix.

ESML0137: French written & oral communication in the international business context B

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: CW40 EX30 OR30
Requisites: Pre ESML0133

Aims & learning objectives:
To enhance French written and oral skills within the international business context.
Content:
Building on unit Written Communication in the International Business Context A, all classes continue to focus on material and topics relevant to the international business context. Materials used in the unit are drawn from across a variety of registers (e.g. business, political, advertising etc.) found in French-language publications, but with reference also to English material, as well as European Union material and corporate communications. Students are encouraged to use materials and experience from their placement year in business. Exploitation of these texts and materials is aimed at increasing presentational skills within a framework of sound and well-elaborated argumentation. In addition to written communication skills, classes with the lector stimulate the development of oral communication skills. Exercises in written communication classes include: transposition of English texts into appropriate registers for a given context, e.g. report writing, professional advice etc.; commentary in French of the linguistic and situational features of texts; elaboration of arguments etc.; specific grammatical problems. Exercises in oral communication (language) classes include: presentations (individual and group) on prepared topics; development of interpersonal skills required in meetings and negotiations; reports in French on business and political items from French audio-visual material; specific grammatical, phonetic or other linguistic problems.

ESML0138: Le management interculturel

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment:
Requisites: Pre ESML0011

Aims & learning objectives:
to develop insights into the cultural specificity of management practices through comparisons between the case of France and other leading industrial nations; to enhance awareness of the cultural dimensions of managing in the international workplace; to provide an opportunity for students to integrate their knowledge of corporate, nation-specific and international management practices by drawing on prior study within the degree as well as on their work experience abroad; to develop research skills, oral presentation skills and report writing skills in French; to develop their teamwork skills, by working in groups.
Content:
The focus will be on business practices in France, whose distinctiveness (or otherwise) will be explored by cross-national comparisons. Introductory lectures review issues to do with national business cultures, particularly the question of whether particular management styles or practices are nation-specific. They also review corporate culture issues in relation to national culture, with reference to core management disciplines such as business policy, organisational behaviour and human resources management within major companies. The second phase of the course is student-led, with group exposés leading to seminar discussions. The subject of group exposés and groups dissertations is decided jointly by the students and course lecturers in line with the major themes of the course. Guidance is given on the development and presentation of both exposés and written projects, as well as feedback on exposées.

ESML0139: German international marketing communications B

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX60 CW40
Requisites: Pre UNIV0027, Ex MANG0063

Aims & learning objectives:
To develop students' understanding of the principles of marketing from their Second Year and to ally it to their own experience on placement, passing on to the international context. It also aims to place the marketing function within social and organisational networks of communication.
Content:
The unit builds on Marketing Communications A by examining the application of theory to specific products and campaigns in case study in addition to theory and practice in other applications of the marketing communications mix.

ESML0140: German written & oral communication in the international business context 2

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: IMML - 50% MANG 50% ESML
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX30 OR30 CW40
Requisites: Pre ESML0135

Aims & learning objectives:
The aim of this unit is keep up the level of linguistic fluency achieved during the year abroad and to further develop the writing and oral skills practised in the post-abroad language workshop.
Content:
As in the preceding unit, classes focus on material and topics relevant to the international business context.

ESML0141: Business French option 1A

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Students must have have a minimum of a GCSE Grade C and/or have taken Single Language Option units during year 1 or the equivalent in order to undertake this unit. Students must also take ESML0142 in year 3 if they take this unit. Aims & learning objectives:
A course to revive, develop and consolidate foreign language skills in order to enable students to operate effectively in the sphere of business and management
Content:
Semester 1: Intensive language work with emphasis on aural comprehension and oral communication. Teaching methods integrate a variety of forms of language learning through the exploitation of foreign language television broadcasts, audio-visual materials and a business language course text. This part of the course concentrates mainly on the practical language necessary for doing business, but also includes work on more theoretical themes such as the various types of company job application and interview practice. Overall fluency and grammatical accuracy are practised throughout the course.

