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Department of Chemical Engineering, Unit Catalogue 2005/06


CE10078: Physical chemistry

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce and develop key concepts in physical chemistry, in particular those of importance in chemical engineering processes.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Understand energy conservation in closed, open and reacting systems.
* Understand the phase behaviour of substances and how to use the phase rule.
* Understand the concepts of chemical potential, ideal and non-ideal conditions, and activity coefficients.
* Calculate changes in enthalpy, entropy, Gibbs' free energy, and equilibrium constants of chemical reactions.
* Understand the basic principles of electrochemistry.
* Understand the basic principles of the physical chemistry of interfaces
Skills:
Analysis and problem solving (taught/facilitated and assessed).
Content:
* Gases; liquids and solutions; solids; polymers; bio-molecules.
* Electrolytes; basic principles of electrochemistry.
* Conservation of energy without chemical reaction; closed and open systems.
* Conservation of energy with chemical reaction; thermochemistry; Hesse's law; combustion.
* Physical and chemical equilibrium; phase transformations; humidity.
* Gibbs' free energy; chemical potential as a main driving force in chemical processes; phase rule.
* Ideal and non-ideal gases and liquids; activity coefficients.
* Physical chemistry of interfaces.

CE10079: Biology & bio-processes

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: The course assumes that the majority of students will have done some biology at GCSE but none at A-level. It is therefore an introduction to aspects of biology and fermentation that enable us to exploit micro- organism systems in order to develop useful products and processes (e.g. enzymes, alcohol, effluent treatment, pharmaceuticals and food stuffs).
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit the student should:
* Have an understanding of the importance of biological systems in the modern process industries;
* Be aware of the different types and classifications of organisms which exist in the microbial kingdom;
*Understand the basic chemistry, structure and function of the main classes of biochemicals;
* Have a basic understanding of the role of DNA and genetics in regulating biological activity, and how DNA can be manipulated to produce "new" processes and products;
* Be aware of the major internal structures in microbial cells and their functions; understand that enzymes are responsible for the catalysis of biochemical reactions, and how these reactions are regulated;
* Have a basic knowledge of at least two commercial bio-processes.
Skills:
This course is designed to provide a knowledge base and industrial awareness of bioprocesses, to act as a foundation for design and synthesis in subsequent courses. This knowledge is taught and assessed.
Content:
* Introduction to biochemical processes and the types of product that are currently produced on industrial scale.
* Classification of organisms within the microbial kingdom and the types of compound which they require for growth or which they can produce as products.
* Basic chemistry, structure and function of these biochemical compounds.
* The role of DNA and genetics in regulation of metabolic and microbial activity, and its significance in modern biotechnology.
* Basic structure of microbial cells, including intra-cellular structures and their biological function.
*The role of enzymes in regulation and catalysis of biochemical reactions.
* Introduction to metabolic pathways and the coupling of degradative and synthetic reactions.
* Case studies of selected commercial bioprocesses, e.g. sewage treatment, alcoholic beverage production, cheese production, antibiotic production, food processing etc.

CE10080: Chemical engineering principles

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX70CW30
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce the principles and practices of material and energy balancing (both steady state and unsteady state) for non-reacting and reacting systems in chemical and biochemical engineering. To introduce the principles of reaction engineering and their application to chemical and biological reactor design.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Formulate and solve manually material and energy balances for process systems that may include multi-component streams, phase changes, simple reactions, recycles, purges, bypasses and mixing.
*Perform simultaneous material and energy balances on adiabatic, non-adiabatic and isothermal reactors, including equilibrium-controlled reactions.
*Calculate reaction orders, rate constants and half-lives for simple reaction mechanisms. Apply the Arrhenius equation to calculate activation energies.
*Distinguish between various reactor types and explain their applications in chemical and biochemical processes.
Skills:
Analysis and problem solving (taught/facilitated and assessed).
Content:
* Introduction to process systems.
* Units and dimensions; concept of dimensionless numbers.
* Flow rate and concentration (mass, molar, partial pressure).
* Law of conservation of mass.
* Material balances on non-reacting systems, steady and unsteady state (continuous, batch, semi-batch, and batch-fed).
* Synthesis of the process flowsheet; the process flow diagram.
* Material balances on reacting systems (stoichiometry, elemental balances, conversion, yield, recycle, purge, by-pass and mixing).
* Forms of energy and their interchangeability.
* Sensible and latent heats; mixing and solution; multicomponent systems.
* First and second laws of thermodynamics; the general energy equation for closed and open (flow) systems.
* Heats of formation, reaction and combustion; standard and non-standard conditions.
* Energy balances on single and multiphase systems with and without reaction (adiabatic, non-adiabatic and isothermal systems).
* Incomplete conversion, excess reactants, inerts.
* Material and energy balances in combustion.
* Elementary and non-elementary reactions.
* Order of reaction and analysis of rate data.
* Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions.
* Kinetic rate expressions; rate and equilibrium constants; Arrhenius equation and activation energy; conversion and yield.
* Reactor types and basic design equations.

CE10081: Communication skills

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce students to the chemical industry and develop communication skills.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Appreciate the role of the chemical engineer as a professional.
* Be able to use a variety of different sources (internet, library etc.) to obtain information.
* Structure and deliver an oral presentation on a technical subject.
* Write an effective report.
* Be aware of the proper use of units.
* Be able to conduct a basic error analysis on experimental data.
* Prepare simple flowsheets
Skills:
Industrial awareness, communication, numeracy, data management.
Content:
* The nature of the modern chemical industry.
* The role of the chemical engineer.
* Listening, writing, taking notes and reporting.
* Verbal communication, including oral presentation.
* Written communication.
* Data treatment and error analysis.
* Flowsheet drawing.

CE10082: IT & computer programming

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To develop skills in the use of IT and to introduce computer programming.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Use spreadsheet packages for the processing and analysis of data.
* Draw various different types of graphs and format the plots.
* Understand the need for computer programming in chemical engineering.
* Understand and draw flow diagrams.
* Break simple problems down into a series of defined steps and formulate them into an algorithm to solve a problem.
* Use a FORTRAN compiler to write and edit simple code.
* Be able to manage data files.
Skills:
* Data management (taught/facilitated and assessed).
* ICT (taught/facilitated and assessed).
* Analysis and synthesis (taught/facilitated and assessed).
Content:
* Use of a commercial spreadsheet package.
* Flow diagrams and algorithms.
* Introduction to computer languages.
* FORTRAN compilers.
* Computer programming in FORTRAN.

CE10083: Transport phenomena 1

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce fluid flow and momentum transfer in pipes, fittings and various devices. To discuss the principles of turbulent flow and flow measurement along with the physical properties of fluids. To introduce the mechanisms and modes of heat transfer, heat transfer situations and heat transfer equipment.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Appreciate the concepts of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.
* Apply the principles of momentum transfer to moving fluids.
* Perform dimensional analysis and develop dimensionless groups.
* Appreciate laminar and turbulent flow and calculate Reynolds number.
* Apply Bernoulli, continuity and momentum equations to fluid flows in pipes and fittings. Appreciate the mechanisms and modes of heat transfer.
* Calculate log mean temperature driving force.
* Calculate the overall heat transfer coefficient.
* Apply heat transfer theory to the design of shell and tube heat exchanger.
Skills:
Analysis and problem solving (taught/facilitated and assessed).
Content:
* Introduction to fluid Flow: types of fluid - Newtonian and non-Newtonian.
* Units and dimensions; concept of dimensionless groups; dimensional analysis.
* Bernoulli, continuity and momentum equations.
* Application of basic equations; pressure drop and power requirement; pressure drop in pipes and fittings.
* Laminar and turbulent flow.
* Flow measurement using pitot tube, orifice and venturi meters.
* Introduction to Fourier's law and thermal conduction.
* Thermal resistances in series and parallel, conduction through cylindrical walls.
* Concept of log mean temperature driving force.
* Introduction to convention, film theory, heat transfer coefficient correlations.
* Introduction to radiation, Stefan-Boltzmann's law, radiation between surfaces.
* Heat exchangers, types, construction and elementary design.

CE10084: Engineering chemistry

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an overview of the principles of chemistry necessary for further understanding of chemical and biological processes. The unit will provide good background in atomic and molecular structure, and relation between structure and reactivity. It will demonstrate a systematic approach to molecular synthesis and design.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Understand the basic ideas of electronic structure and bonding.
* Know the basic types of chemical reactions, including redox, acid-base, electrophilic, nucleophilic, radical, etc.
* Understand principles of catalytic action and the principle of control over reaction pathway using catalysis.
* Understand concepts of 'clean synthesis' and 'green chemistry' and their consequence for the design of organic synthetic routes.
* Understand the nomenclature, draw and interpret structures of most common organic compounds.
* Relate reactivity of organic molecules to their structure.
Skills:
Analysis and problem solving (taught/facilitated and assessed).
Content:
* Atoms, electronic structure, molecular bonding, steric effects.
* Structure of organic compounds and related nomenclature.
* Structure reactivity relationships for common functional groups.
* Typical chemical reactions: acid-bases, redox, radical etc.
* Reaction pathway and activation energy. Basic concepts and fundamental principles of catalysis.

CE10085: Separations processes 1

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce and develop key concepts in separation processes of relevance to the chemical engineering profession.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Outline the basic features of membrane processes, distillation processes, absorption processes and liquid /liquid extraction processes.
* Select appropriate membrane technology for a particular separation problem.
* Understand the operation of single and multistage distillation columns.
* Design simple multistage binary distillation columns.
* Carry out ternary multistage solvent extraction calculations.
Skills:
Analysis and problem solving.
Content:
* Overview of available separation processes;
* Fundamental principles of phase equilibrium relationships;
* Principles of vapour/liquid equilibrium;
* Principles of single stage equilibrium flash;
* Principles of multistage contacting, counter-current contacting;
* Binary phase diagrams;
* Bubble and dew point calculations;
* Binary multistage distillation;
* Reflux ratio; total, minimum and economic ratios;
* Effect of distillation column sidestreams;
* Liquid/liquid equilibria;
* Ternary phase diagrams;
* Classes of synthetic membranes;
* Operation of pressure driven membrane processes;
* Membrane fouling;
* Membrane module design.

CE10086: Instrumentation & control

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce and develop key concepts in instrumentation and control of relevance to the chemical engineering profession.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Identify and define the basic features of a control loop.
* Propose control strategies and solutions.
* Calculate pumping requirements.
* Select appropriate valves and pumps for particular applications.
* Select an appropriate flow measuring, temperature or pressure device for a particular application.
Skills:
Analysis and problem solving.
Content:
* Temperature measuring devices.
* Flow measuring devices.
* Pressure measuring devices.
* Valves.
* Pumps.
* Control loops.
* Control strategies.

CE10087: First year design project

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide students with a practice in team working on an open ended project requiring the exercise of creativity to engineer solutions.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Solve an open ended problem in a team working environment.
* Synthesize material learnt in separate units to develop a solution to an engineering problem as a group activity.
Skills:
Team working, problem solving, presentation skills (assessed), use of log book.
Content:
A simple design problem in an area which will complement design activity in later units.

CE10088: Laboratories 1

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To demonstrate by means of experiments fundamental principles of heat, mass and momentum transfer.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to: Formulate experimental procedures, record and analyse experimental results and be able to communicate their findings by means of written work.
Skills:
The student should develop analytical and design skills, be able to communicate effectively by written reports, improve their data management, problem solving and be able to work as part of a group, use of log book.
Content:
The student will be expected to undertake in groups a number of the following experiments:
1. Distillation.
2. Design and construction of a pumping circuit and use the rig to characterise a pump.
3. Flow measurement using venturi and orifice meters.
4. Operation of a boiler.
5. Pressure loss in pipes and fittings.
6. Fermentation.
7. Enzyme kinetics.
8. Laminar and turbulent flow in pipes.
9. Unsteady-state mass transfer.
10. Mass transfer in a stirred tank and bubble column.
11. Cooling tower.
12. Heat transfer in a fluidised bed.
All students will undertake 9 experiments including experiments 1, 2, 3 and 4, either 6 or 7.

CE20089: Transport phenomena 2

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take CE10083
Aims: To introduce:
1) the underlying phenomena, design methods and principles of heat exhangers, and
2) boundary layer theory.
3) Compressible flow.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Develop heat transfer correlations for natural and forced convection.
* Calculate natural and forced heat transfer coefficients.
* Develop correlations for condensation at vertical and horizontal surfaces.
* Calculate condensation coefficient.
* Perform outline design calculations for shell, plate and spiral heat exhangers.
* Appreciate different types of condenser and reboilers and their application.
* Apply heat transfer theory to the design of embroilers and condensers.
* Apply Reynold's analogy, film model and j-factor analogy to fluid flows.
* Apply the continuity and the momentum equation to moving fluids.
* Apply laminar boundary theory to moving fluids.
* Describe compressible flow phenomena.
Skills:
Analysis and problem solving (taught/facilitated and assessed).
Content:
* Natural convection & Forced convection, including dimensional analysis and correlations for heat transfer.
* Heat losses from pipes.
* Heat exchanger effectiveness - NTU relations.
* Heat transfer from boiling liquids.
* Dropwise and film condensation.
* Heat exchanger selection and design, including various single phase units.
* Introduction to boundary layer flow: definition of boundary layer thickness, simple form of the momentum equation and approximate solution for laminar and turbulent boundary layers.
* Separation and wake formation.
* Shocks and supersonic flow.
* Models and mechanisms; Reynold's and film models, j-factor analogy.

CE20090: Engineering thermodynamics

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: To complete the teaching of core chemical engineering thermodynamics started in year 1.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Understand the significance of and the means for estimating K values;
* Estimate physical properties of pure components and mixtures (with the aid of reference material);
* Question the validity of techniques used to estimate thermodynamic/physical properties, especially when using computer packages;
* Apply the laws of thermodynamics to solve problems of power cycles and refrigeration.
Skills:
Analysis and problem solving (taught/facilitated and assessed).
Content:
* Prediction of physical properties and non-ideal vapour-liquid equilibria;
* Determination of K values;
* PVT relations, equations of state: Van der Waals, Redlich-Kwong, Benedict-Webb-Rubin and Virial equations, compressibility factor, Pitzer's correlation;
* Mixture combination rules; heat capacity of gases and liquids, enthalpy and entropy as a function of temperature and pressure; standard heat of reaction, Maxwell's relations;
* Chemical potential, Gibbs-Duhem equation; fugacity, fugacity coefficient and fugacity in a mixture; activity coefficient in liquid phase; excess thermodynamic functions, extension of binary experimental data to multi-component systems;
* Combustion engines; steam and gas turbine power plant; refrigerators and heat pumps; compressors and expanders; nozzles and diffusers.

CE20091: Reaction engineering

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide students with the ability to produce engineering designs of ideal reactors where the rate of reaction is controlled by chemical and biochemical reaction kinetics.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* complete problems on heterogeneous catalytic reactors if they are supplied with global rate data;
* understand the essential features that control microorganism growth and design fermenters for batch and continuous cultivation to apply a reaction engineering analysis to the controlled growth of microorganisms in biological reactors;
* to use global or homogenous kinetic expressions to formulate material and energy balances for batch CSTR and plug flow reactors that exhibit ideal behaviour with reversible and multiple reaction steps.
Skills:
Analysis and problem solving (taught/facilitated and assessed).
Content:
Basic reactor designs: batch, CSTR, plug flow; application of stoichiometric tables; chemical equilibrium; definition of reaction rate, elementary reactions and temperature dependence; mass and energy balances developed for ideal batch, CSTR, plug flow reactors; ideal batch reactor: constant volume, variable volumes, variable temperature and pressure; expansion factor, irreversible and reversible reactions; performance comparison between batch, CSTR, plug flow; optimisation: multiple reaction; parallel, series, series-parallel, selectivity and yield, optimum temperature, isothermal, adiabatic and non-adiabatic modes of operation, multiple reactions temperature effects; introduction to biochemical techniques and their potential for transfer to large scale; microorganism growth kinetics and kinetics of product formation; the effects of environmental variables such as pH and temperature on performance.

CE20092: Laboratories 2

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: RT80OT20
Requisites:
Aims: To provide instruction and practice in techniques of engineering experimentation. To enhance the students' ability to communicate.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Communicate experimental results more effectively than first year students.
Skills:
Presentation skills and teamwork (assessed), use of logbook.
Content:
A total of 8 laboratory and team working exercises.

CE20093: Particle technology

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take CE20089 and take MA10192
Aims: To give students an introduction to the behaviour of particulate systems within a broad range of applications.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* characterise particles by size, shape, and size distribution;
* calculate drag forces using standard correlations and determine particle trajectories;
* calculate terminal and equilibrium velocities for single particles and design and evaluate classifiers, elutriators and centrifuges;
* calculate sedimentation velocities for suspensions;
* calculate pressure drop in packed beds, describe the basic fluidisation phenomena;
* describe techniques for the storage and conveyance of particles and associated hazards;
* calculate filter performance for constant pressure and rate operation;
* describe the behaviour of fine particles and the electrical and surface effects that cause this behaviour.
Skills:
Analysis, Synthesis and Design and creativity.
Content:
* Formation and characterisation of dispersed phases;
* Crushing and grinding;
* Fluid mechanics applied to deformable and non-deformable dispersed phases;
* Settler thickener design: precipitation and coalescence;
* Centrifugation: disk; decanter; solid bowl types;
* Packed and fluidised beds;
* Filtration;
* Pneumatic and hydraulic conveying and other methods of transport for solids and slurries;
* Colloids and emulsions;
* Agglomeration and flocculation.

CE20094: Management 1

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an introduction to the economic parameters and methods for evaluating the costs and profitability of engineering projects, and the legal framework in which they have to operate.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Make quick engineering estimates of chemical process plant capital and operating costs;
* Determine the profitability of simple projects using traditional and cash flow techniques;
* Describe the legal framework in which companies are required to operate.
Skills:
Industrial awareness, economic awareness, analysis and problem solving.
Content:
* Interest relationships, discount formulas;
* Sources of investment capital; profit and cash flow relationships; payback period;
* Contribution and variable costing, breakeven production diagrams;
* Basis for rate of return concept, minimum acceptable rate of return, risk factor;
* Profitability methods based on cash flow, cumulative cash flow curves, determination of NPV, DCF rate of return, EMIP, IRR, discounted breakeven point;
* Capital cost estimation: short-cut methods e.g. ratio methods, use of cost indices, factored estimates, introduction to detailed cost estimation;
* Manufacturing cost estimation: short-cut methods;
* Optimal costing methods, incremental costs and profitability;
* Common/statute law with examples in Health & Safety at Work & Environmental Protection Act; structure of the courts;
* Law of contract, law of agency, sale of goods, law of partnership;
* Joint stock companies: memoranda; articles of association; shares; debentures; board of directors;
* Commercial arbitration, trade union law, restrictive trade practices;
* Contract of service: duties of employer and employee.

CE20095: Separations processes 2

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To develop key concepts in separation processes and mass transfer of relevance to the chemical engineering profession.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Understand steady and unsteady state models for mass transfer across a phase boundary;
* Design a mass transfer controlled packed column;
* Design a batch distillation column operating under constant top product composition conditions;
* Examine reflux and stage requirements for multi-component distillation columns;
* Carry out a detailed design of a separating column.
Skills:
Analysis, design and problem solving.
Content:
* Mass transfer across a phase boundary, including the 2 film theory, penetration theory, Higbie, and Higbie-Danckwerts models;
* Mass transfer coefficients and their use in dimensionless groups and correlations to describe mass transfer;
* The role of mass transfer coefficients in the design of absorption columns;
* Concept of Number of Transfer Units and Height of a Transfer Unit;
* Batch distillation operation with constant top product composition;
* Estimation of the reflux and stage requirements for multi-component distillation processes using the correlations of Gilliland and Erbar-Maddox;
* Detailed distillation column design;
* Operation of multiple-effect evaporators.

CE20097: Laboratories 3

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide instruction and practice in techniques of engineering experimentation. To enhance the students' ability to communicate.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Communicate experimental results more effectively than first year students.
Skills:
Presentation skills and teamwork (assessed), use of log book.
Content:
A total of 5 laboratory and team working exercises.

CE30012: Industrial placement

Credits: 60
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment: RT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To consolidate and complement the theoretical content of the University courses in Chemical Engineering with practical experience of industrial activity and practice in the process, bio-process and related industries. To encourage self development. To promote self confidence.

CE30028: Chemical reaction engineering 3

Credits: 5
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX90CW10
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take XX20114 and take CE20023

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give a critical analysis of chemical and physical interactions in catalytic processes, to introduce analysis tools and models for a variety of reactors employing catalysts in solid form and to present the basis and value of residence time distribution (RTD) techniques. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* Analyse reaction, mass transfer effects and deactivation in catalytic processes
* analyse and design a wide variety of reactors
* to apply residence time distribution techniques.
Content:
* steps in catalytic reactions
* rate expressions for catalytic reactions: Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Ely-Rideal
* mass transfer in catalysis
* catalyst deactivation and regeneration
* analysis of reactor types: fixed bed, fluidised bed, slurry, monolith
* residence time distribution techniques and application to CSTR and PF reactors
* non-ideal flow models: partial stagnation, by-pass, short-circuiting, segregated flow, CSTR and PF reactors in series and parallel, laminar flow and axial dispersion models.

CE30029: Biochemical reaction engineering 3

Credits: 5
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take CE20023

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide an understanding of the various biological, reactor and process plant strategies that can be employed to produce biochemicals in a controllable and predictable process through the exploitation of bacteria, yeast and higher organisms. After successfully completing this unit the student should:
* be aware of the importance of biological considerations when assessing reactor strategies
* understand how and why when culturing living organisms, the predicted theoretical results often vary from those achieved in practice
* be able to assess and design a reactor for cell growth or to carry out an enzyme reaction.
Content:
* Revision of basic microbial metabolism, stoichiometry and energetics
* Power consumption and mixing in a stirred tank fermenter
* Oxygen transfer during a fermentation.
* Rheology of fermentation broths
* Micro-organism growth kinetics.
* Enzyme reactor kinetics.
* Cultivation of genetically modified organisms, improving reactor performance through genetics
* Structured modelling for biological reactions
* Sterile system design, biosafety and containment.

CE30033: Transport phenomena 3

Credits: 5
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take CE20018

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce students to the principles and practices involved in selected areas of transport phenomena, to advance students' understanding of the principles of complex single phase flow, and to introduce students to the principles and applications of multiphase flows. After successfully completing this unit the student should:
* be able to describe a wide variety of non-Newtonian behaviour and carry out basic calculations,
* have an appreciation of viscous and turbulent flows including secondary flows,
* understand momentum, thermal and mass transfer behaviour in boundary layers and carry out basic calculations,
* be able to describe gas-liquid flows in pipes and mixing reactors,
* be able to carry out 1-D calculations of pressure drop and gas holdup for gas-liquid flows,
* be able to describe multiphase flow in petroleum reservoirs and methods of enhanced oil recovery.
Content:
* Non-newtonian fluids including Bingham plastics
* Application of Navier-Stokes equation
* Simple models for turbulent flow including universal velocity profile
* Prandtl-Taylor analogy, calculation of 1/7th power law
* Approximation for turbulent boundary layer, introduction to thermal and diffusion boundary layers
* Two-phase (gas-liquid) flow: flow patterns, basic equations and nomenclature
* Lockhart-Martinelli correlation
* Multiphase mixing reactors
* Introduction to petroleum reservoir engineering. Secondary and enhanced oil recovery methods.
* Multiphase flow in reservoir porous media
* EOR: gas injection processes and thermal recovery methods.

CE30034: Advanced process management & economics

Credits: 5
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take CE20024

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give students an extended understanding of the economic evaluation of engineering projects, particularly involving the treatment of uncertainties and to gain a wider perspective of the business environment in which companies have to operate, from the practitioner's viewpoint. After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to:
* to use various methods for the economic evaluation of projects
* be able to assess uncertainty in economic predictions
* be able to read a company report and balance sheet
* understand how to control project costs using financial information
* know how a project is planned and the principles of critical path scheduling
* know models of company structure and operating style and how employees are managed
* know the legal framework in which companies, unions and employees operate; the major constraints imposed upon them through legislation and how it is developed, enabled and enforced.
* understand corporate strategies for long term planning; the role of R & D and innovation
* understand the importance of marketing, total quality and customer needs.
Content:
* Feasibility analysis;interest and inflation rates
* Comparison of NPV, B/C, IRR
* Cash flow techniques and sensity analysis
* Effect of uncertainty on forecasts and decision making
* Cumulative probability curves
* Monte Carlo simulation; decision trees; Bayes strategies
* Critical path methods, CPM and PERT
* Total Quality; marketing
* Legal aspects: contracts, patents, European Law
* Project Management
* Company accounts
* R & D/Marketing interface
* Employee relations

CE30115: Industrial placement

Credits: 60
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:
Aims: To consolidate and complement the theoretical content of the university units in chemical engineering with practical experience of industrial activity and practice in the process, bioprocess and related industries. To encourage self-development. To promote self-confidence.
Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this unit students should be able to understand the nature, process and challenges of industrial engineering practice.
Skills:
To normally include: Numeracy, literacy, problem solving, communication, and chemical engineering practice.
Content:
Work in an industrial environment.

CE30116: Environmental awareness

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To develop an appreciation of the complexity of environmental interactions and the ways in which human activities can impinge on the ecosystem as a whole.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit students should have an appreciation of the influence of human activities on the earth&ęs ecosystem at a range of levels including both biotic and non-biotic components of the ecosphere. They should also develop an awareness of how such influences impinge on the viability of human populations.
Skills:
The ability to assess the influence of a specific human activity at both local and global levels and to form a reasoned assessment of the possible environmental consequences over a range of time scales.
Content:
Introduction to the concepts of an integrated environment - the Gaia hypothesis.
Biodiversity.
Principles of toxicology.
Energy conversion.
Hydrogen economy
Climate change.
Ozone depletion.
Water quality.
Life-cycle assessment.

CE30117: Pollution control

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce the technologies of air and water pollution control and the major environmental effects of pollution.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit the student should know the operating and design principles of the major technologies for treating polluted air or water, the pollutants which they are most effective at controlling, and be able to recommend appropriate solutions to particular cases of pollution control.
Skills:
Selection and design of pollution control technologies for treating contaminated air or water. Taught/facilitated and assessed.
Content:
* Water pollutants and their effects. Chemical treatment: precipitation, ion-exchange, adsorption, catalytic oxidation, photocatalytic processes, electrochemical technologies. Physical treatment: sedimentation, flocculation, deep bed filtration. Biological treatment: principles, suspended growth processes, fixed growth processes, anaerobic processes. Combined processes and total systems.
* Air pollutants and their effects. Particulate removal: filters, scrubbers, electrostatic precipitators. Chemical removal: scrubbers, fixed bed adsorbers, catalytic converters.

CE30120: BEng research project

Credits: 15
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: RT90CW10
Requisites:
Aims: To plan, conduct and complete an experimental, literature-based or theoretical/computational project using academic research facilities.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Acquire and critically review technical information on a chemical engineering subject
* Produce a working programme for the project and carry out their research according to this programme
* Critically discuss the results generated during the project, evaluate these results in the context of the literature data available
* Summarise the main project results and suggest directions for further work on the subject
* Produce a professional report and poster on their project.
Skills:
Acquisition and critical review of technical information on a subject; laboratory practice and data analysis, advanced experimental and/or computational skills; report writing; presentation skills. Facilitated/taught and assessed.
Content:
* During the preliminary stage of the project (semester 1) students must discuss the project objectives with their supervisor/s, undertake the necessary background reading and preparation, order/prepare necessary materials, carry out appropriate safety assessments and devise a work programme. At the end of semester 1 a short preliminary report summarising this work must be submitted to the project supervisor.
* In the semester 2, students will carry out research according to their work programme in consultation with their supervisor/s. To complete the work on the project, students will need to produce and submit a detailed report. The final requirement is a poster presentation based on the project.

CE30121: BEng final design project

Credits: 15
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: RT100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce legislation governing the environment and the use of genetically modified organisms and how this affects engineers in managerial, operational and design roles. To provide information on the properties and uses of materials. To complete a design project at undergraduate Honours level.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit students will have demonstrated that they are capable of developing an integral systems approach to chemical engineering and of applying the principles of chemical and/or biochemical engineering to the design of a process; that they have creative and critical skills, and are able to make choices and decisions in areas of uncertainty; that they can work together in a team, and also alone and that they can communicate effectively the results of their work in the form of written reports that include drawings.
Skills:
Individual and group design project work. Problem solving. Taught/facilitated and assessed.
Content:
Introduction to environmental legislation and factors that have an influence. Control of liquid discharges and air emissions. Integrated pollution control (IPC). Environmental assessments and statements. Introduction to regulations governing the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Biosafety and containment of GMOs. Introduction to Good Manufacturing Process (GMP) with respect to bioprocess plant. Materials of construction for chemical and bioprocess plant, preparation of a preliminary technical and economic appraisal of a process where safety and environmental issues form an integral part of process screening. Preparation of an outline process flowsheet. Market survey. Review of alternatives. Physical and chemical property data. Creation and synthesis of flowsheet. Safety and operability. Environmental issues. Capital and operating costs, unit specification sheets. Flowsheets. Engineering drawings and sketches. Executive summary. Demonstration of viability. Individual unit design. Application of rigorous methods. Mechanical design. Outline of control and P and I diagrams.

CE30122: MEng research project (home)

Credits: 24
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: RT90CW10
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take CE30123
Aims: To plan, conduct and complete an experimental, literature-based or theoretical/computational project using academic research facilities in the Department.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Acquire and critically review technical information on a chemical engineering subject
* Produce a working programme for the project and carry out their research according to this programme
* Critically discuss the results generated during the project, evaluate these results in the context of the literature data available
* Summarise the main project results and suggest directions for further work on the subject
* Produce a professional report and poster on their project.
Skills:
Acquisition and critical review of technical information on a subject; laboratory practice and data analysis, advanced experimental and/or computational skills; skills in tackling unresolved scientific and/or engineering problems, report writing; presentation skills. Facilitated/taught and assessed.
Content:
* After allocation of the projects (semester 1) students must meet their supervisor/s to discuss the project objectives and make necessary arrangements concerning their practical work in semester 2.
* During the initial project stage in semester 2, students must undertake the necessary background reading, prepare necessary materials, carry out appropriate safety assessments and devise a work programme. At the end of this stage (two weeks) a short preliminary report summarising this work must be submitted to the project supervisor.
* During the second stage of the project, students will carry out research according to their work programme in consultation with their supervisor/s. To complete the work on the project, students will need to produce and submit a detailed report. The final requirement is a poster presentation based on the project.

CE30123: Intermediate design project

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: RT90OR10
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take CE30122
Aims: This design project is based on an industrial process and is intended to give an introduction to a systematic approach to chemical engineering design.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit students the student should be able to compare alternative routes for a process by technical/economic reasoning; prepare a process flowsheet together with mass and energy balances for the process; be able to consider energy integration and process optimisation, cost estimates and preliminary safety and hazard analysis. Plan and organise the use of group time. Prepare specification sheets for an individual process unit designed by the student and prepare a process and instrumentation diagram for a single unit.
Skills:
Analysis, synthesis problem solving and design. Taught/facilitated and assessed.
Content:
Use of commercial software design package ;use of package for mass and energy balances and accessing the property data bank; use of CAD packages for data prediction. Working as a team and project management. Use of short cut methods in design. Making process decisions and exploring the consequences with and without the use of CAD.

CE30124: MEng research project (overseas)

Credits: 30
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: RT100
Requisites:
Aims:
To provide an opportunity for our students to broaden their international perspective by conducting a supervised research project in an overseas host institution.
Students should be exposed to the nature of academic research, and develop skills in tackling unresolved science and engineering problems.
The students will have the opportunity to develop advanced computation or experimental skills, for example in the preparation and analysis of samples, or mathematical modelling.
To develop and refine the skills required for the presentation of research findings in the form of a formal report.
Learning Outcomes:
Students will learn to devise a work plan, undertake the necessary background reading and preparation, prepare necessary materials, carry out appropriate safety assessments and carry out their work plan in consultation with their supervisor. Students will gain an insight into the different approaches and working practices employed in a non-UK laboratory.
Skills:
Acquisition and critical assessment of technical information from original reference material. Development and evaluation of experimental and/or mathematical research techniques. The ability to carry out a risk assessment of work to conducted in a research laboratory.
Content:
Laboratory research under supervisor guidance, including aspects of : safety, project specific techniques, and report preparation.

CE30125: MEng research project (industry)

Credits: 30
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: RT90OT10
Requisites:
Aims: To plan and conduct a theoretical or experimental research project using the industrial partners' research and development facilities. Students should be exposed to the nature of industrial research and development, and develop skills in tackling unresolved science and engineering problems relevant to industry. Students will have the opportunity to develop advanced computational or experimental skills, for example, in the preparation and analysis of samples, or mathematical modelling, and will have opportunities for appropriate presentation of the project.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to understand the nature, process and challenges of industrially based chemical engineering research and development.
Skills:
To normally include: Numeracy, literacy, synthesis, problem solving, communications, experimental design, data collection, data analysis, laboratory practice and research.
Content:
Work in an industrial research or development environment.

CE40030: Chemical separation processes 3

Credits: 5
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take CE20026
Aims: To introduce the principles and practices underlying (a) the selection and sequencing of complex separations and (b) the design and operation of advanced separation processes based on adsorption, membranes, crystallisation and advanced solvent extraction.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to apply fundamental scientific and engineering principles to:
* determine optimum separation sequences for complex multicomponent feedstocks;
* design and analyse the performance of adsorption-based separations;
* design and analsye the performance of membrane-based separations;
* design and analyse the performance of, crystallisation-based separations;
* design and analyse the performance of advanced solvent extraction processes;
Content:
Selection and evaluation of alternative separation process routes and sequences. Selective adsorption; adsorbents; thermodynamic equilibria; kinetics. Batch, cyclic, continuous and pseudo steady-state processes. Examples of pressure and thermal swing gas and liquid phase separations. Adsorption column dynamics. Formulation of conservation and rate equations. Dilute, isothermal, plug flow and equilibrium-based assumptions. Non-equilibrium systems; constant pattern and linear driving force solutions. Membrane units and their applications in the process industries; reverse osmosis and nanonfiltration. Ultrafiltration, microfiltration and the analysis of fouling. Membrane processes for gas separation; pervaporation. Electrodialysis and related processes. Thermodynamics of simple and complex crystallisation systems; phase diagrams. Kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth. Design and analysis of crystallisation equipment. Chemistry and engineering of advanced solvent extraction processes.

CE40031: Biochemical separation processes

Credits: 5
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take CE20023
Aims: To introduce the main unit operations used in the separation of materials of biological origin; to provide an understandin gof the role of each operation within a multi-unit process and how this in influenced by the properties of the process stream; to introduce and explore the use of quantitative performace equations for design purposes.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit the student should be aware of the main separation techniques available and how their choice is dependent on the nature of the bioproduct to be produced; be able to sequence a series of unit operations on the basis of their capacity and selectivity; be able to formulate quantitative design equations for sizing purposes (centrifuge, membrane, adsorber and chromatographic separator); understand how process data can be used to optimise the performance of a bioseparation sequence.
Skills:
Analysis, problem solving (taught, assessed).
Content:
Properties of biochemicals which influence choice and availability of methods; cell recovery; influence of cell morphology and media composition on recovery. Cell disruption/release of intracellular products. General introduction to membrane processes, materials of construction and modes of operation; flux in UF/MF effects of concentration, pressure and temperature; enhancement using hydrodynamic techniques. Chromatographic separations, review of techniques available. Batch adsorption, predition of equilibrium adsorbed design based on isotherm data. Design of adsorption columns; simplified models based on equilibrium assumption, kinetic models with and without an assessment of mass transfer coefficients. Prediction of breakthrough. Aqueous two phase extraction, field flow fractionation, electrophoresis. Protein refolding systems and applications of genetic engineering to downstream processing. Optimisation of separation process sequences, quantification of purity/recovery.

CE40040: Waste management

Credits: 5
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX75CW25
Requisites:
Aims: To give the student an awareness of the problems of "waste" (solid, liquid and gaseous), and the methods of managing waste to meet with the requirements of legislation, economic and environmental considerations.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this course the student should be able to identify what waste is; be able to determine the sources of waste; be familiar with the legislation covering the handling, treatment and disposal of wast; be able to formulate a scheme for waste management of a process and, where appropriate, be able to suggest methods of reducing the quantity of wast produced by either more efficient processing, clean technology, waste recovery, recycle or reuse; be able to identify the costs associated with a waste management scheme.
Skills:
Analysis, problem solving, industrial awareness (taught, assessed).
Content:
Hierarchies of good waste management practice. Authorities involved in wast, e.g. Health and Safety Executive, Environment Agency and local authorities. Relevant legislation - the Pollution Act, the Duty of Care, etc. Identification, characterisation and documentation of waste. Records, costs, storage, licensing, future liability; contractors; transfrontier movements. Outline treatment of solid wastes - techniques including landfill, stabilisation, incineration. Outline treatment of liquid wastes - destruction or recovery and recycle, biological treatment, etc. Outline treatment of gaseous streams - scrubbing, filtration, incineration etc. Auditing of waste management systems - in-house and contractors.

CE40041: Pollution control

Credits: 5
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX75CW25
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce the technologies of air and water pollution control and the major environmental effects of pollution.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit the student should know the operating and design principles of the major technologies and the pollutants which they are most effective at controlling and be able to recommend appropriate solutions to particular cases of pollution control.
Skills:
Analysis, problem solving, industrial awareness (taught, assessed).
Content:
Water pollutants and their effects. Chemical treatment: precipitation, ion-exchange, adsorption, catalytic oxidation, photocatalytic processes, electrochemical technologies. Physical treatment: sedimentation, flocculation, deep bed filtration. Biological treatment: principles, suspended growth processes, fixed growth processess, anaerobic processes. Combined processes and total systems. Air pollutants and their effects. Particulate removal: filters, scrubbers, electrostatic precipitators. Chemical removal: scrubbers, fixed bed adsorbers, catalytic converters.

CE40043: Environmental management systems

Credits: 5
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an introduction to the principles and practices of environmental management systems and their component procedures in the context of the processing industries.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit the student should understand the basic structure of modern environmental management systems; be able to prepare components of an EMS for a simple processing environment; understand the requirements for complex processing sites and large companies.
Skills:
Analysis, problem solving, industrial awareness, economic awareness (taught, assessed).
Content:
Origins and benefits. EMS elements. EMS loops. Comparisons of European and international standards. Company culture and commitment. The preparatory review. Policy statement. Organisation, personnel and responsibilities. Register of environmental regulations. Register of environmental effects. Life cycle assessment. Indicative assessment matrix. Effects identification matrix. Risk based approaches to determining significance of environmental effects. Objectives and targets. Cost benefit analysis. Risk assessment, reliability and availability. Environmental auditing and environmental reporting.

CE40044: Environmental monitoring & clean technology

Credits: 5
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To develop an understanding of the techniques and problems of obtaining reliable measurements of potential pollutants in the environment and of the role that process design plays in the development of clean technology.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit, the student should understand the techniques and technical problems associated with obtaining accuragte measurements of pollutants in the environment; appreciate the importance of appropriate sampling regimes; appreciate the relationship between emission constraints and limits of detection; be aware of the tools available for clean design and analysis of processes; appreciate the importance of Clean technology; understand the kinetic and thermodynamic limitations on pollution prevention regimes.
Skills:
Analysis, problem solving, industrial awareness (taught, assessed).
Content:
Techniques for determining levels of organic and inorganic pollutants in potable water. Techniques for determining levels of biological contaminants in potable water. Techniques for monitoring airborn pollutants. Monitoring of pollutants in soil. Problems of implementing monitoring systems. Commercial implications, legal implications. Relationship between emission limits and limits of detection. Process waste diagrams and environmental mass balances. Thermodynamic and kinetic limitations. Clean technology case studies. Environmental performance indicators and metrics of sustainable technology.

CE40046: Environmental impact assessment

Credits: 10
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The aim is to introduce the principles and practices of environmental impact assessment in the context of a chemical engineering process development. After successfully completing this unit, the student should be able to:
* critically analyse the quality of a published Environmental Statement in the context of the objectives and legislative requirements of Environmental Assessment in the UK
* carry out selected individual steps involved in an EIA
* identify and critically analyse the roles of specialists in carrying out an EIA
* critically analyse arguments put forward to support and oppose a proposed chemical engineering process development.
Content:
* development and legislative background; implementation in the UK
* objectives and benefits
* the screening process; scale, location, type of development, decision-makers
* project characteristics and baseline studies; baseline conditions
* the scoping process; qualitative and quantitative methods
* desk and field surveys; statutory and non-statutory consultees
* impact identification; significant, direct and indirect impacts
* mitigation; uncertainty and risk management
* the environmental impact statement; decision-making
* monitoring and auditing.

CE40047: Environmental legislation

Credits: 5
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take CE20021
Aims: To advance student understanding of the principles and practices of environmental law as it pertains particularly to the process industries.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit, the student should be able to describe the UK and the EU environmental legal frameworks; analyse the influence of international opinion; compare and contrast command and control legislation with modern alternatives; analyse breaches of statutory duty; describe the role of environmental assessment in the planning process; prepare an IPC/IPPC authorisation for a simple process.
Skills:
Analysis, industrial awareness (taught, assessed).
Content:
Overview of the EU and English law systems. Regulations, directives and decisions. Public and private law. Statutory and common law. Precedent. Delegated legislation. Court structure. Influence of international opinion. Treaties, conventions and protocols. Polluter pays, precautionary, proximity and sustainable development principles. Regulatory regimes in the UK. Command and control practices. Role of the Environment Agency. Guidance notes for the prescribed processes and substances. BPEO, IPC, IPPC, BAT and BATNEEC. Economic instruments, tradeable quotas, special taxes. Developing issues. Regulation, payment, enforcement, management. Proportionality, consistency, transparency and targeting. Administrative action, criminal proceedings, civil proceedings. Sentencing and fines. Liability.

CE40065: Chemical reaction engineering 4

Credits: 5
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take CE30028 and take XX30115
Aims: With worked examples, to illustrate how reactor models may be developed for more complex reacting systems, and the numerical techniques taught in XX30015. To introduce the concept of micro-reactors. To advance knowledge in two/three phase reactors.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to develop a model for a complex reacting system, and apply a numerical technique to obtain a solution; appreciate opportunities for the application of micro-reactors; have a better understanding of how to design a two/three phase reactor.
Skills:
Analysis, problem solving, industrial awareness (taught/facilitated, assessed).
Content:
Complex reacting systems: case studies will be selected and developed for reactions encountered in industry, e.g. reforming a gas phase reaction consisting of series/parallel reversible reactions that occur in a packed catalytic bed. Microreactors: examples will be provided to illustrate applications of microreactors, and the challenges of designing and modelling the performance of such systems, e.g. (i) fuel cells, including the reforming of available fuel to make H2 for the fuel cell; (ii) catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. Two/three phase reactors, e.g. hydrosulphurisation of hydrocarbon feedstocks in a trickle-bed reactor, hydrogenation of methyl linoleate in a slurry reactor in which hydrogen is bubbled up through the liquid and catalyst.

CE40066: Biomedical engineering

Credits: 5
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take CE30029 and take XX30115
Aims: To develop an appreciation of the role that engineers play in the development of new technologies and treatments used in human medicine. Emphasis will be placed on the use of quantitative cellular and molecular techniques.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this course the student should understand the molecular level complexities of cellular phenomena underpinning aspects of biomedical engineering; have an understanding of how chemical engineering fundamentals may be used to analyse molecular, cellular and tissue systems; appreciate the role of chemical engineering in the development of new medical tools and treatments.
Skills:
Analysis, problem solving, industrial/healthcare awareness (taught/facilitated, assessed).
Content:
Review of basic human cell biology and physiology. Cell engineering, basic principles of cell adhesion, principles of cell migration. Fluid mechanical effects on cellular function: devices and methodology used for in vitro experiments. Shear stress effects on endothelial morphology, signal transduction and mass transfer. Methods for cell separation and sorting. Therapeutic applications of cell sorting. Tissue engineering: control of cell function by the extracellular matrix and soluble growth factors (tissue microenvironments). Biomaterials: scaffolds/substrates for tissue regeneration, interaction of cells with artificial substrates. Tissue engineering case studies: engineering of vascular grafts, dermal replacements, artificial organs eg liver assist devices. Principles of drug delivery.

CE40067: Final design project

Credits: 20
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To carry out an integrated design of a chemical/biochemical process plant. To update legislative requirements particularly with regard to rapidly developing areas such as the environment and the use of genetically modified organisms. To provide information on the properties and uses of materials.
Learning Outcomes:
To enable students to demonstrate that they are capable of developing an integral systems approach to chemical engineering and of applying the principles of chemical and/or biochemical engineering to the design of a process; that they have creative and critical skills, and are able to make choices and decisions in areas of uncertainty; that they can work together in a team, and also alone; that they can communicate effectively the results of their work in the form of written reports that include drawings.
Skills:
Analysis, synthesis, problem solving, teamworking, industrial awareness (facilitated, assessed).
Content:
Environmental legislation. Control of liquid discharges and air emissions. Integrated pollution control (IPC). Environmental assessments and statements. Regulations governing the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Biosafety and containment of GMOs. Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) with respect to bioprocess plant. Selection of materials for chemical and bioprocess plant. Preparation of a preliminary technical and economic appraisal of a process where safety and environmental issues form an integral part of process screening. Preparation of an outline process flowsheet. Market survey, Review of alternatives. Physical and chemical property data. Creation and synthesis of flowsheet. Safety and operability. Environmental issues. Capital and operating costs. Unit specification sheets, Flowsheets, Engineering drawings and sketches. Executive summary. Demonstration of viability. Individual unit design. Application of rigorous methods. Mechanical design. Outline of control and P & I diagrams.

CE40071: Product design

Credits: 10
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To describe the concept of materials with functional behaviour derived from specific physical or chemical properties. To demonstrate, using examples taken mainly from industry, the principles used to design and manufacture such materials.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this course a student should be able to describe how the functional aspects of a material can be related to its physical and chemical properties; apply fundamental principles to analyse the influence of process conditions on materials structure and function; describe the basic techniques used to measure material properties at the bulk and micro-structural levels; select appropriate techniques to relate structure to material properties; integrate appropriate techniques to design novel products with the required functionality to meet consumer needs.
Skills:
Analysis, synthesis, problem solving, industrial awareness (taught/facilitated, assessed).
Content:
Product function. Techniques for structuring materials. Material properties. Measuring structure. Chemistry & product function. Intellectual property. Product design in the Food Industry.

CE40134: Pollution control

Credits: 5
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce the technologies of air and water pollution control and the major environmental effects of pollution.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit the student should know the operating and design principles of the major technologies for treating polluted air or water, the pollutants which they are most effective at controlling, and be able to recommend appropriate solutions to particular cases of pollution control.
Skills:
Selection and design of pollution control technologies for treating contaminated air or water. Taught/facilitated and assessed.
Content:
* Water pollutants and their effects. Chemical treatment: precipitation, ion-exchange, adsorption, catalytic oxidation, photocatalytic processes, electrochemical technologies. Physical treatment: sedimentation, flocculation, deep bed filtration. Biological treatment: principles, suspended growth processes, fixed growth processes, anaerobic processes. Combined processes and total systems.
* Air pollutants and their effects. Particulate removal: filters, scrubbers, electrostatic precipitators. Chemical removal: scrubbers, fixed bed adsorbers, catalytic converters.

XX20164: Mathematics 3

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX70CW30
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take MA10192 and take MA10193
Aims: To introduce mathematical modelling techniques. To introduce numerical techniques for the solution of models of systems arising in chemical engineering.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* develop and solve realistic mathematical models of unit operations using a numerical package such as MATLAB and a commercial flowsheeting package such as ASPEN;
* describe and formulate the numerical methods employed in solving the equations of models and choose the most suitable method for a given application;
* analyse the results from modelling activities.
Skills:
Analysis and problem solving (taught/facilitated and assessed).
Content:
Mathematical modelling techniques:
* introduction to formulation of models; mass, energy and momentum balances;
* application to reactor and distillation modelling Numerical Methods: - introduction to initial value problems; - numerical linear algebra; - stability; - boundary value problems;
* introduction to Mathematical Modelling of chemical engineering processes.

XX20165: Design & safety

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW90PR10
Requisites:
Aims: To deal with the philosophy and methods of process design; introduce the techniques for safe design and loss prevention; to give the students a practical grounding in mechanical design of plant and in particular pressure vessels and to provide a background from which to appreciate the role of electrical and electronic technology in chemical engineering.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Formulate an approach to a design problem;
* Produce a solution to a design problem taking into account the problem specification, raw material and energy requirements, electrical power and control requirements and simple energy integration for the design;
* Understand the interaction of component units in a design;
* Develop a flow sheet with preliminary costings for a process;
* Be able to design an individual unit of the flow sheet and produce an engineering sketch and preliminary mechanical design of the unit;
* Produce a risk assessment for the design and COSHH assessments where appropriate;
* Include in the design relevant safety and control equipment.
Skills:
Analysis and problem solving (taught/facilitated and assessed).
Content:
* Synthesis of problems and analysis of alternative solutions, introduction to optimisation of systems; accounting for uncertainty in data and designing for future developments.
* Introduction to energy integration;
* Mechanical design of plant: introduction, stress and strain, temperature and pressure effects, selection of materials, corrosion allowances and pressure effects, wall thickness; safety factors, cracks, plastic regime; flanges and gaskets, types of welds; stress concentration, openings and branches; bending and supports, thin wall theory; vessel ends; weight loads, wind loads, vessel supports: introduction to use of commercial mechanical software package;
* Safety and loss studies: case studies into detection and evaluation of hazards; introduction to MOND Fire and Explosion Index, HAZOP and HAZAN, maintenance and work permit systems, introduction various codes of practice, BSS's, legislation relating to design, COSHH;
* Electronic and electrical technology: Ohms law, Kirchoff's laws, Faraday's laws; passive and active components; impedance; DC and AC circuit theory; single and three phase power systems; AC/DC conversion techniques; transformers and simple AC and DC machines; semi-conductors and semi-conductor devices; amplifiers, gates and memories, simple analogue and digital circuits; A to D and D to A converters; tranducers; instrumentation, computers and applications; interfacing real time data acquisitions and data transmittion; safety in hazardous environments -Zener barriers, intrinsic safety, area classification and codes.

XX20166: Process dynamics

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an introduction to the mathematical description of dynamic processes in chemical engineering, theory and practice of process control. The unit will provide good background in developing dynamic process models, control of dynamic processes and development of complete control systems for chemical and biochemical processes.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:
* Develop dynamic models of typical chemical and biochemical engineering problems, including heat and mass transfer, and chemical and biochemical reactions.
* Use Laplace Transform techniques to solve initial value problems.
* Use simulation tools to obtain parameters of dynamic models.
* Design experiments to obtain parameters of dynamic models of physical processes.
* Develop complete control systems for simple unit operations.
* Analyse dynamic behaviour of first order systems, including interacting and non-interacting series
* Understand the concept of stability and its effects on control problems.
Skills:
Analysis and problem solving (taught/facilitated and assessed).
Content:
* Transient material, energy and momentum balances.
* Laplace transforms to solve initial value problems.
* First order systems; first order systems in series; time constant; process gain; transfer function. Use of time, Laplace and frequency domains for analysis of dynamic systems. Stability.
* Feed-back, feed-forward, cascade control; overall transfer function; design and simulation of control systems.
* Case studies: control of bioprocesses, control of non-linear systems.

XX30115: Mathematical modelling 3

Credits: 5
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take XX20114
Aims: To provide students with an ability to formulate mathematical models of dynamic systems typical of chemical engineering as systems of differential equations and to solve these models numerically.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit the student should be able to choose numerical methods suitable for the solution of non-linear second order elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations with given initial and boundary values and systems of non-linear first order ordinary differential equations with suitable initial conditions; be able to formulate mathematical models which describe dynamic chemical processes in the time domain and assign boundary and initial conditions; be able to solve the problems formulated using MATLAB.
Skills:
Analysis, problem solving (taught/facilitated, assessed).
Content:
Mathematics of p.d.e.s and numerical solutions. Mathematics of linear p.d.e.s, the p.d.e., b.c. and i.c. as a system, classification of system into elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic. Solutions by finite difference methods, method of characteristics, stability. Non-linear problems and their solution by the above methods. The concept of finite elements for the heat conduction problem. Examples: solution of a heterogeneous catalysis problem in slab or cylinder geometry with non-linear kinetics, adsorption waves in a column with non-linear isotherm. Modelling with o.d.e.s, simulation of non-linear problem sets. Equation formulation, use of constraints. Selection of initial and boundary conditions. Conversion of equations into MATLAB programmes. Methods of debugging. Examples from reaction engineering and separation: simultaneous reactions in a bath reactor - bioreaction metabolic engineering problem, catalysis in a tubular reactor, adsorption in a column.

Postgraduate units:


CE50001: Core module

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Distance learning Unit (IEM).
Aims:
The aim is to give the student an understanding of the challenge which the environment presents to business and industry, and why and how business and industry should respond to this challenge.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit, students should be able to identify the role of environmental management systems, and specifically, ISO 14001, in responding to the environmental challenge. They will also have gained an introduction to, and overview of, all the other modules of the course, both compulsory and option. They will be able to identify how the other management tools fit into an environmental management system. Through attending the residential element, the student will gain a more detailed insight into the other modules, as well as an in depth understanding of EMSs from the real world perspective.
Skills:
During the residential school students work in groups on a case study with tutor support, thus developing interpersonal skills and getting to know their cohort group, and the tutors. In studying the distance learning materials students will develop skills in self-study, supported by guidance in the student handbook and a guide to study provided in the Introduction Pack. In completing assignments students practice their written expression in essay form.
Content:
The environmental challenge, environmental legislation, environmental management systems, an overview of Environmental Impact Assessment, Environmental Audit, Economic Analysis, Life Cycle Assessment, Clean Technology, Energy Management, Risk Management.

CE50002: Environmental impact assessment

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Distance learning Unit (IEM).
Aims:
The aim of the module is to give the students a good understanding of how EIA is implemented and practised in the UK and other countries around the world.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing the unit students should be able to manage an EIA, and identify the most appropriate methodology to use when carrying out all of the different stages of an EIA. They should also be able to: interpret the findings that are made; identify when an environmental statement has been properly prepared; and understand the role of the statement in the decision making process.
Skills:
This distance learning unit develops skills in self study and written expression.
Content:
History and development of EIA; existing situation in EU, UK and world wide; methods which have been developed for EIA and their application, the stages and requirements of the EIA process, future development in terms of strategic EIA and integration with IPPC etc.

CE50003: Environmental audit

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Distance learning Unit (IEM).
Aims:
The aim is to provide the student with an understanding of current best practises for all the major different types of environmental audit.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing the unit, students should be able to describe in detail the different stages of the audit process, and the methodology involved in the different types of environmental audit. They should be able to carry out, and manage the environmental audit process and ensure that the resulting audit report is a valid and useful document.
Skills:
This distance learning unit develops skills in self study and written expression.
Content:
The origins of environmental audit; its current status in law; the costs and benefits of auditing; characteristics of an audit programme; the skills required; the basic steps involved; pre-, on- and post- site activities; elements of the audit report; different types of auditing and the potential future trends.

CE50004: Cost benefit analysis

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Distance learning Unit (IEM).
Aims:
The aim is to advance student understanding of the economic principles and analytical techniques behind CBA, and best practises in conducting cost benefit analysis.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to outline the economic principles underlying CBA and distinguish environmental CBA from traditional financial project appraisal. They should also be able to describe the rationale underlying each of the economic valuation techniques; outline the methodology of each technique and identify the main short comings associated with them. They should also be able to describe the economic basis of, and employ the investment decision criteria utilised by CBA; outline the issues associated with the choice of discount rate and identify the limits of environmental CBA. Finally, the students should be able to describe how the results of a CBA should be reported.
Skills:
This distance learning unit develops skills in self study, and use of spreadsheets.
Content:
Introducing CBA; financial project appraisal; willingness to pay and opportunity costs as measures of economic value; market imperfections (e.g. public goods and externalities); shadow pricing; total economic value; techniques employing actual market prices, surrogate market techniques, survey based techniques; determination of cash flows and investment criteria; discount rates; limitations of CBA; presenting and reporting CBA.

CE50005: Management residential school

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take CE50002 or take CE50003 or take CE50004
Distance learning Unit (IEM).
Aims:
The aim is to provide the student with an opportunity to apply the skills learned in the first four modules to a practical real life case study, and to improve their practical knowledge by attending talks given by practitioners working in each of the relevant environmental fields.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to put the academic content of the course in to a 'real world' context. Also, working in groups enables the students to meet and get to know their cohort group, and allows them to meet the subject tutors and other course staff. It also provides the students with the opportunity for face to face tuition and discussion of any problems.
Skills:
The students practice team and presentation skills in the case study project which they complete.
Content:
Three lectures/discussion sessions led by consultants/practitioners in EIA, Audit and CBA; and an integrated case study exercise involving all three techniques ending with a presentation given by the students on the final day.

CE50006: Life cycle assessment

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Distance learning Unit (IEM).
Aims:
The aim is to provide the student with an understanding of LCA as an environmental management tool and a detailed knowledge of how to apply it in practice.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit, students should be able to demonstrate a detailed understanding of the four main phases in conducting an LCA: goal definition and scoping, inventory analysis, impact assessment and improvement analysis) as well as describing the present and potential future applications of LCA and its the shortcomings/limitations.
Skills:
This distance learning unit develops skills in self study, data analysis and use of spreadsheets.
Content:
Goal definition and scoping; inventory analysis - data requirements and quality issues, data processing and validation, inventory calculation methodology, presenting the life cycle inventory results; interpretation of the inventory (i.e. impact assessment methods); improvement analysis (including variations in recycling loops); the applications and limitations of LCA; and the origins of LCA and international standards.

CE50007: Clean technology 1

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Distance learning Unit (IEM).
Aims:
The aim is to advance student understanding of current and best practices in (a) the methodologies of clean technology as it applies to waste minimisation, pollution prevention, cleaner production and cleaner processing, and (b) design for the environment and for recycling.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to (a) describe the origins and problems associated with the generation of waste and pollution, (b) describe the legal aspects of the problem, (c) carry out basic project procedures including technical and economic assessments and the ranking of projects, and (d) apply such assessments and rankings to the design of products for the twin benefits of environmental performance improvement and business performance improvement.
Skills:
This distance learning unit develops skills in self study and written expression.
Content:
Sources of waste, categories of clean technology techniques, legal aspects, contemporary methodologies including objectives, corporate commitment, assessment, technical and economic feasibility analyses, project ranking and implementation, the design of products for the environment, life cycle concepts, the design of machine tools (as a case study), the design of cleaning systems (as a case study), recycling of products and their components, recycling of plastics (as a case study).

CE50008: Technical residential school

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take CE50006 or take CE50007 or take CE50009 or take CE50010 or take CE50011
Distance learning Unit (IEM).
Aims:
The aim is to provide the student with an opportunity to apply the skills learned in the second two compulsory modules, and to try applying the skills required by the option modules, to a practical case study, and to advance their practical knowledge by attending talks given by practitioners working in each of the relevant environmental fields.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to put the academic content of the course in to a 'real world' context. Also, working in groups enables the students to meet and get to know their cohort group, and allows them to meet the subject tutors and other course staff. Finally, the unit will help students choose which of the option modules they wish to take; it also provides the students with an opportunity for fact to face tuition and therefore to discuss any specific problems.
Skills:
The students practice team and presentation skills in the case study project which they complete.
Content:
Five lectures/discussion groups lead by practitioners/consultants in LCA, Clean Technology I and II, Energy Management, Risk Management; and an integrated case study exercise involving all four techniques, and culminating in a presentation given by the students on the final day.

CE50009: Energy management

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Distance learning Unit (IEM).
Aims:
The aim is to advance student understanding of current and best practises in the methodologies of energy management.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to describe the current situation as regard energy use and the environmental implications of it on a global, national and local scale. Students should also be able to demonstrate an in depth understanding of the role of energy management in that context, and in the context of specific benefits for the company; including how energy management can be implemented and what implementation means in terms of action, training, resources etc.; what constitutes efficiency in terms of combustion, refrigeration and heat exchange; and basic economic principles as applied to investment in energy management.
Skills:
The extended essay assignment helps to prepare the students' writing skills for their dissertation.
Content:
Physical aspects of energy, basic principles relating to energy, energy management including the energy policy, energy audit, monitoring and control, combustion, refrigeration, energy recovery and economics for energy managers.

CE50010: Risk management

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Distance learning Unit (IEM).
Aims:
The aim is to advance student understanding of current best practices in the methodologies of risk assessment and management as they apply at policy level e.g. planning issues, and also at the level of individual organisations, and specific processes and substances.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit the students should be able to outline the role of risk management and assessment in environmental management systems, and describe how risk assessment and management methods are employed in EIA, CBA and environmental audit. They should be able to undertake a risk assessment exercise, interpret the results and appropriately manage the identified risks. To this end, the students will acquire a detailed understanding of the various analytical techniques that can be used to assess risk, and identify the role that these techniques play in managing risk.
Skills:
The extended essay assignment helps to prepare the students' writing skills for their dissertation.
Content:
Risk management: government policy and guidelines; risk management through planning control; links to EIA; risk management techniques at the company/organisational level; risk assessment techniques for identifying significant aspects, links to ISO 14001 and EMS; technological risk; process and substance risk assessment; risk/impact pathways; analytical techniques for risk assessment, links to CBA; definitions of risk/uncertainty; descriptive statistics; probability and probability distribution; confidence intervals; decision analysis; scenario analysis and simulation methods; multi-attribute decision criteria; social risk management/risk perception; insurance.

CE50011: Clean technology II - process design

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Distance learning Unit (IEM).
Aims:
The aim is to advance student understanding of the design of processes in which products are manufactured and recycled.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to (a) describe the techniques and procedures for assessing the generation of waste and pollution, (b) carry out material and energy balances on processes that include recycle and chemical reaction, (c) describe the difficulties associated with completing accurate mass and energy balances, (d) apply a range of tools to formulate solutions to environmental problems created in the design and operation of processes, (e) describe clean technologies for fossil fuel use.
Skills:
The extended essay assignment helps to prepare the students' writing skills for their dissertation.
Content:
Waste assessment, mass balancing and energy balancing, scales of study, sources and collection of data, laws of conservation of mass and energy, stoichiometry, steady and unsteady state, open and closed systems, recycling and purging, systems with and without reactions, catalysts and catalysis, reaction types, selection of reactors, accuracy and difficulties of closing balances, combustion, process heat and power cycles, environmental impact of fossil fuel use, new technologies for fossil fuel use, hierarchical design methods, pinch analysis, heat exchanger and mass exchanger network analyses, wastewater minimisation, keyword analysis, life cycle assessment.

CE50012: Dissertation

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:
Distance learning Unit (IEM).
Aims:
To complete a substantial research project relating to the IEM course.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who successfully complete the unit will have a deep knowledge of the chosen area of research and the research methods used.
Skills:
To develop skills in formulating a relevant research hypothesis, planning and carrying out the required research, and writing it up as an academic dissertation.
Content:
Identification of a suitable topic for research and setting a hypothesis; a comprehensive literature review; a rigorous academic analysis and discussion; conclusions.

CE50098: Catalytic reaction pathways

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To advance student knowledge of the principles of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis and to develop detailed understanding of the concept of Catalytic Reaction Pathways (CRP).
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit the student should have good understanding of the principles of catalysis, appreciate the complexity of catalytic reactions and understand the CRP concept. The student should understand how this concept may be used to plan and analyse kinetic experiments, and to develop kinetic models for catalytic reactions.
Skills:
The students will develop intellectual and practical skills in constructing CRP based on experimental data, and in planning and analysis of kinetic experiments (including catalyst testing) on heterogeneous and homogeneous catalytic systems. Also, skills in critical analysis of the literature in the field of catalysis will be developed. These skills will be taught, facilitated and assessed.
Content:
Brief review of basic concepts in catalysis. Catalyst active sites. Catalytic cycles. Catalytic reaction pathways. Effects of reaction conditions (residence time, temperature, pressure, time-on-stream) on conversion and product distribution. Catalyst testing and comparison. Application of the CRP concept in planning and analysis of kinetic experiments, and in development of kinetic models for catalytic reactions. Case studies on selected reactions: heterogeneous catalysis (e.g. catalytic cracking, light alkane aromatisation); homogeneous catalysis (e.g. metal carbene catalysed telomerization or hydroformylation).

CE50099: Industrial catalytic processes

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To give students a detailed understanding of the principles of industrial catalysis and aspects of characterisation of heterogeneous industrial catalysts.
Learning Outcomes:
The students will have detailed knowledge of at least two industrial catalytic processes and a broad understanding of the principles of design and analysis of catalytic processes. The student will have a knowledge of the comparative advantages and disadvantages of various characterisation techniques available, and be able to use this knowledge to select the appropriate technique(s) to be used with a given sample.
Skills:
The students will develop skills in developing rate-based process models and using process simulation for analysis and optimisation. The student will develop skills in analysing gas physisorption, mercury porosimetry, NMR relaxometry, SAXS, and gas chemisorption data.
Content:
Case study on gas-phase heterogeneous catalytic process (e.g. gas-to-liquids process). Case study on three-phase catalytic process (e.g. liquid phase hydrogenation). Multiphase processes and reactors. Batch vs continuous reactors for multiphase processes. Introduction to the characterisation of porous media. Advanced techniques for the analysis of gas sorption data. Advanced techniques for the analysis of mercury porosimetry data. Introduction to the use of NMR relaxometry. Basic analysis of SAXS data. Basic analysis of hydrogen chemisorption data.

CE50100: Fundamentals of drug delivery

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an introduction to how an engineering approach may be used for the design and analysis of drug delivery systems for the controlled delivery of therapeutically useful drugs to target tissues.
Learning Outcomes:
Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the concepts and theories relating to the nature of drug delivery technologies; the inter-relationship between polymer chemistry, implant structure and the rate of drug release.They will also be able to show an appreciation of the molecular mechanisms of drug transport and elimination at the site of delivery.
Skills:
Intellectual skills include the development of critical abilities needed to retrieve and assess information (taught and facilitated). Professional skills include the ability to integrate information from the chemical and biological properties of substrates, catalysts and products of biochemical engineering into engineering design of bioprocesses (assessed). Practical skills include the development of students' competence in oral (assessed). Key skills include self-learning (facilitated).
Content:
* Fundamentals of mass transfer and diffusion.
* Drug dispersion in biological systems and through biological barriers.
* Drug transport and fluid motion.
* Polymeric biomaterials used for drug delivery.
* Controlled drug delivery systems (ie transdermal, matrix, hydrogel, degradable and responsive).

CE50101: Molecular biochemical engineering

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an understanding of how the molecular properties of the substrates/reactants, catalysts and products of bioprocessing can be exploited in the production and purification of commercially relevant compounds.
Learning Outcomes:
Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the concepts and theories relating to: the key molecular interactions that can occur in biochemical reactions and separation processes; the integration of biological properties into engineering design of bioprocesses. They will also be able to demonstrate an awareness of the relevance of biological considerations in bioprocessing.
Skills:
Intellectual skills include the development of critical abilities needed to retrieve and assess information (taught and facilitated). Professional skills include the ability to integrate information from the chemical and biological properties of substrates, catalysts and products of biochemical engineering into engineering design of bioprocesses (assessed). Practical skills include the development of students' competence in oral (assessed). Key skills include self-learning (facilitated).
Content:
* Revision of basic biology of DNA structure and protein synthesis and control.
* Structured models of gene expression, and intracellular product formation.
* Kinetics of enzyme-catalysed reactions and biotransformations.
* Physicochemical properties of proteins.
* Protein separation and purification processes (including membranes, chromatography, fusion proteins).

CE50104: Membrane fundamentals

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX75PR25
Requisites:
Aims: The course aims to introduce the fundamental aspects of membrane processes and acts as a co-requisite to the Membrane Applications course.
Learning Outcomes:
Having successfully completed this unit students should have a firm grounding in the theory and operating mechanisms of membrane processes in the following application areas: gas separation, liquid membranes and liquid-liquid contactors, solid-liquid separations (micro- and ultra- filtration membranes), nanofiltration, ion exchange and electrochemical membranes, reverse osmosis, and hybrid membrane processes, e.g. membrane reactors. Students should be aware of the mechanisms of membrane fouling and cleaning. They should be able to use appropriate mathematical models, describe typical membrane modules, material properties and operating conditions for these processes.
Skills:
Students should be able to describe and understand the principles of operation and theoretical descriptions of a range of membrane processes. This is taught through tutorial work and guided reading/background preparation, and assessed through examination and practical classes.
Content:
Gas separations, liquid membranes, liquid-liquid contactors, solid-liquid separations (micro- and ultra- filtration), nanofiltration, ion exchange and electrochemical membranes, reverse osmosis. Hybrid processes such as membrane reactors. In each case the fundamental principles of operation, mathematical modelling, typical operating conditions and the properties of the membrane materials will be addressed. Mechanisms and modelling of membrane fouling and cleaning.

CE50105: Membrane applications

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: An introduction is provided to the design and application of membrane processes and acts as a co-requisite to the Membrane Fundamentals course.
Learning Outcomes:
Having successfully completed this unit students should have a firm grounding in the design and implementation of membrane processes in application areas such as the food & drinks industry, the biotechnology & pharmaceutical industries, water treatment and environmental protection. This covers: gas separation, liquid membranes and liquid-liquid contactors, solid-liquid separations (micro- and ultra- filtration membranes), nanofiltration, ion exchange and electrochemical membranes, reverse osmosis, and hybrid membrane processes, e.g. membrane reactors. Students should be able to select appropriate membrane cleaning protocols. They should be able to produce appropriate membrane process designs and justify them on the basis of performance and economics.
Skills:
Students should be able to design a range of membrane processes. These skills are acquired through taught and facilitated tutorial work and guided reading/ background preparation, and assessed through a series of assessed coursework.
Content:
Gas separations, liquid membranes, liquid-liquid contactors, solid-liquid separations (micro- and ultra- filtration), nanofiltration, ion exchange and electrochemical membranes, reverse osmosis. Hybrid processes such as membrane reactors. In each case membrane selection, design equations, estimation of process performance and economic assessment will be demonstrated. Selection and optimisation of membrane cleaning protocols. Overall membrane process optimisation.

CE50106: Energy engineering

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Aims: To provide a comprehensive understanding of the engineering aspects (especially plant or unit design and operation) of energy provision and use in the industrial, transport, service and domestic sector, mainly in the UK, but also internationally.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to:understand the main current, and possible future, engineering aspects (especially plant or unit design and operation) of energy demand, conversion, storage, delivery, and use in the industrial, transport, service and domestic sectors, mainly in the UK, but also internationally.
Skills:
* Industrial awareness (taught/facilitated and assessed) - advanced.
* Problem solving (taught/facilitated and assessed) - advanced.
* Analysis (taught/facilitated and assessed) - intermediate.
* Economic, social, political and environmental awareness (taught/facilitated) - intermediate.
Content:
* The nature of energy: work and heat.
* Energy demand.
* Energy conversion systems, especially plant or unit design and operation (about a third of the total contact hrs): fossil fuel (coal, oil, gasoline, natural gas), nuclear (fission and fusion), renewables (wind, wave, tidal, solar, geothermal, hydro, biomass), fuel cells.
* Energy storage, delivery and use.
* Case study (about a third of the total contact hrs).

CE50107: Research project unit 1

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide experience of project planning and the gathering of information from a variety of sources in preparation for a research project.
Learning Outcomes:
Student should be able to: demonstrate an understanding of the key concepts and theories relating to the chosen field of research; know what action they need to take in order to progress the research project; make effective contact with other researchers in the Department who are also working in a related field.
Skills:
Use of a variety of IT techniques to find information. Scheduling a programme of work, report writing.
Content:
Explanation of expectations and timetable for the work. The student selects a research project and is allocated a supervisor who monitors progress. Other researchers in the Department may also be involved in this field and the student will be expected to interact with them. Review of any available literature in the research group and the sourcing of additional information, e.g. library, web. Project planning and decisions about the next phase of work. The student is expected to write a report describing the work done and knowledge acquired. Length of the report should be about 5,000 words supported by about 20 sides of diagrams/tables/figures, etc.

CE50108: Research project unit 2

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To perform preliminary calculations and/or construct experimental apparatus, and become familiar with computational/experimental techniques that will be used in Research Project Unit 3.
Learning Outcomes:
Students should be able to: demonstrate how to perform calculations and/or construct experimental apparatus in preparation for a more extensive period of research work in the chosen field; follow a prepared course of action in order in progress the project.
Skills:
Calculations, development of mathematical models and/or experimental techniques. Use of IT techniques, scheduling a programme of work, report writing.
Content:
More detailed analysis of information gathered in Research Project Unit 1. Additional literature search to cover any gaps in knowledge. Familiarisation with proposed experimental/theoretical methods. The students will have gathered practical experience of the calculations and/or experimental methods. They will need to make decisions about any changes or additional sources of information that they need to obtain in order to complete the next phase of work. Preparation of report. The length will be about 5,000 words supported by 20 figures/diagrams/tables, etc.

CE50109: Research project unit 3

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Dissertation period
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To conduct an experimental, theoretical, or computational research project, in a chosen field of specialism.
Learning Outcomes:
Student should be able to demonstrate a level of understanding about a chosen field of specialism, that has necessitated the need to read published research papers in the field, and to build on that knowledge (by theoretical or experimental work), to a level that would not normally be found in an undergraduate course text book.
Skills:
Record keeping, working in a systematic manner, tackling an open ended problem, oral/written communication, allocation of priorities. Students will gather knowledge about their chosen specialism, realise the importance of time management, scheduling of work, and importance of reviewing progress against objectives.
Content:
In the earlier research project unit(s), the students will have gathered information and formed conclusions. The students will meet their allocated academic supervisors. This information is reviewed and then the work programme is actioned. Data is gathered, the results are interpreted, conclusions are formed. The final requirement is for a written Final Report and a 30 minute oral presentation. The length of this should be about 10,000 words of text supported by about 20 - 30 sides of diagrams/figures/tables, etc.

CE50110: Environmental impact assessment

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of the module is to give the students a good understanding of how EIA is implemented and practised in the UK and other countries around the world.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing the unit students should be able to manage an EIA, and identify the most appropriate methodology to use when carrying out all of the different stages of an EIA. They should be able to: interpret the findings that are made; identify when an environmental statement has been properly prepared; and understand the role of the statement in the decision making process.
Skills:
The distance learning unit develops skills in self study and written expression.
Content:
History and development of EIA; existing situation in EU, UK and worldwide; methods which have been developed for EIA and their application, the states and requirements of the EIA process, future development in terms of strategic EIA and integration with IPPC etc.

CE50111: Cost benefit analysis

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Aims: The aim is to advance student understanding of the economic principles and analytical techniques behind CBA, and best practises in conducting cost benefit analysis.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to outline the economic principles underlying CBA and distinguish environmental CBA from traditional financial project appraisal. They should also be able to describe the rationale underlying each of the economic valuation techniques; outline the methodology of each technique and identify the main shortcomings associated with them. They should also be able to describe the economic basis of, and employ the investment decision criteria utilised by CBA. Finally, the students should be able to describe how the results of a CBA should be reported.
Skills:
This distance learning unit develops skills in self study, and use of spreadsheets.
Content:
Introducing CBA; financial project appraisal; willingness to pay and opportunity costs as measures of economic value; market imperfections (e.g. public goods and externalities); shadow pricing; total economic value; techniques employing actual market prices, surrogate market techniques, survey based techniques; determination of cash flows and investment criteria; discount rates; limitations of CBA; presenting and reporting CBA.

CE50112: Life cycle assessment

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Aims: The aim is to provide the student with an understanding of LCA as an environmental management tool and a detailed knowledge of how to apply it in practice.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit, students should be able to demonstrate a detailed understanding of the four main phases in conducting an LCA: goal definition and scoping, inventory analysis, impact assessment and improvement analysis, as well as describing the present and potential future applications of LCA and its shortcomings/limitations.
Skills:
This distance learning unit develops skills in self study, data analysis and use of spreadsheets.
Content:
Goal definition and scoping; inventory analysis - data requirements and quality issues, data processing and validation, inventory calculation methodology, presenting the life cycle inventory results; interpretation of the inventory (i.e. impact assessment methods); improvement analysis (including variations in recycling loops); the applications and limitations of LCA; and the origins of LCA and international standards.

CE50113: Energy management

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: The aim is to advance student understanding of current and best practices in the methodologies of energy management.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit students should be able to describe the current situation as regards energy use and the environmental implications of it on a global, national and local scale. Students should also be able to demonstrate an in depth understanding of the role of energy management in that context, and in the context of specific benefits for the company; including how energy management can be implemented and what implementation means in terms of action, training, resources etc.; what contitutes efficiency in terms of combustion, refrigeration and heat exchange; and basic economic principles as applied to investment in energy management.
Skills:
The extended essay assignment helps to prepare the students' writing skills for their project dissertation.
Content:
Physical aspects of energy, basic principles relating to energy, energy management including the energy policy, energy audit, monitoring and control, combustion, refrigeration, energy recovery and economics for energy managers.

CE50114: Risk management

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: The aim is to advance student understanding of current best practices in the methodologies of risk assessment and management as they apply at policy level e.g. planning issues, and also at the level of individual organisations, and specific processes and substances.
Learning Outcomes:
After successfully completing this unit the students should be able to outline the role of risk management and assessment in environmental management systems, and describe how risk assessment and management methods are employed in EIA, CBA and environmental audit. They should be able to undertake a risk assessment exercise, interpret the results and appropriately manage the identified risks. To this end, the students will acquire a detailed understanding of the various analytical techniques that can be used to assess risk, and identify the role that these techniques play in managing risk.
Skills:
The extended essay assignment helps to prepare the students' writing skills for their project dissertation.
Content:
Risk management: government policy and guidelines; risk management through planning control; links to EIA; risk management techniques at the company/organisational level; risk assessment techniques for identifying significant aspects, links to ISO 14001 and EMS; technological risk; process and substance risk assessment; risk/impact pathways; analytical techniques for risk assessment; links to CBA; definitions of risk/uncertainty; descriptive statistics; probability and probability distribution; confidence intervals; decision analysis; scenario analysis and simulation methods; multi-attribute decision criteria; social risk management/risk perception; insurance.

 

University | Catalogues for 2005/06 | for UGs | for PGs