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Department of Architecture & Civil Engineering, Unit Catalogue 2003/04


AR10003: Building environment 1

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Aims: To provide a basic vocabulary which enables a discussion of environmental issues. To make students aware of the physical impingements upon the body. To introduce the principal variables in the design of the physical environment. To use calculations at a basic level sufficient to enable students to make informed decisions about the orientation of buildings, the choice of building envelope and satisfactory internal conditions.
Learning Outcomes:
On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of Building Environmental Engineering and to apply them to the design of buildings using passive means of environmental control.
Skills:
Appropriate analytical skills, understanding, design ability.
Content:
Human response, Climate, Vernacular buildings, Thermal environment, Thermal comfort, Heat losses, Heat gains, Condensation risk, Building examples, Natural lighting, Units of light, Sunlighting, Daylighting, Sound environment, Sound propagation, Sound insulation, Sound in rooms.

AR10014: Construction & materials

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take AR10015
Aims: To provide a basic understanding of simple building construction and materials. To integrate construction into the Design Studio. To teach standards of drawing technique, 'technical' drawing, lettering, layout etc.
Learning Outcomes:
On the completion of this unit students will be able to prepare a 1:20 uncut sectional working drawing of a simple house designed in the Design Studio (either timber or masonry construction) with full descriptive annotation and some three-dimensional sketches.
Skills:
The skills required are:
* simple technical (working) drawing, notation and presentation;
* knowledge of the assembly of simple structures;
* knowledge of the application of basic building materials and finishes.
Content:
Lecture course: A series of 5 lectures on timber, timber framed construction, masonry construction, flat and pitched roofs and simple foundations. Lectures illustrated by extracts from construction textbooks, own diagrams and slides of small buildings with reference notes to the sources used and accessible Library information.Students use full-size mock-ups of construction using timber and bricks available in the Studio. Students are encouraged to use 'question-and-answer' tutorials illustrated by Studio tutorials using OHP Draft submission: the coursework submission is tutored in the Design Studio and presented in draft before final presentation.

AR10015: Design studio 1.1

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take AR10014

Aims: To introduce students to the following areas and concepts:
Basic skills:
1. Creative Building Design;
2. Materials and Construction;
3. Visual Communication through drawing and model-making;
Basic Principles:
4. That the above skills are mutually necessary and inseparable;
5. That design is a collaborative process in which ideas and criticisms are freely exchanged between individuals.
Learning Outcomes:
The successful student will be able to demonstrate the following drawing skills:
1. Plan, Section, Elevation;
2. Axonometric and Isometric projection;
3. Perspective;
4. Freehand and mixed-media techniques;
5. Construction drawing.
Skills:
Skills in the following: Freehand drawing, Technical drawing, Model making, Verbal presentation, Drawn presentation.
Content:
The core vehicle is a design project involving two small, related structures, one timber-framed construction and the other in masonry. In conformity with objective 4, formal lecture programmes on materials and construction, and on communication techniques support tutored design work in the studio. The construction lectures in unit AR10014 run concurrently with and are integrated into this.The communication lectures cover the following drawing skills:
1. Plan, Section, Elevation;
2. Axonometric and Isometric projection;
3. Perspective;
4. Freehand and mixed-media techniques;
5. Construction drawing.
In pursuance of Objective 5, the design is undertaken by mixed architect and engineer groups of not more than four students working together.
Sketchbook: Students are encouraged to keep as many sketchbooks as possible, recording analytically three-dimensional spaces, both real and imagined, alongside ideas on how these buildings either are, or might be, constructed.


AR10016: Design studio 1.2

Credits: 24
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR10015 and take AR10014

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To continue, through a series of four short structured projects, the exploration of fundamental theoretical and historical themes in architecture that commenced in Semester 1. The aim of these projects is to provoke students to ask - and suggest some answers to - the basic question, what is this activity called 'architecture' to which we propose to devote our careers? Through this unit they will develop newly acquired skills in architectural design and communication.
Content:
Four architectural design and communication oriented projects:
1. A design project that questions the nature of architecture and landscape, that focuses and highlights issues concerning architectural content and expression;
2. I.T. Project: An introductory design exercise using the computer, adapted to the varying skill levels of individual students;
3. Public Space: focuses on the public open space between and around buildings as positive (rather than residual) environments. The project is introduced through a precedent study and an associated reading list. The design is communicated through models and figure-ground drawings;
4. Building Design. This project is concerned with developing planning and construction skills by focussing on a real site and a more complex functional programme. In addition, there will be a requirement for students to keep sketchbooks for recording three-dimensional spaces analytically, both real and imagined, alongside ideas on how these buildings either are, or might be, constructed.

AR10033: Geology

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX90CW10
Requisites:
Aims: To give a general knowledge of geological processes appropriate to the needs of a civil engineer, and to teach basic methods of interpretation of simple geological maps.
Learning Outcomes:
The successful student will be able to demonstrate:
* a basic knowledge of geological materials and processes;
* an ability to interpret a simple geological map;
* an insight into the impact of geology on civil engineering design and construction.
Skills:
Ability to understand the importance of geological history and processes to civil engineering design.
Content:
Soil and rock description and classification. Particle size distribution. Definitions of voids ratio, moisture content, density, Atterberg Limits with explanation of their relevance. Plate tectonics, volcanoes and earthquakes. Formation and characteristics of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks.Intrepretation of simple geological maps, producing accurate cross-sections for inclined and faulted strata, including unconformities, and sketch cross-sections for folded strata. To be able to appreciate the topography from the geology in common situations. Processes of weathering, erosion and transportation. The formation of sediments in different environments and key characteristics. The Hydrological cycle and occurrence of ground water.

AR10035: History of architecture 1.2

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to provide a summary of key architectural movements from classical to modern times.On completion of the unit students will have been equipped with the tools and vocabulary of architectural appreciation, which they should be able to express in writing and through drawings.
Content:
A series of chronologically arranged lectures which present key representatives of architectural movements. This unit develops from AR10040 and continues at the beginning of the 20th century. Where there is specific expertise within the school, certain lectures are taught by others. Students are encouraged to make appropriate quick sketches whilst images are shown.

AR10040: History of architecture and civil engineering 1a

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: The unit aims to provide a summary of key architectural movements from classical to modern times, alongside an overview of the historical development of civil engineering.
Learning Outcomes:
The successful student will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a number of buildings, and of their historical significance, using annotated sketches and notes.
Skills:
Sketching, note-taking, historical understanding.
Content:
A range of lecturers from within and outside the School will give a series of discrete lectures in which the period, movement or area of activity is examined via a detailed consideration of an individual construction.

AR10041: History of architecture and civil engineering 1b

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To strengthen the basic understanding of structures given to the students in Structures 1 by relating it to the history of civil and structural engineering, and to the design of specific structures through case studies.
Learning Outcomes:
The student should acquire a knowledge of the history of civil and structural engineering. The student should acquire an understanding of the way in which that history, together with an understanding of statics, informs the design of structures.
Skills:
Ability to understand the relationship between the development of materials and technologies and the history of the built environment. Content:A range of lecturers from within and outside the School will give a series of discrete lectures examining the development of various structural systems and materials.

AR10059: Mathematics 1a

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide a general mathematical basis for the development of engineering subjects at first year level of the civil engineering programmes.
Learning Outcomes:
The successful student will be able to demonstrate an understanding and ability to use the following techniques, as detailed in the 'Contents':
* Elementary functions;
* Differentiation and its applications;
* Integration and its applications;
* Infinite series.
Skills:
Ability to manipulate and solve mathematical problems, graphical representation of mathematical functions, development of mathematical ideas relevant to engineering
Content:
Elementary functions Exponential and logarthmic functions, hyperbolic functions and inverses in logarithmic form, inverse circular functions, plotting graphs. Differentiation and its applications Maximum and minimum values, inflection points, tangents, normals, curvature, solution of non-linear equations using Newton's method, limits. Integration and its applications General revision of techniques, by parts, use of partial fractions, substitution, length of curves, areas and volumes, first and second moments, centre of gravity, parallel and perpendicular axes theorem. Infinite series Maclaurin and Taylor's series, binomial expansion, ideas of convergence, geometrical series, comparison, ratio and integral tests, l' H˘pital's rule.

AR10060: Mathematics 1b

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR10059
Aims: To provide a general mathematical basis for the development of engineering subjects at first year level of the civil engineering programmes, and preparation for year 2 work.
Learning Outcomes:
The successful student will be able to demonstrate an understanding and ability to use the following techniques, as detailed in the 'Contents':
* Complex numbers;
* Determinants and matrices;
* Elementary vector analysis;
* Statistics;
* Concept of probability.
Skills:
Visualisation of engineering behaviour in terms of mathematical models, solution of mathematically and statistically described engineering problems.
Content:
Complex numbers: Complex plane, Cartesian, polar and exponential forms, algebra of complex numbers, de Moivre's theorem multiple roots, complex logarithm. Determinants and matrices: Properties of determinants. Matrix algebra. Solution of simultaneous equations using the matrix inverse. Cramer's rule and Gauss elimination. Consistency. Elementary vector analysis: Basic definitions and algebra. Scalar, vector and tensor products. Equations of lines and planes. Geometrical interpretations, orientation of planes, volumes of solids. Statistics: Basic descriptive statistics, histograms, cumulative frequency, measure of location and dispersion, mean, mode and median, upper and lower quartiles, variance and standard deviation. Concept of probability, exclusivity, dependence and independence of events, conditional probability. Binomial and Poisson distributions.

AR10079: Structures 1

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Aims: To make students aware of the role played by structure in the design and building process. To introduce the concepts of statics and load carrying mechanisms, sufficient for an elementary appraisal of structures. To familiarise students with different types of structural materials and assemblies.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit students will be able to design a simple structure and identify and calculate the forces within it.
Skills:
An understanding of Statics and an ability to apply the principals in the context of a design problem. Ability to work in groups on design projects and to present the work verbally and through graphics and modelling. An ability to analyse staticallydeterminate structures and to estimeate appropriate member sizes for permissible stress states.
Content:
Stable structures and structural mechanisms. Newton's laws; static equilibrium and free body diagrams. The concepts of forces and moments in structural members. Equilibrium of loads, forces and moments in simple structures. Introduction to load carrying action of trusses, beams, arches, cables and columns. The concepts of stress, section sizes and shapes. Pin-jointed trusses: triangles of forces, resolving at joints and method of sections; physical behaviour and structural form and efficiency. Direct stresses and strains; Young's Modulus. Beams and free body diagrams, bending moments and shear forces. Bending stresses in beams, section shape and structural efficiency; web action and the concept of shear stresses. Overall efficiency of beams and simple bridges. Combined bending and axial loading in short columns; the middle third; slender columns and stability concepts. Hanging chains and funicular shapes; simple suspension systems. Voussoir arches. Three pin arches and portal frames.The above topics concentrate on a broad overview of structural concepts and will be supportedby laboratory demonstrations, tutorial classes and project work emphasising the relation between structural and architectural concepts, structural safety and examples of structural failures.

AR10080: Structures 2

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX70CW30
Requisites:
Aims: To develop an analytical understanding of the statics and mechanics of statically determinate structures and structural mechanisms.To introduce students to the internal action of structures, stresses and strains, and the comparative action of statically determinate and indeterminate structures.To consider in greater detail the range of structures examined conceptually in Structures 1.To develop a physical and analytical understanding of stresses and strains in two (and three) dimensions, and of the three-dimensional action of structures and components.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will be able to analyse simple structures to determine stress, strain, stability and displacements.
Skills:
An ability to analyse stress, strain, deformations and stability in simple structures.
Content:
Bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; comparison of statically determinate and continuous beams. Bending and shearing stresses in beams; concept of principal stress trajectories and analogies with truss action; structural form and efficiency. Centroid, neutral axis, section modulus and beam sectional shape efficiency. Deflected forms and bending moments in portal and framed structures; weak beam/ strong column and strong beam solutions (physical action and approximate analysis). Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio; shear modulus; elastic behaviour. Internal stress equilibrium; Mohr's circle for stresses and strains; principal stresses and strains. Moment/curvature relations and analysis of deflections. Shear flow in beams; fabricated and composite beams; welds and shear connectors. Bending of asymmetric sections. Torsion of thin-walled closed sections. Shear centre; torsion of thin-walled open sections. Stresses due to combined bi-axial bending, torsion and axial loading in structural members. Euler buckling load for columns; differing end constraints; imperfections, eccentric loading and initial curvatures. Concepts of plastic failure mechanisms. Approximate elastic analysis of multi-storey frames.