ESML0142: Business French option 1B

Semester 1
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX60 CW40
Requisites: Pre ESML0141

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to revive, develop and consolidate foreign language skills in order to enable students to operate effectively in the sphere of business and management
Content:
Semester 2: Further development of linguistic proficiency using the same methods as in Semester 1. The second part of the course is concerned with more real world material such as economics magazines and TV news items, on which the study of many aspects of the foreign business environment will be based. Continued emphasis on overall fluency and grammatical accuracy.

ESML0143: Business French option 2

Semester 2
Credits: 5
Contact:
Topic:
Level: Level 3
Assessment: EX60 CW40
Requisites: Pre ESML0142

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to upgrade, review and refine language skills already acquired during Years 2 and 3 in order that students may operate confidently and effectively in the sphere of foreign business and management.
Content:
Target language is used throughout the course, emphasising fluency and grammatical accuracy. Topics reviewed include communications, marketing, sales and finance, as well as other relevant and/or topical aspects of the foreign business environment.

ESML0144: Chinese stage 1A (beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0145

Aims & learning objectives:
An introduction to basic Chinese ("putonghua") as a preparation to communicating in a Chinese context.
Content:
Basic Chinese grammatical forms. Recognition and production of essential Chinese characters; the Chinese phonetic system and the Pinyin system. Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking and listening. Reading and writing tasks of an appropriate nature will be gradually incorporated. Special attention will be paid to the recognition and differentiation of tones. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. Usually some evidence of competence in another foreign language is required.

ESML0145: Chinese stage 1B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0144

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 1A

ESML0146: Chinese stage 2A (post beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of Chinese, to develop listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Chinese speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering the appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary and there will be continued emphasis on tones and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short talks and undertake writing tasks in Chinese. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements.

ESML0147: Chinese stage 2B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 2A

ESML0148: Chinese stage 3A (advanced beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the Chinese covered in Chinese Stage 2 A and B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to China, Singapore and Taiwan. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Chinese is spoken. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements.

ESML0149: Chinese stage 3B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 3A

ESML0150: French stage 7A (advanced) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0151

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to consolidate, refine and enhance previous advanced knowledge of French
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. GCE Advanced Level French or equivalent required.

ESML0151: French stage 7B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0150

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 7A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 7A

ESML0152: French stage 8A (post advanced) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in French Stage 7A and 7B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works. Where numbers permit, some subject-specific material may be included, covering the relevant scientific and technological areas and/or business and industry. There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0153: French stage 8B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 8A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 8A

ESML0154: French stage 9A (further advanced) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of the work outlined in French 8A and 8B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials used cover a wide variety of sources and cover aspects of cultural political and social themes relating to France. Works of literature or extracts may be included, as well as additional subject-specific material, as justified by class size. This may encompass scientific and technological topics as well as materials relevant to business and industry. There will be discussion in the target language of topics relating to and generated by the teaching materials, with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to consolidate their linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0155: French stage 9B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 9A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 9A

ESML0156: French stage 4A (intermediate) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0157

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of French, to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a French-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation relating to a selection of topics. Remedial work is carried out where necessary. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in French. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. GCSE Grade C in French or equivalent required.

ESML0157: French stage 4B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0156

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 4A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 4A

ESML0158: French stage 5A (post intermediate) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the French covered in French Stage 4A and 4B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0159: French stage 5B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of course French Stage 5A
Content:
A continuation of course French Stage 5A

ESML0160: French stage 6A (advanced intermediate) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course concentrates on the more advanced aspects of French with continued emphasis on practical application of language skills in a relevant context, in order to refine further the student's abilities.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. There is continued further development of the pattern of work outlined in French Stage 5A and 5B

ESML0161: French stage 6B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of course French Stage 6A
Content:
A continuation of course French Stage 6A

ESML0162: German stage 1A (beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0163

Aims & learning objectives:
An introduction to everyday German, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in a German speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. Usually some evidence of competence in another foreign language is required.

