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Department of Education, Unit Catalogue 2004/05


ED10001: Exploring effective learning

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The aim is to review the student's own learning in order to identify approaches to learning which are effective and to develop a better understanding of the learning process in the context of study in Higher Education. The objectives are that students should understand better their own learning and be able to identify effective learning strategies; they should be able to debate and discuss critically their own learning
Content:
The nature of learning; what is learnt (skills, knowledge, values etc.); learning styles; learning in groups; autonomy in learning; communication as part of the learning process; study skills; presentation skills; time management; assessment and being assessed.

ED10001: Exploring effective learning

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The aim is to review the student's own learning in order to identify approaches to learning which are effective and to develop a better understanding of the learning process in the context of study in Higher Education. The objectives are that students should understand better their own learning and be able to identify effective learning strategies; they should be able to debate and discuss critically their own learning
Content:
The nature of learning; what is learnt (skills, knowledge, values etc.); learning styles; learning in groups; autonomy in learning; communication as part of the learning process; study skills; presentation skills; time management; assessment and being assessed.

ED10002: Learning: Theory & context

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit will consider more theoretical aspects of learning. It aims to consider a selection of theoretical perspectives on learning, and to relate these to teaching and learning in different contexts, including schools, colleges, universities and lifelong learning. The unit will also explore the implications of new technologies for learning.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this unit students should be able to:
* begin to understand the nature of learning and teaching;
* evaluate critically the merits of behavioural, cognitive and other theories of learning;
* draw together the various elements impinging on learning to better understand their own learning and ways of imparting it to others;
* establish a critical awareness of new technologies for teaching and have an appreciation of a variety of contexts in which learnnig occurs and can be facilitated.
Skills:
* Comprehensive and scholarly written communication (e.g. essays).
* Effective oral communication (e.g. seminar presentations).
* Ability to select, summarise and synthesis written information from multiple sources.
* Ability to apply theory into practise.
* Ability to produce work to agreed specifications and deadlines.
* Ability to work independently, without close supervision or guidance.
Content:
Theories of learning: a review of a range of approaches to learning theory and the cognitive and other processes associated with learning: including memory, problem-solving and motivation. Contexts for learning: including schools, further and higher education, and a variety of lifelong learning opportunities. Session would include, for example:
* Learners and individual differences.
* Theories of learning including behavioural, cognitive, social cognitive and constructivist approaches to learning.
* Memory, thinking, problem-solving and learning.
* Motivation and learning; comparing theories.
* ICT and learning.
* Lifelong learning and Higher Education.

ED10125: Sports nutrition

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit aims to introduce students to both the theory underpinning commonly used nutritional techniques and also gain the ability to apply the concept of dietary analysis.
Learning Outcomes:
Students completing this unit will understand the function of major macronutrients and micronutrients in the context of athletic training and performance as well as the principles and practice of rehydration. They will acquire practical skills in applying the principle of energy balance to assess dietary intake of sports performers. Students will also develop a depth of understanding that enables them to evaluate the value of nutrient supplements and the benefits of dietary manipulation pre and post competition. Students will gain knowledge of the eating disorders that sports performers are vulnerable to. Students will acquire an appreciation of how different food preparation techniques can influence a foods nutrient quality.
Skills:
The following key skills are either taught and / or facilitated (T/F) or assessed (A) in this unit:
* Written Communication - T/F, A
* Numeracy - T/F
* Problem Solving - T/F, A
* Working Independently - T/F, A.
Content:
Students will study:
* Macro- and micro- nutrients considering fluid intakes, balanced diet, time of year, age and stage of maturation of athlete, health of athlete, athletic training and athletic performance.
* Dietary intake, including RDA, RNI, LRNI and EAR, caloric balance, nutrient balance, and fluid intake.
* Assessments of nutrient intake utilising food diaries, recall methods, manual and computer -based analysis.
* Feedback methods (written, oral, computer-based) of reporting a nutrient analysis.
* Nutrient supplements considering ergogenic aids, fluid based and food-based issues.
* Dietary manipulation for pre- and post- competition.
* The process of dehydration and its physiological effects on performance, including appropriate strategies for rehydration and recovery.
* Eating disorders - anorexia nervosa, anorexia athletica, bulimia and food faddism.
* Food preparation considering boiling, steaming, microwaving, frying, grilling and their effect on nutrient content.

ED10136: Introduction to pedagogy

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Students will identify and explore the critical dimensions involved in pedagogy, such as teachers/teaching, learners/learning, and knowledge formation/development of understanding/context. Students will appreciate the interdependency of each dimension, and will recognise the holistic concept of pedagogy in the contexts of physical education and sport.
Content:
From an introduction to the overall concept of pedagogy, each critical dimension of pedagogy will be focussed upon and will be explored with reference to examples and problematic issues. Physical education and sport will provide the source for discussion, debate, examples and problematic issues. Critical dimensions include:
(i) Teachers and teaching: teacher roles; teaching styles and approaches; teacher effectiveness; pedagogical content knowledge; formulating and using aims and objectives.
(ii) Learners and learning: introduction to learning processes and learning theories, including active learning; learning styles and strategies.
(iii) Knowledge formation/understanding/context: knowledge construction theories; issues in the development of understanding; the importance of context in pedagogy.

ED10142: Lifestyle management

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50OR50
Requisites:
Aims: This unit provides the student with a detailed knowledge and understanding of the lifestyles of sports performers from a coaching and performance perspective. The student will understand the important factors that impact on the lifestyle of sports performers; have a knowledge of a variety of lifestyle management approaches; compare the approaches taken by sports institutions and organisations internationally; and understand the roles and responsibilities of organisational providers in the management of sports performers in the UK. Students will assess the specific lifestyle needs of elite performers using profiles, interview and SWOT analysis techniques, and identify specific strategies to enhance a performer's lifestyle management.
Learning Outcomes:
The student will understand the important factors that impact on the lifestyle of sports performers; have a knowledge of a variety of lifestyle management approachesl compare the approaches taken by sports institutions and organisations internationally; and understand the roles and responsibilities of organisational providers in the management of sports performers in the UK. Students will assess the specific lifestyle needs of elite performers using profiles, interview and SWOT analysis techniques, and identify specific strategies to enhance a performer's lifestyle management.
Skills:
This unit will include the assessment of written communication and oral communication skills.
Content:
Factors: performance issues, selection issues, coach relationships, health, finance, travel, education, accommodation, employment, retirement, media. Lifestyle management approaches: Career and education - school level, further education, higher education, employment, full-time athlete, special needs approach, professional sport, home based, based at training centres, ACE, scholarships. Transitions in sport: Dealing with injury, retirement, changing location, changing coach, Life after sport. Dealing with pressures: Contracts, agents, finance, media, coach, family and peer pressure. Institutions and organisations internationally: Australian institute of Sport, USOC at Colorado, INSEP in Paris, Calgary, UKSI sites. Roles and responsibilities: Aims of organisations, athlete performance enhancement, legal responsibilities, duty of care, health and safety, moral responsibilities, financial support, career development. Lifestyle management strategies: Holistic approach to lifestyle, Quality training and wellness, Rest and recovery, injury prevention, stress management and relaxation techniques, time management.

ED10143: Planning & practice

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW25PR25
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Through this unit students will study the pedagogical skills necessary in the delivery process of sports participation and performance. Students will acquire both theoretical and practical skills in order to apply relevant techniques in the planning and delivery of effective coaching sessions. Students will develop the following:
* Ability to plan for coaching
* Ability to improve technical performance in a particular sport
* Ability to implement effective coaching
Content:
Ability to plan for coaching:
* The coaching process, importance of planning and preparation, creating a season plan, creating a session plan, safety, organisational factors, importance of warm up and cool down, knowing your participants, supervision, organisation and control. Ability to improve technical performance in a particular sport:
* Learning stages, skill development and acquisition. Differences between ability, technique and skill. Implications for coaching. Ability to implement effective coaching students:
* Motivating participants, principles of goal setting, feedback and evaluation. Modifying coaching sessions for beginners, children, individuals and groups.

ED10146: Mental skill development

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Students completing this unit will understand and appreciate a range of psychological factors influencing sport participation. Students will understand how movement skills are developed. They will understand the concepts underpinning mental training and be able to apply a range of mental training techniques to practice and competition scenarios. Students will be able to devise a competition day action plan for performers in their sport.
Content:
Students will examine theories and models of personality, motivation, self-efficacy, arousal and concentration. Students will explain and assess the concepts and variables thought to influence the development of movement skills; concepts and variables considered will include skill acquisition, theories of learning, leadership and group size and structure. Students will study the concepts underpinning mental training, such as goal-setting, arousal and attentional control and mental practices, and be able to apply these concepts to practice and competition scenarios. Students will complete on-the-day action plans dealing with issues such as routines, relaxation and imagery.

ED10148: Sport & recreation management

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Students completing this unit will be able to apply basic principles and functions of recreation management within relevant specialised areas for coaches. Through this unit students will study some of the main principles of recreation management. The unit aims to develop the management functions specific to the needs of the modern day coach. The student will gain insight into the following areas: structure and organisation of sports provision; human resources; finance; marketing and customer services. Students will also develop a depth of understanding that allows them to evaluate the effectiveness of new initiatives.
Content:
Students will study the structure and organisation of sports provision including the concepts of play, sport, recreation and leisure; provision within the public, voluntary and private sectors and national agencies and their impact on the structure of sport. Students will also study human resources, including the management process, management styles and management functions, practices and issues, including leadership, group processes, decision-making, responsibility and authority, legislation and workplace standards, incentives and appraisals. They will examine financial objectives and business plans, financial procedures and processes, including budgeting, cash flow, profit and loss accounts, and breakeven analysis. Students will finally study marketing and customer services, including the marketing mix, SWOT analysis, market research, psychology of the customer, and marketing plans and methods.

ED10149: Working with special populations

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: By considering factors and contexts which impinge on appropriate teaching approaches for special populations, students completing this unit will be able to: identify their responsibilites in teaching both children and adults with a disability; investigate ways of making sport more accessible and positive to all populations; appreciate the individual requirements of children and adults with a disability; describe the services and opportunities for specialist sports populations; and appreciate the physical and mental developmental factors in children. Students will also consider the specific needs of a range of populations including the ageing population, teenagers, women, the unemployed, ethnic/religious groups, and the corporate market. Students will examine opportunity and accessibility factors for specific populations, to include Reasons for participation, Motivation and Exercise Adherence, Reasons for drop-out.
Learning Outcomes:
Students will have the knowledge and understanding to identify a specific population, and design an exercise/sports skills session for a specific population.
Skills:
This unit will include the assessment of written communication skills and problem solving skills.
Content:
Students will examine the responsibilities of a coach working with special populations including those related to legal aspects, health and safety, as well as ethical, moral and physical/emotional responsibilities. Students will examine making sport more positive and accessible to special populations, analysing the benefits of sport and considering how to accommodate the needs of individuals and the community. Students will acknowledge the need to adapt communication, practices and equipment to satisfy the individual requirements of athletes with a disability. Students will consider the services and opportunities for specialit sport populations, including sport-specific rules and regulations, team selection, team training, funding, sponsorship and publicity. Students will have the opportunity to examine different types of exercise prescription and design exercise programmes for specific populations. Students will take into account the specific and individual needs of individual needs of individual clients. Students will consider varied types of screening, including the use of PARQ questionnaires, to assess the current health status and fitness needs of clients. The unit will include practical sessions specifically designed for specific populations, such as water aerobics and/or armchair exercise for the ageing population, and stress management, mediation and relaxation techniques for the corporate market.

ED10162: Introduction to research methods I

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce the student to the methods and practice of research in an educational context.
Learning Outcomes: On completion of this unit students should be able to:
* critically evaluate research reports, describe various research designs, employing qualitative and quantitative techniques, and understand rudimentary statistical methods;
* have some understanding of issues and caveats relating to research ethics, sampling, data collection and analysis, and the interpretation of findings.
Skills:
* Production of concise, scholarly, written communication to agreed specifications and deadlines. F/A
* Analysis and synthesis of written information from multiple sources. T/A
* Oral presentation skills. F
* Interpretation and analysis of numerical data. T
* Working independently. F/A
* Team work in the production of an assignment. F/A
* Formulation of research questions and research design to answer them. T/F/A
Content: The unit will introduce students to commonly used qualitative and quantitative approaches, including interviews, questionnaires, surveys and observation. They will gain understanding of sampling strategies and procedures, issues of validity and reliability, ethical considerations in research, issues in data collection and analysis, including basic techniques in statistical analysis (descriptive, with simple notions of statistical significance testing), and issues concerning the presentation and discussion of research in education.

ED10180: Independence for life

Credits: 15
Level: Certificate
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To enable candidates to define independence in terms which represent the diversity of people's needs and the individual's right to be actively involved in the processes and services which enable them to achieve personal life choices. Candidates will be required to:
* Compare individual perceptions of the consequences of disease and impairment;
* Explore existing definitions of 'rehabilitation' and their impact upon the development and delivery of timely and appropriate services which enable people to achieve personal life choices with respect to independence;
* Analyse different approaches to 'rehabilitation' and the relationship between independence and 'rehabilitation';
* Demonstrate an awareness of the knowledge, values and expectations of the stakeholders involved in the 'rehabilitation' process and the tensions that can and do arise between them.
Content:
Issues of normality/ordinariness. Issues of health, well-being and quality of life. Personal, cultural and societal views of disability and independence. Definitions of 'rehabilitation'. Approaches to independence. Emotional, social, psychological aspects of 'rehabilitation'. Ethical and legal issues. Individuals rights and public services. Professions, organisations and institutions - the impact of their policies, roles and responsibilities on 'rehabilitation'. Knowledge, language and empowerment. The politics of 'health' in relation to disability, 'rehabilitation' and independence. Statutory policies, resources and services. Disability and Employment. The nature of teams and collaborative working.

ED10181: Experience of disability

Credits: 15
Level: Certificate
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims:
* To promote greater understanding and insight into the complexity of the concept of disability.
* To develop positive attitudes towards disability and disabled people;
* To enhance the quality of services which affect disabled people's abilities to achieve personal life choices. Candidates will be required to:
* Reflect on their personal knowledge, attitudes, values and beliefs about: i) Normality and disability; ii) The uniqueness of the individual;
* Compare individual views and experiences of disability;
* Explore and challenge societal and cultural perceptions and attitudes towards normality and disability and how these have evolved;
* Appraise and challenge the different definitions and models of disability and how they may influence the opportunities for people of different abilities to achieve personal life choices in society;
* Explore the relationship between language, labelling, stigma and the role of the media in relation to disability and exclusion;
* Demonstrate an understanding of the rationale for empowering/enabling people to achieve personal life choices.
Content:
This unit will encourage students to address a wide range of issues relating to disability including: quality of life, normality and normalisation, human rights; experiences of disability; attitudes to disability; disability in the past, present and future including legislation, policies and practice; the labelling of disability; issues relating to inclusion and exclusion, dependence and independence; personhood including issues relating to identify, sexuality, gender, culture, religion, empowerment and advocacy.

ED10182: Independent studies

Credits: 15
Level: Certificate
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To enable candidates to explore a particular aspect of disability and/or rehabilitation in a specialist way. This may be in relation to an aspect of clinical practice, it may relate to a specific disability or it may focus upon particular developments in service or rehabilitation concepts. The student must draw up a Learning Contract outlining the rationale and philosophy for their intended study, method of learning and learning plan, the anticipated learning outcomes, level of study, credit weighting, assessment specification (if different from the standardised model), any resource or other implications, and duration of study. This Contract will then be subject to approval by the DARE Foundation and the University. Candidates will be required to:
* Explore, through enquiry, the specific disability/rehabilitation approach/service provision identified;
* Present evidence for intervention and change;
* Implement project work development within the identified field of study and evaluate the change effects;
* Consider the implications of change for overall service provision with respect to their particular area of interest/focus.
Content:
This unit is likely to be taken by one of the following routes:
* A student will identify a particular 'issue' from their enquiries which they wish to address. This would form an enquiry-based investigation, identifying and defining the problem, researching the literature and evidence, proposing, implementing and (where feasible) evaluating change. Students will be guided in their independent study by their tutor and supported with structured open learning materials.
* The student would be a participant in a Workshop Programme run by the DARE Foundation and commissioned by various agencies across the UK. The Workshop Programme runs over 6 months and provides a structured, supported team based action research environment. The team would identify a particular problem and then devise, develop and implement a project to address the problem. Students entering the Independent Studies unit through this mode will be required to demonstrate evidence of independent learning as well as team working and will be guided in their independent study by their tutor and supported structured open learning materials.
* The student may identify a particular area of specialism which is not offered within the Programme but is considered a valid and appropriate area of study. This unit permits the student to gain that knowledge and expertise from another source, e.g. by taking (or attending) a unit offered within another programme of the University or by another recognised university. The study proposal within the Learning Contract would need to meet the general philosophy of the programme and lead to an equivalent of 30 credits study.

ED10183: Managing expectations

Credits: 15
Level: Certificate
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To enable candidates to understand the complexities of managing personal, organisational and societal expectations within an inclusive, user-centred service for disabled people and personal carers. Candidates will be required to:
* Demonstrate an understanding of the diversity and complexity of personal and societal/occupational expectations;
* Explore the way personal/professional/societal expectations about individuals and groups, particularly disabled people, affect the ability and rights of those people to exercise personal choice;
* Demonstrate awareness of the ethical, moral and legal dilemmas that could and do arise when the expectations of different stakeholders conflict;
* Using critical incidents, identify the knowledge and skills involved in consultation, negotiation and conciliation.
Content:
Expectations and disability. People's expectations of themselves and others. Expectations and choice in a democratic society. The notion of user-centred services. Professions - their expectations for and of their members and society's expectations of them. Expectations in relation to 'normality' and 'ability' at individual and societal levels. Ethical, legal issues relating to the notions of personal choice and services. Issues of power and control in relation to expectations. The conflict between expectations and availability of resources to meet them.

ED10190: Ethics & safety

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW25EX50OR25
Requisites:
Aims: To develop an understanding of ethical and safety issues in Coach Education and Sports Development.
Learning Outcomes:
Develop an understanding of emerging issues and pressures experienced by the professional coach and their athletes. Appreciate the risk factors associated with sports performance. Be able to develop responsibility for safe working practice and injury prevention. Understand the moral and ethical issues that the coach and athlete are faced with.
Skills:
Written communication (A), oral communication (T), presentation (A), working as part of a group(A), Written Exam (F).
Content:
(i) The role of the coach in child welfare, to include child abuse, trainability of children, growth and development.
(ii)Drugs in sport, including drug testing, physiological and psychological side effects.
(iii) Safe working practice to include health and safety responsibilities, intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for injury.
(iv) Professionalism vs. amateur, funding, media and role model status.
(v) Multidisciplinary approach to Sport Science, to include coach/athlete awareness of Jet Lag, Acclimatisation, Heat and Cold, Altitude.
(vi) Safe practice within sport and training, to include effective weight training, effective recovery strategies and therapeutic techniques.
(vii) Pressures of success, under achievement and the impact it has on injury occurrence and return to performance.

ED20003: Education in society

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims:
1. To introduce key sociological concepts and theories which can be applied to the study of the relationship between education and society
2. To enable a critical assessment of the construction of problems and proposed solutions in education
3. To develop analytical skills which can be applied to evaluate evidence, arguments and assumptions in texts related to education.
Learning Outcomes:
1. To draw on sociological concepts to engage with key questions concerning the relationship of education to society
2. To appreciate the contested nature of the functions and values of education
3. To undertake a wider questioning of the effects of education on individuals and social groups.
4. To critically evaluate information from a wide variety of sources to make and communicate sound judgements.
Skills:
Intellectual
1. To apply, compare and evaluate theoretical concepts (taught and assessed)
2. To engage in a critical analysis of a wide range of texts and electronic information (taught and assessed)
3. To retrieve and synthesise information from a number of sources to develop propositions and arguments (taught and assessed)
4. To write in an academic style and format (taught and assessed)
Professional/practical
1. Communicate ideas effectively using a range of communication techniques (facilitated and assessed)
2. Apply planning and organisational skills in undertaking group based professional activities (taught)
3. draw on interpersonal skills to discuss and negotiate differences of opinion (facilitated)
Key Skills
1. demonstrate confidence and skills in presenting their own ideas (facilitated)
2. exercise initiative and personal responsibility (facilitated)
3. use texts and information technology to access information (taught)
4. evaluate their own performance and undertake strategies for improvement (facilitated)
Content: This unit provides an overview of the aims and functions of education and its relationship to society. It introduces students to key sociological concepts and theories relating to education. It focuses on key areas of education such as the relationship between education policy and politics, the concept of equality of opportunity, ethnicity, gender and achievement and the curriculum and socialisation.

ED20126: Educational psychology

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Aims: This unit focuses on key concepts in educational psychology, particularly cognitive, developmental and social dimensions.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who have completed this unit will appreciate and be able to explore contemporary issues and theories in educational psychology and will have a greater understanding of their own and others' approaches to learning.
Skills:
Reflecting on approaches to and factors influencing learning (T, F, A). Reflecting on own learning (T, F, A). Reviewing articles, papers (T, F). Critical engagement with literature (T, F, A). Written communications (T, F, A). Working independently (F). Working in groups (F). Discussion/ oral communication (T, F).
Content:
Students will consider the cognitive and affective bases of individual learning, including issues of memory, learning, cognition, metacognition, values and emotion. The major theoretical models utilised to examine developmental psychology, particularly those of Piaget and Vygotsky, will be discussed, as will the significance of social relationships in learning. Contemporary issues in educational psychology will be addressed, including a variety of learning disorders and difficulties.

ED20127: Education and coaching law

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Students completing this unit will have developed an understanding of the legal framework surrounding education and coaching. It will, through a case study approach, focus on the implications of criminal and statute law for practising teachers, coaches and coach educators. It will study issues of legal interpretation, as well as identifying good practice for those involved in any aspect of coaching. Examples will be drawn from Europe and the rest of the world.
Content:
Legal framework - the following areas of the law will be studied: Health and Safety at work, risk assessment, recording and reporting of accidents, child protection, loco parentis, duty of care and higher duty of care, laws of confidentiality and public access to information, the rights and responsibilities of the media, agents and sponsors. Case Studies - students will study antecedents and consequences of a number of educational/coaching scenarios: examples of accidents, negligence, fraud, child abuse, slander, misappropriation, cheating and bribery.

ED20128: Principles of event management

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take MN10071 and take MN20072
Aims: The aims of this unit are to develop both the knowledge and understanding of the techniques of event management in combination with relevant communication and management skills.
Learning Outcomes:
Students completing this unit will understand the theory and application of the theory involved in running a medium / large scale event. They will acquire the knowledge of cultural and social assumptions, expectations and legal frameworks. Relevant communication and management skills will be developed through liaison with appropriate external organisations and also through the process of formal management meetings. Presentation skills will be developed through formally presenting a business plan to relevant stakeholders.
Skills:
The following key skills are either taught and / or facilitated (T/F) or assessed (A) in this unit: Written Communication - T/F, A. Numeracy - T/F. Problem Solving - T/F, A. Working Independently - T/F, A. Working as Part of a Group - T/F, A.
Content:
Students will study:
* Principles of event management.
* The concept of the sports event, including cultural and social assumptions, expectations and legal frameworks.
* Individual group management sessions.
* Organisation of small-scale local events, drawing on resources and facilities available.
* What makes a successful event?
* Planning and management of a medium / large event, liaising with appropriate external organisations and senior event managers.
* Formulation of a business plan.
* Visits to and visits from lecturers from those governing bodies / associations involved with large-scale event management.
* Group Presentation and analysis of management activities undertaken.

ED20129: Historical development of coaching

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Through this unit students will develop an understanding of the nature, scope and pace of change in coaching methodology and technology, along with the socio-economic and cultural factors that have facilitated/inhibited change. Students will be able to track the relationship between the development of coaching and performance accomplishments in specific sports and will be able to link this progress to changing assumptions about the nature of sport in society. Students will gain an appreciation of the potential impact upon sport of future/recent innovations in coaching.
Content:
Nature, scope and pace of change: Students will study changes in coaching technology and methodology, and assumptions about sport, from the ancient Greeks, through the Roman era to more recent techniques used in Victorian times and modern day. Socio-economic factors: Social changes will be analysed as catalysts for change: public interest, political desire, lifestyle trends, educational and research developments, trends in public expenditure, international sports development, the economics of the sports business. Potential impact of recent/future innovation: Students will make a seminar presentation on a recent innovation within a chosen sport, focusing upon the impact this is having on the coaching process within that sport and the consequent performances of athletes.

ED20130: Innovation in coaching

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW25EX50PR25
Requisites:
Aims: Students completing this unit will have developed a breadth and depth of understanding that enables them to evaluate innovations in coaching and to be challenged to be innovative themselves with methodology and technology.
Learning Outcomes:
To assess emerging methodology and technology used by the professional coach. To acquire practical skills in order to apply relevant techniques to the coaching situation effectively. Develop a level of understanding which allows them to evaluate the effectiveness of coaching innovation. To demonstrate the practicality of innovation in the area of coaching. Be able to reflect and critically analyse current literature.
Skills:
Written communication (A), oral communication (A), presentation (A), working as part of a group(A), Information Technology (T).
Content:
Methodology and technology - students will study innovation in a number of areas:
* Competition and training equipment, measuring and testing equipment, simulators, clothing facilities, information technology, communications, coaching and learning styles and psychological analysis. Coach Education and Science:
* Applications of behavioural and cognitive psychology, physiology and training methods, applied biomechanics. Practical skills:
* Notational analysis, measurement & testing, equipment evaluation, use of Information Technology, the ability to handle and present data (plus relevant skills specific to various methodologies and technologies). Evaluation & Innovation:
* Students will be expected to select a particular area of innovation and evaluate the usefulness and effectiveness of its application to the coaching situation as part of the workshop practical assessment. They will also be expected to give an oral presentation on an innovative idea of their own in relation to the coaching of a specific sport.

ED20134: Sports development and business

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce students to the Sports Development Process in Britain and the ways in which sport functions as a business.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing this unit the students will: Be able to define and recognise sports development principles through a range of local and national case studies. Understand the contemporary sport and social policy framework within Britian. Be able to analyse the socio-economic, cultural and educational context of Sports Development locally and nationally. Be able to apply knowledge and understanding of the various partnerships within sports development in Britain to planning and implementing initiatives. Be able to describe and recognise a range of business functions within the world of sport. Understand the role of business in supporting, promoting and undermining sports development and the sport experience. Be able to apply knowledge and understanding of the role of the media plays in both sports development and business.
Skills:
Sports Development Planning Skills - taught and assessed. Business Planning Skills - taught and assessed. Problem Solving Skills - facilitated. Analytical skills - facilitated and assessed. Reflective skills - facilitated. Communication skills - facilitated. Numerical Skills - facilitated and assessed. Research Skills - facilitated and assessed. Collating Skills - facilitated and assessed. ICT skills - facilitated.
Content:
The principles of sports development (foundation, participation, performance and excellence). Case Studies of local and national sports development programmes and initiatives. Specific Sports Strategy Documents and major sports policies. Cross-Cutting Agendas and the role of sport in social policy delivery. The context of sports development to include: social, economic, political, cultural geographic and educational factors. The nature and role of partnerships and alliances within sports development and delivery. Business opportunities in sport. The emergence and growth of commercial sports. Characteristics of commercial sports. Spectatorism and the role of the media in sports business and sports development. Case Studies of commercial and non-commercial sports in terms of business exploitation and sports development.

ED20137: Applied principles of athletic training

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50PR50
Requisites:
Aims: This unit will focus on the development of applied theoretical knowledge and safe practical skills in the area of athletic training. The unit will develop students understanding of the principles of training and fitness and implement training methods and strategies to analyse how these respond and are developed.
Learning Outcomes:
To develop a broad and detailed knowledge of a range of training techniques both specific and generic. To develop an understanding of how the respiratory, musculoskeltal and cardiovascular systems respond to exercise. To understand how, when and why such training techniques should be applied. Be able to prescribe exercise and training programmes for a variety of clients / performers. Be able to critically assess a number of training strategies currently used.
Skills:
Written communication (A), oral communication (T), presentation (A), practical skills (A), working as part of a group(A).
Content:
(i) Principles of training programmes, principles of training sessions, long term planning and periodisation.
(ii) Body system response to training: musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory and energy systems.
(iii) Applied knowledge and safe practical skills: Students will take part in practical sessions where they will be instructed in a range of practical techniques. Practice, demonstration of techniques as well as instruction and teaching will be covered. The theory of the principles of training - specificity, overload, progression, intensity, frequency, recovery and regression - will be applied practically to case studies.
(iv) Range of training techniques, specific and generic:
(v) Generic: resistance training (isometric, isotonic, isokinetic) fixed resistance and free weight, flexibility (active, passive, ballistic, static, proprioceptive neuro muscular facilitation - PNF), plyometric, acrobatic, cardio-vascular (mechanically aided, group and independent) continuous, interval, fartlek, circuit training, speed agility quickness - SAQ, core stability, agility.
(vi) Specific: sport, event, position specific training.
(vii) Exercise prescription: Principles of exercise prescription, and programme development and writing.

ED20152: Introduction to research methods II

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ED10162
Aims & Learning Objectives: This unit aims to enable students to develop their understanding of how research methods can be best applied in the context of their professional practice. On completion of this unit students will have an understanding of techniques of small-scale enquiry, including case study and action research approaches. They will understand how to generate professionally relevant research questions, to develop an appropriate research design, and to locate and review literature in appropriate fields. They will be introduced to methods of data collection and techniques of analysis in professional contexts.
Skills:
* Problem solving (F/A)
* Independent learning (F)
* Written communication (T/F/A)
* Group work (F)
* Formulation of a research question (T/F/A)
Content: The unit will develop students& understanding of: techniques of small-scale enquiry; the relation of professional interests to academic fields of study and the location and review of appropriate literature; the ethics and parameters of undertaking research in professional contexts, and appropriate research designs for such contexts.

ED20160: Professional placement

Credits: 60
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide practical experience in the application of knowledge and skills gained at the University, by working in a professional activity in an approved organisation working in one of the following areas:
* Coaching and Coach Education
* Physical Education Teaching
* Sports Management & Development
* To develop skills in oral and written communication, time management, problem solving, group work and decision making
Content:
The content will vary depending on the placement. In choosing the placement, the University will try to ensure the project offers adequate opportunities for the student to demonstrate a significant number of the following skills:
* Application of academic knowledge
* Practical ability
* Writing skills and oral communication
* Application of Technology
* Interpersonal skills
* Responsibility and Reliability

ED20161: Study year abroad

Credits: 60
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Students undertaking this unit will develop communication skills and develop the ability to work in an environment with an unfamiliar culture. Students will develop the self-confidence and maturity to operate effectively with people from a different cultural background.
Content:
Students should follow a course equivalent to 60 University of Bath credits. Programmes of work will be decided by negotiation between the Director of Studies at the University of Bath, the host University and the student. Courses should not duplicate courses given in the University of Bath degree but should complement the University of Bath programme.

ED20189: National curriculum physical education activity areas

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: PR100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Students completing this unit will gain experience and subject knowledge in the acquisition of practical skills and subject knowledge related to the national curriculum activity areas. They will develop evaluative and diagnostic skills relevant to self and other observations.
Content:
Students will study:
* Principles of skill acquisition
* Principles of preparation
* National Curriculum Practical subject knowledge
* Athletics, Swimming, Games (Invasion, striking/fielding, net/wall), Dance, Gymnastics, Outdoor and Adventurous Activities
* Generic skills of Activity areas
* Principles of attack/defence.

ED30005: Science education in practice

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit considers teaching and theories of teaching within the context of science education. The unit includes practical activities within a teaching context which are designed to illustrate the underlying theories. The unit considers issues such as curriculum, assessment, purposes, elements of instructional design and the role of the teacher.
Content:
The relationship between teaching and learning; issues related to designing a curriculum for science: why teach science, how do we learn science, elements of science teaching, conceptual nature of science learning; designing a science curriculum; implementing an aspect of a science curriculum and evaluating it; assessing learning in science. This unit is intended for science, engineering and mathematics students who may be interested in a career in teaching.

ED30006: Issues in science education

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to consider some of the current issues in science education and to explore and examine some of the key implications for teachers of science in primary and secondary schools. By the end of the unit students should be able to:
a) explain the significance of these developments in school science;
b) describe examples of the practical consequences of these developments at the classroom level;
c) explain, where appropriate, basic implications for curriculum developers and policy makers in science education.
Content:
The issues will change from time to time, examples include: the nature of science; the role of ICT in science education; developments in children's learning in science (e.g. the Cognitive Acceleration through Science Education); the nature of assessment of science (with a focus on diagnostic assessment); the role of language in science education; recent developments in practical work; personal and professional subject knowledge; scientific literacy and the implications for the Public Understanding of Science.

ED30115: Undergraduate certificate in education

Credits: 60
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment:
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Students will complete the study associated with the Postgraduate Certificate in Education.
Content:
The content is identical to that taught on the Postgraduate Certificate in Education. Students must comply with the requirements for entry onto PGCE including a satisfactory interview before they may opt for the UGCE year. Please see the Director of Studies for further information. There is an expectation that students wishing to take the UGCE year would complete, at least, ED30005 in their second year.

ED30141: Effective coaching skills

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW80OR10OT10
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of this unit are to develop an awareness of the holistic and integrated nature of effective coaching, to foster reflective practice and the ability to tackle a range of coaching problems in a professional manner.
Learning Outcomes:
Students will develop the ability to research and reflect on every aspect of complex coaching problems, to consider a range of possible solutions and identify the most appropriate course of action.
Skills:
* Self-directed learning;
* Problem analysis, research and reflection (F/A);
* Both independent and team working (F);
* Problem-solving (F/A);
* Oral presentation (F/A);
* Written communication (A);
* Integrated, cross-discipline understanding of coaching issues (F/A).
Content:
This unit uses a problem-based learning strategy. Students will study:
* A range of realistic, problematic coaching scenarios;
* Cross-discipline research material pertaining to coaching problems;
* A range of possible and preferred solutions;
* Group presentation;
* Written analysis of problem scenarios and defence of preferred solutions.

ED30151: Individual coach education project development

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ED10162 and take ED20152 and while taking this unit you must take ED20152

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Students will develop and produce a research project proposal, planning and devising means of collecting data to support that proposal. Students will develop an appropriate Introduction section comprising a definitive Problem Statement and rationale for the study in addition to a Review of Literature and Method section. In essence, this will comprise the first 3 chapters of their research report.
Content:
Emphasis will be placed upon the development of research ideas. Each student will prepare a research proposal for a project that is relevant to coach education. Students may be allowed to undertake co-operative work with other students in some areas of data collection, although each student will produce an individual project. Students will be required to discuss and agree an overall project design with their respective tutors. Students will pilot their research instruments.

ED30153: Physical education & the national curriculum

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take ED30154 or take ED30155 and before taking this unit you must take ED10136 and take ED20189

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce students to the professional practice of secondary school teaching. This unit will enable students to:
* Develop an understanding of national curriculum requirements;
* Understand the history, development and recent developments of physical education policy;
* Become aware of the everyday issues of working within a school Physical Education department;
* During a school placement analyse and reflect on teaching and learning processes and learn to evaluate their effectiveness in relation to defined outcomes or performance indicators;
* Develop applied understanding of teaching styles, skills and applications.
Content:
i. Trace the development of Physical Education from Public School Athleticism, State provision, significant education acts 1944, Education Reform Act and inception of National Curriculum;
ii. Requirements of National Curriculum. Programmes of Study, Assessment, Recording & Reporting, Equality of Opportunity and Access, Cross Curricular themes and Key skills;
iii. Everyday issues for teachers, role of the teacher, pastoral care, personal tutoring and duty of care, involvement of outside agencies, special educational needs, governors and senior management roles;
iv. Extra curricular activities;
v. Reflect on good practice through observation.

ED30154: The practice of professional coaching

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50PR50
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take ED30153 or take ED30155
Aims: The unit aims to examine the theoretical basis of professional coaching, including generic coaching and educational principles, legal, moral and ethical responsibilities, current initiatives, employment issues, provision, techniques, and support systems. Contemporary ideas and problems relevant to the professional coach will be evaluated. Students will undertake a placement shadowing and assisting a professional coach in order to fully appreciate the practical demands within the vocation.
Learning Outcomes:
Students completing this unit will understand the role of the professional coach in the development of sport at all levels of participation. They will be able to appreciate both the theoretical and practical issues underpinning professional sports coaching. Students will be able to discuss and critically analyse contemporary ideas relevant to the professional coach. They will acquire competence in a variety of routine and complex tasks through practical classes, and they will learn to evaluate their effectiveness in relation to defined outcomes or performance indicators. They will appreciate the demands of professional coaching in a practical context.
Skills:
The following key skills are either taught and / or facilitated (T/F) or assessed (A) in this unit: Written Communication - T/F, A. Spoken Communication - T/F, A. Problem Solving - T/F, A. Working Independently - T/F, A. Working as part of a group - T/F.
Content:
Students will study:
* The theoretical basis of professional coaching - generic coaching, educational principles, legal, moral and ethical responsibilities.
* Current coaching initiatives, employment issues, provision techniques and support systems.
* Evaluation of contemporary ideas and problems relevant to the professional coach.
* Placement shadowing and assisting a professional coach.
* Develop appropriate coaching / evaluation proformas.

ED30155: Sports management & development

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take ED30154 or take ED30153
Aims: To gain an understanding of the range of knowledge and skills underpinning sports management and development. To appreciate the range of roles within the profession.
Learning Outcomes: Students completing this unit will:
* Have gained an understanding of the range of knowledge and skills underpinning sports management and development.
* Will appreciate the range of roles within the profession and will explore the individual requirements of a specific role.
* Will acquire competence in a variety of routine and complex tasks through workshops and practical experience, and they will learn to evaluate their effectiveness in relation to defined outcomes or performance indicators.
* Will be able to explain and discuss the relevance of sports management and development to performance and participation sports and to sports business.
Skills:
* Comprehensive and scholarly written communication (e.g. essays) F/A
* Effective oral communication (e.g. seminar presentations) F/A
* Ability to develop rigorous arguments through precise use of concepts and models. T/F/A
* Ability to apply theory into practice. F/A
* Ability to produce work to agreed specifications and deadlines. F/A
* Ability to work effectively as part of a group or team. F
Content:
(i) Skills underpinning sports management and development:
Interpersonal, time management, personnel management, planning, financial, information technology, presentational, written and communication.
(ii) Range of roles within the profession:
Facility Managers (public and private), Programme Managers (participation, performance, excellence), Development Officers and Managers (National Governing Body, Local Authority, Sports Council, University, Sports Organisations), Institute Managers, Performance Directors, Directors of Sport.
(iii) Routine and complex tasks (operational and functional tasks involving sports equipment, sports facilities and sport procedures).
(iv) Relevance to participation, performance and sports business: Case Studies of projects and programmes demonstrating impact.

ED30156: Continuing professional development

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: Students who complete this unit will have considered the conceptualisation of professional learning as a lifelong endeavour. They will explore issues in the fields of lifelong learning and continuing professional development. They will consider the range of learning opportunities and forms of learning support.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will be able to examine the processes and stages involved in professional induction and professional development within coaching and physical education contexts.
Skills:
This unit will include the assessment of written communication and problem solving skills. Oral presentation skills will be facilitated in the unit, by means of a student-led seminar presentation.
Content:
Students who complete this unit will examine the idea that professional development is a key responsibility of a professional coach and educator. The processes and stages of career-long professional development will be analysed from theoretical, historical and contemporary perspectives. Continuing professional development contexts for both coaches and physical educators will be explored, compared and contrasted in the light of current debates about lifelong learning and continuing professional development. The importance of continuing professional development to a coach will also be considered in the contexts of self and of acting as a facilitator for other's development.

ED30157: Distance & open learning

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of this unit are to develop an awareness of the issue relating to creating an open and distance learning programme for coaches and how to overcome them.
Learning Outcomes:
Students completing this unit will: understand the philosophies and theories of distance and open learning; appreciate system, design and operational considerations of a distance or open learning programme; and recognise the major issues of distance education, both in a generic context and in a physical education and coaching context.
Skills:
* Self-directed learning (F/A)
* Problem analysis, research and reflection (F/A)
* Independent and team working (F)
* Oral presentation (F/A)
* Written communication (A)
Content:
The practical and theoretical bases of coaching/mentoring models involved in distance and open learning will be examined. Operational systems in distance and open learning systems will be explored, such as planning, developing self-instructional materials, learner support, interactivity, modes of learning, and methods and strategies of teaching or coaching. Major underlying issues and problems involving relating to a physical education coaching context will be examined.

ED30158: Individual coach education project analysis

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ED30151 and while taking this unit you must take ED30159

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Students completing this unit will undertake the data collection, complete the results, discussion and conclusion sections of their individual research project, and produce a final research project report.
Content:
Emphasis will be placed upon completing a research project report inclusive of abstract, results, discussion, conclusions, references and appendices. Additionally, the introduction, literature review and methods sections from the Individual Coach Education Project Development unit will also be incorporated into the research project report, but will not be further assessed in their own right. Students may be required to defend the research project and its conclusions at a viva-voce examination.

ED30159: Research seminar

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: PR30CW70
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Students completing this unit will have extended their knowledge of a range of contemporary coach education issues. Students will demonstrate an understanding of recent coaching research.
Content:
Discussion of the development of coaching research and of contemporary trends within it.

ED30164: Analysing coaches' philosophies and practices

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: The unit aims to engage students in reflection and critique of the practices of other coaches, of their own practices and assumptions, and that of current coaching knowledge. It thus aims to provide an opportunity for students to apply theoretical coaching knowledge to the practical environment, thus developing and improving their personal critical praxis.
Learning Outcomes:
Having studied this unit, students will be able to:
* consider and recognise the constraints and opportunities that influence coaching practice.
* appreciate the value of critically reflecting upon the practice of others in terms of enhancing their continuing professional development.
* increasingly recognise appropriate linkages between coaching theory and practice.
Skills:
* Observation (F/A)
* Interviewing (data gathering) (F/A)
* Reflection (F/A)
* Written communication (A)
* Oral communication (F)
* Linking theory to practice (F/A)
* Data (interview) analysis and synthesis (F/A)
* Critical engagement with empirical data in the light of existing coaching theory (F/A).
Content:
Students will observe and interview a coach of their choice with regard to their philosophies and practice. They will subsequently reflect upon, analyze and interpret the gathered data in the light of current coaching literature, and how it can inform their personal practice.


Postgraduate Units:


ED50008: Current issues in history education

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The course aims to:
* introduce participants to current philosophical, curricular and classroom issues in history education;
* critically evaluate current developments in history education.
Objectives: At the end of the course, students will be able to:
* demonstrate their understanding of current developments in history education;
* extend their repertoire of relevant classroom teaching strategies.
Content: Participants will explore developments in history education including those relating to:
* interpretations about the nature of the discipline, including their own philosophy;
* the variety of purposes of teaching history in schools;
* school history curriculum change;
* research findings in history education;
* teaching and learning approaches in school history including:
* teaching about time and chronology;
* the place of empathy;
* developing students' understanding of interpretations in history;
* learning about controversial issues in history;
* developing students' evidence-based skills in history;
* developing students' language, literacy and extended writing skills.

ED50094: Equal opportunities in educational management

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The Aims of the Unit are to provide participants with the opportunity to:
a) Consider the language of equal opportunities.
b) consider issues such as race, ethnicity and religion.
c) consider how equal opportunities policies can be introduced into institutions.
d) reflect upon how their attitudes have changed during the teaching of the unit.
Objectives: At the end of the Unit, students should be able to:
a) understand words such as equality, discrimination, hegemony and stereotyping.
b) understand the difference between radical and liberal approaches.
c) understand how issues such as race, ethnicity, religion, social class, ageism, gender, sexual orientation and disability need to be considered when related to equal opportunities.
d) understand the nature of power in institutions and how best it can be used/overcome to allow equal opportunities policies to be developed.
e) analyse different equal opportunities policies.
f) understand how equal opportunities policies can influence such activities as appraisal and staff development.
Content: The Unit will cover the following content:
* a theoretical consideration of equal opportunities
* specific issues such as race, gender and disability
* issues related to implementing change
* the issues involved in producing equal opportunities policies in educational institutions.

ED50097: Assessment of pupil achievement

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The unit aims to:
* develop understanding of key concepts and terminology in the field of educational assessment;
* broaden participants' awareness of the variety of assessment options available and their applicability to different purposes and contexts;
* encourage critical reflection on assessment practice;
* raise awareness of the roles of assessment in broader educational and social contexts;
* familiarise participants with recent debates and research in this field.
Objectives: At the end of this unit it is expected that students will:
* be able to describe and identify a range of purposes of assessment;
* be aware of the tensions and trade-offs that arise out of these multiple purposes;
* be familiar with a range of concepts and technical issues in assessment;
* have developed critical skills for evaluating current practices in assessment, including their own;
* be able to make an informed selection of techniques of assessment appropriate to different purposes;
* be familiar with and able to evaluate recent research in the field of assessment;
* be familiar with and able to evaluate forms of reporting assessment outcomes to different audiences for different purposes.
Content:
* The nature of educational assessment.
* Dimensions (or modes) of assessment.
* Purposes, roles and effects of assessment.
* The substantive focus of assessment.
* Quality issues in assessment.
* Assessment techniques.
* Norm- and criterion-referencing, and the assessment of competence.
* Formative and summative assessment.
* Internal and external assessment.
* Self- and peer-assessment.
* Marking, moderating and reporting outcomes.
Note: the emphasis in covering this content will be influenced by both contemporary research and concerns in the field and by the needs and experiences of the participants.

ED50098: Evaluation

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The unit will
* develop a systematic understanding of the fundamental principles of educational evaluation;
* critically explore evaluation practice, concepts and methodologies in a range of educational contexts;
* provide opportunities for structuring and communicating ideas.
Objectives: By the end of the unit participants will be able to:
* demonstrate a systematic and comprehensive understanding of the theoretical foundations, processes and ethics of evaluation;
* present a rationale for an original design of a small scale evaluation study; critically select appropriate criteria to enable the collection of evidence to judge effectiveness; present a critical awareness of the limitations of their work.
Content: The unit begins by clarifying definitions of evaluation. It then considers the purposes of evaluation and explores ethical issues arising from evaluation for accountability and evaluation for improvement. Models of approaches used by different evaluators are examined and practical exercises in focussing and an evaluation and gathering good quality evidence are carried out. Data analysis and presentation are considered and the unit concludes with participants designing, undertaking and presenting findings from their own evaluation of the unit.

ED50099: Information technology

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The Unit will
* Develop a better understanding of the main curriculum purposes of Information Technology and the implications for curriculum design;
* Develop an awareness of the range of possibilities which IT can bring to learning;
* Relate research in IT to our understanding about learning and learning theories;
* Explore and evaluate the social and cultural implications of the use of IT in educational settings;
* Explore the organisational and management issues which are presented when an expensive resource such as IT is used in educational settings.
Objectives: At the end of the unit students will
* Be able to describe the key curriculum purposes for IT and how they translate into current practice;
* Be able to list and exemplify ways in which IT can be used to support learning across the curriculum;
* Become critically aware of current research in IT and learning;
* Appreciate the social and cultural implications of the use of IT in schools and colleges;
* Be aware of the organisational and management issues which IT as a resource can bring and how these issues have been addressed.
Content: The unit begins with an exploration of the purposes for IT in the Curriculum. There then follow two strands. One strand is to consider the ways in which IT can be used for teaching and learning, including group work and to examine a few examples. The paradigms categorisation is used as a basis for this exploration. The other theme is to review the research into the impact of the use of IT on learning. This is done by discussing ways in which applications are evaluated and reviewing the results. The paradigms classification is also examined in terms of its relationship with learning theories. The module then considers a number of social and cultural issues including gender, socio-economic factors which affect learner's attitudes. It also considers the wider social implications of using IT in schools. Finally, the module considers models for integrating IT into the Curriculum and the pedagogical implications of IT.

ED50100: Curriculum studies

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims of the Unit: The unit encourages you to examine the main factors which have shaped the curriculum as it is normally recognised in schools today. To understand how we came to have such curricular; how they operate; whether they do that which they are intended to do; the forces which shape them and how they may be made to change. The eight sessions consider some fundamental principles and perspectives and adopt a reflective and analytical approach in re-examining the elements which have shaped (and still shape), curriculum content, organisation and management. A Tyler model is taken as a starting point in considering those aspects which impinge on curriculum organisation but such models are examined critically against the contemporary experience and needs of course members. The curriculum is explored against a background of modern international contexts where the role of schools, education and the expectation and needs of societies may vary. The content of a curriculum is considered as both a vehicle which contributes to an educational process and also that which meets cultural and economic needs. Alternative perspectives are taken in constructing a curriculum models, for example those where personal autonomy or vocational skills were the over-riding aims. Factors relevant to the individual requirements of learners and their learning processes are analysed in terms of their cognitive development, cultural background, gender and personality, particularly as they affect access to a curriculum and the developmental opportunities which it offers. Learning theory and cognitive development are developed as a means to understanding how the objectives of a curriculum may be translated into learning experiences.
Unit Objectives: Following this unit you should be able to:
* Understand the role of a curriculum in contributing to training and to education. Also some models of, and roles for, a curriculum.
* Understand the purposes which are ascribed to some curricular and to be able to analyse these curricular in terms of their stated purposes and outcomes.
* Understand changes in curricular in terms of changing political, economic, social and cultural factors.
* Understand how knowledge of the learner needs to be accommodated in planning models.
* Evaluate a curriculum in terms of learner needs and their abilities and to understand some principles of cognitive development and the constructivist view of learning and curriculum planning.
* Understand the basic principles of learning theory, theories of instruction and the relationship between adopted teaching styles and recognised learning styles.
* Understand the idea of the 'Hidden Curriculum' in terms of transmitted values, culture and traditions.
* Understand the wider scope of a curriculum and the development of pastoral care and 'Personal and Social Education' in terms of the learner's social and cultural background and needs.
* Understand functions of a curriculum within a society or a learning community and some of the relationships between ideology, forms of knowledge, ownership of knowledge and curriculum planning.
* Understand the notions of equality of opportunity and equality of access to an education and some of the main factors which influence a learners personal fulfilment. Inclusive education.
* Understand the underlying principles of assessment and evaluation and their role in curriculum planning and development.
* Understand some important issues in curriculum implementation and change.
Content: Copies of the working papers will be distributed at the start of each session and provide a summary of the content for that session along with recommended reading. The papers form the focus for group discussion and any additional tutor input; they also guide workshop activities and small group work. The working papers are designed to enable course members to develop each area of content from their own perspective and for their own professional circumstances. They are intended to provide 'starting points' for the analysis of a wide range of contemporary curriculum issues from a fundamental, historical, social and philosophical perspective. As such this provides introductions to aspects which are dealt with more specifically in other Units. The taught sessions should encourage you to identify and shape your own individual professional development agenda which you should follow up with individual reading and reflection. Personal tutorials will help you to frame and develop your assignment for the unit.
Session 1:
* Understanding 'Education' and 'Educatedness'.
* Some possible roles for a curriculum; education.v.training.
* Curriculum structures and their rationale.
* Curriculum planning and evaluation models.
Session 2:
* Culture and the curriculum.
* Cultural analysis and curriculum planning.
* The role of the curriculum in meeting personal, cultural and political expectations.
Session 3:
* Curriculum and the learner.
* Cognitive development (Piaget, Bruner, Vygotsky and Ausubel).
* Constructivist view of learning and curriculum planning.
Session 4:
* Learning theory.
* Behaviourist and Gestalt traditions.
* Instructional theory of Gagne, Ausubel and Kyriacou.
* Experiential leaning; Kolb and applications in curriculum planning.
* Relationship between learning and teaching styles.
Session 5:
* The 'Hidden Curriculum', ethos, culture and tradition.
* The tutorial role, pastoral care and the pastoral curriculum.
* Designing and implementing a pastoral curriculum.
* Society, culture and pastoral care.
Session 6:
* Knowledge, education and the curriculum.
* Functions of curriculum and forms of knowledge.
* Role of schools and schools as communities.
* Ideologies and curriculum planning.
Session 7:
* The individual learner and individual needs. Inclusive education.
* The curriculum as a means towards equality of access and opportunity.
* Gender and curriculum planning.
* Social class differences, ethnic differences, personality differences.
Session 8:
* The role of assessment and evaluation in curriculum development.
* The role of the learner in evaluation.
* Curriculum development and implementation.

ED50102: Research methods in education

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Semester: 1
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The aims of this unit are:
* to introduce a range of educational research methods available to those who are beginning an enquiry;
* to examine the strengths and weaknesses of such methods;
* to consider a number of different techniques for data collection (both quantitative and qualitative);
* to consider issues relating to validity and reliability in the context of educational research.
Objectives: Having studied this unit, students will be able to:
* consider a range of different approaches to educational research and make judgements about the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as the likely validity and reliability of each in a particular context;
* consider a number of different data-gathering techniques and make judgements about the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as the likely validity and reliability of each for research conducted in a particular context;
* consider critically written accounts of pieces of research conducted by others;
* plan and conduct a piece of small-scale research, and reflect upon its limitations.
Content: The unit will address a number of issues relating to educational research, including the following:
* Action research within the context of educational research;
* Case study as an approach to educational research;
* The scientific approach to educational research;
* The use of questionnaires as a means of data-gathering in the context of educational research;
* The use of interviews as a means of data-gathering in the context of educational research;
* Observation as a means of data-gathering in the context of educational research;
* The concepts of reliability, validity and triangulation;
* Some basic statistics, and basic data analysis.

ED50103: Education in an international context

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The aims of this unit are:
* to stimulate debate relating to the concepts of international schools and international education, and the relationship between them.
* to promote better understanding of the two concepts as a result of consideration of the characteristics which define them.
* to highlight issues which are of particular relevance to the context of international schools and international education.
* to encourage participants to reflect on, and draw on, their own experience, and to consider how their own professional practice might be improved through greater appreciation of these issues.
Objectives: Having studied this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate understanding of issues relating to defining the concept of international schools.
* demonstrate understanding of the concept of international education, and its relationship to the concept of international schools.
* discuss the relationship between values and ideologies, and how the underlying value system of a school relates to the curriculum and management style adopted.
* demonstrate familiarity with issues which are of particular relevance to students and teachers in the context of international schools and international education.
* relate their understanding of issues arising from research in this context to their own experience and to the improvement of their own practice.
Content: The unit will address a number of issues, including the following:
* Values in education, both nationally and internationally.
* Culture and the curriculum.
* The concept of an international curriculum.
* The concept of international schools.
* The concept of international education.
* Some issues particularly relating to teachers and international education.
* Some issues particularly relating to students and international education.
* Management and organisational issues in the context of international education.

ED50107: Foreign language learning

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The aims of the unit are:
* to investigate theories of learning in general;
* to investigate the relationships between first and second languages;
* to critically consider second language learning theories, particularly from a historical perspective;
* to consider cultural and affective contextual influences.
Objectives: At the end of this unit the student will be able to:
* discuss the theories and literature relating to learning and foreign language learning;
* monitor and identify language learning processes;
* identify key issues relating to language learning in their own cultural and pedagogical contexts;
* link theory and practice.
Content:
* Processes of learning another language in the context of learning one's mother tongue and learning in general.
* Differing concepts of language learning and its purpose according to different theories and methodologies.
* Pupils' learning styles.
* Stages in language acquisition.
* Affective factors influencing language acquisition: motivation, anxiety, age of learner and gender.
* Cultural factors affecting language learning.

ED50108: Foreign language teaching

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: The aims of the unit are to:
* Investigate theories which underpin different teaching methodologies;
* Investigate key aspects of the teacher's role which can vary according to different perspectives;
* Critically assess the idealogical basis and viability of different syllabuses;
* Consider cultural contextual issues.
At the end of this unit the student will be able to:
* Discuss the theories and literature connected with syllabus types and foreign language teaching;
* Monitor and understand their own teaching;
* Carry out an action enquiry into their own practice;
* Link theory and practice
Content:
* Differing concepts of language learning and its purpose according to different theories and methodologies.
* Different views of the teacher's role according to different theories and methodologies.
* Differing classroom contexts
* Different concepts of language learning exemplified in different syllabuses
* Methods of classroom research

ED50109: Educational discourse

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The aims of this unit are:
* To understand the theoretical underpinning of critical discourse analysis;
* To interpret classroom language in relation to competing theoretical positions;
* To examine critically the language of educational policy;
* To consider issues relating to educational research as discursive practice.
Objectives: By the end of the Unit, participants will be able to:
* Understand how educational discourse is "ideologically loaded";
* Develop a view about how the political and social context has affected the language of education in recent years;
* Have access to a range of theoretical perspectives with which to make sense of the language of the classroom, educational policy and educational research;
* Undertake a piece of critical discourse analysis in a professionally relevant area.
Content: As with Language and Learning, the course is delivered in four roughly equal sections, allowing for flexibility according to group composition and interests.
Session 1 The following areas are covered (in varying degrees of detail):
* the increasing interest in discourse in social, cultural and policy studies;
* forms of discourse and ways of analysing them;
* the interrelationship between language and power;
* how understanding discourse practices helps us understand education.
Section 2 (Sessions 2-4) The second section deals with classroom teaching and classroom interaction, approaching the issues from a socially critical perspective. Areas discussed include:
* power relations in the classroom, and institutional constraints on changing them;
* the nature of pedagogic discourse;
* the role of critical theory in informing our understanding of classroom processes;
* classrooms as sites of enculturation. Video extracts of three classroom lessons are analysed to further discussion in these areas.
Section 3 (Sessions 5-6) The third section concerns the language of educational policy and governance, specifically:
* the "technologization" of discourse;
* trends in the language of education policy documentation;
* how the language of educational policy works (or does not work!);
* how critical discourse analysis can help us understand the above.
Section 4 (Sessions 7-8) The final section looks at the language of educational research and enquiry, asking the questions:
* Whose language matters in educational research? (What are the characteristics of the discourse of educational research?)
* How can critical discourse analysis help us understand our own practice and institutions?
* How should we carry out a critical discourse analysis to do the above? A wide range of literature is referred to throughout the course. A distinctive feature of this unit is that students are required to undertake pieces of critical discourse analysis for their assignments.

ED50110: Language & learning

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims:
* To consider children's language acquisition, ages 0-5.
* To examine "the language of the classroom".
* To consider approaches to dealing with language variety in the classroom.
* To consider issues of gender in classroom discourse.
Objectives: By the end of the Unit, participants will be able to:
* understand issues concerning language and learning in classrooms with reference to their professional experience.
* understand the external constraints on classroom discourse.
* consider alternative approaches to teaching and classroom management in light of the above.
* evaluate research into language and learning in classrooms.
Content:
Section 1 (Session 1) In this section, a number of issues are dealt with very briefly; many of them are returned to in later sections. Thus issues covered include the following:
* the degree to which language development is/seems innate/genetically programmed;
* the degree to which language acquisition is socially and culturally conditioned;
* the interrelationship between language, thought and cognition;
* competing learning theories in terms of the role of language in learning;- the commonly agreed essential components of language;
* the role of language in mediating and/or constructing reality;
* types of literacy.
Recommended core readers for this section are Steven Pinker's The Language Instinct, and Helen Haste and Jerome Bruner's Making Sense: the Child's Construction of the World. (For details of books, see "Indicative Reading" below).
Section 2 (Sessions 2-4) Work in these sessions covers the following areas:
* the language of home vs. the language of school;
* the sociolinguistics of the classroom;
* specific issues in classroom language (e.g. questioning, the role of whole class vs. small group teaching);
* the sociology of education with respect to classroom language (e.g. Bernstein);
* social-psychological perspectives on classroom processes (e.g. scaffolding; procedural vs. principled knowledge);
* the specific nature of classroom discourse.
While a good deal of literature is referred to in this section, Edwards and Mercer's Common Knowledge: the development of understanding in the classroom is recommended as a core reader.
Section 3 (Sessions 5-6) This section covers:
* the nature of low-achieving children's discourse problems;
* the role of standard vs. non-standard forms of language in schooling;
* approaches to bilingual and multilingual education;
* the language of text books.
A recommended key reader to accompany this section is Baker's Forms of Bilingualism and Bilingual Education.
Section 4 (Sessions 7-8) These sessions examine gender issues in classroom language, working closely with key research articles in the field. The main focus of this section is the effects of gender on classroom processes: for example:
* boys and girls' levels and types of involvement in classroom discourse;
* the dynamics of mixed and single-sex working groups;
* girls' and boys' attitudes to language-based classroom activities;
* girls' and boys' differential levels of achievement on language-based tasks.
The recommended core text for this section is Elaine Millard's Differently Literate.

ED50111: Environmental education: philosophy and purpose

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of this unit are to develop within students a critical understanding of:
* historical, contextual and political perspectives on interest(s) in the philosophy and purpose of education and the environment, and the breadth and complexity of the tasks associated with it
* macro-, meso- and micro-level developments in theories of environmental learning in relation to policy and practice, in the context of broader issues, e.g. (national) curricula projects, roles and responsibilities of teachers, lifelong learning
* the various dominant, contemporary and implicit models of environmental education; their philosophical underpinnings, origins, purchase, and impact within the field and education more widely
* the impacts of the various models across different scales (locally, nationally, internationally), and factors, conditions or developments that weigh for or against them.
Learning Outcomes: At the end of this unit students will be able to:
* identify a range of educational responses to environmental issues
* comment critically on alternative approaches to environmental education
* develop a personal response to environmental imperatives in their own work as educators
* explore critically their own philosophy and practice, and their development, as environmental educators.
Skills: Self-directed learning (F) Problem analysis, research and reflection (T/F/A) Problem-solving (F/A) Oral presentation (F) (where appropriate) Written communication (A) Integrated, cross-discipline understanding of issues relating to learning and environmental / social issues (F/A) Appreciation of the complex, multifaceted nature of learning in relation to social /environmental issues (F/A) Ability to research, synthesise and decide on the relevancy of knowledge and ideas to environmental learning (F/A)
Content: The unit will address a number of issues relating to:
* Why 'education and the environment'? The roots of environmental education and its significance today: ' are there tensions between EE as environmentalism and as education? why?
* What 'education and the environment'? Philosophies and models of environmental education from around the world: ' (how) do models of EE relate to unit participants' philosophies and practice of environmentalism and education (from their past, now, for the future)?
* Which 'education and the environment'? Developing theories, policies and practices in environmental education: ' how might the evolution and status of alternative/competing approaches to EE be explained?
* Where next for 'education and the environment'? Possibilities and perspectives in developing the philosophy and purpose of environmental education: ' what are the resources and prospects for the philosophy and purpose of environmental education?

ED50112: Environmental education: learning and teaching

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of this unit are to develop within students a critical understanding of:
* the range of environmental and sustainable development education learning goals
* the learning opportunities that communities, schools and outdoor settings provide, and how policies and practices influence learning in these different settings
* what learning approaches, styles and strategies are appropriate for environmental learning
* how educators can take account of learners' perspectives in planning and implementing programmes
* how learning programmes in environmental education can impact on the learner.
Learning Outcomes: At the end of this unit students will be able to:
* demonstrate knowledge about current national and international developments in environmental learning from a broad range of perspectives;
* analyse and comment critically on issues arising from current initiatives and trends;
* evaluate critically a range of approaches to learning and teaching in environmental learning;
* identify a range of developmental issues and needs relating to their own work.
Skills: Self-directed learning (F) Problem analysis, research and reflection (T/F/A) Problem-solving (F/A) Oral presentation (F) (where appropriate) Written communication (A) Integrated, cross-discipline understanding of issues relating to learning and environmental / social change (F/A) Appreciation of the multifaceted nature of learning in relation to social /environmental issues (F/A) Ability to research, synthesise and decide on the relevancy of knowledge and ideas to issues of environmental learning (F/A)
Content: The unit will address a number of issues relating to:
* Environmental Learning and Learners: ' making sense of the environment and environmental learning; introducing research into environmental learning; what are the learning goals of environmental/sustainable development education?
* Contexts for Environmental Learning: ' analysing/ presenting children's young people's ideas about the environment; exploring the potential of e-learning
* Learning and Teaching in environmental education: ' exploring frameworks and models of teaching and learning styles and strategies; environmental education pedagogy; exploring/ evaluating the contribution of different contexts/ models; pursuing settings in more depth - community, residential/ outdoor; schools
* Reflecting on Environmental Learning: ' evaluating educational programmes: participants' perspectives on personal and institutional practice and professional development needs; assessing environmental learning; participants' perspectives on personal and institutional practice and professional development needs.

ED50113: Environmental education: learning and change

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of this unit are to develop within students a critical understanding of:
* the range of theoretical positions and perspectives about the relationship between learning, sustainable development, and social and environmental change
* the different contributions that different strategies (eg, information provision, communication and mediation) make to learning programmes
* how learning can be stimulated to help achieve educational goals related to environmental/ sustainable development
* appropriate learning outcomes and success criteria in relation to sustainable development education.
Learning Outcomes: At the end of this unit students will be able to:
* analyse (environmental) educational and organizational contexts in terms of their readiness for change and development
* identify and use a range of strategies to promote and develop learning in relation to sustainable development in both formal and non-formal educational contexts
* plan, carry out and evaluate an effective enquiry into their own ' or an institution's ' practice in relation to learning and environmental / sustainable development education.
Skills: Self-directed learning (F) Problem analysis, research and reflection (T/F/A) Problem-solving (F/A) Oral presentation (F) (where appropriate) Written communication (A) Integrated, cross-discipline understanding of issues relating to learning and environmental / social change (F/A) Appreciation of the complex, multifaceted nature of learning in relation to sustainable development and social /environmental change (F/A) Ability to research, synthesise and decide on the relevancy of knowledge and ideas to issues of learning and sustainable development (F/A)
Content: The unit will address a number of issues relating to:
* Curriculum design and pedagogy: ' how can sustainable development be promoted through learning?
* Economic, environmental and moral behaviour: values and value: ' how might the relationship between humans and non-human nature be conceptualised? what implications in these relationships are there for how people live?
* Effecting learning and change through action research: ' how can action research support both learning and professional development?
* Building capacity, developing agency: evolving a theory of change: ' what relationships are possible between learning and sustainable development?

ED50116: Primary education: aspects of learning

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: Within the context of the rationale above the module aims to build on the teachers' own training and experiences to analyse:
* how children 's learning strategies change through the primary schooling phase;
* how classroom organisation and practice can reflect and support such change;
* how children are supported in their learning in the classroom and in the home.
Objectives: At the end of the course students will be able to:
a) demonstrate their theoretical understanding:
* of the differing accounts of pupil learning within the primary age range;
* the influence of studies of language development on the development of learning theory;
* the impact of motivation and individual learning styles on pupil learning.
b) use their understanding to present a rationale for
* key aspects of classroom organisation;
* the selection of teaching styles and the curriculum content;
* the involvement of parents in the learning process.
Content:
* Models of learning, in particular those developed by Piaget, Vygotsky, Bruner and Wood.
* Social constructivist accounts of learning including the concepts of ZPD, 'the more capable other' and 'hand-over'.
* The impact of language on the learning process.
* Children's induction into classroom life through a study of the concept of 'coping strategies' developed by Pollard and Woods.
* Independent learning skills and differences in learning strategies of boys and girls.
* Peer groups and their contribution to learning.
* Conflicting classroom roles for teachers including the dual role of manager and teacher.
* Educational responses to learning in terms of teaching styles and classroom organisation.
* Parental contribution to learning.

ED50120: The teaching of literature

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims:
* To consider changing approaches to the study of literature;
* To contextualise literary studies socially, culturally and politically, and in relation to other disciplines;
* To understand changes in the teaching and assessment of literary response in the light of the above.
Objectives: By the end of the unit, students will be able to:
* Understand how approaches to literature and its study have changed, particularly over the last century;
* Relate the above to changes in practices of teaching literature in schools;
* Have clearer views about the role and function of literature and literature study;
* Have access to an increased number of approaches to their own teaching (or study) of literature.
Content:
Session 1: Aim: To consider the question, "What is literature?"
Objectives:
* To explore the development of forms of artistic expression from the ritualistic practices of premodern cultures;
* To understand the development of literature in the context of oral traditions:
* To explore Renaissance and Romantic conceptions of the author as artist;
* To survey contemporary perspectives on the purpose and nature of literature.
Session 2: Aim: To survey trends in literary criticism and the teaching of English in universities in the first half of the Twentieth Century.
Objectives:
* To understand the influence of C19 liberal humanism;
* To consider the role of the Cambridge School under Leavis and Richards;
* To consider techniques of textual analysis connected with Formalism and the New Criticism.
Session 3: Aim: To survey trends in literary criticism and the teaching of English in higher education in the second half of the Twentieth Century.
Objectives:
* To understand structuralism and post-structuralism in the context of Saussurean linguistics;
* To consider theories of reader response;
* To be introduced to recent movements in literary studies, including New Historicism, Cultural Materialism and feminist approaches.
Session 4: Aim: To consider the evolution of the school literature curriculum in England over the last Century.
Objectives:
* To consider the role of literature in the elementary and public school traditions;
* To consider the effects of the Personal Growth model of English teaching since the 1960s and of Cultural Heritage and Cultural Analysis models;
* To consider the role of literature within the National Curriculum;
* To look at trends in the examination of English Literature in schools and colleges.
Session 5: Aim: To consider current debates in the teaching of literature in schools and colleges.
Objectives:
* To consider the political and pedagogic ramifications of the debate about literature in the National Curriculum in England and Wales;
* To consider recent and forthcoming changes in the assessment of response to literature;
* To consider the role of literature in the L2 classroom;
* To consider the implications of the new technologies for literature teaching.
Session 6: To consider whether we should teach "English Literature" or "Literatures in English".
Objectives:
* To consider the contrasting perspectives on literature within the Bullock and Cox Reports of 1975 and 1989 respectively;
* To consider what we mean by phrases such as "other cultures" and "post-colonial literature";
* To consider the role of the English literary canon in the school and college curriculum;
* To discus the extent to which "English" should be seen to embody a national cultural tradition.
Session 7: Aim: To consider notions of "high" and "popular" culture with respect to the teaching of literature.
Objectives:
* To examine research into English teachers' values in relation to teaching their subject;
* To discuss critiques of the "Cultural Studies" approach to literary texts;
* To consider how far the techniques of literary analysis can and should be applied in other contexts, such as to media texts;
* To consider the degree to which the curriculum should be transmitting dominant cultural values through literature.
Session 8: Aim: To consider innovative approaches to the teaching of literary texts.
Objectives:
* To enable course participants to explore innovative approaches to literature teaching in professional contexts known to them by preparing a presentation to the group;
* To enable sharing of participants' approaches to literature teaching;
* To consider children's language acquisition, ages 0-5;
* To examine "the language of the classroom";
* To consider approaches to dealing with language variety in the classroom;
* To consider issues of gender in classroom discourse.

ED50138: Developing inclusive schools

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims:
1. To develop critical understanding of the principal traditions of research and thinking about difficulties in learning and the causes of educational failure.
2. To enhance understanding of how aspects of school culture and organisation can contribute to lessening or exacerbating barriers to successful learning.
Learning objectives: By the end of this unit, students will be able to:
1. Locate national policy on the education of students with disabilities and learning difficulties in the context of research and thinking about inclusion.
2. Draw on a range of strategies for carrying out research and development activities in schools.
3. Make selective use of communications technology as a learning resource.
Content: The unit comprises the following main foci. Traditions of thinking about difficulties in learning. A review of three major traditions of research and thinking about the education of students with learning difficulties and disabilities: the psycho-medical, sociological and organisational approaches. The social model of disability and the distinction between disability and impairment. Inclusion: an international trend? International policy developments in the field of inclusive education: UNESCO's Salamanca Statement. Current policy in the UK: the Green Paper (Excellence for all children), the revised Code of Practice and the proposed Disability Rights in Education Bill. The inclusive school. The debate in contemporary research and theoretical literature on the relative merits of inclusion and segregated special education. Research evidence on the social and academic outcomes of inclusion initiatives. How aspects of school culture and organisation can contribute to lessening or increasing the barriers to learning experienced by students. The school development process. Methods for gathering evidence on barriers to learning and participation within schools. The Index for Inclusion as a resource to support school-based research and development. Strategies for encouraging collaboration and promoting inclusive policy and practice across the school. Theories of learning and pedagogy. Alternative views of the learning process and associated explanations of educational failure which research indicates teachers may hold (the student deficit and school reform models); their implications for pedagogical practice. Enabling student participationAn examination of research into students' experiences of inclusive settings. Approaches to finding out what students think of their school, and enabling students to have a voice in the school development process. The shift from a control-oriented to an educational conception of discipline. Using communications technologies to enhance learning. A workshop on locating, accessing and evaluating resources for learning and professional development on the web, with a particular focus on material related to inclusion and exclusion in education. Social inclusion and exclusion. The relationship between broader processes of inclusion and exclusion in education and social factors. The findings of research into gender and ethnicity as factors in school exclusion, and into the effects of poverty on educational attainment.

ED50140: Managing human resources in education

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The Aims of the Unit are:
a) to provide an overview of key concepts and issues related to human resource management in educational organisations within a range of diverse contexts;
b) to explore selected areas of human resource management practice with reference to research, theory and professional experience; and,
c) to foster students' critical reflection on the effectiveness and improvement of human resource management practice in their experience.
Objectives: At the end of the Unit, students should be able to:
a) demonstrate their understanding of key concepts related to Human Resource Management;
b) examine issues surrounding the practice of Human Resource Management;
c) explore the implications of these ideas for their own current or future educational management practice and for the management of their own educational institutions; and,
d) produce a critical account of 'educational management' practice related to Human Resource Management in their own, or another, educational institution.
Content: The Unit will cover content from within the following range:
* the nature of Human Resource Management;
* Human Resource Management in practice;
* Managing human resources in areas such as (i) recruitment and selection of staff in educational organisations; (ii) staff induction in educational organisations; (iii) mentoring staff in educational organisations;(iv) staff motivation; (v) professional development.
* Performance management and appraisal in educational organisations;
* Human Resource Management in an international context; and,
* Evaluating Human Resource Management in educational organisations.

ED50163: Dissertation for the MA in Education

Credits: 36
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: To provide a structured and supervised opportunity for students to design, conduct and evaluate a small-scale educational research project. Objectives: By the end of the unit students should be able to demonstrate:
* Ability to select and justify the focus, scope and methodology of an educational research study;
* Ability to review, employ, and engage critically with an appropriate literature through the design, conduct and evaluation of an educational research study;
* Ability to collect, analyse and interpret data appropriately;
* Ability to draw appropriate conclusions from an educational research study, taking account of its strengths and limitations.
Content: Detailed content is negotiated (and re-negotiated as necessary as the research unfolds) between student and supervisor.

ED50166: Issues in science education

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The aims of this unit are to;
* provide a background to the development of the science curriculum and current debates about significant issues relating to science teaching;
* introduce teachers to relevant research in science education and to see its application in their teaching;
* encourage participants to reflect on their practice and appreciate ways of developing it.
Objectives: Having studied the unit, students will be able to;
* demonstrate understanding of different perspectives on the nature of science and the relationship between science and science education;
* distinguish between different approaches to and purposes of practical work in science and understand the distinctive features of investigative work;
* identify different learning styles and to understand the implications of research into childrens' learning in science on teaching approaches;
* describe/analyse how science relates and interacts with other curriculum areas, and to understand the importance of a 'whole curriculum' perspective;
* describe a range of assessment techniques and their purposes in the context of science teaching, and demonstrate understanding of the basic principles of assessment.
Content: The unit will address five main issues which relate to the five objectives above:
* The nature of science.
* Purposes of practical work.
* Learning in science.
* Science in the whole curriculum.
* Assessing science.

ED50167: Teaching in a bilingual context

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims:
* to understand the diversity and complexity of different bilingual situations;
* to investigate theories and research related to the bilingual teaching and learning process;
* to investigate the institutional and planning implications of teaching in a bilingual context;
* to examine issues related to language and culture in the bilingual classroom;
* to consider the practical implications for the teacher where there are bilingual learners.
Objectives: At the end of the course students will be able to:
* demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of bilingual situations;
* appreciate the wider implications of implementing bilingual teaching;
* make informed decisions about language and culture teaching;
* relate theory to practice.
Content: The unit covers the following issues:
* the nature of bilingualism;
* the nature of bilingual education using Baker's 'strong' and 'weak' categorisations;
* theories of bilingual language acquisition particularly simultaneous and sequential acquisition;
* cultural differences in terms of identity and learning styles;
* the integration of bilingual initiatives into a school and community;
* the use of collaborative teaching arrangements, including team teaching;
* the implications for teacher training of this new kind of teaching;
* the political, social and linguistic implications of language choice in classrooms;
* the integration of culture teaching;
* particular kinds of teaching approach suitable for a bilingual environment, including extra support for the learner.

ED50168: Mentoring

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: This unit promotes the development of the skills and understanding relevant to teachers undertaking or contemplating the mentoring of novice teachers by consideration of the links between theory and practice in mentoring. It includes approaches and expectations of the role of mentor in professions other than teaching.
Objectives: As a result of this module it is expected that course members will be able to:
* identify, develop and provide learning opportunities for mentees which will provide the opportunity for the application of knowledge, development of skills and the analysis and articulation of values;
* help mentees to relate theory and practice;
* encourage mentees to observe, describe and analyse good practice in terms of pupils learning;
* help mentees to transfer learning from one situation or setting to another;
* help mentees to learn the importance of national, LEA and school policies and procedures;
* help mentees to evaluate their own learning and assess their development and ability as teachers;
* demonstrate the ability to develop a programme and agreed set of targets for a mentee;
* draw up a work programme with a mentee on the bases of his/her learning needs and the requirements of the course;
* supervise the mentee's practice as an accountable member of the school's staff;
* demonstrate the ability to assess a mentee's progress and development;
* take responsibility for continuing their own professional development through learning and research, making use of opportunities for training, and evaluating their effectiveness as mentors.
Content: The unit draws on course members' experience and perceptions of mentoring and members will be expected to carry out tasks arising out of and to contribute to the taught sessions. The course content draws on research into the mentoring of novice teachers and will relate this to the following aspects of mentoring:
* Understanding the role of the mentor;
* Recognising and responding to the needs of the mentee;
* Relating theory to practice in a subject context.
* Teacher development: mentor and mentee;
* Assessing mentees' progress;
* Exploring the use of profiles.

ED50170: Educational enquiry

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: The aims of an Educational Enquiry are to enhance students': contribution to teaching and learning in their own professional contextsability to identify, plan, undertake and evaluate educational developments regarding a good quality educational question related to their own or their school's professional practice. After completing an Educational Enquiry students will be able to:
* develop further small-scale research enquiries relevant to their own and/or their schools' professional development needs;
* incorporate research and inspection evidence into the design of such enquiries in an appropriately critical and balanced way;
* involve students and/or colleagues within such enquiries in an appropriately professional way;
* evaluate the process and outcomes of such enquiries, drawing constructive conclusions for the improvement of educational practices.
Content: Detailed content is be negotiated (and re-negotiated as necessary as the enquiry unfolds) between student and tutor in the context of needs identified at the personal, department, school and LEA levels.

ED50171: Mini-dissertation

Credits: 24
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: To provide a structured and supervised opportunity for students to design, conduct and evaluate a small-scale educational research project.
Objectives: By the end of the unit students should be able to demonstrate:
* Ability to select and justify the focus, scope and methodology of an educational research study;
* Ability to review, employ, and engage critically with an appropriate literature through the design, conduct and evaluation of an educational research study;
* Ability to collect, analyse and interpret data appropriately;
* Ability to draw appropriate conclusions from an educational research study, taking account of its strengths and limitations.
Content: Detailed content is negotiated (and re-negotiated as necessary as the research unfolds) between student and supervisor.

ED50172: Extended essay

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: To provide a structured and supervised opportunity for students to explore an educational issue of their own choice in depth.
Objectives: By the end of the unit students should be able to demonstrate:
* Ability to justify the focus of an educational study with reference to an appropriate literature, and to their own professional experience;
* Ability to make critical use of the literature and their own professional experience in the development of a study and its conclusions;
* Ability to identify and categorise issues, and to undertake a study in an appropriately critical, original and balanced fashion;
* Ability to analyse, interpret and critique findings and arguments and, where appropriate, to apply these in a reflective manner to the improvement of educational practices.
Content: Detailed content is negotiated (and re-negotiated as necessary as the work unfolds) between student and supervisor.

ED50173: Understanding learners & learning

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The aims of this unit are to:
* Consider different perspectives on learning, on ways in which we learn and how learning can be supported;
* Present the major families of learning theories and consider their strengths and weaknesses;
* Recognise how approaches to teaching and instruction can be influenced by tacit and explicit learning theories;
* Debate how knowledge gained about learning and learners can be applied in practical educational and training contexts.
Objectives: Having studied the unit, students will be able to:
* define learning from different theoretical and practical standpoints;
* explain the key ideas contributed by psychologists and others to our understanding of the process of learning;
* critically relate learning theories to their own ideas about learning;
* critically evaluate how research on brain structure and function contributes to our understanding of learning;
* identify individual differences in learning styles and preferences using a variety of approaches;
* promote in their own learners the ability to understand their own thinking and learning using metacognitive and other approaches and strategies;
* critically apply knowledge about learning and learners to their practice.
Content: The unit will address the following areas:
* major families of learning theories;
* implicit theories of learning;
* learning styles and preferences;
* learning about learning;
* brain-based learning;
* motivation and other factors affecting learning;
* learning in adults.

ED50174: Technologies for learning

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: The aims of this unit are to:
* Examine the concept of a technology for learning.
* Consider the effectiveness of these technologies for achieving particular learning outcomes.
* Understand the use of these technologies to support more flexible approaches to learning.
* Provide a framework for evaluating the use of technologies for learning in education and training.
* Explore models for communication.
* Understand the concept of visual literacy and its importance in the development of technologies for learning.
Objectives: Having studied the unit, students will be able to:
* define the concept of a technology for learning and give a range of examples;
* analyse the advantages and disadvantages of a range of technologies for learning;
* enhance and support learning using information and communication technology;
* define the terms open, distance and flexible learning and describe their inter-relationships;
* critically evaluate the role of visual literacy in the design and use of ICT;
* critically evaluate applications involving technologies for learning such as integrated learning systems, pedagogical websites and e-moderation.
Content: The unit will address the following areas:
* the origins and development of technologies for learning models for understanding communication;
* approaches to open and flexible learning;
* models of learning and technologies for learning;
* learning using information and communication technologies;
* visual literacy and multimedia learning;
* web-based learning and the evaluation of pedagogical websites;
* e-learning and e-moderation.

ED50175: Managing educational organisations

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives:
* To provide an overview of key concepts and issues connected with managing educational organisations in diverse contexts;
* To explore selected areas of management practice with reference to research, theory and professional experience;
* To foster students' critical reflection on the effectiveness and improvement of management practice in their experience.
By the end of this unit students will be able to:
* demonstrate understanding informed by research, theory and professional experience of the nature, scope and limits of educational management practice and its development within the wider policy context;
* analyse critically prescriptions for educational management practice and its development within the wider policy context;
* apply this understanding and critical analysis in reviewing management practice in their professional context and considering how it may be improved.
Content: To achieve the aims stated above, students will be supported in learning how critically to engage with relevant literature and to use it to inform the evaluatory analysis of their own experience of management. It is anticipated that topics will include:
* mapping the field of educational management practice and enquiry;
* theoretical perspectives on management;
* the impact of context on management practice;
* individual approaches to leadership;
* management teams and teamwork;
* managing the core educational activity;
* creating conditions for the core educational activity;
* evaluating educational management practice and research.

ED50176: Managing educational innovation

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims:
* to provide an overview of key concepts and issues connected with managing educational innovation in diverse contexts;
* to explore selected areas of practice in managing educational innovation with reference to research, theory and professional experience;
* to foster students' critical reflection on the effectiveness and improvement of practice in managing educational innovation within their experience.
Learning Objectives: By the end of this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate understanding informed by research and theory and professional experience of the nature, scope and limits of practice in managing educational innovation within the wider policy context;
* analyse critically prescriptions for practice in managing educational innovation and assess their applicability to individuals' professional context;
* apply this understanding and critical analysis in reviewing the practice of managing innovation in their professional context and considering how it may be improved.

ED50177: Education, globalisation & change

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: The aims of the unit are to provide students with an understanding of:
* Theories and concepts which seek to explain the origins of globalisation and its impact on national contexts;
* The social, cultural and economic changes associated with globalisation;
* Policy development as a response to global and domestic pressures;
* The complex relationship between globalisation and the convergence and divergence of education policy across states;
* The impact of education policy on economic competitiveness and on equity within and between states.
At the end of this unit the student will be able to:
* Identify, clarify and contribute to the main debates associated with the phenomenon of globalisation;
* Apply and critique major theories on the relationship between globalisation and its differential impact on states;
* Identify the factors leading to the convergence or divergence of education policy in different national contexts and its impact on economic competitiveness and equity;
* Articulate the effects of globalisation in key educational areas such as citizenship education, educational quality and assessment;
* Design a local or national policy strategy which exploits a benefit associated with globalisation or acts to mediate an adverse effect of globalisation.
Content: The unit will address the following areas; some of these will be individual sessions while others are likely to be themes combined in one session or appearing across more than one session:
* Theories on the origins of globalisation and its influence on national contexts;
* Convergences and divergences in state policy responses to globalisation;
* The relationship between education policy and economic competitiveness in different national contexts;
* Local and global markets in education;
* The influence of international agencies and organisations such as the World Bank, UN and EU;
* The knowledge economy and the emergence of mass higher education;
* Global trends in assessment and examinations;
* Citizenship education in an international context;
* Changing definitions of, and influences on, educational quality in the context of globalisation;
* The expansion of, and impact of, international systems of education;
* Mediation of global policy through national and local implementation.

ED50178: Managing International schools

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: AIMS: The aims of the Unit are to provide participants with the opportunity to:
* improve their skills of critical thinking and analysis; and,
* consider ways of enhancing their professional practice through greater theoretical understanding of current educational issues.
OBJECTIVES: At the end of the Unit, students should be able to:
* demonstrate their understanding of the nature of International Schools and the contexts in which they are found;
* examine issues surrounding the management of International Schools;
* explore the implications of these issues for their own educational management practice and for the management of their own educational institutions; and,
* produce a critical account of 'educational management' practice related to International Schools in their own, or another, educational institution.
Content: The Unit will cover the following content:
* the nature of International Schools;
* organisational culture within International Schools;
* the governance of International Schools;
* human resource management within International Schools;
* managing non-human resources;
* the role of the community within International Schools;
* the relationship between curriculum and school organisation; and,
* issues surrounding accreditation, improvement and educational quality in International Schools.

ED50184: Independence for life

Credits: 15
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: To enable candidates to define independence in terms which represent the diversity of people's needs and the individual's right to be actively involved in the processes and services which enable them to achieve personal life choices. Candidates will be required to:
* Compare and contrast individual perceptions of the consequences of disease and impairment;
* Critically explore existing definitions of 'rehabilitation' as a means to developing a definition that would inform the development of timely, appropriate services that would, in turn, enable people to achieve personal life choices with respect to independence;
* Critically analyse different approaches to 'rehabilitation' and the relationship between independence and 'rehabilitation', identifying and challenging the underlying principles and driving forces;
* Critically analyse the knowledge, values and expectations of the stakeholders involved in the 'rehabilitation' process and the tensions that can and do arise between them.
Content: Issues of normality/ordinariness. Issues of health, well-being and quality of life. Personal, cultural and societal views of disability and independence. Definitions of 'rehabilitation'. Approaches to independence. Emotional, social, psychological aspects of 'rehabilitation'. Ethical and legal issues. Individuals rights and public services. Professions, organisations and institutions - the impact of their policies, roles and responsibilities on 'rehabilitation'. Knowledge, language and empowerment. The politics of 'health' in relation to disability, 'rehabilitation' and independence. Statutory policies, resources and services. Disability and employment. The nature of teams and collaborative working.

ED50185: Experience of disability

Credits: 15
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims:
* To promote greater understanding and insight into the complexity of the concept of disability;
* To develop positive attitudes towards disability and disabled people;
* To enhance the quality of services which affect disabled people's abilities to achieve personal life choices.
Candidates will be required to:
* Critically reflect on their personal knowledge, attitudes, values and beliefs about: i) Normality and disability; ii) The uniqueness of the individual;
* Compare and analyse individual views and experiences of disability;
* Explore and challenge societal and cultural perceptions and attitudes towards normality and disability and how these have evolved;
* Critically appraise and challenge the different definitions and models of disability and challenge the notion of a 'model of disability' which would influence the opportunities for people of different abilities to achieve personal life choices in society;
* Critically explore the relationship between language, labelling, stigma and the role of the media in relation to disability and exclusion;
* Develop a well-argued case for empowering/enabling people to achieve personal life choices.
Content: This unit will encourage students to address a wide range of issues relating to disability including: quality of life, normality and normalisation, human rights; experiences of disability; attitudes to disability; disability in the past, present and future including legislation, policies and practice; the labelling of disability; issues relating to inclusion and exclusion, dependence and independence; personhood including issues relating to identify, sexuality, gender, culture, religion, empowerment and advocacy.

ED50186: Independent study

Credits: 15
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: To enable candidates to explore a particular aspect of disability and/or rehabilitation in a specialist way. This may be in relation to an aspect of clinical practice, it may relate to a specific disability or it may focus upon particular developments in service or rehabilitation concepts. The student must draw up a Learning Contract outlining the rationale and philosophy for their intended study, method of learning and learning plan, the anticipated learning outcomes, level of study, credit weighting, assessment specification (if different from the standardised model), any resource or other implications, and duration of study. This Contract will then be subject to approval by the DARE Foundation and the University. Candidates will be required to:
* Research, through enquiry, the specific disability/rehabilitation approach/service provision identified;
* Present evidence for intervention and change based upon existing knowledge, theories and evidence of good practice and user perspectives;
* Implement and critically evaluate project work development within the identified field of study;
* Critically consider the implications of change for overall service provision with respect to their particular area of interest/focus.
Content: This unit is likely to be taken by one of the following routes:
* A student will identify a particular 'issue' from their enquiries which they wish to address. This would form an enquiry-based investigation, identifying and defining the problem, researching the literature and evidence, proposing, implementing and (where feasible) evaluating change. Students will be guided in their independent study by their tutor and supported with structured open learning materials.
* The student would be a participant in a Workshop Programme run by the DARE Foundation and commissioned by various agencies across the UK. The Workshop Programme runs over 6 months and provides a structured, supported team based action research environment. The team would identify a particular problem and then devise, develop and implement a project to address the problem. Students entering the Independent Studies unit through this mode will be required to demonstrate evidence of independent learning as well as team working and will be guided in their independent study by their tutor and supported structured open learning materials.
* The student may identify a particular area of specialism which is not offered within the Programme but is considered a valid and appropriate area of study. This unit permits the student to gain that knowledge and expertise from another source, e.g. by taking (or attending) a unit offered within another programme of the University or by another recognised university. The study proposal within the Learning Contract would need to meet the general philosophy of the programme and lead to an equivalent of 30 credits study.

ED50187: Managing expectations

Credits: 15
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: To enable candidates to understand the complexities of managing personal, organisational and societal expectations within an inclusive, user-centred service for disabled people and personal carers. Candidates will be required to:
* Demonstrate their understanding of the diversity and complexity of personal and societal/occupational expectations, how they arise and the factors that influence them;
* Critically explore the way personal/professional/societal expectations about individuals and groups, particularly disabled people affect the ability and rights of those people to exercise personal choice;
* Critically analyse the ethical, moral and legal dilemmas that could and do arise when the expectations of different stakeholders conflict;
* Using critical incidents, identify and appraise the knowledge and skills involved in consultation, negotiation and conciliation.
Content: Expectations and disability. People's expectations of themselves and others. Expectations and choice in a democratic society. The notion of user-centred services. Professions - their expectations for and of their members and society's expectations of them. Expectations in relation to 'normality' and 'ability' at individual and societal levels. Ethical, legal issues relating to the notions of personal choice and services. Issues of power and control in relation to expectations. The conflict between expectations and availability of resources to meet them.

ED50188: Dissertation (DARE)

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives: Aims: To provide a structured and supervised opportunity for students to design, conduct and evaluate a small-scale educational research project. Objectives: By the end of the unit students should be able to demonstrate:
* Ability to select and justify the focus, scope and methodology of an educational research study;
* Ability to review, employ, and engage critically with an appropriate literature through the design, conduct and evaluation of an educational research study;
* Ability to collect, analyse and interpret data appropriately;
* Ability to draw appropriate conclusions from an educational research study, taking account of its strengths and limitations.
Content: Detailed content is negotiated (and re-negotiated as necessary as the research unfolds) between student and supervisor.

ED50198: Sports coaching practicum

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of the unit are:
* to provide an opportunity for students to apply theoretical knowledge to the practical environment, thus developing and improving their personal critical praxis.
* to encourage original and creative problem solving within students through providing challenging learning situations specific to Sports Coaching.
* to encourage students to question and critique current Sports Coaching knowledge and their own Sports Coaching assumptions and practices.
Learning Outcomes: Having studied this unit, students will be able to:
* work flexibly and adaptably in accordance with the needs of the dynamic Sports Coaching environment
* employ enhanced oral and written communication skills in relation to Sports Coaching
* plan, organise and reflect (self-evaluation) in relation to their personal Sports Coaching practice
* utilise enhance pedagogic skills with regard to practical problem solving with the Sports Coaching environment
* exercise enhanced self-confidence and decision-making according to the needs of each Sports Coaching situation.
Skills: Problem analysis, and reflection (T/F/A) Independent working (F/A) Problem-solving within a practical Sports Coaching environment (F/A) Oral communication (F) Written communication (F/A) Planning and organisation of Sports Coaching sessions (F/A) Analytical evaluation of Sports Coaching (F/A).
Content: This is predominantly a practical unit. Its content relates to:
* theoretical facilitation
* linking theory to practice through appropriate reflection and engagement
* practical Sports Coaching related experience actively engaged in the Sports Coaching process (i.e. planning, Sports Coaching and evaluating). At least 60 hours of this must be spent actively/pedagogically Sports Coaching. Students are responsible for arranging their own Sports Coaching placements. The practicum is largely self-directed, although staff are available for consultation and assistance where necessary.

ED50199: Personal knowledge for continuing professional development in sports coaching

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of the unit are:
* to engage students in reflection and critique of their own assumptions and experiences and how they impact on their Sports Coaching practice
* to engage students in critiquing current Sports Coaching theory in light their experiential knowledge
* to build upon coaches' personal knowledge in relation to Sports Coaching through such reflection and critique.
Learning Outcomes: Having studied this unit, students will be able to:
* consider and recognise the constraints and opportunities that influence their practice
* critically reflect upon their practice in terms of enhancing their continuing professional development
* enhance their continuing professional through auto-ethnography
* make appropriate linkages between Sports Coaching theory and practice.
Skills: Self-directed learning (F) Problem analysis, research and reflection (T/F/A) Independent working (F) Problem-solving (F/A) Oral presentation (F) Written communication (A) Integrated, cross-discipline understanding of Sports Coaching issues (F/A) Appreciation of the complex, multifaceted nature of Sports Coaching knowledge (F/A) Ability to research, synthesise and decide on the relevancy of Sports Coaching knowledge (F/A).
Content: The unit will address a number of issues relating to:
* understanding the value of auto-ethnography as a means of improving practice (of helping coaches to 'grow')
* the value of critical reflection in further developing personal knowledge
* understanding why we coach as we do
* issues of constraints and opportunities as related to Sports Coaching
* a critique of Sports Coaching knowledge sources
* experiential learning
* the socialisation of coaches
* issues of CPD for coaches
* the need to better link theory and practice.

ED50200: Managing sports coaching problems and issues

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of this unit are to develop within students:
* an awareness of the holistic and integrated nature of Sports Coaching
* reflective practice and the ability to tackle a range of Sports Coaching problems
* the ability to integrate and synthesise Sports Coaching knowledge to deal with related problems
* an awareness of the dynamic decision making process typically required in Sports Coaching
* an awareness of the contextual and complex nature of Sports Coaching problems.
Learning Outcomes: Having studied this unit, students will be able to:
* identify, research and reflect on relevant aspects of Sports Coaching problems
* consider a range of possible solutions and identify the most appropriate course of action to deal with specific Sports Coaching problems
* understand and solve issues related to a problem-solving exercise
* take responsibility for planning and organising their own learning
* improve their personal decision making in relation to Sports Coaching issues.
Skills: Self-directed learning (F) Problem analysis, research and reflection (T/F/A) Problem-solving (F/A) Oral presentation (F) (where appropriate) Written communication (A) Integrated, cross-discipline understanding of Sports Coaching issues (F/A) Appreciation of the complex, multifaceted nature of Sports Coaching knowledge (F/A) Ability to research, synthesise and decide on the relevancy of Sports Coaching knowledge (F/A).
Content: The unit will address a number of issues relating to:
* the interactive nature of Sports Coaching
* the problematic, non-sequential nature of Sports Coaching
* the integrated nature of Sports Coaching
* Sports Coaching knowledge and how to treat it
* typical complex Sports Coaching problems and how the deal with them.

ED50201: Higher education management, governance and organisation

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ED50203
Aims:
* To provide participants with a critical understanding of the nature of governance, organisation and management in higher education.
* To enable participants to develop an understanding of the differing conceptual bases of management in higher education.
* To consider the impact of a wide range of policy developments on the management of higher education at both national and system level and from the point of view of individual institutions.
* To understand the way in which human and financial resources influence the management of higher education institutions.
Learning Outcomes: At the end of the unit, participants will be able to:
* Analyse and compare the various forms of governance, organisation and management across nations and between different types of universities.
* Understand the way in which human and financial resources influence the academic policies and strategic management of institutions.
* Analyse the characteristics of management processes appropriate for particular organisational and cultural settings.
* Apply conceptual insights of management processes in an appropriate manner for particular organisational and cultural settings.
* Analyse and assess critically the emerging management issues for higher education in the early twenty-first century.
Skills: Intellectual:
* Planning and management in a university setting (T/F/A)
* Ability to think strategically about university management and governance (T/F/A)
* Synthesise information from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice (T/F/A)
* Demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems (F)
* Apply strategies for appropriate selection of relevant information from a wide range of sources and large body of knowledge (F/A)
* Deal with complex academic issues both systematically and creatively (T/F)
* Evaluate research and a variety of types of information and evidence critically, also making informed judgements in the absence of complete data (T/F/A)
* Analyse, evaluate and interpret the evidence underpinning practice critically and initiate change in practice appropriately. (T/F/A)
Professional
* Enhance their professional practice in higher education for example through analytical planning (F)
* Better contribute to professional debate in the field of higher education (T/F/A)
* Act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional level. (F)
Practical/key
* the executive roles of management (T/A)
* fundamental allocation of resources: money, staff, estates (T/F/A)
* communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences (T/F/A)
* evaluate their own academic and professional performance (F)
* utilise problem-solving skills in a variety of theoretical and practical situations (T/F)
* manage change effectively and respond to changing demands (F)
* continue to advance their knowledge and understanding (F)
* manage time, prioritise workloads and recognise and manage personal emotions and stress (F)
* understand career opportunities and challenges (F)
* develop new or higher level skills, for example in IT (T/F)
Content: To achieve the aims stated above, the unit will consider the following areas:
* models of institutional governance; institutional cultures and micro-politics in a range of national contexts
* interface with stakeholders
* strategic and operational planning
* Human resource management
* Financial management
* Evaluation and performance indicators
* centralisation and devolution
* corporate management; leadership and change management
* management of Faculties and Departments; professional services.

ED50202: Education policy in practice

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: The overall aim of this unit is:
* to consider the complex relationship between education policy making and its implementation and evaluation.
More specifically, the unit aims to :
* illustrate the complexity and contextual dependency of education policy implementation
* understand the role and consequences of policy importation
* to examine critically education policy documents drawn from a range of geographical and historical contexts
* to examine the nature of the policy implementation process at different levels within education systems: international, national, local and institutional
* to illustrate and analyse critically the mediating effects of different stakeholders and interests on the translation of policy into practice.
Learning Outcomes: At the end of this unit the students will be able to:
* evaluate critically education policy statements and documents in relation to the contexts in which they were produced and the influences on them (ideological, historical, cultural, economic and political).
* apply and evaluate critically, in contemporary and historical case studies, concepts and theoretical frameworks developed in the Understanding Education Policy unit.
* analyse critically the process of policy implementation in particular local, national and regional contexts.
* recognise and evaluate the roles of different stakeholders in this process ad the tensions between their various interests.
* apply their understanding of the contested nature of policy implementation to an analysis of the education context in which participants work and to their own professional experience.
Skills: Intellectual:
* synthesise information from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice (T/F/A)
* demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems (F)
* apply strategies for appropriate selection of relevant information from a wide range of sources and large body of knowledge (F/A)
* deal with complex academic issues both systematically and creatively (T/F)
* evaluate research and a variety of types of information and evidence critically, also making informed judgements in the absence of complete data (T/F/A)
* analyse, evaluate and interpret the evidence underpinning practice critically and initiate change in practice appropriately (T/F/A)
Professional
* enhance their professional practice in education (F)
* better contribute to professional debate in the field of education (T/F/A)
* act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional level. (F)
Practical/key
* communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences (T/F/A)
* evaluate their own academic and professional performance (F)
* utilise problem-solving skills in a variety of theoretical and practical situations (T/F)
* manage change effectively and respond to changing demands (F)
* continue to advance their knowledge and understanding (F)
* manage time, prioritise workloads and recognise and manage personal emotions and stress (F)
* understand career opportunities and challenges (F)
* develop new or higher level skills, for example in IT (T/F)
Content: After an initial introductory session, five contact sessions will examine case studies drawn from a range of geographical and historical contexts. These may be single case studies or multiple case studies for comparative analysis. The case study analyses will focus on substantive issues of the initiatives. Each case study will demand prior reading and the contact sessions will take the form of critical discussion and analysis of the case. In the final two contact sessions, the students will individually present their own analyses of case studies identified at the beginning of the unit and researched by themselves, for critical discussion by the group as a whole. Suitable cases for study will be selected on a range of criteria, including: the availability of documents; the capacity of the case to illustrate identified policy formulation and implementation issues; the relevance of the case to the backgrounds and interests of the students; and the experience and research interests of the unit tutor(s). As a result, the cases studied will vary from one delivery of the unit to another, but examples might include:
* Aspects of education policy in England in the 1980s
* Education for Self Reliance in Tanzania in the 1960s and 1970s
* Education policy for development in one of the East Asian NIEs
* Jomtien
* Education for All and international donor education policies
* Japanese education policy: the Meiji Restoration/ post WWII/ late20th century
* World Bank education sector policy and strategy papers, 1995 and 1999
* Comparative studies of language policy in different countries (e.g. South Africa, Tanzania, USA, the Netherlands)
* Testing and system monitoring policies in new Zealand and England
* Higher Education Policy in China in the 1990s and beyond
* The impact of language policy.

ED50203: Strategic issues in higher education

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims:
* To provide participants with a systematic and critical understanding of macro strategic developments affecting higher education
* To gain an understanding of how present developments have evolved from different traditions, philosophies and histories of higher education
* To gain a critical overview of a range of theoretical frameworks used to analyse the relationship between external macro forces and the responses developed by higher education institutions
* To provide participants with relevant knowledge and skills to identify the relevance of macro strategic issues for higher education in general and for their own institutions
* To introduce participants to the growing literature and knowledge base on strategy and policy in higher education
* To enable participants to reflect on and enhance their own professional roles in higher education.
Learning Outcomes: At the end of this unit participants will be able to:
* Demonstrate an in-depth and critical understanding of the nature and processes of macro strategic developments affecting higher education
* Apply insights gained from analytical frameworks and empirical research to demonstrate a detailed understanding of the significance of the above for higher education
* Analyse, compare and evaluate strategic responses developed by different types of universities in different national systems
* Identify key gaps in the knowledge base for higher education policy and strategy
* Identify and analyse the major implications of the macro strategic developments described above for participants own national, institutional and professional contexts.
Skills: Intellectual:
* the history and philosophy of the university as a chartered organisation (T/F/A)
* the structure and organisation of the university (T/F/A)
* synthesise information from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice (T/F/A)
* demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems (F)
* apply strategies for appropriate selection of relevant information from a wide range of sources and large body of knowledge (F/A)
* deal with complex academic issues both systematically and creatively (T/F)
* evaluate research and a variety of types of information and evidence critically, also making informed judgements in the absence of complete data (T/F/A)
* analyse, evaluate and interpret the evidence underpinning practice critically and initiate change in practice appropriately (T/F/A).
Professional:
* enhance their professional practice in higher education for example through analytical planning (F)
* better contribute to professional debate in the field of higher education (T/F/A)
* act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional level. (F)
Practical/key:
* communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences (T/F/A)
* evaluate their own academic and professional performance (F)
* utilise problem-solving skills in a variety of theoretical and practical situations (T/F)
* manage change effectively and respond to changing demands (F)
* continue to advance their knowledge and understanding (F)
* manage time, prioritise workloads and recognise and manage personal emotions and stress (F)
* understand career opportunities and challenges (F)
* develop new or higher level skills, for example in IT.(T/F)
Content: To achieve the aims stated above, the unit will address the following areas; some of these will be individual sessions while others are likely to be themes combined in one session or appearing across more than one session:
* Autonomy and accountability in higher education
* Institutional mission, positioning and identity in a diversified higher education environment
* Macro issues in the funding of higher education
* The relationship between research and teaching in higher education
* The growth of virtual and borderless education
* Widening participation and the development of mass systems of higher education
* The emergence of private and corporate universities
* The role of market mechanisms and new managerialism in higher education
* The development of higher education stakeholders and students as clients
* Emerging systems of quality assurance.

ED50204: Understanding education policy

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims:
* To provide students with a critical understanding of the complex nature and processes of educational policy formulation
* To develop conceptual understandings of the ideological, political, and economic factors that influence education policy making
* To provide a critical overview of theoretical frameworks and research methodologies used in education policy analysis and development
* To identify and analyse the factors influencing specific policy formulations in participants' own national and professional contexts.
* To consider critically the impact of education policy on policy goals such as 'equity', 'economic development ' and ' educational quality'.
Learning Outcomes: At the end of this unit participants will be able to:
* Understand the nature of education policy and the policy-making process at local, national and global levels.
* Identify, compare and evaluate theoretical frameworks applied in policy formulation and research.
* Appreciate the economic, political and cultural influences on policy-making.
* Apply theoretical and empirical insights to critique a range of contemporary policies in education in general and in their own professional and national contexts.
* Apply specific methodologies such as discourse analysis to evaluate critically policy statements and documents.
Skills: Intellectual:
* synthesise information from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice (T/F/A)
* demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems (F)
* apply strategies for appropriate selection of relevant information from a wide range of sources and large body of knowledge (F/A)
* deal with complex academic issues both systematically and creatively (T/F)
* evaluate research and a variety of types of information and evidence critically, also making informed judgements in the absence of complete data (T/F/A)
* analyse, evaluate and interpret the evidence underpinning practice critically and initiate change in practice appropriately (T/F/A)
Professional:
* enhance their professional practice in education (F)
* better contribute to professional debate in the field of education (T/F/A)
* act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional level. (F)
Practical/key:
* communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences (T/F/A)
* evaluate their own academic and professional performance (F)
* utilise problem-solving skills in a variety of theoretical and practical situations (T/F)
* manage change effectively and respond to changing demands (F)
* continue to advance their knowledge and understanding (F)
* manage time, prioritise workloads and recognise and manage personal emotions and stress (F)
* understand career opportunities and challenges (F)
* develop new or higher level skills, for example in IT.
Content: To achieve the aims stated above, the unit will address the following areas; some of these will be individual sessions while others are likely to be themes combined in one session or appearing across more than one session:
* Differing and contested understandings of education policy
* Theories explaining the policy formulation process
* Social, economic, political and institutional influences on education policy formulation
* The relationship between the state and education policy
* The nature and processes of market mechanisms on education policy
* The impact of ideology on education policy including social democracy, liberalism and neo-liberalism
* The impact of education policy on equity, economic development and quality
* The development of new managerialism
* Discourse analysis as a research tool for policy analysis.

ED50205: Early childhood education and learning

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims:
* To enable deeper understandings of teaching and learning in early years education
* Enable engagement with current debates and issues relevant to early years education
* Allow early years educators to develop skills for assessing the quality of and effective practice within early years settings
Learning Outcomes: By the end of this unit, students will be able to:
* Demonstrate understanding informed by research, theory and professional experience of the foundations of learning in the early years
* Critically analyse issues concerned with quality, curriculum and assessment in the early years.
Skills:
* Critically engaging with literature (T/F/A)
* Analysing and interpret findings (T/F/A)
* Identifying and categorising concepts (T/F/A)
* Developing a logical argument (F/A)
Content: In order to achieve the aims of this unit, students will be supported in learning how to critically engage with relevant literature and use it to critically examine teaching and learning in the early years, addressing issues such as:
* Quality in early years education and how to evaluate it
* Curriculum in the early years
* Play and learning
* Assessment in the early years
* Literacy development

 

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