AR10087: Surveying 1

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To give students the knowledge and skills required to carry out an engineering survey of a small site.
Learning Outcomes:
The succesful student will be able to demostrate the knowledge, understanding and skills required to carry out an engineeirng survey of a small site.
Skills:
Ability to use a range of surveying instruments to acceptable accuracy, to plan execute, and process small surveying projects.
Content:
Object and application of surveys - basic functions of survey instruments - survey planning - assessment of accuracy. Measurements of distance - direct tape measurements - cumulative errors in chainage measurements and corrections applied. Principles of electronic methods of distance measurement. Measurement of level - types of levels - levelling procedures and methods of booking - errors - reciprocal levelling - recording and plotting levels. Measurement of angles - principles and operations of the theodolite - scope of use - instrument errors and adjustments. Usage of theodolite and computation for tacheometry, traverse surveys, triangulation. After a series of initial practice periods with survey instruments the unit concludes with a survey project consisting of the measurment of a closed traverse around a land plot and its detailed mapping.

AR10113: History & theory 1A

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce students to a number of key texts dealing with fundamental concepts in architecture. In this unit, students are introduced to a variety of arguments put forward by leading architectural theorists. On its completion they will be able to demonstrate familiarity with the theories raised.
Content:
Students work individually and unsupervised, reading one chosen text from a list of seminal architectural books writing a 'review' in which they identify and summarise the major themes in that text. These reviews are compiled to produce a volume which is available in the studio for all the students in the year to read and compare.

AR10212: Surveying and Geology Field Course

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR10059 and take AR10033 and take AR10087
Aims: To learn how to apply modern surveying techniques appropriate to a larger scale and rougher terrain than can be found on the university campus, and to gain experience in geological field observations.
Learning Outcomes:
At the end of the unit, the student should be able to:
* appreciate the requirements for carrying out geological and surveying observations in the field;
* carry out a limited range of geological field observations;
* understand the use of methods for surveying in rough terrain;
* appreciate the scale of some geological structures;
* be able to describe some geological structures and materials.
Skills:
Group working, working outdoors, use of advanced surveying instrumentation, sketching, geological observation.
Content:
Surveying:
* Techniques for reconnaisance surveys.
* Use of total stations and GPS. Geology:
* Study of glaciated landforms.
* Study of coastal and fluvial systems.
* Study of patterns of discontinuities and description of materials in outcrops. Takes place before the start of Semester 1.

AR10230: Computer aided design

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce students to the use of CAD software in the construction industry, and to develop skills using AutoCAD 2000.
Learning Outcomes: By the end of the unit students should be able to use AutoCAD to construct 2D drawings and 3D models of their design projects and to present this information in a variety of ways.
Skills: Ability to use AutoCAD in the support of engineering and architectural design.
Content: Contents include; creating basic drawing elements, editing and manipulation; adding text, dimensions and hatching; understanding the user co-ordinate system; creating and editing 3D objects; plotting.

AR20001: Acoustics & sound control

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To strengthen the link between theory and design.
Objectives: To complement previous acoustics courses with an understanding of the analytical methods and practical techniques for the acoustic design of buildings.
Content:
Wave theory: plane and spherical waves Standing waves. Propagation across medium boundaries. Vibration in buildings: free and forced vibration. Damping. Machine motion, inertial bases Traffic noise. Sound insulation case studies. Ventilation noise design: - ductborne and regenerated noise Speech in offices Open plan offices

AR20002: Continuum mechanics 1

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce continuum mechanics and its application to elasticity, plasticity and fluid mechanics.
Content:
The unit is complementary to other units describing the numerical methods which would be used to solve the equations. Equations in three dimensions using 'Timoshenko notation'. Stress functions. Compatability equations. Two dimensional elasticity: derivation of del4phi=0 and solutions using polynomials. Reworking of this using cartesian tensor notation to demonstrate its utility. Plasticity: Tresca and von Mises yield criteria. Outline proof of upper and lower bound theorems. Application to indentation problems. Derivation of Navier-Stokes equations in fluid mechanics.

AR20004: Building environment 2

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR10003
Aims: To show how the choice of particular systems may be influenced by the type of architectural and engineering solution chosen for the building. To provide a framework for establishing the design objectives for the internal environment and to demonstrate the application of principles by examining examples of systems in houses and small commercial buildings.
Learning Outcomes:
On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the range of Building Services incorporated within buildings, and show how they may be used to actively control the internal building environment in contrast to the passive means considered in Building Environment 1.
Skills:
Appropriate analytical skills, understanding, design ability.
Content:
Building services, Need and development, Systems design, Thermal environment, Heating systems, Mechanical ventilation, Air conditioning, Plant, System choice, Daylighting, Regular lighting arrays, Design of electric lighting., Quality, Luminaires, Light sources, Acoustics, Propogation of sound, Trans. and insulation, Acoustic design.

AR20009: Computer aided design 1

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course is intended to introduce students to the use of CAD software in the construction industry and to develop skills using AutoCAD 2000. By the end of the course students should be able to use AutoCAD to construct 2D drawings and 3D models of their design projects and to present this information in a variety of ways.
Content:
Contents include; creating basic drawing elements, editing and manipulation; adding text, dimensions and hatching; understanding the user co-ordinate system; creating and editing 3D objects; plotting.

AR20012: Construction 2.2

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR10014 and while taking this unit you must take AR20018

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To integrate construction, building services and engineering into the Design Studio.To establish standards of technical (i.e. working' drawing) drawing technique. On completing this unit students should understand the basic connection between building design, the use of materials and the construction and assembly of buildings, of a standard that may be expected by employers during their first Placement.
Content:
A series of 12 lectures each on an element of building construction illustrated by extracts from construction textbooks, building trade (product) information, case studies and a range of completed buildings that are important in architectural history. Each lecture is accompanied by reference notes to the sources used and accessible Library information.Coursework includes preparation of a 1:20 uncut section working drawing of a building designed by the student in the Design Studio together with structural diagrams, building services diagrams, 'U' value calculations and full descriptive notation.

AR20017: Design studio 2.1

Credits: 15
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR10016

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To expand the student's experience of buildings in context; to introduce ideas of context, village and town planning and spaces;; to introduce ideas of mixed uses, urban densities and urban strata; to study rural housing and study recent and historical housing precedents; to introduce methods of site analysis. On the completion of this unit the student's range of architectural drawing and model making will have been expanded and, in preparation for the first Placement, an insight gained into housing and urban/rural design as well as current methods of site analysis.
Content:
Study of typical local villages, history of village development, architecture and building materials, visual analysis and form; site analysis based on a real site; Village and town visits including examples of rural housing; precedent studies of urban/suburban and rural housing; housing design and theory; design of public spaces, roads and squares; and the design of simple housing units, repeated units, terraced and stacked housing forms.

AR20018: Design studio 2.2

Credits: 12
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20017

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce the idea of a specific building brief; to study a particular building type in the context of its landscape and local settlement; to study the design of larger, specific interior spaces. On completion of this unit students will be able to comprehend the process of design from the initial brief, to the site and context study, resolved in relation to an individual building design.
Content:
Precedent studies of the building type; visits to important examples of the building type; site analysis; design of simple building to given areas with different types of space, volume etc.; design of external space (square, courtyard, wider landscape) associated with the building.

AR20036: History & theory 2

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The aim of this course is to extent beyond the basic history survey undertaken in the first year, and to give the students the opportunity to participate more actively in the research and presentation of material. A period covering approximately 4 centuries, from Baroque to the present day, is analysed according to a range of thematic concepts. On completion of this unit students will have developed their learning and communication skills and demonstrated these in a public environment.
Content:
Each week, groups of 2-4 students use 'powerpoint' to present to the whole year a lecture on a selected period or movement. This is followed up by an essay submission.

AR20042: Industrial placement 1

Credits: 15
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: RT100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20082 and take AR20213 and take AR30006

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To gain experience and knowledge of civil engineering in practice, and to report on an area of interest.
Content:
Practical experience and first hand observation of civil engineering and construction, preferably on a construction site as an employee of a contractor, but possibly as an employee of a consultant with visits to sites. The student is supported in finding an employer, but the School cannot guarantee that every student will be employed. All students will be given an academic supervisor for the duration of the unit. Students who obtain employment in the UK will normally be visited at their place of work; otherwise, communication will be maintained by other means. Should a student fail to find a job, they would be expected to carry out a relevant study in the area in which they live; their supervisor will discuss this study with them, and give guidance where required. Students will be assessed for the award of the credits on the basis of a report on one aspect of the work they have done.

AR20043: Industrial placement 2

Credits: 18
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: RT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To gain experience and knowledge of civil engineering design in practice, and to report on an area of interest.
Content:
Practical experience and first hand observation of civil engineering desgn, preferably in a consulting practice. The student is supported in finding an employer, but the School cannot guarantee that every student will be employed. All students will be given an academic supervisor for the duration of the unit. Students who obtain employment in the UK will normally be visited at their place of work; otherwise, communication will be maintained by other means. Should a student fail to find a job, they would be expected to carry out a relevant study in the area in which they live; their supervisor will discuss this study with them, and give guidance where required. Students will be assessed for the award of the credits on the basis of a report on one aspect of the work they have done.

AR20044: Industrial placement M2

Credits: 24
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: RT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To gain experience and knowledge of civil engineering design in practice,and to report on an area for which the student has taken significant responsibility (project report IP1).
Content:
Practical experience and first hand observation of civil engineering design, preferably in a consulting practice. The student is supported in finding an employer, but the School cannot guarantee that every student will be employed. All students will be given an academic supervisor for the duration of the unit. Students who obtain employment in the UK will normally be visited at their place of work on two occasions in order to discuss the progress of project work (related to IP1) and potential follow-up work to be undertaken in Semester 2 at the University for Project IP2. Should a student fail to obtain a placement they will be required to undertake project work (for IP1) at the University under the joint supervision of academic and industrial tutors.

AR20047: Laboratory 1

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20004 and take AR20076 and take AR20082 and take ME20134

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To consolidate material covered in lecture-based units and demonstrations, and to introduce good civil and environmental engineering laboratory and practical techniques. To develop skills in the writing up and analysis of practical work.
Content:
Laboratory experiments and exercises in geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, fluid mechanics, acoustics and lighting

AR20049: Landscape

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To raise awareness of the physical environment around buildings and its modification, through passive and active technical means. On the successful completion of this course students will be able to apply the principles of landscape to design studio work.
Content:
Understanding the Site: An introduction to the principles of landscape assessment and the basic methods of recording and analysing site specific landscape and ecology information. Landscape Design theory: An outline understanding of landscape design history and an introduction to contemporary landscape planning and design. Landscape and Buildings: Providing a basic outline of how landscapes influence the design of buildings. Technical details: An introduction to the basic principles of landscape detailing.

AR20050: Lighting

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: Lighting for civil engineering projects and overall building form.
Objectives: Introduction to external lighting which may be experienced by practicing civil engineers. The calculation of sky factors to enable rapid estimation of sky components in order to assess the adequacy of window design.
Content:
Applications: Streetlighting, Floodlighting,Tunnel lighting, Sports lighting, Light sources: Discharge light sources, luminaires. Theory: Adaption time, apparent brightness, unit hemisphere, vector summation method.

AR20052: Management 1

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
An introductory course concerning the management of the construction industry and the roles and responsibilities of the professions.
Content:
This unit is designed to develop the individual's concept of employment, professional duties and the 'business of business' by: Gaining an appreciation of the economics of the construction industry. Ensuring an understanding of the various ways in which the design team may be structured. Demonstrating the role and differing levels of the professional's responsibility within each structure. Generating an understanding of sole trader, partnership and corporate entities. Examining the laws governing employment. Reviewing the role of architects, engineers, contractors, and project managers both nationally and internationally. Reviewing the organisation and management of an architecture office including reference to health and safety. Discussing personal promotion in terms of the use of technology, e.g. the use of computer technology for the presentation of c.v.'s and the like.

AR20061: Mathematics 2

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR10060
Aims: To provide a general mathematical basis for the development of engineering subjects at second year level of the civil engineering programmes, and preparation for year 3 work.
Learning Outcomes:
The successful student will be able to demonstrate an understanding and ability to use the following techniques, as detailed in the 'Contents':
* Ordinary Differential equations;
* Functions of several variables;
* Numerical Methods;
* Elementary computer programming using C++.
Skills:
An understanding of the mathematical tools used in engineering analysis and how they can be applied to civil engineering problems.
Content:
Ordinary Differential equations Simple first order using separation of variables and integrating factor. Linear equations with constant coefficients using trial method for particular integral. Simultaneous equations. Application of differential equations to mechanical systems and structural problems. Functions of several variables: Multiple Integration, Partial differentiation. Separation of variables, Laplace's equation, diffusion and wave equations. Fourier series Full and half-range series. Odd and even functions, odd harmonics. Numerical Methods: Method of least squares, Finite differences, interpolation using Lagrange and Newton difference formulae. Error estimation, splines, Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. Euler, improved Euler, Runge-Kutta methods. Accuracy and stability. Initial and boundary value problems. Numerical integration. Root finding Newton Raphson, Secant method. An introduction to the principles and techniques of computer programming using C++.

AR20064: Professional placement 1

Credits: 12
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims and objectives are stipulated as part of an RIBA Practice Logbook to be completed by the student and his/her employer.
Content:
The thin sandwich system at Bath offers students of architecture the opportunity to experience a range of employment in architectural practices, or on other activities that are related to the academic and professional nature of the course.The Department will support all students in their search for placements, and will in particular offer guidance in the preparation of applications. However, employment is not guaranteed, and students who are not successful will be encouraged to pursue activities that will form a useful contribution to their development. Students will be assessed for the award of the credits attached to this unit on the basis of a written report on the work they have done.

AR20065: Professional placement 2 (Bath)

Credits: 12
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims and objectives are stipulated as part of an RIBA Practice Logbook to be completed by the student and his/her employer.
Content:
The thin sandwich system at Bath offers students of architecture the opportunity to experience a range of employment in architectural practices, or on other activities that are related to the academic and professional nature of the course.The Department will support all students in their search for placements, and will in particular offer guidance in the preparation of applications. However, employment is not guaranteed, and students who are not successful will be encouraged to pursue activities that will form a useful contribution to their development. Students will be assessed for the award of the credits attached to this unit on the basis of a written report on the work they have done.

AR20067: Project C1

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take AR20042

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce students to the art of resolving apparently conflicting architectural and engineering requirements in the context of a simple building.
Content:
Structural and Environmental Engineering Design linked with architecture and engineering studio Precedent lectures are used to discuss relevant examples. Suitable buildings might include a woodworking shop used for training, a small exhibition space, or a visitor centre with spans typically up to 10m. Structural issues should cover the overall conceptual design, choice of appropriate materials, sizing of members and connection details, and simple foundation design. The type of project chosen for the design brief will be intended to foster ingenuity in its solution. Environmental issues should concentrate on light, sound and passive energy control. The proportion of time spent on common group working with the architectural students is about 30% (at the early stages of the project).

AR20072: Project M1

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To consider design of buildings relying on passive energy and to relate to general environmental issues.
Objectives: To determine the attitudes of a number of organisations to sustainability and the impact of human habitation on the environment, ecology and nature. To investigate different forms of passive energy design and the use of renewable energy. To provide vehicles for group and individual presentations.
Content:
Brown field development, BREAM, International Commission on Climate Change, Brundland Report, Brandt Commission, Sustainability and organisations: ICE, RIBA, ISE, CIBSE, South West Regional Development Agency, Bath City Council, National Trust Wind Power, Wave power, Tidal Power, Nuclear power, Nuclear Waste, Combined Cycle power stations, Energy and transport, Energy and buildings, Fuel Cells, Shading to limit overheating, Combined Heat and Power, Life Cycle costing of Buildings, Geothermal Energy, Solar Voltaic Cells, Solar Heating Panels, Biomass as an energy source, District Heating, Buried Buildings, Ventilation in Victorian Buildings, Sites of Special Scientific Interest, Site Contamination and its consequences, Heat Reclaim and Ventilation, Using Buildings to store energy, Waste Water, Human Waste disposal, Recycling

AR20076: Soil mechanics 1

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop an understanding of the behaviour of soil, and the factors that influence that behaviour.
Content:
Stresses in soil - total stress, effective stress and pore water pressure. Non-linear stress-strain character of soils. Isotropic and one-dimensional consolidation. Consolidation of natural deposits, normally consolidated and over-consolidated materials. The shear box, behaviour of loose and dense samples, concept of a critical state, dependence of critical state density on normal stress. The triaxial test, Mohr's circles of total and effective stresses, use to determine angle of friction and undrained shear strength. Seepage, Darcy's law of permeability, head as a measure of potential. Wide range of permeability values. Flow nets, derivation from a common sense approach, how mathematical 'derivation' is merely a formularisation of this. Determination of volumetric flow rates by Nf/Nh. Relative importance of predictions of volumetric flow rates and pore pressures, sensitivity to inaccuracy of flow net. Prediction and importance of low effective stresses. Measurement of permeability, use of triaxial apparatus as a permeameter. Falling head and constant head tests. Pumping tests - confined and unconfined aquifers. Flow nets for anisotropic permeability. Coursework - flow net for a moderately complex situation, related questions. Outline of other approaches to analysis of flow - physical / electrical / computer numerical modelling. Seepage in earth dams, importance of drainage, stability of downstream face, rapid drawdown. Influence of rainfall. Design of filter layers, use of geotextiles.

AR20081: Structures 2A

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR10079

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To consider the development of the design process as the interaction between architecture and engineering, of various classes of structure. To define efficiency and aesthetic quality. To consider in more detail the structural design of steel and reinforced concrete structures, and to apply structural concepts of stability, safety and serviceability to examples of contemporary architecture. On the completion of this unit students should be able to demonstrate their understanding of the design process that links architecture and engineering, in relation to various classes of structure.
Content:
The structural design process. Basic concepts of static and structural action. Structural materials. Definition and quantification of loads on structures. Concepts of safety, stability and serviceability. Identification of architectural and structural concept in design. Comparison between efficiency and aesthetics of structures and buildings. Approximations and other criteria for sizing structural elements. Design of steel structural elements. Design of reinforced concrete structural elements. Design of connections. Application of the above programme to the structural assessment of a chosen case study, among contemporary works which highlight interaction between architectural creativity and innovative technological design.

AR20082: Structures 3

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop analytical and conceptual understanding of structural action through the use of compatability methods (virtual work and flexibility analysis). To develop an appreciation of the importance of construction tolerances and foundation settlements. To develop understanding of structural analysis using equilibrium methods.
Content:
Revision of statics for statically determinate frames and trusses. Virtual work and the Unit Load method for calculating deflections. Maxwells reciprocal theorem and influence lines. Flexibility Analysis of statically indeterminate truss and frame structures. Lack of fit, support settlements and temperature effects. Virtual work extended to beams subject to bending, shear and torsion. Torsional and shear deflection of beams. Derivation of slope deflection relations. Application of the slope/deflection method to continuous beams and sway frames.

AR20086: Thermodynamics

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20004 and take AR20061

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide an introduction to the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics and their implications for the use of energy in buildings. At the end of the unit, the student should be able to demonstrate:
* an understanding of the 1st law of thermodynamics and its application to open and closed systems
* an understanding of entropy
* an ability to apply a knowledge and understanding of property relationships for pure substances to simple power, refrigeration and heat pump cycles
* an understanding of the 2nd law of thermodynamics and thermodynamic efficiency
* an understanding of psychrometrics, and an ability to analyse air conditioning processes
* a knowledge of vapour power processes
* a knowledge of refrigeration and heat pump systems
* a knowledge of types of compressors, their characteristics, and their use in air conditioning systems
* a knowledge of fuel types, combustion, and efficiency.
Content:
Power generation and the environment. Energy resources and the effects of fossil fuel combustion. Renewable energy sources and their possibilities for future use. Definitions, 1st law of thermodynamics for closed systems, thermodynamic properties of the perfect gas, relationship between internal energy and specific heat at constant volume. Work transfer in closed systems for constant volume, constant pressure, hyperbolic and polytropic processes; adiabatic reversible process for perfect gas. 1st law of thermodynamics for open systems and the Steady Flow Energy Equation; enthalpy and entropy changes for a perfect gas; relationship between enthalpy and specific heat at constant pressure. Applications of the SFEE to power and refrigeration plant. Introduction to entropy, isentropic efficiency, entropy as a measure of irreversibility, entropy changes in a perfect gas. Property relationships for pure substances, two property rule, phase diagram. T-s, p-h and h-s diagrams. Applications to simple power, refrigeration and heat pump cycles. 2nd law of thermodynamics, Entropy and Clausius inequality, Carnot cycle; corollaries to the 2nd law, absolute temperature scale and thermodynamic efficiency. Mixtures of gases and vapours , introduction to psychrometrics and condensation. Psychrometrics: analysis of air conditioning processes. Vapour power cycles: steam turbine cycles , power cycles and CHP. Refrigeration and heat pump systems; multistage vapour compression cycles, refrigerant properties. Absorption refrigeration: analysis of LiBr systems; comparison with NH3 systems. Compressors: compressor types and applications, analysis and characteristics of compressors, compressors for air conditioning. Fuels and combustion: introduction to fuel types, classification and properties; combustion processes, combustion equations, stoichiometric analysis, combustion efficiency.

AR20208: Structures design and construction

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR10079

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce students to the concepts of limit state design and its practical application to reinforced concrete, steel, timber and masonry structural elements. To further develop analytical and conceptual understanding of structural action through the design of elements and simple structures. To introduce elements of construction technology as applied to reinforced concrete, steel, timber and masonry construction. To introduce principles of prestressed concrete.
Content:
Structural arrangements to resist vertical loading and wind loading. Design philosophies (Geometrical principles; Permissible stress; LFRD; Limit state). Codes of Practice, Standards, Building Regulations. British Standards, Euro-codes. Design loads and actions. Layout of calculations; drawings. Reinforced concrete design
* materials; singly reinforced rectangular beams; doubly reinforced beams; non-rectangular sections; serviceability
* deflection, cracking; shear; detailing of reinforcement; fire resistance; simple retaining wall design. Structural steel design
* steel sections; materials; simple tension members; simple compression members; beam design (bending; lateral restraints; laterally restrained beams; laterally unrestrained beams; shear; deflections); bolted and welded connections. Structural timber
* materials (grading, species); tension; compression; bending; connections. Structural masonry
* materials; compression; bending; shear. Introduction to principles of prestressed concrete; section stresses; losses; load-balancing. Introduction to construction technology (steel, concrete. Timber, masonry); temporary works used in concrete, steel, timber and masonry construction.

AR20213: Management 1C

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR10014
Aims: To provide students with a basic knowledge of the civil engineering profession and it's place in society, and other basic skills needed for obtaining and successfully completing a first industrial placement.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit, the student should be able to:
* Demonstrate an understanding of what is needed for good written and verbal communication skills, and an awareness of the requirements for effective use of mass media and graphical communications.
* Demonstrate an outline understanding of the organisation of the construction industry and the various major players.
* Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of the engineer's role in society, and some of the broader issues affecting an engineer's work.
* Demonstrate an understanding of the role of professional organisations, and the ethical and behavioural framework within which the engineer is expected to operate.
* Demonstrate a knowledge of the routes to corporate membership of ICE and IStructE, and the contribution to be made by industrial placements.
* Demonstrate an ability to find and apply for a job.
* Demonstrate an ability to assume responsibility for their personal safety on a construction site.
Skills:
Oral presentation skills; knowledge of basic management theory and health and safety issues relating to construction.
Content:
Communication skills:
* Written communication skills (English usage; Word processing; Report writing). Verbal communication skills (e.g. Presentations; Interviews; Meetings; Conversation). Mass media.
* Graphic communications skills (Data presentation). Organisation of the construction industry:
* Sectors, clients, designers, contractors, roles of the various parties, different ways in which teams are put together. The Engineer & Society:
* Role of the engineer, architect, contractor.
* Case studies of contentious engineering projects.
* Introduction to construction law. The basics of English Law as applied to:
* Contracts; Employment; Professional responsibility; Negligence. Professional ethics:
* Professions. Professional organisations (ICE, IStructE). Code of ethics. Professional behaviour. Professional training:
*SARTOR. Employer's role. Sandwich training. Looking for a job:
* Matching applicant's and employer's potentials. Research. Applications (C.V.'s and covering letters).
* Personal safety on construction sites.

AR30005: Building environmental modelling

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20004 and take AR20086

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To provide students with an understanding of the analytical techniques that are needed to validate the passive control of the building environment. Objectives: To introduce Computational Fluid Dynamics to investigate natural air flows in and around buildings, to include buoyancy effects and pressure driven flow. To introduce the dynamic thermal modelling of the building fabric to include finite difference methods of modelling transient heat flow through structures and radiance methods of establishing solar irradiances incident upon room surfaces. The use of commercially available software packages to provide experience of methods used in practice, and also their use in simple examples in order to provide experience of the relative degree to which different design variables affect the environmental conditions. Issues related to the combining of the two analytical techniques are introduced and discussed in relation to the solving of practical problems in design.
Content:
Computational Fluid Dynamics: Industrial applications of CFD, revision of fluid dynamics, (boundary layers, separation and turbulence), mesh generation, derivation governing equations, finite volume discretisation, solution method (pressure correction) for the Navier-Stokes Equations, turbulence modelling. Revision of heat transfer, thermal conductivity, thermal capacity and thermal diffusivity. Surface heat transfer coefficients, convective and radiant modes combined. Sol_air temperatures. Thermal modelling using Degree Days, Admittance, Response factors. Finite difference method of modelling transient heat flow, lumped parameters, Biot no, Fourier no., incorporation of surface heat transfer effects. Use of commercial software packages. Investigation of displacement ventilation.

AR30006: Civil engineering construction

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The course covers the practical, safety and organisational aspects of civil engineering construction and is intended to present an overview of procedures in the industry.
Content:
Early roads (Roman to Macadam) and Bridges (beams, arches, trusses to steel and concrete). Present organisation and procedure - DOT, Welsh Office, etc. RCU's and County Councils - rules, codes, memoranda. Road Alignment horizontal curves, vertical curves, gradients, sight lines. Pavement Design rigid, flexible, vertical curves, gradients, sight lines. Bridge Design types of crossing, relationship to strata, factors affecting choice of materials and construction, headroom, loading rules. Cut and fill/embankments factors affecting excavation and fill (costs, suitability of fill, difficulties of excavation programme etc), calculations for cut and fill, slopes of embankments, compaction. Piers and caissons, box foundations buoyancy rafts and basements, piers, open caissons, box caissons, pneumatic caissons. Methods of construction. Excavating below water table or in water sheet cofferdams, diaphragms, underwater construction, well-pointing, pumping. Excavations in cohesive and non-cohesive soils methods of excavation and shoring, means of determining forces and bending moments in shoring systems. Tunnelling in rock and in soft ground types of machines, immersed tubes. Safety and Health on construction sites, good practice and relationship to law.

AR30007: Civil engineering hydraulics 1

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop the student's knowledge and understanding of open channel flow beyond that covered in Fluid Mechanics, and give the student a knowledge of civil engineering structures in which that understanding is applied.
Content:
Open channel flow: normal flow, critical flow, Froude Number, surges, hydraulic jump, broad crested weir, narrowing channel, gradually varied flow, backwater curve and surface profiles. Hydraulic structures: dams, spillways, stilling basins, draw off towers, constant velocity channel, settlement tanks, flow dividers.

AR30008: Civil engineering hydraulics 2

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30007

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To give the students some knowledge and understanding of Water Engineering applied to coastal, estuary and river engineering. To give the students a knowledge of Public Health Engineering including water supply, drainage and treatment. Learning objectives: The succesful student should be able to:
* demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the factors and relationships affecting groundwater, including replenishment, contamination and extraction
* demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the main factors affecting the design of civil engineering works on coasts
* demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the application of open-channel hydraulics to river and canal engineering
* demonstrate knowledge of the factors influencing the design of hydro-electric and tidal power schemes
* demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the main elements of water supply, sewage disposal, and surface water drainage systems.
Content:
a) Water Engineering Hydrology: hydrological cycle, meteorology, groundwater, surface run-off, analysis and forecasting. Groundwater: wells, groundwater movement, groundwater contamination, dispersion and diffusion. Coastal Engineering: Wave action, sediment transport, natural bays, defences and protection, coastal structures, wave power. River and canal engineering: optimum cross-section, unlined channels, alluvial channels, river modelling. Hydro-electric power, tidal power. b) Public Health Engineering Sanitation: Appliances, materials and components; sanitary incinerators and mascerators; sanitary provision. Discharge pipe systems, terminal velocities, pressure variation in stacks. Water supply: sources of water, purity, hardness, water consumption, methods of treatment; corrosion, sludge, micro-organism control in water and steam systems, supply networks; supply installations, estimation of demand and sizing, simultaneous demand. Drainage: foul and surface water drainage; materials and components; sizing and design; ventilation; sewage lifting. Sewage disposal and drainage: water cycle, rainfall, run off, soakaways, sewerage systems, chemical and biological methods of treatment, small plants; problems with various effluents, septic tanks, disposal to rivers or sea outfalls. Environmental risk assessment, pollution

AR30010: Computer aided design 2

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20009

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit introduces students to the principles of rendering and animation using 3D Studio Viz. By the end of the course students should be able to produce 3D models of their design project and to use these models to create photo-realistic static views and animations generated from these models.
Content:
Contents include; importing 3D models from AutoCAD; creating models directly in 3D Studio; setting up camera positions and animation paths; creating and assigning textures and materials; lighting 3D models; putting together presentations using Adobe Premiere.

AR30011: Conservation of historic buildings

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30083
Aims: To give the student sufficient specialist knowledge and insight to enable participation in design and appraisal of engineering work on historic buildings.
Learning Outcomes:
The successful student should be able to demonstrate:
* familiarity with issues affecting the structural conservation of historic buildings.
* an ability to apply a correct methodological approach.
* an interest in historic and architectural issues.
* a flair for investigation supported by sound structural knowledge.
Skills:
Evident from content and learning outcomes.
Content:
The mechanics of historic materials, and the assessment of their properties in situ and in the laboratory. The use of analytical tools in the implementation of the structural condition of existing buildings. The methodology for the analysis of historic buildings:
* the collection of data from different fields of analysis (history, architectonic quality, visual inspection, survey and in situ testing, crack pattern interpretation and structural analysis).
* interpretation of data to produce a final judgement on causes of damage and present safety level, with examples. Choice and implementation of structural conservation techniques. Level of alteration of existing structure, reversibility of new work, homogeneity of old and new materials, with direct involvement in project work. Dedicated seminars will be used throughout the course, given by representatives of English Heritage and engineering companies.

AR30013: Construction 3

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20012 and while taking this unit you must take AR30021 and take AR30022

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit assumes a basic understanding of 'traditional' construction techniques and focuses on innovative techniques, new tools and fostering an intelligent approach to decision making in relation to construction - environmental 'sustainability' is a core issue. On completing this unit students will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of construction synthetically - in written report form and through specific detailed drawings relating to design project work.
Content:
Lectures at the beginning of Semester 1 are concerned with specialist topics supplemented by group tutorials to support exploratory design work which is fully integrated with Design Studios 4.1 & 4.2 - in three stages: 1. An examination of selected buildings, which are exemplars of material technology which are investigated in detail and presented to a review panel. Presentations include three-dimensional representations of one of more key details, large-scale physical models, or a three-dimensional computer model, which can be viewed from various angles. 2. The lessons learnt from the precedent study are integrated into Design Studio 4.1. 3. The preliminary phase of Design Studio 4.2 at the end of Semester 1 requires the development of a briefing document - this includes identifying 'building performance criteria' which establish 'benchmarks' by which the individual project can be assessed in relation to construction. This final assessment takes place at the end of Semester 2.

AR30019: Design studio 3.1

Credits: 15
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take AR30093 and before taking this unit you must take AR20018

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To further individual capacity for independent architectural thought and its application at all stages of the design process, as well as encouraging the coherent presentation of ideas through suitable media, and on open group discussion of these ideas. In particular, this studio syllabus exploits the international SOCRATES profile of the year, by exploring the relationship between culture, urban form and architecture, allowing students from diverse cultural backgrounds to share their understanding and experiences.This unit will develop individual and team working skills in architectural design, working with designers originating from different cultural backgrounds.
Content:
A series of design projects that explore the architectural culture of Britain - its countryside and cities - in relation to European models.

AR30020: Design studio 3.2

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30019

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The third year studio syllabus exploits the international profile of the year. The studio furthers the individual student's capacity for independent architectural thought and its application at all stages of the design process. The studio explores the relationship between culture, urban form and architecture, allowing students from diverse cultural backgrounds to share their understanding and experiences, as well as the coherent presentation of ideas through suitable media, and on open group discussion of these ideas.The studio develops skills in working as individuals and as members of a team.
Content:
A series of design projects, including a joint design project with students of engineering in the year.

AR30021: Design studio 4.1

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30020

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The collaborative design project for Architects and MEng students (known as the Basil Spence Project) has been running since 1978. It is intended to develop creative, collaborative working techniques; explore the impact of engineering, both structural and environmental on the form and functioning of the building; acquaint students with the characteristic strengths and weaknesses of a particular material, together with its environmental profile.This unit will bring together Architecture and Engineering students in a way which will simulate the best of real life design projects, introducing to each discipline what the other can contribute creatively in the production of the built environment.
Content:
It is centred around a design project that is highly prescriptive (in contrast to Design Studio 4.2). This project is considered to be an integral part of the sustained study of a specific urban area, which gives the fourth year a unique character, but is focused on material and technique. Students are required to design and detail a large span structures, and to understand the material and the building from an environmental point of view and put forward a case for minimising the building's carbon dioxide usage.

AR30022: Design studio 4.2

Credits: 30
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30021

Aims & Learning Objectives:
In contrast to Design studio 4.1 provides for a more individualistic approach: each student develops their own brief, discovers a site or sites, and proceeds with their design project on an individual basis. A core team of critics who meet with each student on a regular basis, is supplemented by specialist or ' wild card' critical input at random intervals.The outcome will be that individual students will learn to foster individual responsibility for a complex design project, by writing and developing a specific brief in relation to a self-selected site. They will experience and understand the full range of the design process.
Content:
Each individual design project will be underpinned by a number of common themes:
(1). the exploration of contemporary urban conditions > (urban study areas are chosen which are exemplary as hybrid urban / suburban / ex-urban settings, engagingly peculiar intersections of place and non-place, which by conventional criteria are so unrelentingly bland that they must be concealing hidden qualities e.g. Swindon, Bristol Parkway).
(2). ecological concerns > the recycling of materials, self sufficiency, the recycling of land that is apparently without value, the implications of change in relation to transport systems and changing lifestyles and working patterns, corresponding attitudes to concentration and dispersal.
(3). the impact of digital media and telecommunications > explicit in relation to the anticipated immersion of the year in computer assisted design, representational techniques and applications, from the most straightforward to more advanced modelling and rapid prototyping operations.

AR30023: BEng Dissertation

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: DS80OR20
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To assess the ability of students for original and individual thought and application to a substantial project/ programme of work.
Content:
A substantial work of research presented as a short thesis, normally entailing experimental and analytical or numerical modelling and their practical application to a researched topic. This preliminary unit represents the background reading and planning for the investigation. Assessment will be together with Dissertation Completion, but a formal presentation must be made by each student describing the background, aims, and proposed methods of their dissertation, which will carry 20% of the mark for this unit.

AR30024: Continuum mechanics 2

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give a brief introduction to cuvilear co-ordinates and tensors which are useful for any advanced work in continuum mechanics, the finite element method, or shell theory. To stimulate the students interest in physics and its relation to some important areas of current engineering research.
Content:
Revisio of Navier-Stokes equations and introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics. Curvilinear co-ordinates, covariant and contravariant base vectors, metric tensor. Tensor product. Tensors in cuvilenear co-ordinates. Properties of symmetric second order tensors - principal values and directinos, Mohr's circles in three dimensions. Definition of stress and strain in curvilinear co-ordinates. Christoffel symbols and covariant differentiation. Equilibrium equations in curvilinear co-ordinates. Constiutive equations in elasticity, plasticity and fluid mechanics using curvilinear co-ordinates. Geometry of surfaces, metric tensor, second fundamental form, normal curvature and twist, mean and Gaussian curvature. Order of covariant differentiation, Reimann-Christoffel tensor. Gauss's theorem and the Codazzi equations. Membrane equilibrium equations. Application to shell and tension structures. Discussion of ccurvilinear co-ordinates in 4-dimensional space-time, the Bianci relations, the Ricci tensor, the Einstein tensor and the General Theory of Relativity.

AR30025: BEng Dissertation completion

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
As for Dissertation.
Content:
The main part of the dissertation work, following on from the 'Dissertation' unit.

AR30026: Facade engineering construction

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give a knowledge and understanding of the design and construction of building facades. Objectives: To give an understanding of the various structural and environmental requirements of facades. To give a knowledge of the various methods used in facade construction, and of how they meet design requirements.
Content:
Design principles Windows, curtain walling, slope glazing, overcladding. Front sealed, drained and ventilated and pressure equalised systems. Materials Glass, aluminium, steel, PVC.U, G.R.P., G.R.C., bricks, natural stone, precast concrete, finishes, sealants, gaskets. Performance criteria Water penetration, air leakage, wind, thermal mass and insulation, condensation, acoustics, building movement, thermal movement, ventilation, fire, security, blast. Specification and contracts Nature of the industry, construction/manufacturing, specification, contracts, installation. Detailing Joints, anchorages, stick systems, panellised systems, untied systems, tolerances.

AR30029: Environmental design

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20004 and while taking this unit you must take AR30021

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To improve students confidence to use building environmental design as a major positive factor in the design of buildings.
Objectives: to examine in some detail the objectives of design using examples from practice. The course will use the joint design project as a vehicle for the early lectures in the course.
Content:
Lighting Design: Designed appearance, enclosure, structure, rational use of colour. Combined lighting: Exploitation of natural light, control of electric lighting. Design criteria: Establishing criteria, isolation of variables, effects of experimentation. Display: Art galleries, museums, principles of design, conservation. Nighttime lighting: Security, floodlighting of buildings. Green buildings: Integrated design. Acoustics: Principles of internal room acoustic design. Acoustic design of lecture and drama theatres. Multipurpose hall design. Noise control in buildings. Case histories of internal acoustic and noise control design. Guidance for the final year joint design project. Thermal Choice between passive and active control of internal environment, value engineering. Implications on building design when incorporating major building services.

AR30030: Facade engineering

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To extend the knowledge and understanding gained in Facade Engineering Construction by examining the engineering issues involved in current developments in Window and Cladding Technology.
Content:
Brittle materials, anchorages and fixings Engineering use of adhesives Structural/ cladding interaction Structural use of glass Heat transfer, thermal capacity, component temperatures, shading, moisture and condensation Advanced glazing Durability, weathering

AR30031: Fire & construction safety

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce the subject of Fire Engineering and develop previous course material concerning construction safety on site and in design considerations for the future use of building structures.
Content:
An introduction to fire engineering including the nature of fire, the mechanism of combustion and the behaviour of its products. The behaviour of people in fire is examined, the interaction between fire, buildings and other enclosures and the principles of escape and survival studies. The course goes on to examine safety in the context of the construction site, the industry and application of legislation and the development of safety policies and management systems. CDM regulations (short course).

AR30034: Geotechnical engineering

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take AR30214

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give an understanding of the behaviour of piled foundations, and of the principles, theory and methods used in their design and analysis. To give a knowledge and understanding of a range of geotechnical engineering processes, including an appreciation of how soil mechanics theory combines with a general engineering approach to yield practical solutions to real problems. The succesful student should be able to demonstrate a depth of understanding of the technologies studied, and the way in which approaches to design and construction have been developed. The succesful student should also be able to examine a new situation, realise the potential geotechnical problems involved, and be able to make reasonable suggestions as to how they might be dealt with.
Content:
Earth Retaining Structures: generalised types, failure modes, construction. Different approaches to design. Gravity structures, cantilever structures, introduction to sheet pile and embedded design. Soil as fill. Requirements of engineering fills, suitability criteria, excavation, transportation and compaction. Reinforced soil. Mode of reinforcement, distinction between reinforced soil and soil anchors. Requirements of reinforcing elements - tensile stength/stiffness, durability, ease of construction. Importance of interaction, strain compatability. Function of and requirements for facing, types of construction. Use in embankment foundations, slope repair. Methods of analysis and design - walls and steep slopes, ensuring a margin of safety, other slopes, common errors. Piling. Construction and design of single piles and pile groups. Types of pile and appropriate analytical methods, related to site investigation methods. Calculation of working loads and settlements. Design of a piled foundation. Geotechnical engineering site appraisal, assessing geotechnical problems in a project. The 'trees and foundations' problem. Importance of soil type, tree species and size, location relative to building, rainfall, ground cover, ground water movement, building brittleness. Behaviour of soil as water content is reduced and air enters.Approaches to risk in design and assessment of existing buildings. Need for an empirical approach in the face of inevitable shortage of data for a theoretical approach.

AR30037: History 3

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20036 and while taking this unit you must take AR30038

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to introduce a range of analytical theories and research techniques associated with the formal design of buildings in western architecture. By the time students have completed this unit they should be able to analyse a historic building or project in order to distinguish and evaluate key concepts relating to the way in which mathematical, hierarchical and aesthetic principles inform its design, and to locate such concepts against changing patterns of cultural and intellectual history.
Content:
Lectures provide a grounding in the history of the use of formal design methods in architectural design via an exposition of textual sources, proportional analyses and recent research. General themes include the dialogue between the ideal and contingency in architectural design, with particular reference to the origin of form, abstract and aesthetic issues, formal composition, proportion and geometry. Topics include the following: Vitruvius and the foundations of classical design theory; the changing concept of proportion over time; the re-birth of classical theory in the Renaissance; modern conceptions of origin and proportion; Le Corbusier's theory; arithmetical and geometrical modes of composition and their relation to the use of drawing; the design of the orders in antiquity; the Renaissance ideal of church and palace design; ruins as inspiration, and the Romantic reception of antiquity; the Pantheon and other projects where ideals bend to contingency.

AR30038: Theory 3

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20036 and while taking this unit you must take AR30037

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims introduces and examines theoretical positions relating to design activity, and the explanations advanced by both practitioners and historians to account for types of architectural solutions. By the time students have completed this unit they should be able to interpret critical ideas and movements that have influenced modern design, and explain how their effect is manifest in typologies of built form and design strategies proposed by individual architects.
Content:
Lectures analysing a succession of key theories and their relationship to modern architectural design, with emphasis on the second half of the 20th century. Theoretical topics covered include models of functionalism, behaviourism, determinism, Karl Popper's critique on hypothesis and deduction, the notion of 'served' and 'servant' space, and Christopher Alexander's Pattern Language. The work of practitioners examined includes that of Mies van der Rohe, Louis Kahn, Carlo Scarpa and Richard Meier, and special attention is given to the library and the museum as building types suited to the advancement of a theoretical approach to design.

AR30039: History & theory 4

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30037 and take AR30038 and while taking this unit you must take AR30021

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The unit aims to introduce the discipline of architecture as a discourse - as a collection of architectural designs inscribed within a body of ideas.By introducing the theoretical critique of thinkers not trained within the discipline of architecture, but recognised as having made a significant contribution to contemporary thinking, students will learn from this unit that there exists a tradition of critical thinking within architectural culture, which is related to contemporary design issues.
Content:
This unit introduces a range of theoretical debates broadly encompassed by the material in the edited volume, Rethinking Architecture, a collection of essays on architecture and the built environment written by key cultural theorists and philosophers of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, such as Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, Henri Lefebvre, Jean Baudrillard, Fredric Jameson and Gilles Deleuze. It examines how theory can be used as a tool to open up questions about architectural thinking, that may be brought to bear on architectural culture, and which can inform contemporary design issues.

AR30045: Industrial project IP1

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: RT100/CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give experience in solving a real industrial problem under both industrial and academic supervision.
Content:
Structural or Environmental Engineering Design carried out in industry with academic links, following or during the second industrial placement M2. For students who are unable to gain an industrial placement the project IP1 will be undertaken as a sponsored project on behalf of one of the companies who would normally employ students. In this case the project will be undertaken wholly at the University (in labs or CAD labs) during the first part of term 2 and before commencement of Semester 2.

AR30046: Industrial project IP2

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give further experience in solving a real industrial problem under both industrial and academic supervision.
Content:
Structural or Environmental Engineering Design linked with industry sponsorship, following on from Industrial Project IP1, but for all students based in the University under closer academic supervision.

AR30048: Laboratory 2

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce more sophisticated laboratory techniques including electronic instrumentation and data logging, and to give experience of some of the methods and apparatus referred to in lecture modules.
Content:
Laboratory experiments and exercises in geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, fluid mechanics, acoustics and lighting

AR30051: Lightweight structures

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop an understanding of the theory and practical design of lightweight wide-span structures, particularly tensile membranes, cable networks, grid shells, air-supported and pneumatic structures.
Content:
Characteristics, behaviour and analytical methods for funicular cable structures subject to uniform and non-uniform loadings. Effects of elastic extensino, temperature effects, support settlements and cable slip. Matrix methods for geometric and material non-linear cable and membrane structures. Incremental, Newton-Raphson and modified N-R methods. Zero stiffness controls in the iteration process. Implicit and explicit integration vector methods. Dynamic Relaxation applied to shell, space and tension structures. Form-finding controls. Kinetic and viscous damping. Behaviour and modelling of prestressed fabric membranes. Crimp interchange and on-off non-linear material properties modelling. Computer Aided Design packages for form-finding and analysis of membrane, cable network, grid shell and pneumatic structures. Wind load response and numerical and physical modelling. Practical design aspects for steelwork, membrane and foundation design, steelwork detailing and steelwork and membrane fabrication patterning. Assembly and on-site construction procedures. The course will entail design project studies embracing conceptual and structural engineering dsign and detailing using both CAD and physical modelling methods.

AR30053: Management 2

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20052

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To provide an overview of procurement approaches taken to construction work. To study contemporary approaches to the management of cost, time and quality in providing buildings completed to the client's satisfaction. Learning objectives: To ensure students acquire an understanding of the Architect's authority under standard forms of contracts.
Content:
This unit is designed to provide the students with more detailed coverage of the Architects responsibilities and liabilities in law as well as management concepts and practices utilised by construction professionals. The unit contains the following content: Procurement of construction works, traditional, management, design and build, partnering etc. Standard forms of contracts and the Architects responsibilities and liabilities. Examination of the Latham and Egan reports and the ongoing 'rethinking construction' debate. Planning and control time management. Principles and the management of cost control. Quality management and an introduction to QA and TQM systems and philosophy.

AR30054: Management 2C

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20213

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give a general knowledge of legal and contract obligations in the construction industry. At the end of the unit, the student should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the following areas at a level to provide appropriate preparation for employment as a graduate in the construction industry:
* the management roles of the engineer;
* basic management theory;
* business management in construction;
* methods of civil engineering procurement;
* processes and roles on construction sites;
* construction hazards and their management / responsibility for safety
Content:
Structure of business organisations. The Engineer as Manager Management theory: Organisational culture. Handy's paradoxes of modern organisational life. Changing patterns of organisation and their relevance to construction. Decision-making models: rationalist, Carnegie, incremental, 'garbage can'. Business management in construction: Corporate policy, objectives, strategies, tactics, marketing. Construction health and safety: Safety law and regulations, safety management systems, construction hazards, cost of accidents, CDM, Risk Assessment. Economics of safety (financial and non-financial costs of accidents, ethical standards). The tender process: Procurement of design, consultancy contracts, methods of payment Construction contracts (design and build; subcontracting; design, build and operate). Project management overview: Concept of project management. Construction and operation (energy, pollution, ecology, resources, recycling, sustainability). Environmental Impact Assessment (process, EC and UK approaches, methods, monitoring, risk assessment). Life cycle costing. Value management & engineering. Construction sites: Basic terminology of construction techniques and plant. Organisation of construction sites. Roles of architect, engineer, contractor, project manager. Buildability, method statements, access to workface, commissioning, international variations.

AR30055: Management 3C

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30054

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give students a knowledge of the economics of the construction industry. At the end of the unit, the student should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the following areas at a level to provide appropriate preparation for employment as a graduate in the construction industry:
* law of torts
* contract law
* company law
* employment law
* a systematic approach to human resources and motivation / responsibility for safety
* operational research
* project planning and control.
Content:
Introduction to English law and legal system Law of torts. Negligence. Design liability. Introduction to CDM regulations. Insurance and Litigation; the ethical context and the legal context. Contract Law: Creation of a contract document. Defects in a contract, termination. Parties to a contract. Introduction to construction contracts. Company law (types of business organisation; setting up a limited company; appointment and responsibilities of directors; meetings, financing a company, partnership, insolvency, bankruptcy) Employment law (contract of employment; rights and duties; statutory regulation of remuneration; legal constraints on terms and conditions of employment; termination of employment) Estimation and bills of quantities: Civil Engineering Standard Method of Measurement. Preparing bill items and taking-off quantities. Operational estimations; measurement, valuation and claims, role of method-related charges Preparation of contract documents. Partnering, benchmarking Quality Assurance Principles of QA. Quality auditing. Human resources and motivation: Theories of motivation. Responsibility for safety. Team building, conflict, leadership, group theory, power and influence, conduct of meetings. Human Resource Management. Performance appraisal. Introduction to project planning and control: Planning, activity planning, logic, critical path networks, resource analysis, GANTT. Charts & PERT charts.

AR30056: Management 4C

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30055

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give students a general knowledge of the broad economic context in which the construction industry operates, and general principles of financial management. By the end of the course, the student should be able to demonstrate a broad understanding of the material covered.
Content:
Microeconomics: Supply and demand. Supply curve. Monopolies. Cost-benefit analysis. Macroeconomics: Fiscal policy. Investment and monetary policy. Inflation and unemployment. Balance of payments Politics and Business: Discuss and explain how politics and business interact. Government intervention, protectionism and trading distortions. The European Community, monetary union and its implications. Multi-national projects. Introduction to finance and accounting Accounting concepts. Financial statements. Management accounting concepts. Financial Management: Budget compilation and expenditure management. Investment appraisal. Analytical tools. Benchmarking. Key performance indicators Pricing practices: Mark-up pricing and profit maximisation, price discrimination, predatory pricing, Limit pricing, multiple and joint product pricing. Cost and price: Cash flow in project and contract, time value of money, time/cost optimisation; site Cost control.

AR30062: Mathematics 4

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide a general computational and mathematical basis for the development of engineering subjects at third year level of the civil engineering courses.
Content:
Further principles and techniques of computer programming using C++: Sources of error and ill conditioning. Algorithms design and correctness. Arrays, searching and sorting. Convergence. Application of Numerical Methods: Linear equations. Numerical differentiation and roots. Interpolation and numerical integration. ODEs.

AR30063: Numerical modelling

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide practice in the computational formulation and solution of engineering problems; principally related to structures but including field problems such as seepage and fluid flow.
Content:
The theoretical basis for computer packages used or demonstrated will be studied and students will develop their own (simplified) computer programs or routines for the numerical methods employed. These will cover step-by-step integration methods for the modelling of structural dynamics, heat transfer and potential flow problems. Individual projects will be undertaken to cover one of these areas and will be presented in seminar groups covering all aspects.

AR30068: Project C2

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop skills in integration of engineering and architectural objectives to produce creative and competent designs.
Content:
Structural and Environmental Engineering Design linked with architectures studio. Precedent lectures are used to discuss relevant examples. Suitable buildings might include a community centre, an electronics factory with spans typically up 15m. Structural issues should include the integration of architectural and environmental aspects in the complete conceptual design, the design to codes of practice of all principal members, connection details and construction aspects, and the design of foundations. Environmental issues should include optimal use of daylight, solar heating, natural ventilation, noise from surroundings. The proportion of time spent on group working with the architectural students is up to 50% (in the first half of the project development).

AR30069: Project C3/1

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give students experience in developing a complex scheme working in teams with architecture students.
Content:
Precedent lectures are used to discuss relevant examples. The building type will have more complex planning problems and potential for elegance to suit the needs of the architects. There should be environmental conditions to consider, ie air conditioning/ natural ventilation to compare, and lighting and acoustic problems. Types of building which are suitable include autitoria based (theatre, opera house, concert hall - all have potential for interesting structures, eg cable, domes, frameworks etc), museum (differing types from art galleries to 'Exploratory' type, and libraries, requiring exclusion of noise and good lighting ), industrial (eg brewery, with the process providing a problem), or sports complex. All have air conditioning / natural ventilation, potential for interest visually as well as in services and structure, and heavy foundation loads. The project will be tutored both by academic staff and industrial visiting tutors.

AR30070: Project M4

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Development of a holistic approach to structural and environmental design.
Content:
Two alternative paths can be taken for this project, depending on the subject and content of the semester 1 project C3/M3 (carried out as a group project involving architectural students):
1. Individual design development of Project C3/M3, involving consideration of civil, structural and environmental engineering design issues. Normally a real current development project will be used for this brief, and the project will involve the full structural, geotechnical and environmental design for a particular building or small complex of buildings within the development. Precedent lectures are used to discuss relevant examples, and the work is tutored by visiting architects and engineers.
2: A design project which is specifically related to one of the option courses (in Lightweight Structures, Conservation, Facade Engineering, or Bridge Engineering); it may also be related to Project M3 (but would not be restricted to the development of a particular feature of that project).

AR30071: Project C3/2

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To undertake an entirely individual design project and develop it from concept through to detail design.
Content:
The project is intended to be linked to one of the option or core design subjects (Lightweight Structures, Conservation, Facade Engineering, or Bridge Engineering), and will be tutored by both academic staff and industrial visiting tutors. The project undertaken may be an extension and redevelopment of a particular feature of project C3, but will entail a new structure which complements the C3 design project, and is developed to a much greater level of engineering competence in its detailed solutions.

AR30073: Project M2

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce the installation of Building Services.
Objectives: To consider the various types of Building Services Systems that are used to promote comfortable environmental conditions within a building, using a real building as a vehicle for the study. The use of commercially available software for the investigation and sizing of Building Services Installations
Content:
The details of this depend upon the particular building chosen for study, but include a selection from: Heating systems, Mechanical ventilation systems, Air conditioning systems, Cooling plant design, Displacement ventilation, consideration of appropriate legislation. Design of systems for reduced energy use, heat reclaim, variable speed fans, control of electric services and lighting.

AR30075: Socrates Exchange & Socrates Placement

Credits: 60
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20018

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The SOCRATES exchange programme links the Department with selected European Schools of Architecture. It provides students with opportunities to study abroad and learn directly about the architectural values of the institution being visited through design project work and lectures, as well as from travel within the host country. The Placement allows them to then extend these experiences into the work place. They also have an opportunity to perfect their language skills - particularly the technical language relating to design and practice.
Content:
This is tailored to the requirements of the individual student, partly by the Socrates co-ordinators (here and at the host university), and according to the units being offered by the host institutions. Exchange students complete design projects which is first assessed by the host institution, and marks and a report on each student are sent to Bath. On returning to Bath each student is required to submit their portfolio of designs to the Socrates co-ordinator and Placement logbook to the Practical Training Supervisor for inspection and assessment.

AR30077: Soil mechanics 2

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20076

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To gain a knowledge of the way in which the understanding developed in Soil Mechanics 1 can be applied to the design of foundations and soil structures, and how the necessary information is obtained in practice.
Content:
The shear strength of soils - the critical state model, relationship between normal consolidation line, Roscoe surface, Critical State Line, Hvorslev Surface, zero tension criterion. Test paths for drained and undrained testing, behaviour of normally consolidated clays, introduction to behaviour of lightly and heavily overconsolidated clays. Brittle behavoiur of heavily overconsolidated clays. Use of p'e for normalising wrt specific volume. Obtaining information about current state of a sample (undrained shear strength) compared with fundamental properties (drained shear strength / critical state parameters) from triaxial testing. Site investigation. Purpose of site investigation - general scenario, anomolies, design parameters. Desk study requirements, sources, walk over survey. Preliminary and final site investigations. Methods of borehole drilling. Safe use of trial pits. In-situ testing. Geophysical methods of investigation, capabilities and limitations. Slope stability analysis. Purpose, derivation of Bishops' and Janbu's simplified methods. Application. Other methods. Foundation design - stress distributions, bearing capacity and settlement calculation, related to site investigation techniques.

AR30083: Structures 4

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Development of matrix methods of analysis and computer techniques for structural analysis. To advance the student's knowledge and ability in the plastic analysis of structures, including multibay frames and the yield line analysis of slabs.
Content:
Revision of virtual work, flexibility analysis, and slope deflection method. Matrix Methods: stiffness analysis of pin-jointed space trusses and rigidly jointed frames. Organisation of stiffness method for computation. Introduction to finite element method. Finite element method: Shape functions. Application of virtual work and the Rayleigh-Ritz method to the derivation of stiffness and load matrices. Compatibility requirements between elements. Plane stress, plane strain and three dimensional elements. Simple plate bending elements. Application of Finite Element Computer Package to analysis of frame and slab structures. Plastic analysis of frames: Upper and lower bound solutions. Instantaneous centres, combined mechanisms for multibay and multistorey frames. Plastic analysis of slabs and yield line theory: equilibrium and energy methods, isotropic and orthotropic slabs, skew reinforcement. Iterative methods, "Affine" methods.

AR30084: Structures 5

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take AR30214

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop the understanding and application of design procedures for various materials (particularly steel and concrete) related to professional codes of practice. To cover the effects of vibrations and issues affecting the stability of structures.
Content:
Reinforced concrete: beams - T & L beams, doubly reinforced beams, crack widths. Slabs - two way span slabs, flat slabs, strip theory. Columns - combined compression and bending, compression and tension control, derivation of design graphs, moment increase due to slenderness. Prestressed concrete: derivation of losses, elastic and ultimate analysis. Introduction to shear and end blocks. Structural steel: lateral torsional buckling. Local buckling of webs, web stiffeners. Combined shear and bending. Column design. Plastic sizing of elements. Structural timber: properties of timber, strength of joints, slenderness, notching, combined stresses, glued laminated members. Masonry: strengths and partial safety factors, stress block, slenderness, arching. Wind loading, tensile stresses, precompression. Tables of panel moments. Composites. Vibrations Single degree of freedom systems: free vibrations, response to step load, sinusoidal load and seismic and inertial excitation. Dynamic loads: random loads. Earthquakes, rigid model and aeroelastic model wind tunnel tests. Natural frequencies and mode shapes or buckling loads and mode shapes with a variety of end conditions. Orthogonality conditions. Damping and response to loads including moving loads. Multi degree of freedom systems: lateral vibrations of beams under constant axial load. Discussion of post buckled stability via single degree of freedom models. Interaction of buckling and plasticity; lateral torsional buckling of beams. Modal analysis for vibrations and buckling of structures; eigenvalues, eigenvectors and othogonality conditions. Damping and geometric stiffness.

AR30085: Structures 6

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30084

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To extend previously introduced structural theory and analysis to an appropriate level for a broad coverage of finite element methods. To develop the understanding and application of finite element methods to a range of structural systems. To extend understanding of, and the ability to apply plasticity methods for the analysis of structures.
Content:
Numerical methods: revision of matrix methods of analysis as applied to pin jointed trusses, rigidly jointed frames, and finite element modelling of continuum structures. Isoparametric elements, plate and shell elements. Finite element analysis of complete structures; compatiblity of in-plane and bending displacements. Classical plate theory. Plate buckling and buckling of thin-walled box-beams. Non-linear behaviour of structures, geometric and material non-linearity; Newton-Raphson and incremental solution methods. Computer finite element modelling of non-linear problems. Plasiticity theory: yield and failure criteria, 3-D Mohr's circle of stress, hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses. C-curves and the pi-plane. Tresca and von Mises yield criteria. The flow rule, normality and convexity. Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. The upper and lower bound theorems. Shakedown. Torsion, indentation, axial and shear effects for metallic structures. Concrete plasticity, upper-bound flexural and shear analysis, lower-bound strut-and-tie methods.

AR30088: Surveying 2

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: PR60CW40
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To extend the student's knowledge of surveying by giving them an understanding of how terrerial and aerial photogrammetry can be used in support of engineering projects.
Content:
Photogrammetry Definition, history, uses and application of photogrammetry. Photographic measurements, coordinate systems, scale and relief displacement. Stereoscopic viewing, depth perception, the human eye, principle of parallax. Terrestrial photogrammetry. Geometry of photo pairs, intersection procedures for computation of coordinates for parallel and angled camera sights. Planning air photography, flight map, required photo scale, end and side flap. Surveying accuracy / errors Differences between random and systematic errors, observations not equally precise, assessment of accu-racy. Sources of Errors in photogrammetry and plain survey work. Assessment of acceptable tolerances in construction and building. Laboratory / practical work Measurement of point coordinates on Terrestrial photographs. Practical Terrestrial camera exercise for comparative appraisal of method's accuracy. Air photo studies, stereoscopic methods of parallax measurement, elevations by parallax differences. Review of photogrammetric equipment, camera requirements, comparators.

AR30089: Thermofluids

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The movement of energy and fluids in buildings.
Content:
Dimensionless analysis and similarity : Introduction to the principles of dimensionless analysis; determination of dimensionless groups; use of dimensionless groups in experimental investigation. Turbo-machinery Performance characteristics of rotodynamic machines; centrifugal, axial and mixed flow pumps and fans; use of specific speed for pump selection; simple applications of network machine systems. Euler one dimensional theory for axial and centrifugal turbomachines. Introduction to heat transfer :General conduction equation, 2-D steady state solutions; 1-D unsteady state, lumped parameter approach, Biot and Fourier numbers. Convection : Velocity and temperature boundary layers, calculation of convection coefficients, use of dimensionless parameters in heat transfer, analogies between momentum and heat transfer; dimensionless correlations in forced and natural convection. Radiation : Laws of radiant heat transfer, radiation properties of real materials, geometric factors. Radiation networks in buildings. Extended surfaces : Analysis of heat transfer from fins, overall U-value for extended surfaces. Heat exchangers : Analysis of parallel and counterflow exchangers, log mean temperature difference and Transfer Unit approaches, fouling factors. Heat recovery devices used in buildings

AR30093: Urban studies

Credits: 9
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30019 and After taking this module you must take AR30020

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The aims of this unit are twofold: to introduce students to the ideas and ideals which have shaped cities; and understand the policies that govern urban design and to introduce the methodology in use to assess the architectural character and qualities of an historic UK city.On completion of this unit students will be able to make a coherent presentation through a written illustrated report on the urban form of an historic UK city.
Content:
The unit begins with 6 lectures introducing the ideas and ideals that have shaped European cities, and which focuses on specific historic UK cities as case studies (3 credits). The second part of the unit (6 credits) is an assessment by students in small groups of part of an historic city using a range of analytical techniques - drawings, photographs, physical and computer models in order to define the architectural character and quality of the area under study and in relation to the whole. The material gathered will be analysed and presented in illustrated reports in a format to be determined by the examiner.

AR30112: Building services engineering

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take AR30073

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To enable the design of mechanical and electrical services. Objectives: To understand the techniques available to design various air conditioning systems and choice of suitable plant. To provide tools needed design principal electrical service distribution systems. To consider the design of utility systems within buildings.
Content:
Design of heating systems Design of mechanical ventilation systems Design of air conditioning systems Choice of cooling plant and methods of heat rejection, Design of Utility systems, Design of hot and cold water services, Gas distribution Telephones and communictions Waste systems and management. Design of electrical distribution systems, fault protection, harmonics, interference Emergency power generation Fire and security systems.

AR30114: Structures 4A

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20081

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To reinforce the understanding of architectural students in the role of statics in determining the form efficiency of structural systems.
Content:
A number of architectural projects with significant qualities in their structural engineering and conceptual realisation are examined in the context of their statical actions as a whole and the influence of these actions on the construction detailing.

AR30207: Bridge Engineering

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop an awareness and enthusiasm for the design, construction and assessment of various forms of bridge structures. The successful student should be able to demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the material given in the content.
Content:
The history of bridge engineering, from stone arches and rope-suspension bridges to the wholly plastic Aberfeldy Bridge and the 2km long span Akashi Bridge. Lessons learned from intermittent bridge collapses. Bridge components and their nomenclature. The choice of bridge types and suitability at specific sites for reasons of constructability, aesthetics, economics, function and available materials. Issues involved in short, medium and long span bridge design. Bridge construction techniques available for various applications, and design of the bridge to allow for easier construction. Design loading on bridges, including dead, superimposed dead, traffic, wind, temperature, earthquake, etc. Elastic and plastic analysis techniques available for the design of various forms of bridge structure. Realistic strength assessment of existing highway bridges, so that needless demolition of adequate bridges may be prevented. Bridges of the future, from short-span to the Messina Crossing.

AR30214: Project C3/M3

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment:
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30073 and take AR30083

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give students experience in developing a complex scheme working in teams with final year BSc architecture students or MArch students. At the end of the unit, the student should have demonstrated an ability to engage in interdisciplinary design of a complex scheme.
Content:
Precedent lectures are used to discuss relevant examples. The building or development project type will have more complex planning problems such as transportation, geotechnical and flood alleviation aspects, and potential for elegance in its structural solution and architectural function. There should be environmental conditions to consider, both external and internal - such as air conditioning/ natural ventilation to compare, and lighting and acoustic problems. Types of building complexes which are suitable include autitoria based (theatre, opera house, concert hall - all have potential for interesting structures, eg cable, domes, frameworks etc), museum (differing types from art galleries to 'Exploratory' type, and libraries, requiring exclusion of noise and good lighting ), industrial (eg brewery, with the process providing a problem), sports complex or transport interchange facilities. All have potential for interest functionally, structurally and visually as well as in services, and heavy foundation loads. The project will be tutored both by academic staff and industrial visiting tutors. The project is also intended to be competitive between groups (with each group consisting ideally of 2 architectural and 2 engineering students), and is the subject of a prize jury and presentation - known as the Basil Spence Prize. The BEng, MEng and Architectural students all participate in this interdisciplinary group project. The main distinction between the BEng (Project C3/1) and MEng (Project M3) is that MEng students are expected to apply their broader knowledge to the design, and to demonstrate leadership in the conceptual design stage.

AR30216: Management 5C

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment:
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30055

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop an increased depth of understanding of construction project management by the examination of case studies. At the end of the unit, the student should be able to demonstrate an awareness of a range of approaches, procedures and techniques, and should have begun to understand how they may be used in managing a construction project.
Content:
Case studies are presented to develop the student's awareness of the influence of the following issues on the management of design and construction. Note that these topics are not expected to be covered in detail, but rather in the context of the case study projects. Project management: Anatomy of a project, project boundaries, multi-project planning. Defining the project, the design brief. Leadership and teams, project organisation. Structure of a design team. Professional responsibilities within different structures. Operations management: Product, plant, processes, programs, people Introduction to operations research techniques: Queuing theory. Simulation. Linear programming. Dynamic programming. Contract procedures: Conditions of contract (ICE 5th and 6th ed., NEC), Parties to the contract, duties and responsibilities; running the contract, programmes, Certificates, durations; paying for work, variations, claims; disputes resolution. Quality Assurance: TQM (principles and practice); Implementing quality management in a construction firm. Risk analysis and management: Forecasting, sensitivity, mean expected values, decision strategies. Managing uncertainty and variation. Organisational change. 'New Thinking' in organisational theory and practice. Implementation in construction. Industrial relations Developments in the use of computers in construction management.

AR30229: Natural building materials & methods

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20082 and take AR20208
Aims: To develop an awareness of and enthusiasm for building design and construction using natural materials and methods, and develop understanding and ability.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit the successful student should be able to demonstrate:
* a broad understanding of the context, characteristics, manufacture and applications of natural building materials;
* sufficient knowledge and insight to design, specify and build with confidence using natural materials and methods.
Skills:
Evident from content and learning outcomes.
Content:
Outline the main issues of sustainability relating to building materials: environmental impact; CO2 emissions; embodied energy; recycling of materials; role of natural materials; vernacular building methods and appropriate technology. Designing to take account of unfamiliar material properties and appropriate construction methods; designing in the absence of prescriptive codes of practice. These issues are then considered in relation to the following material types and construction methods. Depth of coverage may vary between these areas, and additional materials/technologies may be introduced into or removed from the unit with the development of appropriate technologies. Earthen construction: adobe; rammed earth; cob; compressed block; wattle & daub; soil mortars; material suitability; stability; durability; manufacture; characteristics; applications; design; case studies. Timber construction: natural 'green' timber construction; properties & characteristics; production and treatments; building technology; applications; traditional connections; design; case studies. Natural fibre construction: bamboo; straw bale; grasses and leaves; wool; turf roofs; animal skins; properties and characteristics; applications; building technology; design principles; case studies. Natural binders: prozzolans; gypsum; lime; sulphur concrete; production and characteristics; techniques (lime motar; lime-crete); applications; design principles; case studies. Stone: materials (rock types); sources and extraction; environmental impact; properties; durability; applications (foundations, walls, roofs, and floors); design; case studies. Waste materials: waste paper and textiles; sewage sludge; coal wastes; blast furnace slag; bauxite waste; rubble; rice husks; coconut wastes; wood residues; water hyacinth; vegetable wastes; applications; case studies. Caves and underground dwellings; ice (igloos). A number of external expert speakers will be invited to deliver specialist lectures (e.g. timber construction; use of lime). In addition, site visit(s) will be arranged to inspect particular case studies (e.g. CAT, Wales). The coursework will comprise a small project in which students will be encouraged to innovate and explore further by designing a medium size building using entirely natural materials.

AR30231: Advanced composites in construction

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW20EX80
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30084

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop an awareness and enthusiasm for (i) the design and construction of fibre-reinforced polymer structures and (ii) the repair and strengthening of existing structures in order to prolong the life of our infrastructure. At the end of this course, the successful student should be able to decide on the feasibility and appropriateness of the use of fibre-reinforced polymers for specific design applications. In particular, the student will have understanding of the issues involved in the design of polymeric structures, the design of concrete structures with polymeric reinforcement and the design of strengthening schemes for structures and buildings.
Content:
Lecture 1: General introduction to Advanced Composites, their properties, advantages and disadvantages, manufacturing processes, case studies. Lecture 2: Fibre-reinforced plastics (FRPs), wholly polymeric structures, design issues, modular construction.
Lecture 3: FRP as internal concrete reinforcement, general design issues, durability, flexural design, ductility.
Lecture 4: FRP as internal concrete reinforcement, shear design issues, detailing issues, fire, creep, fatigue.
Lecture 5: FRP as internal prestress for concrete, external prestress via polymeric ropes, novel reinforcement layouts.
Lecture 6: FRP strengthening of concrete structures for flexure.
Lecture 7: FRP strengthening of bridges for shear; use of sheets, bars and plate.
Lecture 8: FRP strengthening of columns and piers for earthquake and/or vehicle impact, ductility issues, confinement issues with non-circular sections. Lecture 9: FRP strengthening of timber, steel, iron, masonry and other structures; sustainability, economics of FRPs.

AR40095: Wind & earthquake engineering

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20002 and take AR30024 and take AR30007
Aims: To enable understanding of the use of power spectra analysis in the design of structures (e.g. how to you plan wind tunnel tests to give the information necessary to predict the rms acceleration of a building caused by the peak ten minutes of a storm within a return period of five years?). To enable understanding of earthquake engineering design issues.
Learning Outcomes:
The successful student should be able to demonstrate understanding of the subjects described under 'Content', and the ability to use that understanding in design.
Skills:
Evident from content and learning outcomes.
Content:
The nature of wind, flow around angular, curved and streamlined bodies. Vorticity and turbulence. The effect of terrain. Introduction to the statistics of extremes, return periods, gusts, etc.. Introduction to codes and standards. Wind tunnel testing. Comfort criteria limiting sway of tall buildings. Introduction to aero-elasticity, flutter, galloping and divergence. Aero elastic wind tunnel tests. The causes of earthquakes, prediction of ground movements. Effects of earthquakes on buildings and other structures. Introduction to codes and standards. Rules for the design of earthquake resistant buildings and structures. Description of wind and earthquake loads using power spectra. 'Reconstitution' of load from power spectrum. Fourier transform, auto-correlation and cross-correlation. Use of modal analysis to predict the root mean square building acceleration from power spectrum of load. The use of tuned mass dampers to reduce the motion of tall buildings. Flow visualisation laboratory for flow past a circular cylinder and a square to investigate flow separation and turbulence.

AR40096: Socrates exchange (MArch)

Credits: 24
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
SOCRATES Exchange This exhange programme with 12 other European Schools of Architecture provides students with an opportunity to study abroad from October to December. As the usual exchange period for Bath students occurs in year 3 of the BSc in General Architectural Studies, it is usual for incoming students to the BArch course from other UK institutions to take advantage of SOCRATES at this time. Students on the programme learn from first-hand experience about the architectural values of another European country, by travelling within the country, and perfecting their knowledge of its language. The unit is undertaken prior to commencement of units based at the University.
Content:
The content of the SOCRATES Exchange is tailored to the requirements of the individual student in collaboration of the host institution in which the student is placed. SOCRATES Exchange students complete project work which is assessed by the host institution and marks and a report are sent to Bath. On returning to Bath each student is to submit their Socrates portfolio for inspection by the Director of Studies of the MArch programme.

AR40097: Placement MArch

Credits: 24
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Graduation in the BSc in General Architectural Studies takes place in march of the year preceding the commencement of the MArch programme. The unit is undertaken prior to commencement of units based at the University. The unit provides practical experience of architectural design and/or building construction. It develops integrated design and professional practice skills introduced during the first degree in architecture, and introduces students to specialist activities, which will be developed during the MArch programme. More detailed aims and objectives are stipulated in the RIBA Practice Logbook that every student is required to complete, with his/her employer, as partial fulfilment of this unit. On the successful completion of this unit students will have demonstrated an ability to integrate design and professional skills in an architectural practice.
Content:
The Placement is tailored to the requirements of the individual student in collaboration of the host office in which the student is placed, and in line with the checklist of activities compiled in the RIBA Practice Logbook. The Wessex Region RIBA Professional Practice Officer, who also scrutinises and counter-signs the RIBA Practice Logbook completed by the student, visits placement students in their work place when it is considered necessary to do so.

AR40098: Design studio 5.1

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To emphasise the role of architectural design and planning in an urban, UK context. To encourage an understanding of the historical and cultural evolution of the city being studied and provide an overview - through text and drawings - of its present condition. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate through drawings, models and written reports an understanding of the relationship between individual buildings and the development of a particular city.
Content:
The exploration of architecture within a UK urban context explored through Architectural Design. It involves a short fieldtrip to study a UK town or city. Collection by groups of visual, historical, social and cultural information relating to its urban development. Presentation by groups of drawings photographs and models of the past and present character and future potential of the area. Written documentation as necessary supportive of visual and verbal presentations. Specialist expertise will be provided by visiting Architectural, Landscape, Environmental and Structural Engineering consultants, and visiting design critics will be invited at appropriate times during the project.

AR40099: Design studio 5.2

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The exploration of architecture within an a UK urban context explored through Architectural Design. The course builds on knowledge acquired during the first degree in architecture, with an emphasis on architectural design and planning in an urban context presented in unit Design Studio 5.1 (AR40098). Students are to demonstrate a competence in the integrated design of a range of building types while producing architecturally elegant designs.
Content:
The formulation of group and/or individual design briefs using material accumulated in Design Studio 5.1 (AR40098) for different building types (public and residential) in different locations within the established urban context. The design to be presented at a drawing scale not less than 1:100 through plans and sections of key examples of these types, and supplemented by models (physical and/or computer models). Designs will be developed with due regard to aesthetic and technical requirements pervailing nationally and especially within the urban context studied; and with due regard to the perceived long-term social and physical needs of the local community. Specialist expertise will be provided by visiting Architectural, Landscape, Environmental and Structural Engineering consultants.

AR40100: Natural building materials & methods

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop an awareness of and enthusiasm for building design and construction using natural materials and methods. To develop and understanding and design ability using natural building techniques. On completion of the unit the successful student should be able to demonstrate: a broad understanding of the context, characteristics, manufacture and applications of natural building materials; sufficient knowledge and insight to design, specify and build with confidence using natural materials and methods.
Content:
Precedent lectures, including invited guest speakers covering: climate change; sustainable development; environmental impact of building materials; natural alternatives; Stone; Earth; Pozzolans; Natural binders; Underground dwellings; Ice; Lime construction; Natural fibres (including straw, grass, hemp, reeds); Green Oak and round pole timber construction; Bamboo; Recycled natural products; Natural building materials and building regulation requirements. Design exercise joint with MEng Structural Engineering students.

AR40101: Management 5

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to provide students with an in-depth study of the practice of architecture, and the professional role of the architect. To demonstrate the need for advance planning in the cost of construction works, and for the combined control of expenditure. To develop an understanding of estimating procedures, cost analyses and the impact of design changes upon costs.This unit will provide students with a detailed understanding of how architects carryout their professional responsibilities according to the demands of current legislation and RIBA practice guidelines in preparation for the RIBA Pt 3 Exams and Professional Practice.
Content:
Sources of work, types of clients, the appointment process, management and design process, role playing the client/architect relationship. Contracts of appointment, codes of conduct, fees, consultants, collateral warranties, registration acts. The RIBA Job Book, planning ahead, pricing the job, tendering procedures for the architect, communication in the office, feedback and development. Visit to an architect's office and a practical exercise in job getting, confirming the appointment, planning the work, pricing for fees, dealing with warranties and appointing other consultants. The nature of cost planning and the preparation and use of viability studies. Estimates of capital construction cost and cost analyses. Impact of design on cost and principles of cost control. Cost reporting procedures and preparation of final accounts. Cost benefit analysis, cost-in-use and life cycle costing.

AR40103: Landscape & ecology

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To create an awareness of the physical environment around buildings, and to demonstrate a range of appropriate measures for modifying this environment, through passive and active, visual and technical means. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate in an essay, and in relation to a specific building type in the design project being explored in Design Studio 5.2/5.2a, the impact of Landscape & Ecology on architectural design.
Content:
The unit will comprise of introductory lectures relating prevalent landscape and ecological attitudes to the context of the urban situation being studied in Design Studio 5.2/5.2a. Tutorials will develop individual and group responses to such issues by students in the context of design problems that are part of these respective units.

AR40105: Architectural theory

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To present the relationship between philosophy, the principal written architectural theories and architectural practice. To provide a forum for the discussion of cultural, aesthetic and philosophical issues relating to architectural design and society at large. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to realise the connection between theory and design process, and to express their understanding of this in writing, and in group presentations.
Content:
The unit commences with introductory lectures outlining the scope of the subject, followed by student led seminars at which seminar papers are submitted for discussion, and which explore the writings of selected themes.

AR40106: Dissertation (MArch)

Credits: 15
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide an opportunity for students to study an aspect of the history, theory or practice of architecture in depth, and to present this material primarily in written form. The dissertation is to take the form of an academic piece of writing structured with a clear argument that reaches a balanced conclusion. The dissertation should be written as a balanced review of archive material, or as a survey of a building and/or associated products. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate their use of written English and powers of reasoning and expression, and presentation skills in relation to the agreed topic.
Content:
Emphasis is to be placed on the cultural context of architecture, with particular to respect to the history, theory and urban design of architecture; or, on a technical aspect of architectural design or production. The dissertation is to be on a theme selected by the candidate and agreed to by the dissertation co-ordinators. It is to be written in English, have a maximum length of 8,000 words, and be illustrated as necessary. It is to be properly referenced, provided with a full bibliography and bound.

AR40107: Pre design studio 1

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR20098 and take AR40098

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The exploration of architecture within a European urban context explored through Architectural Design. The unit develops skills in urban analysis acquired during units Design Studio 5.1 and 5.2 (FT MArch students), and Design Studio 5.1 and 5.2a&b (PT MArch students), and relates the individual and group understanding of a specific urban environment (physical and cultural) to the development of a brief, which is used to shape an individual building design. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate through drawings, models and written reports their understanding of how the selected city was shaped by its unique history, culture and natural topography.
Content:
Field trip lasting not less than eight days to study a major European city. Collection in groups of visual, historical, social and cultural information relating to its urban development. Presentation singly, or in groups through sketch books, drawings, photographs and models of the past and present character and future potential of the area. Written documentation as necessary supportive of visual and verbal presentations.

AR40108: Design studio 2

Credits: 21
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Students are to demonstrate a high level of competence in the integrated design of one building type in a major European urban setting, while producing an architecturally elegant design. The course builds on knowledge acquired during unit Design Studio 5.2 (AR40098) and Urban design studio 1 (AR40107).
Content:
The formulation of group and/or individual design briefs using material accumulated in Urban Design Studio 1 for one building type (public or residential) in one location within the established urban context. The design is to be presented at a drawing scale not less than 1:100 through plans and sections, and supplemented by models (physical and/or computer models). The design will be developed with due regard to the technical requirements pervailing in the UK and aesthetically in accordance with the urban context being studied; and with due regard to the perceived long-term social and physical needs of the local community. Specialist expertise will be provided by visiting Architectural, Landscape, Environmental and Structural Engineering consultants.

AR40109: Design project reports

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30107 and take AR40107

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Design Project Reports will be used to explain the urban context of the European city under investigation in Urban design Studio 1 and 2a+b (AR40107 & AR40221 & AR40222, or AR40108), and to describe group and individual architectural and urban design responses to it. The unit aims to demonstrate the role of concise report writing in the presentation of architectural and urban ideas. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate their ability to summarise complex ideas concisely in writing and through appropriately selected images.
Content:
An illustrated A3-sized bound project report to be produced by a study group/or an individual student describing the cultural and physical context of the city as it was in the past, as it is now, and as it may be developed in the near future. An illustrated A4-sized bound project report describing the building type designed by each student and in its national, regional and local cultural and physical context.

AR40110: Management 6

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR40101

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to determine some of the principles of policy organisation, planning and control that are present in project management in the construction industry. To encourage an understanding of the present strengths and weaknesses of project management. To appreciate something of cause and effect in business practice.On completion of this unit students will be ready to enter their final Placement equipped with the fundamentals of project management, and architectural management in general.
Content:
This unit focuses, at an advanced level, on the principle concepts of project management using a series of case studies: The business system and the market, project and en terprise.The participants in the project: sponsor, leader, co-ordinator, construction etc. Management and control of time, cost and quality. Project appraisal: viability, social, economic, environmental impact. Corporate Management: strategies for development. The management of risk in project management, variability, uncertainty etc.

AR40209: Architectural history & theory

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To offer an introduction to historical and theoretical research in architecture, by analysing the ways in which architecture has been understood - as a practical and/or intellectual discipline - at different points in history. Students should acquire an overview about research methods, and how it is undertaken in research libraries and national archives. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate the knowledge they have acquired in verbal and written form.
Content:
Lectures and structured discussions will cover the following topics: an introduction to Bath's built fabric, showing how the buildings have been appropriated in different ways; the Philosophy of History; defining Legitimate Knowledge, Magic and Alchemy in architecture; and the shaping of history through historical method; the illustrated architecture book in history; Alberti and Vitruvius, the similarities and differences between key concepts in their two treatises; Dom Hans Van Der Laan's interpretation of Vitruvius' six fundamental principles; the notion of bodily perfection in classical antiquity and the 20th century; Richard Payne Knight's concern to abolish formulae and regulations in matters of taste. There will also be structured visits to the Building of Bath Museum and the County Records Bath.

AR40210: Conservation of historic buildings

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
An introduction to the range of philosophies and techniques concerning the repair and re-use of historic buildings, drawing on the resource of the classical city of Bath and its regional context. The unit introduces the range of tasks performed by conservation professionals from the repair of individual buildings through to the field of urban management, and describes the historic evolution of structures and the causes of, and remedies for structural defects and decay. The aim is to stimulate debate and to develop individual viewpoints on the issues raised. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate in essay form their knowledge of the subject covered.
Content:
Lectures and discussion include: conservation and classicism in Bath, reviewing the phases of building in Bath, and examining some of the conservation techniques that have been applied locally; the ethics and aesthetics of architectural conservation and a discussion of society's influence on the emergence of twentieth century planning and conservation law; an historical outline of structural engineering, an overview of the history of structures and structural materials; causes of damage and decay in structures; the assessment of structural defects; and repair criteria and techniques; monitoring and maintenance, techniques for ongoing care and maintenance of building structures.

AR40217: MEng dissertation (6)

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW20ES80
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30007 and take AR30073 and take AR30077 and take AR30083

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Together with the post requisite unit, to assess the ability of students for original and individual thought and application to a substantial project/ programme of work. At the end of this preliminary unit, the student should be able to demonstrate the ability to define the objectives of a short research programme, carry out a literature review, plan a program of activity, and organise materials, equipment and facilities as required.
Content:
In conjunction with the postrequisite unit, a substantial work of research presented as a short thesis, normally entailing experimental and analytical or numerical modelling and their practical application to a researched topic This preliminary unit represents the background reading and planning for the investigation. Students are expected to have written up most of this work by the end of the unit. This preliminary unit represents the background reading and planning for the investigation. Students are expected to have written up most of this work by the end of the unit.

AR40218: MEng dissertation completion (6)

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR40217

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To assess the ability of students for original and individual thought and application to a substantial project/ programme of work. At the end of the unit, the student should be able to demonstrate the ability to design a short research programme, excecute it, and report on it.
Content:
The main part of the dissertation work, following on from the 'Dissertation' unit.

AR40223: MEng dissertation (3)

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW20ES80
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR30007 and take AR30073 and take AR30077 and take AR30083

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Together with the post requisite unit, to assess the ability of students for original and individual thought and application to a substantial project/ programme of work. At the end of this preliminary unit, the student should be able to demonstrate the ability to define the objectives of a short research programme, carry out a literature review, and plan a program of activity to carry out the research.
Content:
In conjunction with the postrequisite unit, a substantial work of research presented as a short thesis, normally entailing experimental and analytical or numerical modelling and their practical application to a researched topic. This preliminary unit represents a 'scoping study', the background reading and planning for the investigation. Assessment will be together with Dissertation Completion, but a formal presentation must be made by each student describing the background, aims, and proposed methods of their dissertation, which will carry 20% of the mark for this unit.

AR40224: MEng dissertation completion (9)

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR40223

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To assess the ability of students for original and individual thought and application to a substantial project/ programme of work. At the end of the unit, the student should be able to demonstrate the ability to design a short research programme, excecute it, and report on it.
Content:
The main part of the dissertation work, following on from the 'Dissertation' unit.

EG30041: Materials science 2

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EG10040 or take EG10118

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course develops from the introductory ideas of structure of materials presented in the first year and uses those ideas to show how the basic mechanics and physical properties of constructional materials are determined by their molecular and crystaline nature. The course forms a basis for the further development of an understanding of design aspects of materials at the macroscopic rather than the atomic level. The course identifies a number of aspects of the behaviour of building materials of specific importance to the engineer, with emphasis being on problems of design and selection of materials for given service conditions.
Content:
1. Classification of engineering materials according to type and properties.
2. Elastic behaviour, linear and non-linear. The elastic moduli, anisotropy; elastic properties of crystals and poly-crystals; composite materials, rubber elasticity.
3. Viscoelastic behaviour and time dependent effects.
4. Strength of engineering materials. Theoretical and actual strengths of solids; improving the strength of real materials. Problems of designing with brittle materials.
5. Longer term effects. Fatigue and creep (introductory).
6. Durability of metals and plastics. Corrosion and environmental attack (introductory). Engineering design The process of engineering design in relation to materials evaluation and selection; relevance of measured properties to service conditions. Short-term mechanical effects Time-dependent behaviour of metals , plastics, concrete, timber; creep and fatigue; combined effects of fatigue and corrosion. Long term chemical behaviour Durability and ageing; changes in material properties in service conditions. Corrosion and protection of metals and alloys; environmental degredation of plastics; chemical degredation of concrete - sulphate attack, conversion of HAC etc.; biodeterioration of timber and protection methods; flammability and fire damage to building materials. Long term stability of adhesives and adhesive bonds.

 

 

Postgraduate Units:


AR50232: Urban design studio 1 (MA)

Credits: 24
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: The exploration of architecture within a European unban context explored through Archtiectural Design. The unit develops skills in urban analysis, and relates the individual and group understanding of a specific urban environment (physical and cultural) to the development of a brief, which is used to shape an individual building design. On the successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate through drawings, models and written reports their understanding of how the selected city was shaped by its unique history, culture and natural topography and how best to contribute a new design into that setting.
Content: Collection in groups of visual, historical, social and cultural information relating to its urban development. Presentation singly, or in groups through sketch books, drawings, photographs and models of the past and present character and future potential of the area. Written documentation as necessary supportive of visual and verbal presentations.

 

University | Catalogues for 2003/04 | for UGs | for PGs