ESML0163: German stage 1B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0162

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 1A

ESML0164: German stage 2A (post beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in German Stage 1A and 1B to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a German-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in German Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0165: German stage 2B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 2A

ESML0166: German stage 3A (advanced beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the German covered in German Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0167: German stage 3B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 3A

ESML0168: German stage 7A (advanced) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0169

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to consolidate, refine and enhance previous advanced knowledge of German
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. GCE Advanced Level German or equivalent required.

ESML0169: German stage 7B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0168

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 7A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 7A

ESML0170: German stage 8A (post advanced) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in German Stage 7A and 7B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works. Where numbers permit, some subject-specific material may be included, covering the relevant scientific and technological areas and/or business and industry. There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0171: German stage 8B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 8A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 8A

ESML0172: German stage 9A (further advanced) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of the work outlined in German Stage 8A and 8B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials used cover a wide variety of sources and cover aspects of cultural political and social themes relating to German speaking countries. Works of literature or extracts may be included, as well as additional subject-specific material, as justified by class size. This may encompass scientific and technological topics as well as materials relevant to business and industry. There will be discussion in the target language of topics relating to and generated by the teaching materials, with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to consolidate their linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0173: German stage 9B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 9A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 9A

ESML0174: German stage 4A (intermediate) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0175

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of German, to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a German-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation relating to a selection of topics. Remedial work is carried out where necessary. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in German. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. GCSE Grade C in German or equivalent required.

ESML0175: German stage 4B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0174

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German 4A
Content:
A continuation of German 4A

ESML0176: German stage 5A (post intermediate) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the German covered in German Stage 4A and 4B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0177: German stage 5B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 5A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 5A

ESML0178: German stage 6A (advanced intermediate) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course concentrates on the more advanced aspects of German with continued emphasis on practical application of language skills in a relevant context, in order to refine further the student's abilities.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. There is continued further development of the pattern of work outlined in German Stage 5A and 5B

ESML0179: German stage 6B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 6A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 6A

ESML0180: Italian stage 1A (beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0181

Aims & learning objectives:
An introduction to everyday Italian, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in an Italian speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. Usually some evidence of competence in another foreign language is required.

ESML0181: Italian stage 1B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0180

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Italian Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Italian Stage 1A

ESML0182: Italian stage 2A (post beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in Italian Stage 1A and 1B, to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in an Italian-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in Italian. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0183: Italian stage 2B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Italian Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Italian Stage 2A

ESML0184: Italian stage 3A (advanced beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the Italian covered in Italian Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Italy and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Italian is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classwork.

ESML0185: Italian stage 3B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Italian Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Italian Stage 3A

ESML0186: Japanese 1A (beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0187

Aims & learning objectives:
An introduction to everyday Japanese, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in a Japanese speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and the reading and writing of the 2 phonetic Japanese scripts and selected kanji (Chinese characters)
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Course material will be drawn from a variety of sources and will include audio-visual resources. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. Usually some evidence of competence in another foreign language is required.

ESML0187: Japanese 1B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0186

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 1A

ESML0188: Japanese 2A (post beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in Japanese Stage 1A and 1B, to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Japanese-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and undertake appropriate writing tasks in Japanese. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0189: Japanese 2B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 2A

ESML0190: Japanese 3A (advanced beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the Japanese covered in Japanese Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks which will include extended use of kanji characters and an introduction to keigo (respect language) as well as covering the appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Japan and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Japanese is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classwork.

ESML0191: Japanese 3B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 3A

ESML0192: Spanish stage 1A (beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0193

Aims & learning objectives:
An introduction to everyday Spanish, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in a Spanish speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. Usually some evidence of competence in another foreign language is required.

ESML0193: Spanish stage 1B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0192

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 1A

ESML0194: Spanish stage 2A (post beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in Spanish Stage 1A and 1B, to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Spanish-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in Spanish. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0195: Spanish stage 2B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 2A

ESML0196: Spanish stage 3A (advanced beginners) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the Spanish covered in Spanish Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spanish speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0197: Spanish stage 3B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 3A

ESML0198: Spanish stage 4A (intermediate) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0199

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of Spanish, to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Spanish-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation relating to a selection of topics. Remedial work is carried out where necessary. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in Spanish. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. GCSE Grade C in Spanish or equivalent required.

ESML0199: Spanish stage 4B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0198

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 4A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 4A

ESML0200: Spanish stage 5A (post intermediate) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the Spanish covered in Spanish Stage 4A and 4B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spain and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0201: Spanish stage 5B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 5A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 5A

ESML0202: Spanish stage 6A (advanced intermediate) (3 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
This course concentrates on the more advanced aspects of Spanish with continued emphasis on practical application of language skills in a relevant context, in order to refine further the student's abilities.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. There is continued further development of the pattern of work outlined in Spanish Stage 5A and 5B

ESML0203: Spanish stage 6B (3 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 3
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites:

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 6A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 6A

ESML0204: Chinese stage 1A (beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0205

Aims & learning objectives:
An introduction to basic Chinese ("putonghua") as a preparation to communicating in a Chinese context.
Content:
Basic Chinese grammatical forms. Recognition and production of essential Chinese characters; the Chinese phonetic system and the Pinyin system. Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking and listening. Reading and writing tasks of an appropriate nature will be gradually incorporated. Special attention will be paid to the recognition and differentiation of tones.

ESML0205: Chinese stage 1B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0204

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 1A

ESML0206: Chinese stage 2A (post beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0207

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of Chinese, to develop listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Chinese speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering the appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary and there will be continued emphasis on tones and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short talks and undertake writing tasks in Chinese.

ESML0207: Chinese stage 2B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0206

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 2A

ESML0208: Chinese stage 3A (advanced beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0209

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the Chinese covered in Chinese Stage 2 A and B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to China, Singapore and Taiwan. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Chinese is spoken.

ESML0209: Chinese stage 3B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0208

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 3A

ESML0210: French stage 7A (advanced) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0211

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to consolidate, refine and enhance previous advanced knowledge of French
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0211: French stage 7B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0210

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 7A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 7A

ESML0212: French stage 8A (post advanced) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0213

Aims & learning objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in French Stage 7A and 7B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works. Where numbers permit, some subject-specific material may be included, covering the relevant scientific and technological areas and/or business and industry. There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0213: French stage 8B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0212

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 8A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 8A

ESML0214: French stage 9A (further advanced) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0215

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of the work outlined in French 8A and 8B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials used cover a wide variety of sources and cover aspects of cultural political and social themes relating to France. Works of literature or extracts may be included, as well as additional subject-specific material, as justified by class size. This may encompass scientific and technological topics as well as materials relevant to business and industry. There will be discussion in the target language of topics relating to and generated by the teaching materials, with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to consolidate their linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0215: French stage 9B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0214

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 9A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 9A

ESML0216: French stage 4A (intermediate) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0217

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of French, to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a French-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation relating to a selection of topics. Remedial work is carried out where necessary. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in French. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0217: French stage 4B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0216

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 4A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 4A

ESML0218: French stage 5A (post intermediate) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0219

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the French covered in French Stage 4A and 4B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0219: French stage 5B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0218

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of course French Stage 5A
Content:
A continuation of course French Stage 5A

ESML0220: French stage 6A (advanced intermediate) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0221

Aims & learning objectives:
This course concentrates on the more advanced aspects of French with continued emphasis on practical application of language skills in a relevant context, in order to refine further the student's abilities.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. There is continued further development of the pattern of work outlined in French Stage 5A and 5B

ESML0221: French stage 6B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0220

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of course French Stage 6A
Content:
A continuation of course French Stage 6A

ESML0222: German stage 1A (beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0223

Aims & learning objectives:
An introduction to everyday German, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in a German speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work

ESML0223: German stage 1B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0222

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 1A

ESML0224: German stage 2A (post beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0225

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in German Stage 1A and 1B to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a German-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in German Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0225: German stage 2B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0224

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 2A

ESML0226: German stage 3A (advanced beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0227

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the German covered in German Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0227: German stage 3B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0226

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 3A

ESML0228: German stage 7A (advanced) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0229

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to consolidate, refine and enhance previous advanced knowledge of German
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0229: German stage 7B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0228

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 7A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 7A

ESML0230: German stage 8A (post advanced) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0231

Aims & learning objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in German Stage 7A and 7B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works. Where numbers permit, some subject-specific material may be included, covering the relevant scientific and technological areas and/or business and industry. There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0231: German stage 8B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0230

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 8A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 8A

ESML0232: German stage 9A (further advanced) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0233

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of the work outlined in German Stage 8A and 8B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials used cover a wide variety of sources and cover aspects of cultural political and social themes relating to German speaking countries. Works of literature or extracts may be included, as well as additional subject-specific material, as justified by class size. This may encompass scientific and technological topics as well as materials relevant to business and industry. There will be discussion in the target language of topics relating to and generated by the teaching materials, with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to consolidate their linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0233: German stage 9B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 2
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0232

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 9A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 9A

ESML0234: German stage 4A (intermediate) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0235

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of German, to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a German-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation relating to a selection of topics. Remedial work is carried out where necessary. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in German. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0235: German stage 4B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0234

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German 4A
Content:
A continuation of German 4A

ESML0236: German stage 5A (post intermediate) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0237

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the German covered in German Stage 4A and 4B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0237: German stage 5B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0236

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 5A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 5A

ESML0238: German stage 6A (advanced intermediate) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0239

Aims & learning objectives:
This course concentrates on the more advanced aspects of German with continued emphasis on practical application of language skills in a relevant context, in order to refine further the student's abilities.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. There is continued further development of the pattern of work outlined in German Stage 5A and 5B

ESML0239: German stage 6B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0238

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 6A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 6A

ESML0240: Italian stage 1A (beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0241

Aims & learning objectives:
An introduction to everyday Italian, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in an Italian speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work

ESML0241: Italian stage 1B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0240

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Italian Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Italian Stage 1A

ESML0242: Italian stage 2A (post beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0243

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in Italian Stage 1A and 1B, to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in an Italian-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in Italian. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0243: Italian stage 2B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0242

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Italian Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Italian Stage 2A

ESML0244: Italian stage 3A (advanced beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0245

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the Italian covered in Italian Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the students abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Italy and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Italian is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classwork

ESML0245: Italian stage 3B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0244

Amis & Learning Objectives: A continuation of Italian Stage 3A.
Content:
A continuation of Italian Stage 3A.

ESML0246: Japanese 1A (beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0247

Aims & learning objectives:
An introduction to everyday Japanese, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in a Japanese speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and the reading and writing of the 2 phonetic Japanese scripts and selected kanji (Chinese characters)
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Course material will be drawn from a variety of sources and will include audio-visual resources. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work

ESML0247: Japanese 1B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0246

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 1A

ESML0248: Japanese 2A (post beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0249

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in Japanese Stage 1A and 1B, to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Japanese-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and undertake appropriate writing tasks in Japanese. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0249: Japanese 2B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0248

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 2A

ESML0250: Japanese 3A (advanced beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0251

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the Japanese covered in Japanese Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks which will include extended use of kanji characters and an introduction to keigo (respect language) as well as covering the appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Japan and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Japanese is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classwork.

ESML0251: Japanese 3B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0250

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 3A

ESML0252: Spanish stage 1A (beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0253

Aims & learning objectives:
An introduction to everyday Spanish, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in a Spanish speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work

ESML0253: Spanish stage 1B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites: Co ESML0252

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 1A

ESML0254: Spanish stage 2A (post beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0255

Aims & learning objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in Spanish Stage 1A and 1B, to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Spanish-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in Spanish. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

ESML0255: Spanish stage 2B (6 credits)

Semester 2
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0254

Aims & learning objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 2A

ESML0256: Spanish stage 3A (advanced beginners) (6 credits)

Semester 1
Credits: 6
Contact:
Topic: Foreign Language Centre
Level: Level 1
Assessment: EX45 CW40 OR15
Requisites: Co ESML0257

Aims & learning objectives:
This course builds on the Spanish covered in Spanish Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural,