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Department of European Studies & Modern Languages, Unit Catalogue 2005/06


EU00408: German-English translation for SOCRATES students A

Credits: 3
Level: Foundation
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
This unit is solely for Socrates-Erasmus, Exchange and Visiting students.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
To refine students' ability to translate competently from German into English in a variety of contemporary registers.
Content:
The main emphasis in this semester will be placed on dealing with texts written in more colloquial registers.

EU00409: German-English translation for SOCRATES students B

Credits: 3
Level: Foundation
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
This unit is solely for Socrates-Erasmus, Exchange and Visiting students.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
To refine students' ability to translate competently from German into English in a variety of contemporary registers.
Content:
The main emphasis in this semester will be placed on translating with texts written in more formal registers.

EU10003: French cultural studies 1A: form & genre in French culture

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an introduction to modern French literature, film, and art; to analyse a range of narrative and dramatic structures; to explore a variety of critical and theoretical approaches.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* analyse written and visual texts using a variety of different critical approaches
* compare and contrast different genres
* recognise a range of narrative and visual strategies.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, and the planning/¬conduct/¬reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
The language of literature: metaphor, music and image as meaning, the nature of representation, the relationship between form and content; the language of film; the language of theatre. Texts to be studied include: Lainé, P. (1974), La Dentellière, Paris: Folio, in conjunction with the film version: Goretta, C. (1977), La Dentellière; Ionesco, E. (1954), La Cantatrice chauve, Paris: Folio.

EU10004: French cultural studies 1B: Changing viewpoints and narrative strategies

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: To identify and explore the changing viewpoints and narrative strategies of modern literature, film, and art; to explore and apply a range of critical approaches, and to appreciate their significance; to understand fundamental theories of autobiography and écriture féminine.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* describe and account for changing narrative strategies and viewpoints in modern literature;
* discuss issues of narration and point of view in relation to gender and voice;
* structure individual critical responses using appropriate vocabulary and register.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Narrative: words and images; novel and film; reading strategies and the role of the reader/spectator; questions of the narrator and point of view; realism and self-reflexivity; women's voices. Texts and films to be studied include: Duras, M. (1958), Moderato Cantabile, Paris: Minuit; Ernaux, A. (1983), La Place, Paris: Folio; Carax, L. (1991), Les Amants du Pont Neuf.

EU10005: French politics & society 1A: Introduction à la politique et à la société françaises 1

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to introduce students to the study of French politics and society via a chronological survey of the period until 1945.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this unit students should:
* understand some contemporary French history essential to understanding key aspects of French politics and society;
* have acquired essential reading, listening, and note-taking skills in French;
* be able to understand basic political concepts and write about them;
* be able to mobilize knowledge gained from lectures and readings.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
This unit will introduce students to a study of France since the 1930s. Certain issues and problems will be highlighted within a basic chronological structure covering the following: French politics in the 1930s; class and politicss, the Popular Front; left-wing and right-wing attitudes and polical parties, foreign policy, the Second World War; Vichy France and Occupation; Collaboration; Resistance and the Liberation. The unit is taught in French. Key texts: Antoine Prost, Petite histoire de la France au 20e siècle, Arnand Colin, 2000; Jean François Sirinelli et al, La France de 1914 à nos jours, Presses Universitaires de France, 1993; James McMillan, Twentieth Century France, Arnold, 1992.

EU10006: French politics & society 1B: Introduction à la politique et à la société françaises 2

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to introduce students to the study of French politics and society via a chronological survey of the period from 1945 to the present.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this unit students should:
* understand some contemporary French history essential to understanding key aspects of French politics and society;
* have consolidated essential reading, listening, and note-taking skills in French;
* be able to understand basic political concepts and write about them;
* be able to mobilize knowledge gained from lectures and readings.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
This unit will introduce students to a study of France since the Second World War. Certain issues and problems will be highlighted within a basic chronological structure covering the following: The Post-War period; post-war expansion, decolonisation, the coming of the Fifth Republic, May 1968; changes in French society; Recent developments in French politics and society up to and including the Chirac presidency; the Fifth Republic and political parties. The unit is taught in French. Key texts: Antoine Prost, Petite histoire de la France au 20e siècle, Arnand Colin, 2000; Jean François Sirinelli et al, La France de 1914 à nos jours, Presses Universitaires de France, 1993; James McMillan, Twentieth Century France, Arnold, 1992.

EU10032: German cultural studies 1A: Kultur der Weimarer Republik

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce students to the culture of the Weimar Republic in its socio-political context, in particular through close study of representative texts and films; to make students aware of the formal characteristics and expressive potential of forms of cultural production such as autobiography, film and short story; to develop their analytical capacities and self-confidence in the evaluation of works of culture; to improve their fluency in reading German.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this unit students should be able to
* read and understand texts and film from the period;
* identify key themes and explain their socio-cultural significance in an oral presentation;
* describe their basic structure, style and symbolism;
* formulate and illustrate an argument about them in an essay.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Will include the study of a) Texts: Ernst Toller, Eine Jugend in Deutschland; Franz Kafka Erzählungen; b) Film: Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari.

EU10033: German cultural studies 1B: Drittes Reich und Nachkriegsjahre (1933-61)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce students to significant aspects of German culture in the period 1933-61 through a close study of representative texts and films seen in their socio-political context; to make students aware of the formal characteristics and expressive potential of forms of cultural production such as the short story, the novel, autobiography, drama, poetry and the film; to enable students to develop their critical capacities and their ability to reach well-reasoned conclusions in their evaluation of works of culture.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this unit students should be able to critically evaluate cultural products of the Fascist and early post-war periods; and to explain the particular significance of selected cultural practitioners both today and within the framework of their own times.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Lectures will introduce students to the principal features of German cultural life during the Third Reich and in the immediate post-war years. Seminars will be devoted to critical analysis of selected texts and films which are representative of the period.Key sources: Leni Riefenstahl (dir.), Triumph des Willens (1935); Ernst Jünger, Auf den Marmorklippen (1939); Wolfgang Borchert, Draußen vor der Tür (1947).

EU10034: German politics & society 1A: Deutschland und Österreich 1918-1939

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To trace the most important political, social and economic developments in inter-war Germany and Austria; practice in German comprehension, speaking and writing.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete this unit successfully will be able to follow straightforward lectures in German and take notes from them; understand vocabulary and concepts relevant to the history of the period; make short oral presentations in German and facilitate seminar discussion as part of a panel; write short essays in German on topics arising out of their seminar presentation.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
i. Weimar (1918-1933)
a) Revolution, Friedensvertrag und Weimarer Verfassung
b) Bruning und das Ende von Weimar
ii. Drittes Reich (1933-1945)
a) Propaganda
b) Holocaust
iii Osterreich
a) Entstehung der Republik
b) Bürgerkrieg
The unit is taught in German.

EU10035: German politics & society 1B: Bundesrepublik, DDR and Österreich, 1945-1961

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: To convey in German political and social developments from 1945 to 1967; to give students practice in understanding lectures in German and taking notes, to introduce relevant vocabulary and concepts, and to assist students in discussing and writing on the above issues in German.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete this unit successfully will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the most significant political and social developments of the period in written and spoken German.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
i) - BRD
* DH unter den Alliierten
* Grundgesetz & westdeutsche Gesellschaft
ii) - DDR
* Juni 1953
* Entwicklung: den 50er jahren
iii) - Osterreich
* Bürgerkrieg
* Ständestaat
The unit is taught in German.

EU10064: Italian cultural studies 1A: Introduction to Italian cultural history

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce students to some of the key periods in Italian cultural history. To study the emergence of the Neorealist movement in Italian cinema and narrative and to analyse its political and social significance. To familiarise students with some basic concepts of narrative in film and literature.
Learning Outcomes:
At the end of the unit students will be able to:
* understand the significance of the Renaissance for Italian culture;
* understand the importance of Neorealism in Italian post-war film;
* discuss critically two key films of the Neorealist movement.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The artistic and intellectual development of Italy since the Renaissance and its importance for contemporary Italian society. The Neorealist cinema, the key films of this movement, their narrative techniques and their critical reception.

EU10065: Italian politics & society 1A: Italian foundation history (1860-1914)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To teach Italian economic, social and political history from Unification to the First World War in the context of European and international developments.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this unit, students will be familiar with the main developments in Italian history 1960-1914, have developed critical and analytical skills for an understanding of the study of history, and be familiar with essential political terminology in Italian.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
The unification of Italy. The difficult construction of a sense of nationhood. Political liberalism and the emergence of the transformist variant of parliamentary politics. The division between 'legal Italy' and 'real Italy' in the nineteenth century. Industrialisation and the emergence of organised labour. Political Catholicism, anarchism and socialism. Economic liberalism and protectionism. The rise of nationalism. Italy between neutrality and intervention.

EU10066: Italian cultural studies 1B: Italian writing of the 19th century

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce students to the main developments in Italian prose and poetry in the 19th Century and to develop their critical skills through the analyses of passages from literary texts and two short stories.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students should be able to:
* make links between Italian 19th Century literary movements and contemporary European culture
* connect the development of Italian literature to Italian history and geography, the creation of the Italian nation, and the social changes brought about by Unification
* identify styles and themes associated with different writers
* understand how a prose text works and identify its 'ingredients' (point of view, time, character, etc.), and how meaning is produced.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Lectures: Romanticism and verismo and a number of writers (Leopardi, Manzoni, Verga). Seminars: the analysis of two short stories.

EU10067: Italian politics & society 1B: Italian fascism

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10065
Aims: The aims are to provide students with an understanding of the origins, success and collapse of fascism in the context of European and international developments; to show how a crisis of the Italian state developed after the First World War; to consider and compare different interpretations of the fascist dictatorship.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this unit students should be familiar with the main developments in Italian history 1914-1945 and have enhanced their critical and analytical skills through discussion of competing analyses of Italian fascism.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/¬conduct/¬reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
Italy in the First World War. The 'biennio rosso' and the origins of fascism. Mussolini's rise to power. The creation of a fascist dictatorship. Fascism and national identity. Church and State under fascism. Economic crisis and fascist economic policies. Foreign policy. The alliance with Hitler. Italy in the Second World War. The fall of Mussolini, the armistice and the Resistance movement. Interpretations of fascism.

EU10082: Russian written & spoken language 1A (ab initio)

Credits: 12
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take EU10635 or take EU10083
Aims: To provide a systematic grounding in the Russian language. To introduce students to the alphabet, the main structures of Russian grammar and basic vocabulary. To develop good pronunciation and intonation.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to:
* read and write the Russian cyrillic alphabet;
* have an elementary command of Russian vocabulary and grammar;
* pronounce Russian words correctly and make simple statements accurately.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit; skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:
The Colloquial Russian course with additional use of specially prepared explanatory material, exercises and drills. The Ruslan computer assisted learning package. Practice in pronunciation, intonation, aural comprehension and conversation. Textbook: S. Kay & S. Le Fleming, Colloquial Russian (Routledge: 1997).

EU10083: Russian cultural studies 1A: Introduction to Russian culture (post A level)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take EU10082
Aims: To introduce Year 1 advanced-entry students to some key texts of 19th century Russian literature.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will:
* be familiar with the poetry and/or prose of a classic Russian writer (or writers);
* have improved their Russian vocabulary and grammar;
* have improved their skills in translating from Russian into English;
* have learnt how to write an essay of literary criticism.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Set texts will normally be chosen from A S Pushkin, The Queen of Spades and selected lyric poetry; I S Turgenev, First Love; A P Chekhov, The Seagull. The choice will depend upon which works students have studied previously.

EU10085: Russian written & spoken language 1B (ab initio)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX50CW20OR30
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take EU10635
Aims: To continue a systematic grounding in the Russian language up to approximately A-level standard. To ensure that students acquire a firm grasp of the main structures of Russian grammar and of basic vocabulary, and are able to express themselves in a variety of contexts. To develop the ability to take part in simple everyday conversation. To develop reading ability to the point at which less complex works of literature can be read with the aid of a dictionary.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will:
* have understood most of the basic grammatical structures of Russian;
* have increased their vocabulary significantly;
* be able to read simple literary texts with the aid of a dictionary;
* be able to conduct a simple conversation on personal and everyday themes.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit; skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:
The Colloquial Russian course with additional use of specially prepared explanatory material, exercises and drills. The Ruslan computer assisted learning package. Practice in aural comprehension and conversation.Textbook: S. Kay & S. Le Fleming, Colloquial Russian (Routledge: 1997).

EU10086: Russian cultural studies 1B: Introduction to Russian culture (ab initio)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take EU10085
Aims: To familiarise students with literary Russian and introduce them to classical pre-revolutionary literature. To read (in Russian) and discuss a well-known literary text.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will:
* be familiar with the historical development of Russian literature before 1917 and the particular contribution of major writers;
* have studied in depth a short piece of classical Russian literature;
* have improved their vocabulary, grammar and translation skills;
* have developed skills in textual analysis and literary criticism.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Lectures on the history of Russian literature; reading and discussion of Chekhov's Dama s sobachkoi.

EU10087: Russian politics & society 1A: Russia before 1917 - Directed study

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take EU10088

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To permit post A-level students of Russian (and others requiring a six-credit unit) to make a more detailed study of topics covered in Russian Politics and Society 1B (EU10088).
Content:
As for Russian Politics and Society 1B (EU10088).

EU10088: Russian politics & society 1B: Russia before 1917

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: The main aim of the unit is to offer an outline history of Russia focusing on the geopolitical, social and cultural factors which shaped its development and to examine in detail the problems posed by industrial development and social change in the late 19th and early 20th centuries culminating in the revolution of 1917. The unit also introduces some classic literary and political texts to illuminate the moral and political dilemmas of the 19th century. A second aim is to develop skills in historical analysis through seminar discussion and essay techniques.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will:
* have a clear understanding of the character and historical evolution of the Russian Empire and of its collapse in 1917;
* be familiar with the debate about the factors which shaped its rise and fall;
* have gained experience in analysis of primary sources;
* have shown they can present an effective analysis of an issue in essay form.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The first Russian states and the rise of Moscow; modernization and westernization 1680-1855; Russian society in the mid-19th century as reflected in Turgenev's Fathers and Children; reform and industrialisation 1855-1903; the emergence of a revolutionary movement; dilemmas of Russian revolutionaries as reflected in Lenin's What is to be Done?; Dostoevsky's critique of 19th century Russian social values in Crime and Punishment; women and the women's movement before 1917; the revolution of 1905 and the successes and failures of constitutional rule 1906-1914; war, revolution and the failure of liberal democracy 1914-1917. Key text: G. Hosking Russia and the Russians: from the Earliest Times to 2001 (Penguin: 2001).

EU10103: Introduction to European studies

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: The first aim of the unit is to begin an exploration of the historical and cultural identity of Europe and of the socio-economic, political and cultural factors which have shaped it since ancient times and more specifically in the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. The second aim is to help first-year students develop university-level skills in active learning and communication, including note-taking, seminar participation, oral presentations, teamwork and essay-writing.
Learning Outcomes:
A student who completes the unit successfully will:
* have begun to think about the question of European identity and the issues which unite and divide Europeans;
* be familiar with the main contours of European history since the French Revolution and the social, cultural geopolitical and ideological divisions which characterised the continent in the first half of the 20th century;
* have been introduced to some basic concepts and techniques of political and cultural analysis and applied them in a European historical and cultural context;
* have developed important basic skills in oral and written communication.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
Defining Europe - history, languages and culture; industry, nations and empires in 19th Century Europe; the First World War; communism and fascism in interwar Europe; the Second World War; studying European culture; images of war in 20th Century Europe.

EU10104: Europe since 1945

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33EX67
Requisites:
Aims: The first aim of the unit is to explore the experience of Eastern and Western Europe since the Second World War and to analyse the features and problems of post-1945 European states. This will including discussion of political structures and culture, economic structures and performance, and the interaction of culture and politics. The second aim of the unit is to help first-year students refine university-level communication skills, including seminar participation, oral presentations and teamwork.
Learning Outcomes:
A student who completes the unit successfully will:
* be familiar with the main contours of European history since the Second World War including the experience of European states on either side of the Iron Curtain and developments since its collapse in 1989;
* have been introduced to some further concepts and techniques of political, economic and cultural analysis and applied them in a contemporary European context;
* have been invited to reflect upon the characteristics and issues which have united and divided Europe in the contemporary era;
* be able to research chosen issues in European history since 1945 and discuss them effectively in oral presentations and in writing.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
Europe in the Cold War era; politics and culture in post-war Europe; economic and social change in Western Europe; liberal democratic politics in Europe - elections and party systems; political culture; the rise and fall of European communist states and command economies; economic and political problems in the age of globalisation; postmodernism in European culture.

EU10115: French economic & industrial environment

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50ES50
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
to introduce students to the economic contexts in which firms in France operate, to analyse the causes of economic growth and industrial development in the post-war period and to introduce students to the language of the French business environment.
Content:
economic growth and development in the post-war period (1945-1973); recession and structural changes in the 1970s; economic performance and public policies in the 1980s and 1990s; industrial policy: concentration, nationalisation, privatisation, small firms; foreign trade in goods and services. Classes are conducted in French.

EU10118: German business environment 1

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to introduce students to key concepts of the German economic environment. In the second half it will focus on aspects of the integration of the former East into the economy of the West.
Content:
The unit first concentrates on the period of post-war economic reconstruction, in particular on aspects of the 'economic miracle' and the social market economy. Then the emphasis will shift towards the reconstruction of the economy in East Germany following unification. Special emphasis will be on the role of the 'Treuhand', the question of private property, ecological 'Altlasten'. Finally we will discuss the impact of processes of economic globalisation on the German economy.

EU10120: French legal environment

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES80OT20
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take EU10115

Aims & Learning Objectives:
to introduce students to the underlying principles of French law, to outline the legal framework within which firms in France operate in specific domains and to introduce students to French legal terminology
Content:
introduction to the French legal system; company law; droit des obligations (contracts and tort); consumer protection legislation; labour law; competition law. Classes are conducted in French.

EU10123: German business environment 2

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10118

Aims & Learning Objectives:
to provide students with an introduction to the structure of the German economy and the organisation of major economic interest groups; to introduce students to the legal system in the Federal Republic of Germany which governs the relationship between the state and its citizens with particular emphasis on the implications of the constitutional framework on the organisation of business; to familiarise students with relevant language and concepts, to assist students in writing in German about the relevant areas.
Content:
i. The German economy a) the structure of the German economy b) interest groups within the German economy ii. The German legal environment a) the constitutional framework of business b) aspects of change in the legal environment of German business

EU10144: Chinese stage 1A (beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
An introduction to basic Chinese ("putonghua") as a preparation to communicating in a Chinese context.
Content:
Basic Chinese grammatical forms. Recognition and production of essential Chinese characters; the Chinese phonetic system and the Pinyin system. Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking and listening. Reading and writing tasks of an appropriate nature will be gradually incorporated. Special attention will be paid to the recognition and differentiation of tones. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. Usually some evidence of competence in another foreign language is required.

EU10145: Chinese stage 1B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10144

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 1A

EU10150: French stage 7A (advanced) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate, refine and enhance previous advanced knowledge of French
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. GCE Advanced Level French or equivalent required.

EU10151: French stage 7B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10150

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 7A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 7A

EU10156: French stage 4A (intermediate) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of French, to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a French-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation relating to a selection of topics. Remedial work is carried out where necessary. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in French. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. GCSE Grade C in French or equivalent required.

EU10157: French stage 4B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10156

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 4A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 4A

EU10162: German stage 1A (beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
An introduction to everyday German, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in a German speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. Usually some evidence of competence in another foreign language is required.

EU10163: German stage 1B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10162

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 1A

EU10168: German stage 7A (advanced) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate, refine and enhance previous advanced knowledge of German
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. GCE Advanced Level German or equivalent required.

EU10169: German stage 7B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10168

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 7A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 7A

EU10174: German stage 4A (intermediate) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of German, to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a German-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation relating to a selection of topics. Remedial work is carried out where necessary. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in German. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. GCSE Grade C in German or equivalent required.

EU10175: German stage 4B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10174

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German 4A
Content:
A continuation of German 4A

EU10180: Italian stage 1A (beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
An introduction to everyday Italian, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in an Italian speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. Usually some evidence of competence in another foreign language is required.

EU10181: Italian stage 1B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10180

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Italian Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Italian Stage 1A

EU10186: Japanese stage 1A (beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
An introduction to everyday Japanese, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in a Japanese speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and the reading and writing of the 2 phonetic Japanese scripts and selected kanji (Chinese characters)
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Course material will be drawn from a variety of sources and will include audio-visual resources. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. Usually some evidence of competence in another foreign language is required.

EU10187: Japanese stage 1B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10186

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 1A

EU10192: Spanish stage 1A (beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
An introduction to everyday Spanish, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in a Spanish speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. Usually some evidence of competence in another foreign language is required.

EU10193: Spanish stage 1B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10192

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 1A

EU10198: Spanish stage 4A (intermediate) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of Spanish, to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Spanish-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation relating to a selection of topics. Remedial work is carried out where necessary. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in Spanish. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements. GCSE Grade C in Spanish or equivalent required.

EU10199: Spanish stage 4B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10198

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 4A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 4A

EU10204: Chinese stage 1A (beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
An introduction to basic Chinese ("putonghua") as a preparation to communicating in a Chinese context.
Content:
Basic Chinese grammatical forms. Recognition and production of essential Chinese characters; the Chinese phonetic system and the Pinyin system. Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking and listening. Reading and writing tasks of an appropriate nature will be gradually incorporated. Special attention will be paid to the recognition and differentiation of tones.

EU10205: Chinese stage 1B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10204

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 1A

EU10210: French stage 7A (advanced) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate, refine and enhance previous advanced knowledge of French
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU10211: French stage 7B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10210

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 7A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 7A

EU10216: French stage 4A (intermediate) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of French, to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a French-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation relating to a selection of topics. Remedial work is carried out where necessary. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in French. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU10217: French stage 4B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10216

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 4A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 4A

EU10222: German stage 1A (beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
An introduction to everyday German, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in a German speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work

EU10223: German stage 1B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10222

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 1A

EU10228: German stage 7A (advanced) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate, refine and enhance previous advanced knowledge of German
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU10229: German stage 7B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10228

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 7A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 7A

EU10234: German stage 4A (intermediate) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of German, to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a German-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation relating to a selection of topics. Remedial work is carried out where necessary. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in German. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU10235: German stage 4B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10234

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German 4A
Content:
A continuation of German 4A

EU10240: Italian stage 1A (beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
An introduction to everyday Italian, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in an Italian speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work

EU10241: Italian stage 1B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10240

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Italian Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Italian Stage 1A

EU10246: Japanese stage 1A (beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
An introduction to everyday Japanese, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in a Japanese speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and the reading and writing of the 2 phonetic Japanese scripts and selected kanji (Chinese characters)
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Course material will be drawn from a variety of sources and will include audio-visual resources. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work

EU10247: Japanese stage 1B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10246

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 1A

EU10252: Spanish stage 1A (beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
An introduction to everyday Spanish, in order to enable the student to cope at a basic level in a Spanish speaking environment, concentrating on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary is acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work

EU10253: Spanish stage 1B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10252

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 1A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 1A

EU10258: Spanish stage 4A (intermediate) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of Spanish, to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Spanish-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation relating to a selection of topics. Remedial work is carried out where necessary. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in Spanish. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU10259: Spanish stage 4B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10258

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 4A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 4A

EU10264: EFL Academic Writing A

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The aim of this course is to improve students' academic writing skills in English, thereby enabling them to raise the standard of their degree course work.
Content:
Essay and report writing, to include overall structure, orthography, grammar, punctuation and appropriateness of writing style.

EU10265: EFL Academic writing B

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continuation of EFL Academic Writing A.
Content:
Continuation of EFL Academic Writing A.

EU10266: EFL Cambridge English examination classes A

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To prepare students for Cambridge First Certificate, Advanced English and Proficiency in English examinations
Content:
An integrated course, covering the four language skills and including the following: Reading authentic texts Focus on register recognition Grammar Vocabulary development Listening practice Oral discussion Writing compositions, letters and other texts Examination practice

EU10267: EFL Cambridge English examination classes B

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continuation of EFL Cambridge English Examination Classes A
Content:
Continuation of EFL Cambridge English Examination Classes A

EU10268: EFL English for business A

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop business students' spoken and written English using appropriate business materials
Content:
Spoken English: Seminar skills Giving a presentation Listening skills Negotiating skills Written English: Reading business texts Essay writing Case studies

EU10269: EFL English for business B

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continuation of EFL English for Business A
Content:
Continuation of EFL English for Business A

EU10270: Effective writing for native speakers of English

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Students should not have taken this unit in a previous semester.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop native speaker students' essay writing skills by teaching study skills for academic writing and developing accuracy.
Content:
Surveying a book or article Note-taking and summarising skills Avoiding plagiarism Incorporating source material Referring to sources Essay structure Paragraph structure Planning an essay Writing introductions and conclusions Synthesing from different sources Cohesive devices Academic style - showing and avoiding personal commitment Grammatical accuracy Writing in examinations

EU10382: EFL Spoken English A

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The aim of this course is to improve students' spoken English, thereby facilitating their social and academic interactions while in Britain, and enabling them to raise the standard of their degree course work.
Content:
Presentation and seminar skills; listening to lectures; pronunciation and fluency; colloquial English.

EU10383: EFL Spoken English B

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continuation of EFL Spoken English A.
Content:
Continuation of EFL Spoken English A.

EU10410: Political ideologies

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES50EX50
Requisites:
Aims: To provide a grounding in the study of political ideologies, namely the thought which has been central to modern political debate, and to show the importance of ideas to the study of politics.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students should be able to demonstrate i) an understanding of the notion of ideology, and of the key political ideologies discussed, and ii) an ability to engage with and analyse the main debates and arguments discussed in the course.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The lectures will focus on the main ideologies which have helped shape the modern world, together with more methodological debates surrounding the study of ideology. Lectures will include: what is 'ideology'?; liberalism; conservatism; Marxism; social democracy; nationalism; feminism; ecologism; and the 'end of ideology' debate.

EU10417: British politics

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES40PR10EX50
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed provide a grounding in the study of the British political system, including wider aspects of Britain's relations with the European Union. Frequently comparison will be made with other politics system, including European ones and the USA.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the Unit students should be able to demonstrate: i) a knowledge of the major aspects of the British political system within a historical context; and ii) an awareness of recent trends and plans for reform.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The lectures will focus on a wide range of specific topics central to beginning the study of politics (parties, institutions, etc.). Lectures will include: conservatism; social democracy; voting behaviour; the media; electoral systems; parliament; executive; Britain and the European Union.

EU10439: Spanish stage 7A (advanced) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate, refine and enhance previous advanced knowledge of Spanish. Students will be able to improve their receptive and productive language skills in a variety of situations.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spain and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU10440: Spanish stage 7B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Further consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in Spanish Stage 7A. Students will be able to practise and further improve their receptive and productive language skills in a variety of situations.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spain and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU10442: EFL reading & vocabulary

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To enable students to raise the standard of their degree course work through reading more effectively and through expanding their vocabulary from their reading. Learning Objectives:
* To develop students reading skills
* To enable students to read more quickly and efficiently
* To improve students comprehension of reading texts
* To develop students skills at taking notes from written texts
* To expand students specialist and non-specialist vocabulary
* To enable students to use their newly acquired vocabulary in their writing.
Content:
Prediction; Skimming and scanning; Reading for gist; Improving reading; Note taking from written texts; Understanding the writers intention; Understanding the meaning of a text; Distinguishing fact from opinion; Evaluating a text; Understanding words in context; Building new words from given vocabulary items; Using new vocabulary in writing.

EU10447: Spanish stage 7A (advanced) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate, refine and enhance previous advanced knowledge of Spanish. Students will be able to improve their receptive and productive language skills in a variety of situations.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spain and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU10448: Spanish stage 7B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Further consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in Spanish Stage 7A. Students will be able to practise and further improve their receptive and productive language skills in a variety of situations.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spain and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU10453: Spanish business environment 1

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
After taking this unit you must take EU10454

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce students to the Spanish Economic Environment, to analyse the causes of economic development since the civil War, and to introduce students to the language of the Spanish business environment. On completion of the Unit students will have gained an understanding of these.
Content:
The unit first concentrates on the stages in the Spanish economy since the Civil War: autarchy 1939-1958; stabilisation 1959-1974; the transition 1975-85 and alignment with Europe 1986-96. It then moves on to consider the primary sector (agriculture, fisheries), industry (including energy), and the service sector (tourism and finance).

EU10454: Spanish business environment 2

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX20ES60PR20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10453

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide students with an introduction to the structure of the Spanish economy and the organisation of the major economic interest groups; to introduce students to the legal system in Spain which governs the relationship between the state and its citizens with particular emphasis on the implications of the constitutional framework on the organisation of business; to familirise students with relevant language and concepts; to assist students writing in Spanish about the relevant areas. On completion of the Unit students will have gained an understanding of these areas relevant to their learning outcomes.
Content:
i. The Spanish Economy a) structure b) interest groups within the Spanish economy ii) The Spanish legal environment a) the constitutional framework of business b) aspects of change in the legal environment of Spanish business

EU10455: Spanish politics & society 1A: introduction to Spanish politics & society 1

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce students to the study of Spanish politics and society from the beginning of the twentieth century to the 1970s.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of the unit students shall have a better appreciation of the forces which have shaped Spanish politics and society during the 20th century.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
A chronological survey of Spain since 1898 which examines issues including: the advent and decline of the Second Republic; the causes and course of the Spanish Civil War; and the dictatorship of General Franco. Seminars provide a forum for discussion and consolidation of lectures as well as providing study skills session for note taking and essay writing. The unit is taught in Spanish.

EU10456: Spanish politics & society 1B: introduction to Spanish politics & society 2

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: To build upon the political, social and other issues raised in Semester 1 and apply them to contemporary political developments.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this semester students should have a solid background in 20th Century Spain, understand some of the key aspects of Spanish politics and society, and have acquired essential analytical and writing skills in Spanish.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
Spain at the death of Franco, the transition to democracy, the Socialist decade and the rise of the Partido Popular. Themes will include regionalism, immigration and the changing role of women in Spain. Seminars provide a forum for discussion and consolidation of the lectures as well as providing study skills sessions for argumentative essay writing. The unit is taught in Spanish.

EU10499: British History and Society

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
This unit is solely for Socrates-Erasmus, Exchange and Visiting students.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to give students an overview of British history and the way in which contemporary Britain has been shaped and continues to be influenced by its past.
Objectives: Having completed the unit, students will be able to:
* differentiate between approaches to and interpretations of history and the values and assumptions which may underlie these;
* outline major events in Britain over the past 2000 years and explain their significance;
* chart the development of the constituent parts of the United Kingdom and their coming together, and explain the cultural, economic and linguistic factors involved;
* select current news stories which show the influence of history on twenty-first century events and explain how a knowledge of history can help contemporary understanding.
Content:
The unit will cover aspects of British history and society in a thematic rather than a purely chronological way. Starting with consideration of the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom and how they came together, the unit will go on to discuss topics including the Black Death, the end of feudalism and different definitions of the beginnings of modern Britain; the evolution of the modern English language; the Industrial Revolution, urbanisation and demographic change; a general history of social policy from the monasteries to the welfare state; and monarchy, parliament and the development of constitutional government.

EU10500: Britain's International History: from the Romans to the Treaty of Rome

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
This unit is solely for Socrates-Erasmus, Exchange and Visiting students.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to give students an understanding of the history of Britain's relations with other countries and the efffects of historical forces and events upon Britain's contemporary international relations with a particular focus upon relations with other European countries and with former colonies. This unit is especially suitable for students with no previous knowledge of European history.
Objectives: Having completed the unit students will be able to:
* outline Britain's relations with other countries over the past thousand years;
* explain the impact of selected key events such as the Norman invasion, the Reformation and the American War of Independence;
* identify distinctive elements of Britain's history and make relevant comparisons with the experience of other countries around core themes such as colonisation and the emergence of nation states;
* interpret current international events involving Britain in the light if history and explain the historical background to current events.
Content:
The unit will offer an overview of selected issues in British history with a particular focus on Britain's relations with the rest of the world. Starting from the arrival of the Romans, the course will review the other invaders and later immigrants who contributed to the making of the English and later the British people. The Norman conquest and subsequent conflict with France will be studied: the reformation will be examined in the context of the consequent hostility to Catholic Europe and the developing concept of Englishness. The unit will continue with the founding of the early colonies in North America, trade and the American war of independence; the shifts in focus eastwards; the slave trade and the scramble for Africa. The unit will conclude with the study of the two world wars, the league of nations and the U.N. and the founding of the European Union.

EU10501: Shakespeare - English literature

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
This unit is solely for Socrates-Erasmus, Exchange and Visiting students.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To introduce students to the works of William Shakespeare in their literary and historical contexts. Objectives (Learning outcomes): Students will be able to:
* identify characteristcs of Shakespearean comedy;
* identify characteristcis of Shakespearean tragedy;
* make connections between Shakespeare's works and their historical, political, social, philosophical, religious, national, literary, artistic and threatrical contexts;
* apply a variety of methods of critical theory to Shakespear's works;
* analyse Shakespeare's use of language;
* undertake close textual analysis of Shakespeare's work;
* analyse Shakespeare's use of history (with particular reference to "the Tudor myth");
* identify source material for Shakespeare's work;
* identify characteristics of Renaissance thought;
* identify trends, features, factions and personalities of the reign of Queen Elizabeth I;
* discuss possibilities for production and adaptation of Shakespeare's work;
* introduce and discuss individually researched material to others.
Content:
Three Shakespeare plays will be studied: one comedy, one tragedy, one history play. (If time permits, a 'problem' play will be included). Final choice will depend on:
* current productions and film versions, which students will be encouraged to see;
* student's existing knowledge of Shakespeare's plays: (so that they are not repeating material already studied). Film versions of specific plays will be watched.

EU10502: From Lansdown to Land's End - Writers of Bath and the West Country

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
This unit is solely for Socrates-Erasmus, Exchange and Visiting students.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
AIMS: To acquaint students with the West Country writers, from Sheridan to today; to consider the relevance of Place, Class and Humour in local literature. OBJECTIVES: To study particular writers who have lived and worked in the South-West of England, from Bath to Cornwall. Variety of genres and styles to be studied; some film adaptations on video will be used.
Content:
1) Richard Brinsley Sheridan (plays, 18th century) 2) Jane Austen (novels; late 18th - early 19th century) 3) Thomas Hardy (poetry and novels; late 19th - early 20th century) 4) A variety of poetry (from 18th, 19th and 20th centuries) Video adaptations of some of the texts.

EU10503: English literature - 19th century literature

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
This unit is solely for Socrates-Erasmus, Exchange and Visiting students.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To introduce students to the main literary developments, movements and themes of the nineteenth century.
Objectives: (Learning outcomes): Students will be able to:
* identify a chronological development of English literature through the nineteenth century;
* locate pieces of writing at their correct point in the nineteenth century;
* identify the progress of specific literary movements through the nineteenth century;
* make connections between literary texts and their social, political, regional, scientific, artistic and philosophical contexts;
* make connections between literary movements in England and their counterparts in Europe and the United States of America;
* apply a variety of methods of critical analysis to literary texts;
* analyse the development of literary language through the nineteenth century;
* identify literary styles;
* analyse literary styles;
* discuss literary genres;
* introduce individually researched material to other students.
Content:
1) Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (novel) 2) Great Expectations by Charles Dickens (novel) 3) The Importance of Being Ernest by Oscar Wilde (play) 4) A variety of poetry from throughout the century. Poets to include Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, the Rossettis, Tennyson. 5) A variety of additional and supplementary texts will be suggested by the tutor. A film version of a play will be shown. Students will be encouraged to contribute supporting material from their own literary and scholastic backgrounds.

EU10504: Contemporary literature & film of the British Isles

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
This unit is solely for Socrates-Erasmus, Exchange and Visiting students.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To gain an overview of the kind of literature and films emerging in recent years from various regions of the British Isles. Objectives (Learning Outcomes): Students will be able to:
* identify the themes common in post-Second World War literature of the British Isles;
* identify and locate literature from different regions of the British Isles;
* make connections between literary texts and their social, political, regional and artictic contexts;
* apply a variety of methods of critical analysis to literary texts;
* analyse contemporary literary language;
* identify literary styles;
* analyse literary styles;
* discuss literary genres;
* identify characteristcs of British film;
* identify themes common in British films;
* identify and locate film from different regions of the British Isles;
* make connections between films and their social, political, regional, artistic and commercial contexts;
* make connections between British, European and North American films;
* apply a variety of methods of critical analysis to films;
* analyse verbal and non-verbal communication in film;
* analyse translation from text to film;
* discuss film genres;
* introduce and discuss individually researched material to others.
Content:
1) Talking Heads 2 by Alan Bennett (monologues) 2) The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter (short stories; film versions) 3) The Commitments by Roddy Doyle (novel and film) 4) A selection of poetry from various parts of the British Isles 5) Additional films will be selected from the following list: Clockwise; Shirley Valentine; Four Weddings and a Funeral; Trainspotting; The Full Monty; The Blue Boy; East is East; The Remains of the Day; The Wrong Trousers. Students will be expected to watch a number of videos provided by the tutor. Students will be encouraged to visit the cinema, to watch a new British film. The themes of Place, Class and Humour, Fairytale, Dream and Transformation will be discussed in relation to texts and films on this unit.

EU10505: Key concepts in politics

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES40PR10EX50
Requisites:
Aims: This unit seeks to:
* provide students with an introduction to essential concepts in the study, understanding and analysis of politics;
* inform students about the nature and role of political institutions, agents, and ideologies at national, regional and international levels;
* introduce students to key debates in contemporary political thought on a wide variety of issues, ranging from how powers are dividedand used in democratic political systems to the dynamics of international organisation;
* illustrate the importance of moving beyond simple description, and engaging in critical debates about these issues.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate in seminars, essays and exams that they:
* have acquired knowledge of the key concepts in the study, understanding, and analysis of politics;
* are aware of major academic and political debates about the nature of contemporary political processes at national and international levels;
* can apply this knowledge and awareness to contemporary political issues.
Skills:
Basic research and essay writing skills, seminar preparation and participation skills.
Content:
Lectures on: Power; the State and Forms of Government; the Executive ; the Legislature; the Judiciary; Political Ideologies; Political Parties and Party Systems; Political Culture; Political Change; National Sovereignty and Statesmanship; the Globalisation of Politics. Seminars on: Key Skills; Power; the State; Political Ideologies.

EU10526: EFL reading & vocabulary

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To enable students to raise the standard of their degree course work through reading more effectively and through expanding their vocabulary from their reading. Learning Objectives:
* To develop students' reading skills
* To enable students to read more quickly and efficiently
* To improve students' comprehension of reading texts
* To develop students' skills at taking notes from written texts
* To expand students' specialist and non-specialist vocabulary
* To enable students to use their newly acquired vocabulary in their writing.
Content:
Prediction; Skimming and scanning; Reading for gist; Improving reading speed; Note taking from written texts; Understanding the writer's intention; Understanding the meaning of a text; Distinguishing fact from opinion; Evaluating a text; Understanding words in context; Building new words from given vocabulary items; Using new vocabulary in writing.

EU10531: Modern British society

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
This unit is solely for Socrates-Erasmus, Exchange and Visiting students.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to give students a broad overview of contemporary British society; this will cover both the formal and the institutional level, for example the political process, the education system and the informal level of the family and the social group. Learning
Objectives: Having completed this unit students will be able to:
* describe the demographic and cultural composition of modern Britain and evaluate current demographic trends;
* describe the workings of British institutions such as governement and parliaments, the NHS and schools and universities;
* define and distinguish between British institutions, making international comparisons using knowledge previously acquired from home countries/institutions;
* explain and evaluate the arguements for and against change in the structures studied;
* recognise and describe the role of informal rules and constraints in modern British society;
* differentiate between superficially distinctive features of contemporary Britain and those featuers which represent significant differences between the United Kingdom and other countries in Western Europe and North America.
Content:
The course will cover the following topics:
* Geography and demography of the UK; population movement; variations in prosperity and in patterns of employment, including women in the labour market; the implications of an ageing population;
* The post-war welfare state, with particular emphasis on the NHS and its role as a totem and agent of social cohesion;
* Changes in family patterns, particularly lone parents; the rise in social security, leading to a growing gap between the prosperous and the poor;
* "There is no such thing as society" change in emphasis to individual provision;
* The end of Empire and de-colonisation; changing patterns of immigration from short-term workers to permanent settlers;
* Education, from the Butler Act to comprehensive schools; the coming of the National Curriculum; school leaving qualifications; the expansion of higher education;
* The political process; declining turnouts; under-representation of women and ethnic minorities.

EU10533: French stage 1A (Beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide an introduction to everyday French. On completion of this unit students will be able to cope at a basic level in a French-speaking environment, with the emphasis on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary as acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated, Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU10534: French stage 1B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10533

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French stage 1 A (EU10533).
Content:
A continuation of French stage 1 A (EU10533).

EU10539: French stage 1A (Beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide an introduction to everyday French. On completion of this unit students will be able to cope at a basic level in a French-speaking environment, with the emphasis on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
Initial emphasis will be placed on speaking, listening and reading. As vocabulary as acquired more attention will be given to grammar. Writing tasks of a relevant and appropriate nature will be incorporated, Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU10540: French stage 1B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10539

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French stage 1 A (EU10539).
Content:
A continuation of French stage 1 A (EU10539).

EU10552: Spanish cultural studies 1A: introduction to 20th Century Spanish culture

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an introduction to modern Spanish culture and the events that have marked its development; to explore the work of authors that have played a significant role from the early 20th Century up to 1975.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit students should be able to:
* recognize and articulate the significance of the authors and works studied;
* identify and use key concepts in the study of modern Spanish culture.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
Introduction to major texts and authors from the early century to 1975. Texts will be taken from the beginning to the 20th century (regeneracionismo), the Spanish Civil War and the Franco period. Themes will include genre, ideology, censorship and resistance. The unit is taught in Spanish.

EU10553: Spanish cultural studies 1B: introduction to contemporary Spanish culture

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: To identify key events in the developments of culture since the advent of democracy; to explore the work of authors that have played a significant role in that development; to examine narrative strategies of modern literature and film; to understand the development of women's writing in Spain.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students should be able to:
* recognize and articulate the significance of the authors and works studied;
* identify and use key concepts in the study of modern Spanish culture;
* analyse the relationship between sociopolitical change and literature/film.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The development of literature and film during the democratic transition, through the Socialist period and up to the present. Exploration of themes of the writer and society, narrative strategies and the development of women's writing. The unit is taught in Spanish.

EU10616: International relations and global politics

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Aims: The theoretical background in which the unit is set is represented by International Relations and International Political Economy. International relations theories will be analysed and explained, and then applied to assess the consequences of globalisation on a range of issues. These range from social movements and NGOs, to environmental issues, and to migration and the new global division of labour. The unit aims:
* to provide an overview of theoretical approaches to international relations and global politics;
* to assess the meaning and implications of globalisation;
* to explore case studies exemplifying the outcomes of globalisation.
Learning Outcomes:
Students successfully completing this unit will have achieved the following: 1. an understanding of different theoretical approaches to International relations and global politics; 2. a knowledge and understanding of globalisation and its different definitions; 3. a more in-depth knowledge of a specific issue area within global politics.
Skills:
Students will be able to enhance their presentational skills through the coursework requirements and feedback on their performance. In addition, students will be able to enhance their ability to analyse the contemporary debate in IR/IPE, including the ability to compare and evaluate competing explanations for international relations and global politics issues.
Content:
L1: Introduction to IR and Global Politics
Part 1: IR
L2: Realism in IR
L3: Institutionalism in IR
L4: Theories of International organizations
L5: Critical approaches to IR
Part 2: Global Politics
L6: Definitions of Globalisation and the impact on the nation state
L7: The new Global division of Labour and illegal migration
L8: Globalisation and identity
L9: Globalisation, social movements and NGO-politics
L10: Globalisation and environmental issues
L11: Conclusion and Revision

EU10617: Academic English for electrical engineering

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To raise the standard of English language usage in written reports, essays and presentations, with specific reference to Electrical Engineering.
Learning Outcomes:
Improved proficiency in the use of written and spoken academic English.
Skills:
Effective reading, listening, writing and speaking techniques.Taught, facilitated and assessed.
Content:
Written English: Surveying books, papers, reports and other written material. Note-taking and summarising skills. Incorporating source material: referring to sources and avoiding plagiarism. Report and essay structure: planning, sentence and paragraph structure, writing introductions and conclusions, cohesive devices. Academic style: showing and avoiding personal commitment. Grammatical accuracy and punctuation. Writing in examinations. Spoken English: Presentation skills. Discussion techniques and practice. Listening to lectures. Vocabulary and pronunciation. Comparison of informal, everyday English with the formal English style used in lectures and presentations.

EU10621: French written and spoken language 1

Credits: 12
Level: Certificate
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of this unit are:
* to stimulate and monitor the production of authentic, fluent and accurate written and spoken French;
* to provide a grounding in French grammatical and syntactic structures and heighten student awareness of linguistic difficulties in written communication;
* to promote an awareness of different styles and registers and a proficiency in the comprehension and production of texts in French with reference to contemporary issues;
* to introduce students to the techniques of summarisation, abstraction of argumentation and comparative text analysis.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate a basic grasp of lexis and grammatical structures;
* practise simple, accurate written and spoken receptive and communicative skill;
* demonstrate awareness of style and linguistic register.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Learning Outcomes:

a. Grammar/Creative Writing: creative writing activities, introduction to résumé; systematic practical grammar course; introduction to CALL multimedia and LogiFrench; development of lexis, text rewriting.
b. Spoken language: comprehension, oral presentation, video work, course related conversation sessions.
c. Translation: varieties of genre and register; written translation from French into English, translation commentary, grammar exercises; introduction to Transit-Tiger.
Key text: M.Jubb & A. Rouxeville, 2003, Grammar in Context, Arnold.

EU10626: German written and spoken language 1

Credits: 12
Level: Certificate
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of this unit are:
* to refresh and consolidate students' knowledge and understanding of the most important and fundamental grammatical structures;
* to enable them to apply the acquired skills to the production of short but fluently written German texts;
* to enhance students' communicative and listening skills in a limited variety of contexts;
* to expand their vocabulary and improve their presentation skills.
Learning Outcomes:
Increasingly students should be in a position to apply the acquired skills to the production of coherent and fluent written composition: to introduce students to a variety of German texts dealing with appropriate contemporary issues.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:

Written Language: With regard to the consolidation of grammar, the course focuses on:
* the various classes of words, including their declension
* their function within the phrase or sentence.
As regards the production of texts, the course concentrates on:
* translation into and from German
* developing essay writing skills/exercises in creative writing.
Spoken language: Students will be discussing a limited variety of topics related to culture, politics, business and society in the German speaking countries. This includes:
* reading short Austrian and German newspaper articles;
* doing simple role plays, interactive exercises, small-group discussions etc.
Key text: Hilke Dreyer, Richard Schmitt: A Practice Grammar of German. New Edition, Hueber Verlag: Ismaning 2001.

EU10631: Italian written and spoken language 1 (ab initio)

Credits: 12
Level: Certificate
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW40TE10
Requisites:
Aims: In Semester 1, this unit aims to give students a systematic grounding in the basis structures of Italian grammar and syntax; to enable them to employ these structures correctly in short written texts within a communicative context and orally in a variety of practical and everyday situations; and thus to bring students to an intermediate level of knowledge of Italian. In Semester 2, the unit aims to consolidate the knowledge acquired in Semester 1, complete the study of Italian grammar and syntax, and extend the vocabulary, thus bringing students to an advanced standard of Italian. Students will be exposed to more complex written texts (including literary ones from contemporary authors), will extend their aural comprehension and oral skills to a larger number of situations and contexts, and will develop specific skills of inferring meaning from unknown or unfamiliar language.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students should be able to:
* use and understand more complex structures of the Italian language
* employ those structures correctly in longer written texts such as reports, summaries, letters, etc. and using specific vocabulary
* read contemporary writing
* converse on practical and everyday situations and discuss issues with native and non-native speakers of Italian.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target country are developed in this unit.
Content:

Written language. Increasingly more complex morphological and syntactic aspects of the Italian language will be covered. Lessons are based upon the textbook, which will be integrated with handouts, grammar exercises, and short prose passages drawn from contemporary sources.
Spoken language. Listening and speaking skills are developed by means of conversation groups, role-play, paired activities, and supervised lab activities, based on authentic audio-visual material and printed texts and leading to more creative and contextualised written assignments. Contact with native speakers is a crucial aspect of the unit.

EU10632: Italian written & spoken language 1 (advanced entry)

Credits: 12
Level: Certificate
Academic Year
Assessment: CW50EX25OR25
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to:
* build upon knowledge of Italian grammar and syntax acquired at A level;
* consolidate and expand these structures and thus enable students to deploy them fluently and effectively in the production of written texts and exercises;
* develop and expand aural comprehension skills;
* expand oral communication skills through the use of advanced audio-visual material and class contact with lector.
Learning Outcomes:
At the end of the unit students will be able to:
* employ and understand complex Italian structures in written exercises;
* understand written texts in Italian and produce accurate translation into English;
* produce accurate Italian translations of English texts;
* interact orally in situations requiring an intermediate level command of spoken Italian;
* read and understand selected passages from the press and contemporary narrative;
* express themselves clearly and comprehensibly in Spoken Italian using complex vocabulary and structures.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:

Written Language: more complex grammatical problems are studied with the aid of specially prepared handouts and explored through regular exercises. Excerpts from the Italian press and other authentic sources are used to expand writing skills in more formal contexts.
Spoken Language: the oral activities, such as supervised audio-visual practice and role-playing, will equip students with sophisticated communicative skills for informal and formal contexts.

EU10635: Russian written & spoken language 1 (advanced entry)

Credits: 12
Level: Certificate
Academic Year
Assessment: CW50EX25OR25
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take EU10082 or take EU10085
Aims: To consolidate knowledge of basic grammar, broaden vocabulary and improve aural comprehension. To develop fluency in spoken Russian at the level of everyday conversation.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will:
* have improved their command of basic grammatical structures of Russian
* have developed vocabulary in a number of specific areas
* be able to translate intermediate-level texts and produce written Russian to an intermediate standard with the aid of a dictionary
* be able to converse fluently on personal and everyday themes.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit; skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:
Prose and essay composition; translation into English; grammar revision; conversation.

EU10638: Spanish written and spoken language 1

Credits: 12
Level: Certificate
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Aims:
* To refresh and consolidate students' knowledge and understanding of fundamental grammatical structures
* To improve students' communicative and listening skills (oral/aural) in a variety of contexts
* To expand their vocabulary so that they are able to express themselves clearly and appropriately in a variety of contexts
* To improve students' receptive and productive written communication skills in Spanish in a communicative and participative atmosphere.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of the unit, students should be able to apply the skills acquired to the production of coherent and fluent written and oral work; they will also be familiar with a variety of Spanish texts dealing with appropriate contemporary issues.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:

Written language
* The consolidation of grammar focuses on the effective and accurate use of basic structures and tenses. Activities focused on specific areas of grammar (prepositions, objects etc) will also be included.
* In text analysis, students will develop reading and writing skills, skills in critical analysis of texts, and elementary translation into both languages.
Spoken language
* Students will discuss a variety of topics related to culture, politics, business and society in Spanish-speaking countries. Such themes will be developed in oral presentations.
Key text: Kattán-Ibarra, J & Howkins, A (2003) Spanish Grammar in Context, Arnold.

EU20009: French cultural studies 2A: from realism to abstraction: disintegration of the image

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an introduction to major artistic and literary movements of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, whose theories are fundamental to contemporary cultural thought; to develop the comparative study of genres; to explore the nature of visual images (including art and photography), in relation to literary images.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* describe the evolution of the visual image in the modern period;
* analyse the shifting relationship between visual and literary images;
* compare and contrast the narrative and visual strategies of a range of different texts.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
A comparative analysis of the work of selected writers and artists within the modern period. Movements to be studied include: Impressionism; Post-Impressionism; Cubism; Surrealism. Writers to be studied include: Proust, M. (1954), Combray, in Du Coté de chez Swann, Paris: Folio; Butor, M. (1957), La Modification, Paris: 10/18.

EU20011: French politics & society 2A: De Mitterrand à Chirac, ruptures et continuités

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: To build on and develop understanding of key structures and institutions of French political life; to evaluate elements of change and continuity in the 1980s and 1990s using the framework of both presidencies, Mitterrand and Chirac; to develop note-taking and summarising skills in French; to develop listening and discussion skills in French; to encourage students to extract information and ideas from French source material.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate familiarity with key political terminology and different interpretations of political events since 1981;
* demonstrate a broaden and consolidate knowledge of contemporary French politics and society;
* discuss topical, social, political and economic issues in French.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
Introductory session; l'ère mitterrandienne, les années Chirac; élections et partis politiques; vers une économie libérale; une société fragmentée; continuités et ruptures; le chômage: l'héritage des années Mitterrand?; les élections de 2002; France, mutations, mondialisation; l'immigration. The unit is taught in French. Key texts: A. Cole French Politics and Society (Prentice Hall, 1998); J. Hayward & H. Machin Developments in French Politics (Palgrave, 2001).

EU20038: German cultural studies 2A: Kultur in der Bundesrepublik von 1961 bis zur Gegenwart

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: To study the development of cultural life in the German Federal Republic over the years when the two German states were separated by the Berlin Wall. To refer in detail both to proseworks and films produced during this period and to more recent works taking stock of divided Germany from a post-unification perspective. To focus on a number of key cultural phenomena of these years: (i) personal experiences of life in the West, and especially in West Berlin, after the building of the Wall; (ii) the challenge to the self-confidence of the Federal Republic represented by the events of 1968 and their aftermath; and (iii) the struggle for gender equality in the context of the 1970s and 1980s.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete this unit successfully will have gained a broad overview of post-1961 culture; they will understand the important socio-political role that authors and film-makers have played over this period; they will appreciate the creative difficulties involved in portraying the psychological/emotional effects of the division of Germany from a 'Western' perspective.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
A framework of lectures will provide an overview of this era from the West German perspective and an introduction to the work of the authors and film-makers to be studied. The seminars will focus on the analysis of representative works of the period and the changing post-unification view of its significance. Works to be studied are likely to include Heinrich Böll, Die verlorene Ehre der Katharina Blum, Peter Schneider, Der Mauerspringer and Margarethe von Trotta, Die bleierne Zeit. The unit is taught in German.

EU20042: German politics & society 2A: Geteiltes Deutschland 1961-1989

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: The unit is designed to build on the knowledge, understanding and skills acquired in the first year German Politics and Society units. It covers historical, political and social developments in both Germanies from the construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961 to its fall in 1988. Its aims are:
* to study relations between the two German states from the Hallstein Doctrine through the Ostpolitik of the Brandt government to the collapse of the GDR and German unification;
* to analyse the main features of the political, economic and social system of each of the two German states;
* to examine why and how GDR socialism collapsed at the end of the 1980s;
* to raise awareness of the short as well as long term issues and consequences of unification for German society at the beginning of the 21st century;
* to build on the vocabulary and concepts previously acquired and to assist students in discussing and writing on the above issues in German at an advanced level.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete this unit successfully will be able to:
* demonstrate a sound understanding of the political, social and economic systems of the two German states in the period 1961-1989;
* explain the relationship between the two German states in this period as well as the role of Germany in the Cold War;
* demonstrate a sound understanding of the key factors which contributed to the collapse of GDR socialism;
* identify key political, social and economic issues Germany has been confronted with since unification in 1990;
* discuss the above issues in an informed manner in both spoken and written German.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
i) DDR: vom Mauerbau bis zur deutschen Einigung a) Aspekte der DDR-Identitat (Politische Kultur, Alltag und Stasi); b) BRD und DDR: ein kritischer Systemvergleich; c) Frauen und Soziale Sicherheit; d) Das Jahr der Wende; ii) BRD: vom Mauerbau bis zur deutschen Einigung a) Deutsch-deutsche Beziehungen; b) 1968 und die Folgen; iii) Vereintes Deutschland a) Die Mauer im Kopf. The unit is taught in German.

EU20070: Italian cultural studies 2A: Italian writers of the early 20th Century

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: To build on the textual and cultural awareness acquired in Year 1 and to provide an overview of Italian cultural production in the early 20th Century. To develop students' skills in analysing and interpreting literary texts.
Learning Outcomes:
Learning objectives: at the end of the unit students will be able to:
* produce a critical analysis of two major novels;
* give an account of the major intellectual debates of the period.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit. Language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
This core module will be based upon key examples of Italian 20th Century novel, poetry, and short story, from the primo Novecento to the Fascist period. Lectures and seminars will address literary as well as social/political developments, such as the Southern question, Fascism, and women's issues.Texts: Sibilla Aleramo, Una donna; Ignazio Silone, Fontamara.

EU20071: Italian politics & society 2A: Italy since 1945

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: This unit aims: 1) to provide a historical overview of the main political and social events of the post-war period in Italy; 2) to equip students with the appropriate analytical skills to permit a critical evaluation of the period.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit students should: 1) be familiar with the main historical and political events of the post-war period; 2) be able to critically evaluate the principal interpretations of post-war Italian politics; 3) have in-depth knowledge about the role of the Cold War in Italy's post-war history.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit.
Content:
The unit will pay attention to the following areas: the period of reconstruction; the effects of the Cold War on Italy's domestic affairs; collective movements of the l960s and l970s; the political system; the major political parties.

EU20090: Russian cultural studies 2A: Russian literature from Chekhov to Zoshchenko

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce Year 2 students to some key literary texts of the period from the 1880s to the 1920s.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will:
* have studied in depth works by three classic Russian writers;
* have improved their Russian vocabulary, grammar and translation skills;
* have developed their skills in literary analysis and criticism.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Three writers (studied in key works): Chekhov, Blok, Zoshchenko.

EU20091: Russian politics & society 2A: Soviet Russia 1917-1985

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: The main aim of this unit is to examine the character and evolution of the communist political order in the USSR from 1917 to 1985, focusing particularly upon controversies of evidence and interpretation in order to develop skills in historical and political analysis. A second aim is to help students improve their essay and seminar techniques.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will:
* have a clear understanding of the historical evolution of the Soviet politica and social order;
* be familiar with the major academic debates about the nature of the Soviet polity and about the roles of actors, ideas and structures in its evolution;
* have gained experience in analysis of primary and secondary sources;
* have shown they can present an effective analysis of a particular controversy to a seminar and in essay form.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The establishment of Bolshevik power under Lenin 1917-1921; the New Economic Policy and the struggle for power in the Communist Party in the 1920s; Stalin's drive for industrialization and rule by terror in the 1930s-40s; the USSR in the Second World War; reform and its limits under Khrushchev and Brezhnev in the 1950s-70s; the structure and problems of the Soviet political system in the early 1980s. Key texts: G. Hosking A History of the Soviet Union 3rd edn (Fontana: 1996), M. McAuley Soviet Politics 1917-1991 2nd edn (Oxford: 1992).

EU20093: Russian cultural studies 2B: Soviet Russian literature & cinema in the 1920s & 1930s

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: To present an overview of the development of Russian literature and film in these years; to further develop skills in literary analysis and criticism; to introduce the study of Russian film.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will:
* be familiar with the historical development of Soviet Russian culture before the Second World War and the particular contribution of major writers and directors;
* have studied in depth some major literary texts and films of the period;
* have improved their vocabulary, grammar and translation skills;
* have improved their skills in the analysis and criticism of film and literature.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Two writers (studied in key works): Kharms, Zoshchenko. Films by Eisenstein and others.

EU20094: Russian politics & society 2B: Reform & reconstruction in Russia since 1985

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: The main aim of this unit is to examine the reform and collapse of Soviet communism and the subsequent construction of a post-communist political order in Russia, focusing particularly upon controversies of interpretation in order to develop skills in political analysis. A second aim is to help students further improve their essay and seminar techniques.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will:
* have a clear understanding of the historical evolution of the Soviet political and social order 1985-1991 and the Russian political and social order since 1991;
* be familiar with the major academic debates about the collapse and reconstruction (and the roles of actors, ideas and structures in these processes) and about the nature and problems of the postcommunist order;
* have gained further experience in analysis of primary and secondary sources;
* have shown they can present an effective analysis of a particular controversy to a seminar and in essay form.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The origins, development and failure of Gorbachev's reform programme 1985-91; ethnic and social developments in the post-Stalin USSR and their bearing on the collapse of communism; Yeltsin's attempt to build a new political order in Russia; the impact of transition on Russian society; the character of postcommunist politics under Putin. Key texts: A. Brown The Gorbachev Factor (Oxford: 1997), S. White Russia's New Politics: the Management of a Postcommunist Society (Cambridge: 2000).

EU20105: Politics of the European Union

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80OT20
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce students to key theories of European integration; to trace the development of the European Union; to examine current debates around the future of the European Union, including the impact of enlargement.
Learning Outcomes:
Students will develop:
* an awareness and understanding of key contemporary debates on European integration;
* an understanding of how European integration works in terms of institutions and the dynamic of integration;
* an ability to discuss contemporary issues concerning European institutions and the future of European integration.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The origins of the European Community; treaty reform in the 1980s and 1990s; institutions and the "democratic deficit"; the European Union as a world actor; moves towards a European constitution; citizenship; eastward enlargement.

EU20141: Business French option 1A

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
After taking this unit you must take EU20142
Students must have have a minimum of a GCSE Grade C and/or have taken Single Language Option units during year 1 or the equivalent in order to undertake this unit. Aims: A course to revive, develop and consolidate foreign language skills in order to enable students to operate effectively in the sphere of business and management.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of the Unit students will be able to discuss their placement experience in the target language. They will be able to operate effectively both orally and in writing in predictable business scenarios, write a CV and participate in job interviews.
Skills:

* Speaking, listening, reading, writing in French - all assessed
* Cultural understanding - taught and facilitated
* Team skills - facilitated
* Autonomous learning - facilitated
* Cognitive - taught
Content:
Intensive language work with emphasis on aural comprehension and oral communication. Teaching methods integrate a variety of forms of language learning through the exploitation of foreign language television broadcasts, audio-visual materials and a business language course text. This part of the course concentrates mainly on the practical language necessary for doing business, but also includes work on more theoretical themes such as the various types of company job application and interview practice. Overall fluency and grammatical accuracy are practised throughout the course.

EU20142: Business French option 1B

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20141
Aims: The course continues to revive, develop and consolidate foreign language skills in order to enable students to operate effectively in the sphere of business and management.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit students will be able to read and understand business reports, understand and respond to business letters, understand and comment on business statistics, summarise business-related reports, understand and react to audio and video material related to business.
Skills:

* Speaking, listening, reading, writing in French - all assessed
* Cultural understanding - taught and facilitated
* Team skills - facilitated
* Autonomous learning - facilitated
* Cognitive - taught
Content:
Further development of linguistic proficiency using the same methods as in Semester 1. The second part of the course is concerned with more real world material such as economics magazines and TV news items, on which the study of many aspects of the foreign business environment will be based. Continued emphasis on overall fluency and grammatical accuracy.

EU20146: Chinese stage 2A (post beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of Chinese, to develop listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Chinese speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering the appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary and there will be continued emphasis on tones and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short talks and undertake writing tasks in Chinese. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements.

EU20147: Chinese stage 2B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20146

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 2A

EU20152: French stage 8A (post advanced) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in French Stage 7A and 7B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works. Where numbers permit, some subject-specific material may be included, covering the relevant scientific and technological areas and/or business and industry. There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20153: French stage 8B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20152

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 8A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 8A

EU20158: French stage 5A (post intermediate) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the French covered in French Stage 4A and 4B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20159: French stage 5B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20158

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of course French Stage 5A
Content:
A continuation of course French Stage 5A

EU20164: German stage 2A (post beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in German Stage 1A and 1B to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a German-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in German Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20165: German stage 2B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20164

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 2A

EU20170: German stage 8A (post advanced) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in German Stage 7A and 7B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works. Where numbers permit, some subject-specific material may be included, covering the relevant scientific and technological areas and/or business and industry. There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20171: German stage 8B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20170

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 8A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 8A

EU20176: German stage 5A (post intermediate) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the German covered in German Stage 4A and 4B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20177: German stage 5B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20176

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 5A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 5A

EU20182: Italian stage 2A (post beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in Italian Stage 1A and 1B, to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in an Italian-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in Italian. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20183: Italian stage 2B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20182

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Italian Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Italian Stage 2A

EU20188: Japanese stage 2A (post beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in Japanese Stage 1A and 1B, to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Japanese-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and undertake appropriate writing tasks in Japanese. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20189: Japanese stage 2B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20188

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 2A

EU20194: Spanish stage 2A (post beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in Spanish Stage 1A and 1B, to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Spanish-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in Spanish. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20195: Spanish stage 2B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20194

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 2A

EU20200: Spanish stage 5A (post intermediate) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the Spanish covered in Spanish Stage 4A and 4B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spain and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20201: Spanish stage 5B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20200

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 5A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 5A

EU20206: Chinese stage 2A (post beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to consolidate existing knowledge of Chinese, to develop listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to reinforce grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Chinese speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering the appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary and there will be continued emphasis on tones and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short talks and undertake writing tasks in Chinese.

EU20207: Chinese stage 2B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20206

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 2A

EU20212: French stage 8A (post advanced) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in French Stage 7A and 7B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works. Where numbers permit, some subject-specific material may be included, covering the relevant scientific and technological areas and/or business and industry. There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20213: French stage 8B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20212

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 8A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 8A

EU20218: French stage 5A (post intermediate) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the French covered in French Stage 4A and 4B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20219: French stage 5B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20218

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of course French Stage 5A
Content:
A continuation of course French Stage 5A

EU20224: German stage 2A (post beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in German Stage 1A and 1B to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a German-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in German Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20225: German stage 2B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20224

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 2A

EU20230: German stage 8A (post advanced) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in German Stage 7A and 7B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works. Where numbers permit, some subject-specific material may be included, covering the relevant scientific and technological areas and/or business and industry. There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20231: German stage 8B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20230

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 8A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 8A

EU20236: German stage 5A (post intermediate) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the German covered in German Stage 4A and 4B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20237: German stage 5B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20236

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 5A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 5A

EU20242: Italian stage 2A (post beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in Italian Stage 1A and 1B, to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in an Italian-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in Italian. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20243: Italian stage 2B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20242

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Italian Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Italian Stage 2A

EU20248: Japanese stage 2A (post beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in Japanese Stage 1A and 1B, to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Japanese-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and undertake appropriate writing tasks in Japanese. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20249: Japanese stage 2B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20248

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 2A

EU20254: Spanish stage 2A (post beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A course to build on language skills acquired in Spanish Stage 1A and 1B, to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar, in order to enable students to operate in a Spanish-speaking environment.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in Spanish. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20255: Spanish stage 2B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20254

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 2A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 2A

EU20260: Spanish stage 5A (post intermediate) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the Spanish covered in Spanish Stage 4A and 4B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spain and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20261: Spanish stage 5B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20260

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 5A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 5A

EU20300: Year abroad

Credits: 60
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To promote the development of high-level language skills in an appropriate foreign environment; to acquire personal experience and understanding of the appropriate foreign culture(s).
Content:
To carry out an agreed programme or programmes of work and/or study in a foreign environment appropriate to the student's language combination. The nature, scope and assessment is determined by the choice of language(s), placement(s) and country/countries, in consultation with Year Abroad Coordinators, Course Tutors, Personal Tutors and Director of Studies.

EU20385: European political thought

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: The unit aims:
* to provide an introduction to major political thinkers of the European tradition;
* to raise the students' awareness of the extent to which contemporary politics in European countries is based on philosophical and moral traditions that reach back for at least two centuries;
* to enable students to contextualise and evaluate contemporary political debates in the light of ongoing debates in political thought and theory.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who have successfully completed this unit should:
* have achieved a solid overview of major traditions in European political thought;
* have acquired the ability to see contemporary politics and political debates in the context of European political thinking;
* be able to understand and discuss political issues making use of the conceptual tools provided by political thought and theory.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The course provides a survey of the major European political thinkers from Niccolo Machiavelli to Antonio Gramsci.

EU20386: Business German option 1A

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
After taking this unit you must take EU20387
Students must have have a minimum of a GCSE Grade C and/or have taken Single Language Option units during year 1 or the equivalent in order to undertake this unit. Aims: A course to revive, develop and consolidate foreign language skills in order to enable students to operate effectively in the sphere of business and management.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of the Unit students will be able to discuss their placement experience in the target language. They will be able to operate effectively both orally and in writing in predictable business scenarios, write a CV and participate in job interviews.
Skills:

* Speaking, listening, reading, writing in German - all assessed
* Cultural understanding - taught and facilitated
* Team skills - facilitated
* Autonomous learning - facilitated
* Cognitive - taught
Content:
Intensive language work with emphasis on aural comprehension and oral communication. Teaching methods integrate a variety of forms of language learning through the exploitation of foreign language television broadcasts, audio-visual materials and a business language course text. This part of the course concentrates mainly on the practical language necessary for doing business, but also includes work on more theoretical themes such as the various types of company job application and interview practice. Overall fluency and grammatical accuracy are practised throughout the course.

EU20387: Business German option 1B

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20386
Aims: The course continues to revive, develop and consolidate foreign language skills in order to enable students to operate effectively in the sphere of business and management.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit students will be able to read and understand business reports, understand and respond to business letters, understand and comment on business statistics, summarise business-related reports, understand and react to audio and video material related to business.
Skills:

* Speaking, listening, reading, writing in German - all assessed
* Cultural understanding - taught and facilitated
* Team skills - facilitated
* Autonomous learning - facilitated
* Cognitive - taught
Content:
Further development of linguistic proficiency using the same methods as in Semester 1. The second part of the course is concerned with more real world material such as economics magazines and TV news items, on which the study of many aspects of the foreign business environment will be based. Continued emphasis on overall fluency and grammatical accuracy.

EU20405: Perspectives on Europe - France

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take MN20082

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit builds on European Business Environment, to develop students' understanding of differing national perspectives of EU member states with respect to business, social and political interests. In addition, it considers how national economic interests shape the bargaining agenda between states within the EU as well as of those attempting to negotiate accession to the EU (e.g Central and Eastern European Countries - CEECs).
Content:
The unit will address issues: EU membership, background and key data, from the point of view of both France AND Germany, perspectives on Europe - the EU as perceived by nations (and their business communitites) such as Germany, Italy and CEECs; the Europeanisation of economic policy making; social policy, political objectives and "bargaining" - setting the agenda.

EU20406: Perspectives on Europe - Germany

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take MN20082

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit builds on European Business Environment, to develop students' understanding of differing national perspectives of EU member states with respect to business, social and political interests. In addition, it considers how national economic interests shape the bargaiing agenda between states within the EU as well as of those attempting to negotiate accession to the EU (e.g. Central and Eastern European Countries - CEECs).
Content:
The unit will address issues: EU membership, background and key data, from the point of view of both Germany AND France, perspectives on Europe - the EU as perceived by nations (and their business communities) such as Germany, Italy and CEECs; the Europeanisation of economic policy making; social policy, political objectives and "bargaining" - setting the agenda.

EU20407: Border crossings: memory and identity in contemporary Europe

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: The purpose of this unit is to challenge assumptions about European and national identities; to enable students to gain an understanding of the complexity, diversity and interrelated nature of European cultures, as reflected in the work of selected contemporary European writers and film-makers.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* reflect on questions of identity in relation to family, community, ideology
* describe and evaluate the impact on individuals of migration, forced and unforced movement across borders, between languages, traditions
* assess the ways in which Europeans deal with the legacy of war, displacement, catastrophe, through the functioning of memory and the denial of memory.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
An exploration of shifting identities in contemporary Europe, through a variety of written and visual media, with particular reference to geographical and linguistic boundaries, and the themes of exile, migration, memory and forgetting. Texts and films for analysis may include, but are not limited to: H. Mueller, The Land of Green Plums; E. Palandri, The Way Back; I Kadare, The File on H; F.T. Fridriksson, Cold Fever, X. Koller, Journey of Hope; E. Reichart, February Shadows; J. Berger, To the Wedding.

EU20413: Placement

Credits: 60
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment:
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide practical experience in a working environment, and to develop personal and organisational skills. By the end of their placement year students should have enhanced skills in communication (both written and oral), planning and time management, problem solving and analysis, and decision making. They should also have gained practical experience of working as part of a team.
Content:
Period of work experience.

EU20414: American politics

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: This first semester course is designed to examine a series of debates relating to the national political system in the United States, with emphasis on theories, institutions, informal processes, recent political history and some key policy issues. The objective is to explore the American political system, enabling students to extend their understanding of some key concepts and themes in the study of politics.
Learning Outcomes:
Students should, at the end of the unit, be able to demonstrate understanding of a range of issues and topics relating to the study of American politics.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The course applies the concepts and theories of political science to the United states of America, assessing the role played by formal and informal political entities. Notions of liberal democracy are assessed by reference to debates on the role of political parties, interest groups, elites and political culture on political outcomes in America. A number of case studies consider the political significance from a European perspective of questions of race and poverty, judicial review, and the American foreign policy process.

EU20415: Media politics

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50ES50
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to examine both theory and evidence relating to the political significance of the media of mass communication. A key aim is to examine alternative theories of the political implications and effects of the mass media and then to apply these theories by examining a number of case studies. The unit will examine debates relating to aspects of the role of the media in liberal democratic politics, as well debates concerning the media's role in other contexts (e.g. 'globalisation' and the media, the media in countries in political transition, and the media's role in reporting war).
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students should be able to demonstrate understanding of key theories, and be able to use them to explore the political significance of media institutions in a number of issue areas.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The course examines alternative theories of the political role of the mass media, and these to case studies. Topics include the Frankfurt School and mass culture, Marxist and pluralist notions of the media, the 'propaganda model', notions of public broadcasting, cinema and politics, the global role of the media, and the media and war.

EU20416: Totalitarian politics

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX80OT20
Requisites:
Aims: To further students' knowledge of comparative politics and history by examining 20th century European non-democratic movements and regimes, with particular attention being paid to the relevance of the concept of 'totalitarianism' to communist and fascist regimes.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students should be able to demonstrate:
* an understanding of the main theories of the rise, nature and failure of non-democratic regimes;
* familiarity with debates about whether non-democratic politics, particularly communism and fascism, could revive;
* an ability to work in teams to make a seminar presentation;
* an ability to synthesize diverse empirical and theoretical material in order to write and essay.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The concepts of authoritarianism and totalitarianism; the role of ideas and ideology in the genesis of European non-democratic movements and regimes; state and leadership in non-democratic regimes; violence, coercion and support; the collapse of non-democratic regimes.

EU20424: Introduction to the teaching of English as a foreign language (TEFL)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Aims:
* To enhance language awareness in general and introduce a systematic approach to the linguisitc analysis of English.
* To provide a practical introduction to the phonology of English.
* To provide a slef-contained introduction to the skills fo TEFL, of practical use to students preparing to work as language assistants abroad.
* To develop transferable skills relevant to a career in foreign language teaching.
* To enable students (at their own expense) to obtain a recognised TEFL qualification (CELTA) via a subsequent add-on course.
Learning Outcomes:
A student who completes this unit will successfully show evidence of:
* awareness of the factors which influence teaching and learning.
* understanding and use of basic ELT (English Language Teaching) terminology relating to form/meaning/language use/skills.
* ability to analyse language for teaching purposes.
* understanding the aims and stages of a language/skills lesson.
* understanding the rationale for choosing specific resources and activities for a specific learner. A student who completes the CELTA (Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults) add-on successfully will have the most widely recognised and respected initial teaching qualification in the ELT field.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking and effective communication in English are developed and assessed in this unit, along with practical teaching skills.
Content:
An introduction to basic linguistics with a practical focus on the skills and systems of the English language; teaching methodology (the context for learning and teaching English as a foreign languagel, planning effective teaching, classroom skills); selection and evaluation of resources and materials. Recommended background texts: 'Learning Teaching' (Scrivener, J.: MacHELT 1994). 'Practical English Usage' (Swan, M.: OUP 1995). 'Source Book for TEFL' (Lewis, M. and Hill, J.: MacHELT 1993).

EU20428: Film, politics & society

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of the unit is to provide students with a grounding in debates about the social significance and 'effects' of film and television drama and documentary, in various industrial, national and global contexts.
Learning Outcomes:
Students should attain a confidence in discussing and analysing the significance of film in particular political and historical contexts, and they should attain the ability to read and interpret film texts and to understand and assess the visual and other codes of film language in relation to political and social analysis.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The course draws on a number of theoretical approaches to film and the mass media, and draws on theoretical work on the political and social significance of film. The course deals with questions of the construction and reception of political meaning in film and television drama, and at issues relating to film and national identity, film policy, political culture, censorship, propaganda, and the notion of documentary. Examples are drawn in particular, but not exclusively from American and European film.

EU20443: Spanish stage 8A (post advanced) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW40EX45OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in Spanish Stage 7A and 7B Students will be able to use and develop previously acquired receptive and productive language skills in a variety of contexts.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spain and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works. Where numbers permit, some subject-specific material may be included, covering the relevant scientific and technological areas and/or business and industry. There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20444: Spanish stage 8B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW40EX45OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Further consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in Spanish Stage 8A. Students will be able to continue to use and extend previously acquired receptive and productive language skills in a variety of contexts.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spain and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works. Where numbers permit, some subject-specific material may be included, covering the relevant scientific and technological areas and/or business and industry. There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20449: Spanish stage 8A (post advanced) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW40EX45OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in Spanish Stage 7A and 7B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spain and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works. Where numbers permit, some subject-specific material may be included, covering the relevant scientific and technological areas and/or business and industry. There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20450: Spanish stage 8B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW40EX45OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in Spanish Stage 7A and 7B Students will be able to use and develop previously acquired receptive and productive language skills in a variety of contexts.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spain and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works. Where numbers permit, some subject-specific material may be included, covering the relevant scientific and technological areas and/or business and industry. There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20461: Multiple perspectives on Europe - Spain

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20466

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The unit builds on Comparative Employee Relations and aims to develop students' understanding of differing national persepctives of EU states with respect to business, social and political interests. In addition, it considers how national economic interests shape the bargaining agenda between states within the EU as well as those attempting to negotiate accession to the EU(eg Central and East European states or CEECs). On completion of the Unit students should be in a position to understand the differing agendas operating within member states under the above headings, together with their impact on Spain.
Content:
The Unit will address issues such as :EU Membership, background and key data, from the point of view of Spain, Germany, France and Italy; perspectives on Europe - the EU as perceived by the nations (and their business communites) already cited together with CEECs; the Europeanisation of economic policy making; social policy; political objectives and "bargaining": setting the agenda.

EU20466: Comparative employee relations (Spanish)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To introduce students to key concepts, approaches and vocabulary in the field of employee relations; to examine structures and institutions of employment relations in a comparative context, focusing particularly on Spain and Britain; to explore cultural differences and similarities influencing employment relations and the possible impact of Europeanisation. After following this course, the student will be familiar with the broad structures of employment relations in Spain and Britain, have a good understanding of basic terminology used in this field, and be able to make informed comparisions between the two national situations.
Content:
(1) Historical/cultural setting of employee relations. (2) Interest representation. (3) Collective bargaining. (4) The future of trade unions and employee representation.

EU20467: Spanish politics & society 2A: Introduction to contemporary Latin American studies

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW33EX67
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce students to the study of contemporary Latin American politics and society.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of the unit students shall be able to:
* Analyse the internal and external political forces that shaped Latin American politics in the twentieth century.
* Demonstrate understanding of the social changes that occurred in terms of industrialisation, modernisation and class.
* Analyse some of the political and social problems that confront Latin America today.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
An overview of contemporary Latin America which examines issues including: the legacy of colonialism, the rise of authoritarianism, ISI, modernisation and urbanisation, the impact of the Cuban revolution and the role of the US in Central America. Seminars provide a forum for assessed presentations, discussion and consolidation of the lectures as well as providing study skills sessions for argumentative essay writing. The unit is taught in Spanish.

EU20529: Spanish politics & society 2B: further contemporary Latin American studies

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Aims: To build upon the political, social and economic issues raised in Semester One and apply them to contemporary political developments within Latin America.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of the unit students should have:
* A solid understanding of the political, social and economic changes in 20th century Latin America.
* Knowledge of the key aspects of Latin America political development.
* The ability to apply theoretical understanding to specific case studies.
* Acquire advanced analytical and writing skills in Spanish.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
Analysis of the economic, social and political repercussions of economic transformation from the 1980's, and the limits of redemocratization. Case studies for political analysis include Colombia, Mexico and Chile. Seminars provide a forum for assessed presentation, discussion and consolidation of the lectures as well as providing study skills sessions for argumentative essay writing. The unit is taught in Spanish.

EU20530: European political economy: political science perspectives

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES50EX50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EC10006 and take EC10007
Aims: The unit is meant to provide a theoretical overview of the process of European Integration, particularly European economic policy making. The theoretical background in which the course is set is represented by the traditional political scientists' definition of political economy, mainly deriving from the tradition of International Relations and related theories of European integration. European integration and policies will be therefore assessed in the light of the different interpretative and heuristic tools provided by the theories analysed with special attention towards the explanation of change in the adoption of policy from the competing theoretical perspectives focusing on institutions, economic interests and ideological paradigms. The policies considered range from competition policy, to EMU, unemployment and social and migratory policies.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the course students should be able to demonstrate the following:
1. an understanding of different political science theoretical approaches to the explanation of economic policy making;
2. a knowledge and understanding of major European economic policy issues from a political science perspective;
3. in their essay, a more in-depth knowledge of a specific area of economic policy making.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
Introduction: what is European political economy?; theoretical approaches to European Political Economy; the making of European economic integration; the Single European Act: competing explanations; the making of EMU: history and institutions; the making of EMU: explanations; the European Central Bank between growth and stability; the political economy of European unemployment; European social policy: the role of social partners ; Globalisation; the new global division of labour and migration to the EU.

EU20535: French stage 2A (Post beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10533 and take EU10534

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To build on language skills acquired in French stage 1A and 1B to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar. On completion of this unit students will be able to operate confidently in a French-speaking environment, with continued emphasis on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20536: French stage 2B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20535

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French stage 2 A (EU20535).
Content:
A continuation of French stage 2 A (EU20535).

EU20541: French stage 2A (Post beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU10539 and take EU10540

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To build on language skills acquired in French stage 1A and 1B to enhance listening, reading, speaking and writing, and to consolidate grammar. On completion of this unit students will be able to operate confidently in a French-speaking environment, with continued emphasis on oral/aural communication and reading.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in French. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU20542: French stage 2B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20541

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French stage 2 A (EU20541).
Content:
A continuation of French stage 2 A (EU20541).

EU20556: Spanish cultural studies 2A: modern and contemporary Spain

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW33EX67
Requisites:
Aims: To provide a theoretical framework for cultural analysis; to understand culture as a wide range of discursive practices; to understand culture as a site for the struggle over meaning and identity; to apply this conceptual paradigm to Modern and Contemporary Spain.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* argue how a cultural text or practice works;
* analyse a cultural text in terms of the construction of national, ethnic, gender or class narratives;
* understand and discuss the cultural elements at stake in Spanish Modernity and Postmodernity.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
Cultural analysis, theoretically informed, of different practices and discourses in Modern and Contemporary Spain. This unit is taught in Spanish.General Bibliography: Graham, Helen and Labanyi, Jo, eds. Spanish Cultural Studies. An Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995; Jordan, Barry and Morgan Tamosunas, Rikki, eds. Contemporary Spanish Cultural Studies. London: Arnold, 2000.

EU20557: Spanish cultural studies 2B: contemporary Spain and the case of Latin America

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33EX67
Requisites:
Aims: To build on EU20556 in developing a theoretical framework for cultural analysis, understanding culture as a wide range of discursive practices, and understanding culture as a site for the struggle over meaning and identity. To continue to apply this conceptual paradigm to Contemporary Spain and to apply it in addition to a few Latin American case studies.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will have improved their ability to:
* argue how a cultural text or practice works;
* analyse a cultural text in terms of the construction of national, ethnic, gender or class narratives.
They will also be able to:
* understand and discuss the cultural elements at stake in Spanish and Latin American Postmodernity.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:
Cultural analysis, theoretically informed, of different practices and discourses in Contemporary Spain and Latin America. This unit is taught in Spanish.General Bibliography: Graham, Helen and Labanyi, Jo, eds. Spanish Cultural Studies. An Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995; Hart, Stephen and Young, Richard, eds. Contemporary Latin American Cultural Studies. London: Arnold, 2003; Jordan, Barry and Morgan Tamosunas, Rikki, eds. Contemporary Spanish Cultural Studies. London: Arnold, 2000.

EU20570: Berlin - Politik und Kultur seit der Wende

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20038 or take EU20042
Aims: To examine the social, political and economic changes which have taken place in Berlin since the two halves of the divided city were reunited in 1989-90 and to investigate the ways in which that process has been depicted in recent German films.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will understand the continuing impact of the years of division on all aspects of life in today's Berlin and why the unification process has been particularly slow and complicated there. They will grasp what the specific issues faced by citizens in each half of the city are and how well the city government has coped with them. They will have looked in detail at a representative selection of films focused on contemporary Berlin and developed their analytical and comparative skills in studying them.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Subjects for close study include the legacy of division in both halves of the city; the unification process; problematic social, political and economic aspects of Berlin's transition to capital city; symbolic actions marking the beginning of a new era; the aspiration to renew Berlin's status as a cultural metropolis; its geopolitical role in an enlarged EU; the films Der Himmel über Berlin (Wenders, 1987), Ostkreuz (Klier, 1991), Das Leben ist eine Baustelle (Becker, 1997) and Berlin Babylon (Siegbert, 2000). The unit is taught in German.

EU20571: Frauen und Literatur in Deutschland

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20038 or take EU20042
Aims: The unit aims to provide an overview of the New Women's Movement in Germany and identify significant areas of impact on German politics, culture and society since the late 1960s. To study how and why gender role expectations and social practice have changed in areas such as the family, education, and work, and to assess whether women's struggle for 'equality' may be said to have been successful. To examine changes and continuities over controversial issues such as abortion rights, sexuality, and violence. To take full account of German unification in order to appreciate the differences and similarities between women's experiences in the former East and West Germany. Through the close study of a number of key texts and films to explore issues of gender and identity raised in the unit as a whole.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete this unit successfully be able to demonstrate good understanding of controversial issues relating to women's social and cultural experience in Germany and to identify change over time in this respect. They will be able to explain how key issues and areas of public and political debate have been reflected in selected literary texts and films. They will be familiar with representative literary texts and films in the context of German culture prior to and since unification and show critical awareness of issues of gender, identity and difference.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
The new women's movement in Germany; changes in women's perception, understanding and representation of their role in society; a critical examination of images of women as cultural and social representations of femininity; a theoretical exploration of issues of gender and writing; women's experiences in the context of work, the family and politics; key texts and films: Brigitte Schwaiger, Wie kommt das Salz ins Meer; Renan Demirkan, Die Frau mit Bart; Libuse Monikova, Eine Schädigung, Katja von Garnier, Abgeschminkt; Christoph Stark, Julietta; Ralf König, Der Bewegte Mann. The unit is taught in German.

EU20575: Capitale et province: régionalismes français

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20011
Aims: To enhance students' awareness of the physical, human, economic and political geography of France as reflected in the 'capitale'/ 'province' opposition; to examine the ways in which difference is asserted in political and cultural terms.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* describe the historical roots of regional imbalances in France;
* analyse the specific attributes of selected regions;
* evaluate the relative importance of cultural, political and social factors in delineating regional difference.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
The history of regional development and underdevelopment; the preponderance of Paris; the importance of the 'Paris et le désert français' factor; cultural and linguistic diversity; the impact of regional policies of the EU; selected regional specificities.

EU20576: The experience of women during the Second World War

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20011
Aims: The aim of this unit is to build on the experience already gained in Politics and Society by applying the expertise gained so far to the experience of women in the Second World War.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this course unit students should be able to:
* explain the gendered nature of women's experience during the war;
* explain the political nature of the choices made by women during the war;
* evaluate critically the importance of the Liberation for French women;
* put together seminar presentations and write seminar papers in French.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
This unit will examine the experience of women in France during the Second World War, the Occupation and the Liberation. It will examine the ways in which French women developed strategies for survival and how some were drawn towards collaboration or resistance. It will analyse the importance of the Liberation and its impact on women's lives. The unit is taught in French. Key text: Hanna Diamond, Women and the Second World War in France 1939-48: Choices and Constraints, Longman, 1999.

EU20577: French drama in the political & social context of the 1930s & 1940s

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20009
Aims: The unit builds on the experience of both Cultural Studies and Politics & Society by examining the inter-War period, the Occupation, and the beginning of the end of Empire, and the ways in which French drama both implicated and exemplified the trends in and the experience of the real world. The unit seeks to evaluate the conspicuously theatrical aspects of these plays, to consider why playwrights at this time chose to return to Classical mythology for their subject matter, and to establish the extent to which these works were allegorical in terms of their references to current affairs as distinct from or in addition to being purely theatrical and imaginative creations.
Learning Outcomes:
A good knowledge of one of the most important and culturally productive periods of French drama, and a deeper understanding of the social and political issues in French domestic and foreign policy during the most traumatic period in the recent history of France.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Cocteau: La Machine infernale; Giraudoux: Électre and La Guerre de Troie n'aura pas lieu; Anouilh: Antigone; Sartre: Les Mouches; Montherlant: Le Maître de Santiago.

EU20578: Images & identities in flux: French cinema & the Auteur tradition

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20009
Aims: To explore the nature and significance of cinema in contemporary French culture, with particular reference to questions of identity and representation and the Auteur theory; to develop familiarity with critical concepts and analytical techniques, within the context of dominant theoretical debate.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* explain the relevance of cinema to contemporary cultural issues, specifically questions of identity and representation;
* demonstrate a clear understanding of the films studied and of the Auteur tradition;
* analyse films critically, using appropriate vocabulary and idiom;
* recognise basic theoretical concepts and understand how to apply these to films being studied;
* situate these films within the broader context of French cinema.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Topics for study include: the role and significance of cinema within French culture; the nature of first person viewpoint in film, in relation to issues of identity and representation; time and memory in film; filmic autobiography and the depiction of childhood; the Auteur theory and its significance; the nature of the filmic image and questions of technique; an introduction to film theory. Films to be studied will include: Zéro de conduite (Vigo, 1933); Les 400 coups (Truffaut, 1959); Diabolo menthe (Diane Kurys, 1977); Au revoir les enfants (Malle, 1987); Les Roseaux sauvages (Téchiné, 1994); La Haine (Kassovitz, 1995); Y aura-t-il de la neige à Noel? (Sandrine Veysset, 1996)

EU20579: Images of conflict: the French at war

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20009 or take EU20011
Aims: To develop students' understanding of the political and historical background of the French experience of conflict in the twentieth century, and of the ways in which that experience has been articulated in written and visual terms, both documentary and creative.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* describe the variety of French experiences of wartime conflict;
* assess the complexity of political and moral choices confronting the French in times of occupation and resistance;
* evaluate various creative and imaginative responses to the experience of war, as expressed by writers and film-makers.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
This unit will examine the history of conflicts in which France was involved in the twentieth century, with a principal focus on the period from the1940s to the 1960s. Principal issues for discussion will include the morality and legitimacy of violence, and the status of memory in coming to terms with the past, and will involve discussion of themes such as armed combat, the occupation, resistance, commemoration, war crimes, and colonial war.

EU20580: Spectres du passé: le cas de Vichy

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20011
Aims: To build on the experience of Politics and Society by applying the expertise gained so far to an analysis of France coming to terms with the German Occupation of 1940-1944 some sixty years on.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of the Unit the student will have an appreciation of the complexities of France's attitudes to the so-called années noires, particularly in the light of trials and developments in the 1990s, and be able to demonstrate this knowledge through seminar presentations and essays on given topics in the area.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
Chronological overview of key dates and events. Policy and Ideology under the Vichy régime: Travail, famille, patrie. Vichy and the Jewish Question. Collaboration and Resistance: key figures, events, and controversies. The épuration and its repercussions. Post-war trials. The unit is taught in French.

EU20590: Working through culture: France

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW50OT50
Requisites:
Aims: To develop students' awareness of cultural difference as preparation for living and working abroad on placement.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* show an understanding of cultural theories;
* have an awareness of the impact of culture shock and how to overcome it;
* develop strategies to adjust to living in a new country;
* critically evaluate national management models and practices;
* discuss issues raised in French.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. Language skills are also developed in this unit.
Content:

* Cultural differences at national and organisational levels.
* Coping with the French administrative system and the role of public services.
* Understanding the higher education system in France.
* Integrating into the foreign workplaceWorking in multicultural teams: opportunities and pitfalls. The unit is taught in French.

EU20591: Working through culture: Germany

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW50OT50
Requisites:
Aims: To develop students' awareness of cultural difference as preparation for living and working abroad on placement.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* show an understanding of cultural theories;
* have an awareness of the impact of culture shock and how to overcome it;
* critically evaluate national management models and practices;
* discuss issues raised in German.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. Language skills are also developed in this unit.
Content:

* Cultural differences at national and organisational levels.
* Leadership and culture.
* Working in multicultural teams: opportunities and pitfalls.
* Firm case-studies. The unit is taught in German.

EU20611: Immigration in France

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20011
Aims: To build on the experience of French Politics and Society by applying the expertise gained so far to the issue of immigration in France; to examine social, political, economic and cultural changes affecting French society; to discuss the changes affecting the definition of French National identity in relation to the issue of immigration.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate a broaden and consolidate knowledge of contemporary French Society and the issue of immigration;
* discuss and explore topical, social and cultural issues about French immigration
* explore the concept of citizenship and national identity within the European context.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/¬conduct/¬reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Introduction; histoire de l'immigration en France; l'Etat de l'immigration: panorama économique et social; politiques et opinion publique; les immigrés et la question d'identité; intégration versus assimilation, les politiques d'intégration. The unit is taught in French.

EU20612: Business Spanish option 1A

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
After taking this unit you must take EU20613
Students must have a minimum of GCSE Spanish Grade C and/or have taken Single Language Option Spanish units at intermediate or advanced level during Year 1 or the equivalent in order to take this unit. Aims: A course to revive, develop and consolidate foreign language skills in order to enable students to operate effectively in the sphere of business and management.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of the unit students will be able to discuss their placement experience in the target language. They will be able to operate effectively both orally and in writing in predictable business scenarios, write a CV and participate in job interviews.
Skills:

* Speaking, listening, reading, writing in Spanish - all assessed.
* Cultural understanding - taught and facilitated.
* Team skills - facilitated.
* Autonomous learning - facilitiated.
* Cognitive - taught.
Content:
Intensive language work with emphasis on aural comprehension and oral communication. Teaching materials integrate a variety of forms of language through the exploitation of foreign language television broadcasts, audio-visual materials and a business language course text. This part of the course concentrates mainly on the practical language necessary for doing business, but also includes work on more theoretical themes such as the various types of company job application and interview practice. Overall fluency and grammatical accuracy are practised throughout the course.

EU20613: Business Spanish option 1B

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW40EX45OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20612
Aims: The course continues to revive, develop and consolidate foreign language skills in order to enable students to operate effectively in the sphere of business and management.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit students will be able to read and understand business reports, understand and respond to business letters, understand and comment on business statistics, summarise business-related reports, understand and react to audio and video material related to business.
Skills:

* Speaking, listening, reading, writing in Spanish - all assessed.
* Cultural understanding - taught and facilitated.
* Team skills - facilitated.
* Autonomous learning - facilitated.
* Cognitive - taught.
Content:
Further development of linguistic proficiency using the same methods as in Semester 1. The second part of the course is concerned with more real world material such as economics magazines and TV news items, on which the study of many aspects of the foreign business environment will be based. Continued emphasis on overall fluency and grammatical accuracy.

EU20614: Italy in the 1960s and 1970s: Social transformation and political and cultural dissent

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20070 or take EU20071
Aims: This unit has three main aims: 1) to provide students with a detailed understanding of societal changes, political developments and cultural trends in Italy in the 1960s and 1970s; 2) to provide students with an appreciation of the theoretical debates associated with these issues; 3) to enable students to develop a critical/analytical approach to these major issues.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students should: 1) have in-depth knowledge of the major issues and trends in Italian society, politics and culture in these two crucial decades; 2) be familiar with theories relating to these issues; 3) be familiar with the major debates concerning these issues; 4) be able to respond in an informed manner to questions about these different issues and how they relate to each other.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
The economic miracle, internal migration, social and labour movements, the 'Opening to the Left', the growth of Communism, political extremism and terrorism, feminism, new voices in literature (women, workers, youth) and cinema.

EU20615: Italian politics and culture in the 1990s

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20070 or take EU20071
Aims: This unit has three main aims: 1) to provide students with a detailed theoretical/empirical understanding of contemporary issues in Italian politics; 2) to provide students with an appreciation of the theoretical debates associated with these issues; 3) to enable students to develop a critical/analytical approach to these major issues.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students should: 1) have in-depth knowledge of the major issues in Italian politics and culture in the 1990s; 2) be familiar with theories relating to these issues; 3) be familiar with the major debates on these issues; 4) be able to respond in an informed manner to questions about these different issues and how they relate to each other.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Women in Italian society, immigration as a political issue, the Italian left today, Berlusconi and la Casa della Libertà, Labour movements, the judiciary, the Mafia, the new threat of terrorism, 'pulp' Fiction and the phenomenon of the young cannibali writers, literature of immigration and the film 'Cento Passi'.

EU20619: Women between worlds: images of exile in francophone literature and the visual arts

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20009
Aims: This option aims to develop students' understanding of the experiences of immigrants and their descendants, with a particular emphasis on the experiences of women. It will focus specifically on the ways in which French women of North African origin transcribe their mothers' stories of exile, and articulate their own position 'between' cultures, in a range of literature, film and painting.
Learning Outcomes:
As a result of the course, students will be able to:
* assess the impact of factors such as gender, culture and ethnicity on experiences of immigration and exile;
* analyse and make comparisons between a range of textual and visual representations of such experiences with regard to their themes, language and style;
* understand the societies and historical contexts from which the prescribed works emerged;
* appreciate the diversity and complexity of French culture and identity.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. Language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
This option will examine the representation of a variety of literal and metaphorical journeys between cultures in textual and visual material produced in the period from the 1980s to the present day. Principal themes to be considered include the experience of identity conflict for the descendant of immigrants, the discrepancy between the cultural attitudes of North African immigrant mothers and their daughters, the impact of factors such as gender, culture and ethnicity on the construction of identity, and the problem of defining 'home' in a postcolonial francophone context. The unit will focus on works such as Kerouani, D. (1991), Une fille d'Algérie éprise de liberté, Paris: Robert Laffont; Nini, S. (1993), Ils disent que je suis une beurette, Paris: Editions Fixot; Sebbar, L. (1982), Shérazade: 17 ans, brune, frisée, les yeux verts, Paris: Stock; and the films Benguigui, Y. (1997), Mémoires d'immigrés: l'héritage maghrébin; Faucon, P. (2002), Samia.

EU20622: French written & spoken language 2

Credits: 12
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: To enhance the production of authentic and accurate written and spoken French; to develop comprehension and application of French grammatical and syntactic structure; to improve further skills in translation from French into English.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:
* demonstrate a broad and sound grasp of lexis, grammatical structures and syntax;
* practise accurate and more complex (written and spoken) receptive and communicative skills;
* demonstrate sound awareness of style and linguistic register.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:

a. Translation: varieties of register, written translation from French into English, some English into French work.
b. Grammar/creative writing: introduction to guided essay, systematic practical grammar course, use of CALL multimedia, development of lexis.
c. Spoken language: comprehension, oral presentation, course-related conversation.
Key text: M. Jubb & A. Rouxeville, 2003, Grammar in Context, Arnold.

EU20624: French written and oral communication in the business context

Credits: 12
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims:
* To develop more advanced skills in contemporary written communication with regard to techniques of summarisation, abstraction of argumentation and comparative text analysis and with reference to the subjects covered in the core and interface courses whilst maintaining a focus on the business dimension of written communication.
* To develop receptive aural and communicative oral skills in business contexts.
Learning Outcomes:
The unit will familiarise students with written and oral/aural communication tasks appropriate to the world of business and management in France.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:
Materials used in the course are drawn from across a range of socio-economic and legal texts drawn from the French press, with reference also to English press material, and European Community and other documents. Exploitation of these texts is aimed at increasing student awareness of presentational differences of the same material, soundness and elaboration of arguments etc.
Students are instructed in the drafting of commercial correspondence in addition to work on CVs and accompanying documentation. Specific exercises include: commercial correspondence; terminology and its application; language, style, development/elaboration of argumentation; specific grammatical problems.
Students are given specific assignments aimed at improving aural comprehension of spoken language, based on video and audio material relevant to the world of business and to the European business environment in particular. Oral and interpersonal communication skills aer practised in various situations commonly experienced in the world of business, especially telephone skills, job interview techniques and presentation exercises.
Classes are conducted in French.
Key text: M. Jubb & A. Rouxeville, 2003, Grammar in Context, Arnold.

EU20627: German written & spoken language 2

Credits: 12
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of this unit are:
* to increase and complement students' knowledge of more complex grammatical structures;
* to enable them to apply the acquired skills to the production of a variety of German texts;
* to further enhance students' communicative and listening skills in a broader variety of contents;
* to widen their vocabulary and knowledge of idiomatic phrases, improve their presentation skills, and train them in leading a discussion.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate:
* a deeper insight into a wider range of more complex structures of German grammar;
* command of translation techniques and of strategies for the production of different types German texts;
* familiarity with techniques and strategies for giving a presentation and leading a discussion;
* the ability to communicate fluently in a broader variety of different contexts.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:
With regard to German grammar, the course places particular emphasis on:
* a number of specially selected and more complex grammar points.
As regards the production of texts, the course focuses on
* translation into English;
* essay writing techniques;
* summary of English texts into German.
In Spoken Language classes, students will be discussing a variety of topics related to culture and society in the German speaking countries. This includes:
* reading more detailed Austrian and German newspaper articles;
* watching topical Austrian and German video material;
* doing more demanding role plays, interactive exercises, small-group discussions etc.
Key text: Hilke Dreyer, Richard Schmitt: A Practice Grammar of German. New Edition. Hueber: 2001.

EU20629: German written and oral communication in the business context

Credits: 12
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: The unit pursues a dual aim.
1. To improve students' communicative and listening skills and to expand their vocabulary, especially in economic, business and professional contexts. To enable them to converse accurately, fluently and in an appropriate register.
2. To develop more advanced skills in contemporary written communication with specific reference to material used in the core and interface courses; to focus on the business dimension of written communication in order to prepare students for industrial placements in a German company during their third year abroad.
Learning Outcomes:
The unit will familiarise students with written communication tasks appropriate to the world of business and management in Germany.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:
Oral communication classes may consist of aural comprehension exercises by using videos of current (business) affairs, usually taped from German/Austrian television. This may include summarisation, answering of questions and discussion of the topics presented to them. Also office skills simulations, such as answering the telephone, form a part of these classes. There are also free discussions which involve either a larger group or smaller sub-groups.
Written communication materials consist primarily of socio-political and business texts. Exploitation of these texts is aimed at familiarising students with specific issues from the German business context. Specific exercises include: comparative/text analysis, acquisition of business terminology, business communication: correspondence, reports, CVs, surveys, statistics, summarisations.

EU20633: Italian written and spoken language 2

Credits: 12
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: This unit aims:
* to broaden students' command of contemporary written Italian with greater emphasis on resolving complex grammatical points;
* to build on the communication skills acquired in Year 1;
* to improve oral proficiency and aural comprehension;
* to expand students' vocabulary in social and cultural areas and to develop sensitivity to style and register.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit students should:
* be able to translate different styles of Italian advanced texts using a fluent and appropriate register;
* have developed an extensive vocabulary in Italian, drawn from literary and political texts;
* be able to converse in Italian using sophisticated grammar and advanced level vocabulary;
* be familiar with a range of linguistic registers and vocabulary in Italian;
* have developed their oral and aural skills to a fairly advanced level.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target country are developed in this unit.
Content:

Written Language: prose and translation exercises from a variety of literary and non-literary texts; general essays.
Spoken Language: role-playing, paired and group activities, dictation, summarisation of audio-visual texts in Italian, reading, conversation classes.

EU20636: Russian written and spoken language 2

Credits: 12
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: To deepen knowledge of Russian grammar, expand lexis and develop translation skills in several registers. To give students practice in expressing themselves in writing. To improve aural comprehension and to develop fluency in spoken Russian at the level of everyday conversation.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will:
* have understood all the main grammatical structures of Russian
* have broadened their vocabulary in a number of specific areas
* be able to translate intermediate-level texts and produce written Russian to an intermediate standard with the aid of a dictionary
* be able to understand the gist of a TV news item or documentary
* be able to make a presentation and hold a conversation on practical themes.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit; skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:

Written Language: introduction of the remaining fundamental structures of Russian grammar followed by systematic review with exercises and drills drawn from a variety of sources; translations into Russian and English with discussion of grammatical points, lexis etc. Essay writing in Russian with discussion of stylistic points and vocabulary.
Spoken Language: small group conversation on a range of themes; role-playing; task-based use of audio-visual material. To assist vocabulary acquisition, work in written and spoken language will be organised around themes of geography and peoples, culture and recreation, social issues, history and politics.
Key text: T. Wade A Comprehensive Russian Grammar 2nd edn (Blackwell: 1998).

EU20639: Spanish written and spoken language 2

Credits: 12
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: To continue the production of accurate written and spoken Spanish; to provide further work in Spanish grammatical and syntactic structures; to develop further skills in translation from English into Spanish.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit students will be able to:
* demonstrate a broaden and consolidate grasp of lexis and grammatical structures;
* practise simple, accurate (written and spoken) receptive and communicative skills;
* extend awareness of style and linguistic register.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:

a) Translation: varieties of register, written translation from English into Spanish, extempore translation, cloze tests.
b) Grammar: further application of grammatical structures.
c) Creative writing: introduction to guided essay, systematic practical grammar course, use of CALL multimedia, development of lexis.
d) Spoken Language: comprehension, text recreation, controlled oral production, course-related conversation.

EU20641: Spanish written and oral communication in the business context

Credits: 12
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: The unit pursues a dual aim.
1. To improve students' communicative and listening skills and to expand their vocabulary, especially in economic, business and professional contexts. To enable them to converse accurately, fluently and in an appropriate register.
2. To develop more advanced skills in contemporary written communication with specific reference to material used in the core and interface courses; to focus on the business dimension of written communication in order to prepare students for industrial placements in a Spanish/Latin American company/business school during their third year abroad.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of the unit students will be familiar with written communication tasks appropriate to the world of business and management in Spain and able to apply them accordingly.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in the target countries are developed in this unit.
Content:

Oral communication classes may consist of aural comprehension exercises by using videos of current (business) affairs, usually taped from Spanish television. This may include summarisation, answering of questions and discussion of the topics presented to them. Also office skills simulations, such as answering the telephone, form a part of these classes. There are also free discussions which involve either a larger group or smaller sub-groups.
Written communication materials consist primarily of socio-political and business texts. Exploitation of these texts is aimed at familiarising students with specific issues from the Spanish business context. Specific exercises include: comparative/text analysis, acquisition of business terminology, business communication: correspondence, reports, CVs, surveys, statistics, summarisations.

EU20666: Blasting the past: the European avant-garde

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20009
Aims:
* To continue the chronological overview of major artistic and literary movements started in French Cultural Studies 2A: From Realism to Abstraction: Disintegration of the Image.
* To provide an introduction to the radical experimentation carried out by avant-garde practitioners from the early twentieth century to the Second World War, particularly in Paris, and the influence they have had on contemporary visual and verbal output.
* To pursue a comparative approach to analysis, taking into account a wide variety of genres, both visual and verbal, from prose to poetry, from collage to performance.
Learning Outcomes:
A student who completes the unit will be able to:
* demonstrate understanding of literary and visual cultures, as well as their interaction and development, in the first half of the twentieth century.
* engage in comparative analysis of interdisciplinary production.
* show knowledge of how these avant-garde movements have impacted contemporary output and infiltrated everyday life and discourse.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. Language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Various European avant-garde movements, such as Futurism, Dada and Surrealism, will be examined through representative texts in French, including prose, poetry and manifestoes. Their relationship with the visual arts, photography and film will also be investigated. Writers and artists to be studied include: Guillaume Apollinaire, Blaise Cendrars, Tristan Tzara, André Breton, Louis Aragon, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Alberto Giacometti and Man Ray.

EU20667: La France et la mondialisation

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20011
Aims:
* To deepen students' comprehension of political life;
* To develop their understanding of the processes of globalisation as related to France;
* To examine the ways in which national traditions both impact on and are challenged by globalisation.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* Identify France's key perspectives on globalisation;
* Analyse the main issues and debates connected with globalisation;
* Evaluate the ways which French has adapted to globalisation.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:

* Differing conceptions of globalisation (political, economic, cultural).
* France and international diplomacy.
* France and the cultural implications of globalisation.
* France and the economic aspects of globalisation.
* The impacts of globalisation on domestic political debates and policies.
Key text: Baudrand, V. (2002) Les Eléments clés de la mondialisation, Paris: Jeunes Editions. The unit is taught in French.

EU20668: The French "events" of 1968

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20011
Aims: To develop students' understanding of the "events" of May/June 1968, the background to this crisis and its subsequent widespread impact on French society.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* Describe in detail the various stages of the events (student revolt/ social upheaval/ political crisis);
* Assess the social, political and economic conditions of 1960s France that brought about the upheaval;
* Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of May/June 1968 on French society.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
This unit will examine the events of May/June 1968 in France as one of the most important historical events since the Second World War. Using a range of sources including, films, tracts and the plethora of existing literature, areas for discussion will include in-depth analyses of the roles played by the numerous protagonists, examination of primary sources, assessment of the portrayal of the "events" in the media and literature, and an evaluation of the legacy of 1968.

EU30015: French national option F1: La France et l'Europe

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20011
Aims: To examine the relations between France and the wider European area (including the former USSR) in the post-war world, with specific emphasis on developments since the late 1980s. The general focus will be the broad field of international relations which will be narrowed down to three specific and inter-related areas: economic and commercial interests; foreign policy and diplomacy; military policy and security.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this unit, students will be able to demonstrate understanding of:
* relations between France and other European states since the late 1950s;
* political debate in France over European policy;
* current dilemmas in European policy facing French political leaders.
They will also have improved their ability to engage with and conduct academic discourse in French.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
The unit will examine the tensions which have always existed in French policy towards Europe between a nationalist and an internationalist impulsion. In the three areas noted above, protectionism, individualism and national independence have constantly vied with liberalism, international cooperation and alliance solidarity. These dichotomies go beyond the traditional right/left divide in French politics and have always run as a deep fissure within both the broad left and the broad right. At the same time, since the end of the 1980s, France has been faced with a new dichotomy; whether to prioritise the deepening of the Community of 12 (the Maastricht process) or, on the contrary, to pursue the old Gaullist vision of a broader Europe "from the Atlantic to the Urals". Particular emphasis will be placed throughout the course on the complex but crucial role played by Franco-German relations. Four hours will be devoted to each of the following:
1. The historical background to France's relations with Europe.
2. France and the EEC (1958-85).
3. French foreign and defence policy (1958-89).
4. France, the Single Market and Maastricht.
5. French European security policy since the fall of the Berlin Wall.
The unit is taught in French.

EU30017: French national option F3: La femme en France au vingtième siècle

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20011
Aims: The aim of this unit is to introduce students to various aspects of feminist thought and to situate some of the main debates within feminism. It will seek to explore the position of women in France throughout the 20th century.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the course, students should be able to:
* apply some gender theory to events in 20th French history
* explain the position of women in 20th century French society
* explain some of the debates around gender, race and citizenship in contemporary France
* put together seminar presentations and write seminar papers in French.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
This unit will first devote itself to exploring a range of feminist ideas. It will then move in to discussions based on student presentations around a series of themes related to women's experience of the 20th century. These might include: women and first wave feminism, suffragism, women and the world wars, second wave feminism and women's activism, women and violence, politics and power, representations of women in the media, women in enthnic minorities. Key text: Claire Laubier (ed) , The Condition of Women in France, 1945 to the present, Routledge,1990.

EU30018: French national option F4: Films of the nouvelle vague

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20009
Aims: To study the history, achievements and significance of the Nouvelle Vague; to develop an understand of the works of key directors within the movement, from a variety of theoretical and critical perspectives; to situate the films within the context of modernism and contemporary French culture.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* explain the aims and achievements of the Nouvelle Vague, and demonstrate sound understanding of the films studied;
* analyse films critically, using appropriate vocabulary and idiom;
* demonstrate familiarity with relevant theories, and the ability to apply these to filmic texts;
* compare and contrast the works of the directors being studied, and account for similarities and differences discovered;
* situate these films in relation to modernist art and literature in France;
* trace the influence of the movement upon contemporary French cinema.
Content:
Topics for study include: the historical, cultural and social context of the Nouvelle Vague; ways in which the Nouvelle Vague altered the language and nature of film, with particular reference to Astruc, the Cahiers group, and the auteur theory; the fragmentation of narrative in relation to editing, mis-en-scene, and sound; the Nouvelle Vague and modernism; the legacy of the Nouvelle Vague. Films to be studied will include: Jean-Luc Godard, A Bout de souffle (1960), Vivre sa vie (1962); Louis Malle, Le Feu follet (1963), Le Souffle au coeur (1971); Alain Resnais, Hiroshima mon amour (1959) (to be studied in conjunction with the script by Marguerite Duras, Hiroshima mon amour, Gallimard 1960), L'Annee derniere a Marienbad (1961); Francois Truffaut, Les 400 coups (1959), Jules et Jim (1961).

EU30019: French national option F5: French comedies from Molière to Beaumarchais

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20009
Aims: The unit is for those who wish to familiarize themselves with some of the classic comedies which have become central to French cultural consciousness and are still guaranteed to evoke an appropriate response in theatres today. The texts carry messages of social and political significance which must be evaluated, but it is essential for participants in the unit to be able to question them also as examples of French humour. Thus, the texts will be read critically and analytically to enable an apprehension of the social, political, and historical background seen within and through the context of the aesthetic and dramaturgical imperatives that informed the period under review. The approach will be thematic and structural rather than biographical or stylistic, and examples of universal applicability will be sought, e.g., Marivaux's insights into human sentiment, Beaumarchais's sardonic vision of political authority, and Molière's readiness to send up vacuous linguistic pomposity.
Learning Outcomes:
Familiarity with some of the classic comedies which have become central to French cultural consciousness and are still guaranteed to evoke an appropriate response in theatres today.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Molère, L'Avare and Le Malade imaginaire. Marivaux, Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard and Les Fausses Confidences. Beaumarchais, Le Barbier de Séville and Le Mariage de Figaro.

EU30020: French national option F6: French autobiography

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20009
Aims: To promote an awareness of the motives of autobiography; to trace the evolution of autobiographical writing in France throughout the modern period and to examine ways in which writers have explored the themes of personal identity, memory, reality and imagination and the polarity between private and public history.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* Describe the historical development of autobiographical writing in France;
* Explain the significance of evolving concepts of selfhood and the influence of such concepts on the role of the autobiographer;
* Demonstrate an awareness of the complex relationship between fictional and factual reality in autobiographical writing;
* Analyse the significance of memory in the creation of autobiographical truth;
* Analyse and differentiate the variety of strategies employed by autobiographical writers for the purposes of persuasion, justification, self-analysis.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. Language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
History of autobiography and theories of autobiography; theories of selfhood and identity; the power of memory, nature and culture in the development of personality, with reference to a range of texts reflecting the development of autobiographical writing in French, including, but not limited to: J-P. Sartre, Les Mots, S. de Beauvoir, Mémoires d'une jeune fille rangée, N. Sarraute, Enfance, G. Perec, W ou le souvenir d'enfance.

EU30028: French national option F12: Environnement, société, développement

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20011
Aims:
* To explore environmental problems in terms of their political and social dimensions and present the main debates on their nature and severity;
* to evaluate the impact of the environmental debate in France by reference to public opinion and the media;
* to assess the impact of EU policy-making;
* to promote understanding of environmental policy-making processes at the international level;
* to outline the nature, scope and impact of sustainable development discourses.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate familiarity with key concepts related to environmental issues and sustainability;
* evaluate different types of discourse and argument related to the environment;
* identify and use different ways of analysing environmental problems;
* demonstate understanding of the interaction between social, political, economic and physical desiderata in the amelioration of environmental problems;
* demonstrate knowledge of the drivers of environmental policy in national and international contexts;
* demonstate understanding of the roles of different actors, including policy-makers, NGOs, firms, consumers and citizens;
* evaluate different types of policy content and instruments, and assess their strengths and weaknesses;
* show understanding of the challenges posed by sustainable development for the future;
* discuss issues raised in French.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
The major themes studied are:
* the ideas behind environmentalism and political ecology;
* the impact of environmental ideas on the media and on public opinion;
* green politics in France today;
* environmental policy-making in France and the EU;
* interpretations of sustainable development;
* global issues, such as climate change, and the role of international treaties.
The unit is taught in French.

EU30053: German national option G4: Kultur und Politik in der ehemaligen DDR

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20038 or take EU20042
Aims: This unit will provide an overview of the development of literature and film in the political context of the GDR and assess the distinctive qualities of GDR culture. It will take full account of the way in which perspectives on GDR culture have changed since German unification. Through the close study of a number of key texts and films it will identify some major thematic concerns of the period following the rejection of socialist realism as a cultural doctrine.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will have grasped the complicated role of culture as the focus of pre-1989 criticism of the GDR from within; they will appreciate the challenges faced by authors and film-makers inadapting to the unified German context; they will have gained a detailed understanding of the significance of the chosen works; they will have developed their analytical and comparative skills.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Lectures will provide an overview of the key events in the GDR's cultural history and highlight problems involved in dealing with GDR culture from today's perspective. Seminars will focus on representative literary texts and films of the period between the mid-1960s and the present day. These will include Volker Braun, Unvollendete Geschichte; Christa Wolf, Was bleibt; Thomas Brussig, Sonnenallee; and the films Spur der Steine, Solo Sunny and Nikolaikirche. The unit is taught in German.

EU30056: German national option G6: Mensch - Natur - Technik

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce students to the critique of technology and social modernisation in 20th century German culture and to explore the role of literature and film in posing practical and ethical questions about our relationship with the natural environment; to extend students' awareness of the formal characteristics and expressive potential of the novel, poetry, shorter prose and film; and to develop their analytical capacities and self-confidence in the evaluation of works of culture; to improve their fluency in reading, listening to, speaking and writing German.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students should be able to:
* identify conceptions of nature implicit in the texts and films examined;
* explain their socio-cultural significance in an oral presentaion in German;
* analyse their structure, style and symbolism;
* formulate written arguments in German about the potential of cultural works;
* to contribute to shifts in norms and values, and illustrate them with reference to a range of different works.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Texts: will include the study of a) Max Frisch, Homo Faber; Marlen Haushofer, Die Wand; Hans Magnus Enzenberger, Der Untergang der Titanic. b) Films: Leni Riefenstahl, Das blaue Licht; Werner Herzog, Aguirre; Tom Tykwer, Winterschläfer. The unit is taught in German.

EU30058: German national option G8: Gender und Transformatsionsprozesse in Deutschland

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20042

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to study of processes of significant social change in contemporary German society from the perspective of gender; to examine in particular the impact of processes of social transition and transformation on the identity, social position and opportunities of women both as citizens affected by institutional and structural reform and as agents of change. More specifically, the unit aims:
* to familiarize students with feminism as a critical framework of references for the study of German politics and society;
* to compare and contrast the position of women in East and in West Germany during three periods of significant social change and transformation; the immediate post-war period, the late 1960s, and the late 1980s;
* to examine issues such as the withdrawal of the welfare state, economic and political reform, changing patterns of employment, technological advance, mobility of labour and patterns of migration through the prism of gender. Learning objectives: students who complete this unit successfully will be able to:
*demonstrate good understanding of feminism as a critical framework of reference for the study of processes of social change in Germany;
* demonstrate good understanding of the interrelationships between gender, identity, and society on the basis of three 'case studies' in the history of German society;
* explain the interrelationships between ideology, social and institutional framework, and economic system in the former two Germanies and the position of women within these two states;
* identify the potential and the limitations of social movements such as the women's movement as agents of significant and lasting social change;
* conduct an investigation into major processes of transition and transformation in Germany since unification from a gender-based perspective that is historically precise and differentiated;
* draw firm conclusions about the extent to which significant social changes such as the division of Germany and German unification may be said to have disadvantaged women in particular.
Content:
A comparative analysis of the goals, achievements and limitations of the women's movement as a social movement in the old Federal Republic with women's position in the former GDR will provide the background against which current debates about reform and redefinition within the women's movement in Germany will be examined. In the light of this historical perspective and of more recent developments in the new Federal states opportunities and perspectives for women's political participation and the development of strategies for social and institutional reform will be examined. The unit will cover topics such as: The first German women's movement, its goals, achievements and objectives; women in Nazi Germany and in the post war period of reconstruction and consolidation; impact, opportunities and perspectives of the new women's movement in the 1960's; a comparative analysis with women's position in the former GDR; the 'Wende' and Germany's unification process; the period of transition and transformation since 1990; counting the cost and identifying perspectives and strategies for the future. Taught in German.

EU30059: German national option G9: Die Massenmedien in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20042
Aims: To develop an understanding of the principles of mass communication and an awareness of the common features of European mass media in a democracy; todevelop critical awareness of the potential of new technologies as well as the threat posed by increasing commercialisation.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will be able to analyse journalistic and televised texts and situate these within wider discussions on the role of the mass media in contemporary Germany.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Theories of the function of the mass media in a democracy; historical developments in the German media (FRG/GDR); problems of increasing commercialisation and cross-ownership patterns of media in Germany; the impact of German unification on the media; potential of new media particularly the internet; analysis of news reporting in newspapers and television. Key text: Peter J. Humphreys Media and Media Policy in Germany: the Press and Broadcasting since 1945 (Berg: 1990). The unit is taught in German.

EU30076: Italian national option IT1: Territorial identities & socio-political cultures in Italy

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20071
Aims: The aims of this unit are to examine the persistence of territorial divisions in Italy, addressing differences in economic development and social structures between different parts of Italy; to explore the ways in which these differences have been shaped as sub-national identities and territorial political subcultures, while the construction of an 'imagined community' has rarely coincided with the nation-state; to analyse recent tensions between the national and sub-national dimensions.
Learning Outcomes:
Students should be able to:
1. understand persisting structural divisions in Italy;
2. explain what is meant by ' territorial political subcultures' as well as their role in Italian society and politics;
3. account for the emergence of political regionalism in the 1990s;
4. evaluate critically theories relating to social capital, globalisation, and the construction of collective identities.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Theoretical approaches to concepts of identity, subculture, modernisation and trust. The persistence of local and regional identities in Italy. Uneven development and the emergence of "three Italies". The Catholic and communist territorial political subcultures. Social and civic cultures. Old and new perspectives on the "Southern problem". The Northern League: ethno-regionalism? Territorial identities and national politics.

EU30077: Italian national option IT2: The novel, the cinema & Italian society

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20070
Aims: To examine how cinema and narrative have cross-fertilized to produce an artistically satisfying critique of Italian society. Attention will focus on the narrative techniques appropriate to each medium, to narrative theory in novel and film, and to the question of fidelity in adaptation.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students will be able to:
* explain the importance of the links between literature and film in Italy;
* critically assess a variety of film adaptations from literature;
* explain how each director handles the theme of the individual and the State.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. Language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Tomasi di Lampedusa Il Gattopardo, Alberto Moravia Il conformista and Leonardo Sciascia il contesto. Adaptations by Luchino Visconti, Bernardo Bertolucci and Francesco Rosi. Taught partly in Italian.

EU30078: Italian national option IT3: Scrittrici Italiane del ventesimo secolo

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20070
Aims: To further the knowledge of Italian women's writing acquired in Year 1 and Year 2, and provide students with an overview of 20th Century women's writing in relation to the situation of women Italian literature, culture, and society; an in-depth knowledge of four narrative texts by major Italian women writers; and a set of critical and theoretical tools necessary for a gendered reading of the texts which can be transferred to the analysis of other discourses.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students should be able to:
* evaluate the position of women in Italy as producers of literature over the 20th Century;
* understand the role of 1970s feminism in changing Italian women's position vis-à-vis the institution of literature;
* produce a gendered reading of a literary text by making use of different modes of textual analysis, including feminist theory;
* evaluate the extent women writers have revised and subverted traditional genres;
* identify themes in Italian women's writing as represented in the set texts.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Four set texts: Grazia Deledda, Cosima (1937); Dacia Maraini, Donna in guerra (1975); Francesca Sanvitale, Madre e figlia (1980); Elsa Morante, Aracoeli (1982). Lectures and seminars will focus on: artistic vocation and femininity, sex and gender, equality and difference, sexuality, patriarchal relations, relationships between women, mother-son/mother-daughter relationship, gender and genre (autobiography, romance, etc.), writing and sexual difference. New editions of the texts are currently in print. Taught partly in Italian.

EU30099: Russian national option R2: Literature & society in modern Russia

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20093
Aims: To introduce students to some major authors and texts of Russian literature of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries set in their historical and socio-political context.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will:
* have read and understood some of the major works of modern Russian literature;
* have a clear grasp of Russian literary politics from 1917 to the beginning of the new millenium;
* have improved their ability to produce oral and written presentations on Russian literature and society.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. Language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Among the works to be studied are the following (subject to availability in print): M Bulgakov, Master i Margarita#; E Zamiatin, My; A Solzhenitsyn, Odin den' Ivana Denisovicha; B Pasternak, Doktor Zhivago#; Iu. Olesha, Zavist'; N Ostrovskii, Kak zakalialas' stal'.
#As these novels are fairly long, you are advised to read them before the start of the academic year.

EU30101: Russian national option R4: Gorbachev & Perestroika

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20094 or take EU20416
Aims: The option aims to provide the opportunity for detailed study of political and social change in the USSR during the years 1985-1991.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students should be able to demonstrate understanding of:
* the origins of perestroika and the evolution of Gorbachev's thinking during the years 1985-91;
* the strengths and weaknesses of civil and political society in the USSR 1985-91;
* the demise of the USSR and communist party power in 1991.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Origins of perestroika; glasnost and democratization; nationalities issues and conflicts; the collapse of communism. Key text: A. Brown, The Gorbachev Factor (Oxford: 1997).

EU30102: Russian national option R5: Politics in post-communist Russia

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20094 or take EU20416
Aims: The main aim of the unit is to develop a knowledge and understanding of change in government and society in Russia since the end of communist rule in 1991, drawing on theoretical perspectives from literature on democratisation as well as from literature that holds Russia to be unique. A second aim is to encourage use of current printed and electronic media sources, in view of the rapid pace of change in Russia, and to develop skills in seminar techniques. A third aim, applying only to students of Russian, is to encourage the location and use of Russian-language materials.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate the ability to analyse key issues in Russian politics in a manner which shows that they:
* can identify the fundamental features and problems of the evolving political order
* are familiar with the main academic debates and controversies of interpretation in Russian politics
* have acquired a detailed knowledge of the issue concerned by research in academic and current media sources
* are able to communicate their analysis effectively to an intelligent reader in both brief and extended formats.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. CIT skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
Political insitutions and actors in Russia in August 1991; dimensions of the crisis surrounding the collapse of Soviet communism; theoretical approaches to transition; reform and political conflict since 1991; dilemmas of foreign and economic policy; the social impact of transition; the 1993 Constitution, the presidency and parliament; political elites; local power; elections and party formation; civil society; political culture; legal order and corruption; federalism and ethnic politics; prospects.
Key texts: R. Sakwa Russian Politics and Society 3rd edn (Routledge: 2002), R. Sakwa Putin: Russia's Choice (Routledge: 2004), A. Brown (ed) Contemporary Russian Politics: a Reader (Oxford: 2001).

EU30107: Culture & national identity

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an overview of nationalism in various twentieth-century European contexts and of the role of culture in influencing debates on issues such as national identity; to provide a particular focus on the changes in post-1989 Central and Eastern Europe.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students should be able to evaluate the significance of nationalism as a shaping force in European history; to demonstrate good understanding of key aspects of culture theory in the context of Europe; to explain the particular role of culture in the forging of national identity in a variety of territorial contexts, particularly since 1989; to analyse the significance of particular cultural products in the light of the critique of nationalism and the role of culture in the development of national identity.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Key texts: Anthony D. Smith, National Identity; Bernhard Gibson, Intellectuals and the Nation; J. Giles and T. Middleton, Studying Culture; K. Woodward, Identity and Difference, Edward Said, Representations of the Intellectual; the work of intellectuals such as Barzini, Konwicki, Rossellini, Scholl, Maron, Arendt, and Foucault.

EU30108: European option E2: Politically committed European culture: the end of an era?

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an historical understanding of the development of politically committed culture (literature and film) in the post-1945 era in both Eastern and Western Europe. To take account of the factors which led to the growing disillusionment on the part of creative intellectuals regarding the value of their efforts to bring about 'socialism with a human face': the dominance of Stalinism during the Cold War, the crushing of reform movements in Eastern Europe (especially the Prague Spring in 1968), the general scepticism in Western Europe since the 1960s about the value of committed culture. To study some examples of the post-engagement culture in Russia and Eastern Europe since the collapse of communism. The close study of works by leading authors of the post-1945 period will provide the focus for the seminars which form the core of the unit.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete this unit successfully will have gained an awareness of why 'political commitment' remained an issue for writers and film-makers in Eastern and Western Europe in the post-1945 era; they will understand the factors which have gradually led writers and film-makers to reject any restrictions on their creative independence; they will have developed their analytical and comparative skills through their in-depth study of their chosen works.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Introductory lectures on the issue of commitment and a range of national responses to it in Eastern and Western Europe. A selection from the following works: a dossier of Camus's writing; De Sanctis: Bitter Rice; Wolf: The Quest for Christa T; Solzhenitsyn: One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich; Kundera: The Unbearable Lightness of Being; Perec: Things; Sciascia: Candido; Klíma: Waiting for the Dark, Waiting for the Light; Makanin: Baize-covered Table with Decanter; Loach, Land and Freedom.

EU30143: Business French option 2

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20141 and take EU20142
Aims: A course to upgrade, review and refine language skills already required during years 2 and 3 in order that students may operate confidently and effectively in the sphere of foreign business and management.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of the Unit students will be able to give a presentation in the target language about a company of their choice. This could take the form of an analysis of a specific problem faced by the company, or an explanation of company strategy in a particular business context. They will be able to operate effectively both orally and in writing in a variety of business scenarios.
Skills:

* Speaking, listening, reading, writing in French - all assessed
* Cultural understanding - taught and facilitated
* Team skills - facilitated
* Autonomous learning - facilitated
* Cognitive - taught
Content:
Target language is used throughout the course, emphasising fluency and grammatical accuracy. Topics reviewed include communications, marketing, sales and finance, as well as other relevant and/or topical aspects of the foreign business environment. Teaching methods integrate a variety of forms of language learning through the exploitation of foreign language television broadcasts, audio-visual and print materials.

EU30148: Chinese stage 3A (advanced beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the Chinese covered in Chinese Stage 2 A and B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to China, Singapore and Taiwan. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Chinese is spoken. Flexible provision dependent on demand, but selection criteria based on past examination performance and a needs analysis may be imposed and/or prioritisation according to Programme requirements.

EU30149: Chinese stage 3B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 3A

EU30154: French stage 9A (further advanced) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of the work outlined in French 8A and 8B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials used cover a wide variety of sources and cover aspects of cultural political and social themes relating to France. Works of literature or extracts may be included, as well as additional subject-specific material, as justified by class size. This may encompass scientific and technological topics as well as materials relevant to business and industry. There will be discussion in the target language of topics relating to and generated by the teaching materials, with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to consolidate their linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30155: French stage 9B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 9A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 9A

EU30160: French stage 6A (advanced intermediate) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course concentrates on the more advanced aspects of French with continued emphasis on practical application of language skills in a relevant context, in order to refine further the student's abilities.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. There is continued further development of the pattern of work outlined in French Stage 5A and 5B

EU30161: French stage 6B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of course French Stage 6A
Content:
A continuation of course French Stage 6A

EU30166: German stage 3A (advanced beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the German covered in German Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30167: German stage 3B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 3A

EU30172: German stage 9A (further advanced) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of the work outlined in German Stage 8A and 8B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials used cover a wide variety of sources and cover aspects of cultural political and social themes relating to German speaking countries. Works of literature or extracts may be included, as well as additional subject-specific material, as justified by class size. This may encompass scientific and technological topics as well as materials relevant to business and industry. There will be discussion in the target language of topics relating to and generated by the teaching materials, with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to consolidate their linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30173: German stage 9B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 9A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 9A

EU30178: German stage 6A (advanced intermediate) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course concentrates on the more advanced aspects of German with continued emphasis on practical application of language skills in a relevant context, in order to refine further the student's abilities.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. There is continued further development of the pattern of work outlined in German Stage 5A and 5B

EU30179: German stage 6B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 6A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 6A

EU30184: Italian stage 3A (advanced beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the Italian covered in Italian Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Italy and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Italian is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classwork.

EU30185: Italian stage 3B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Italian Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Italian Stage 3A

EU30190: Japanese stage 3A (advanced beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the Japanese covered in Japanese Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks which will include extended use of kanji characters and an introduction to keigo (respect language) as well as covering the appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Japan and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Japanese is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classwork.

EU30191: Japanese stage 3B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 3A

EU30196: Spanish stage 3A (advanced beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the Spanish covered in Spanish Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spanish speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30197: Spanish stage 3B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 3A

EU30202: Spanish stage 6A (advanced intermediate) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course concentrates on the more advanced aspects of Spanish with continued emphasis on practical application of language skills in a relevant context, in order to refine further the student's abilities.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. There is continued further development of the pattern of work outlined in Spanish Stage 5A and 5B

EU30203: Spanish stage 6B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 6A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 6A

EU30208: Chinese stage 3A (advanced beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the Chinese covered in Chinese Stage 2 A and B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to China, Singapore and Taiwan. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Chinese is spoken.

EU30209: Chinese stage 3B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU30208

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Chinese Stage 3A

EU30214: French stage 9A (further advanced) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of the work outlined in French 8A and 8B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials used cover a wide variety of sources and cover aspects of cultural political and social themes relating to France. Works of literature or extracts may be included, as well as additional subject-specific material, as justified by class size. This may encompass scientific and technological topics as well as materials relevant to business and industry. There will be discussion in the target language of topics relating to and generated by the teaching materials, with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to consolidate their linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30215: French stage 9B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU30214

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French Stage 9A
Content:
A continuation of French Stage 9A

EU30220: French stage 6A (advanced intermediate) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course concentrates on the more advanced aspects of French with continued emphasis on practical application of language skills in a relevant context, in order to refine further the student's abilities.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. There is continued further development of the pattern of work outlined in French Stage 5A and 5B

EU30221: French stage 6B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU30220

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of course French Stage 6A
Content:
A continuation of course French Stage 6A

EU30226: German stage 3A (advanced beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the German covered in German Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30227: German stage 3B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU30226

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 3A

EU30232: German stage 9A (further advanced) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of the work outlined in German Stage 8A and 8B
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials used cover a wide variety of sources and cover aspects of cultural political and social themes relating to German speaking countries. Works of literature or extracts may be included, as well as additional subject-specific material, as justified by class size. This may encompass scientific and technological topics as well as materials relevant to business and industry. There will be discussion in the target language of topics relating to and generated by the teaching materials, with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to consolidate their linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which German is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30233: German stage 9B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU30232

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 9A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 9A

EU30238: German stage 6A (advanced intermediate) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course concentrates on the more advanced aspects of German with continued emphasis on practical application of language skills in a relevant context, in order to refine further the student's abilities.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. There is continued further development of the pattern of work outlined in German Stage 5A and 5B

EU30239: German stage 6B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU30238

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of German Stage 6A
Content:
A continuation of German Stage 6A

EU30244: Italian stage 3A (advanced beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the Italian covered in Italian Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the students abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Italy and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Italian is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classwork

EU30245: Italian stage 3B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU30244

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Italian Stage 3A.
Content:
A continuation of Italian Stage 3A.

EU30250: Japanese stage 3A (advanced beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the Japanese covered in Japanese Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks which will include extended use of kanji characters and an introduction to keigo (respect language) as well as covering the appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Japan and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Japanese is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classwork.

EU30251: Japanese stage 3B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU30250

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Japanese Stage 3A

EU30256: Spanish stage 3A (advanced beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course builds on the Spanish covered in Spanish Stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spanish speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/or participating in informally arranged conversation groups and in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30257: Spanish stage 3B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU30256

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 3A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 3A

EU30262: Spanish stage 6A (advanced intermediate) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This course concentrates on the more advanced aspects of Spanish with continued emphasis on practical application of language skills in a relevant context, in order to refine further the student's abilities.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. There is continued further development of the pattern of work outlined in Spanish Stage 5A and 5B

EU30263: Spanish stage 6B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU30262

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 6A
Content:
A continuation of Spanish Stage 6A

EU30294: In search of Europe (1) - Europe divided

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: The 'In Search of Europe' course as a whole aims to provide an appropriate theoretical, conceptual and empirical framework of reference to enable students to explore continuities and changes in the concept of Europe since World War II. In Semester 1, the unit focuses on the implications of Soviet-American rivalries during the Cold War for both halves of Europe, and the causes and nature of the Cold War's demise in 1989.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students should be able to:
* demonstrate understanding of the different impacts of the Cold War on Western and Eastern Europe, and on different countries within these regions;
* explain the eventual collapse of Soviet-type systems in Europe.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
The Cold War; strengths and weaknesses of the Soviet bloc before 1989; Cold War and détente in Western Europe (1960s-1980s); 1989 and the collapse of Cold War era political systems. Key text: R.Eatwell (ed), European Political Cultures: Conflict or Convergence? (1997).

EU30295: In search of Europe 2: nationalism, regionalism and convergence in Europe since 1989

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: The 'In Search of Europe' course as a whole aims to provide an appropriate theoretical, conceptual and empirical framework of reference to enable students to explore continuities and changes in the concept of Europe since World War II. In Semester 2, the unit focuses on regional and European identities within Europe since the collapse of communism.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students should be able to:
* demonstrate understanding of major developments in European politics since the collapse of communism, with special focus on trends towards greater integration and, simultaneously, fragmentation, regionalism and ethnic conflict;
* analyse the components of national and ethnic identity and apply theories about nationalism and about the creation and transmission of identities to developments in contemporary Europe;
* attempt an informed definition of ' Europe' in the context of global political developments since the end of the Cold War.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Immediate consequences of 1989; the resurgence of particularism; forces for integration. Key texts: A. Smith, Nations and Nationalism in a Global Era (1995); K. Cordell (ed), Ethnicity and Democratisation in the New Europe (1999).

EU30374: French Language for Engineers 5

Credits: 5
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW25OR25
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To improve the students' general language skills, particularly in relation to report writing. To introduce techniques appropriate to the technical translation and summarisation of foreign language texts. To provide practice in oral presentation. To investigate the working of mechanical and electrical systems to extend further the students technical vocabulary. To give the student some detail of the organisation of French industry and prepare for industrial project. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Exchange information with native speakers including engineers on basic technical matters. Follow argument when reading, and extract information by inference. Read technical material in French in their own field, and provide either a translation or a summary. Write in an organised way and present supporting evidence and argument. Take an active part in a technical discussion in French.
Content:
Grammatical topics to be covered as appropriate for the language. Technical translation. Report writing. Country related topics to be selected from: post-war events; world of work; political institutions and elections; mass media; theatre/film.

EU30376: German language for Engineers 5

Credits: 5
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW25EX50OR25
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take EU30374

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To improve the students general language skills, particularly in relation to report writing. To introduce techniques appropriate to the technical translation and summarisation of foreign language texts. To provide practice in oral presentation. To investigate the working of mechanical and electrical systems to extend further the students technical vocabulary. To give the student some detail of the organisation of German industry and prepare for industrial project. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Exchange information with native speakers including engineers on basic technical matters. Follow argument when reading, and extract information by inference. Read technical material in German in their own field, and provide either a translation or a summary. Write in an organised way and present supporting evidence and argument. Take an active part in a technical discussion in German.
Content:
Grammatical topics to be covered as appropriate for the language. Technical translation. Report writing. Country related topics to be selected from: post-war events; world of work; political institutions and elections; mass media; theatre/film.

EU30384: Russian national option R3: Modern Russian Cinema

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20093
Aims: To acquaint students with recent developments in Russian cinema, from the late Soviet period (early 1980s) to the present day. To provide an overview of the cultural and political background to these developments. To conduct advanced analysis of film as text, examining some key films of the period.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate that they:
* are familiar with the main developments in Russian cinema since the late 1980s;
* are familiar with key issues in the academic study of Russian film;
* are able to conduct a sophisticated and critical analysis of chosen films.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. Language skills are developed in this unit.
Content:
A brief history of Soviet film 1917-1985; some critical tendencies in the late 'stagnation' years; Gorbachev's policy of glasnost' in the arts; the 'unshelving' of previously banned films in the late 1980s; the end of Soviet film and the emergence of the 'new' Russian cinema post-1991.

EU30411: Politics Dissertation 1

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The aim of the unit is for students to design and conduct a research project on an approved politics topic (NB politics is understood broadly to include related political aspects of related subjects such as social policy). The objective is for students to attain research skills, the ability and confidence to work and conduct primary research independently, and a critical awareness of the importance of methodology and analysis in political research and writing. (Further details of the Politics Dissertation are given in the Student Handbook for Politics with Economics students.)
Content:
Students will choose a specific research topic, in consultation with a suitable supervisor, and design a research project.

EU30412: Politics dissertation 2

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To complete work undertaken in Politics Dissertation 1 unit (EU30411).
Content:
Discussion, further reading and writing up of a 10,000 word research project.

EU30429: French national option F15: Le leadership contemporain

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20011
Aims:
* To deepen students' appreciation of leadership processes in political and organisational life;
* To develop an understanding of leader-follower dynamics;
* To develop students' understanding of variations in leadership style and content by reference to leadership theories;
* To explore and evaluate examples of particular types of leadership situated within context.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* Identify and compare particular styles and processes of leadership;
* Associate leadership styles with contexts;
* Demonstrate awareness of the nature of leader-follower dynamics;
* Link leadership styles, contexts and procedures to outcomes and performance;
* Discuss and explore issues issues raised in French.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
The unit analyses leadership at three levels: the French national polity, the EU, and the international arena, with case studies taken from each. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches, it identifies the social and personal characteristics of exemplary leaders, identifies contextual and procedural aspects of leadership, and explores the dynamics of social and political interaction processes. The unit is taught in French.

EU30441: Women & politics in Europe

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of the relationship between gender and politics in contemporary Europe; to examine some areas of political theory in relation to gender and to explore a number of thematic case studies.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this unit students should be able to:
* apply a basic theoretical knowledge of the relationship between women and politics;
* explain the position of women in European politics;
* critically evaluate the realities of women's involvement in politics across Europe.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
This unit will first introduce some of the major debates in contemporary feminist political theory. It will then move into a comparative analysis of the relationship between women and the political processes in Europe by examining feminist movements, women's voting patterns, women's participation in government and political parties, social policy concerning women and women's involvement in the European parliament and commission.Key text: Valerie Bryson, Feminists debate issues of theory and political practice (Macmillan, 1999).

EU30445: Spanish stage 9A (Further advanced) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW40EX45OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in Spanish Stage 8A and 8B Students will be able to apply and build on previously acquired receptive and productive language skills in a variety of contexts and situations
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials used cover a wide variety of sources and cover aspects of cultural political and social themes relating to Spain. Works of literature or extracts may be included, as well as additional subject-specific material, as justified by class size. This may encompass scientific and technological topics as well as materials relevant to business and industry. There will be discussion in the target language of topics relating to and generated by the teaching materials, with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to consolidate their linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30446: Spanish stage 9B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW40EX45OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Further consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in Spanish Stage 9A Students will be able to continue to use and expand previously acquired receptive and productive language skills in a variety of contexts and situations
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials used cover a wide variety of sources and cover aspects of cultural political and social themes relating to Spain. Works of literature or extracts may be included, as well as additional subject-specific material, as justified by class size. This may encompass scientific and technological topics as well as materials relevant to business and industry. There will be discussion in the target language of topics relating to and generated by the teaching materials, with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to consolidate their linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30451: Spanish stage 9A (further advanced) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW40EX45OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Continued consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in Spanish Stage 8A and 8B Students will be able to apply and build on previously acquired receptive and productive language skills in a variety of contexts and situations
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials used cover a wide variety of sources and cover aspects of cultural political and social themes relating to Spain. Works of literature or extracts may be included, as well as additional subject-specific material, as justified by class size. This may encompass scientific and technological topics as well as materials relevant to business and industry. There will be discussion in the target language of topics relating to and generated by the teaching materials, with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to consolidate their linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30452: Spanish stage 9B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW40EX45OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Further consolidation and enhancement of the language already acquired in Spanish Stage 9A Students will be able to continue to use and expand previously acquired receptive and productive language skills in a variety of contexts and situations
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary. Teaching materials used cover a wide variety of sources and cover aspects of cultural political and social themes relating to Spain. Works of literature or extracts may be included, as well as additional subject-specific material, as justified by class size. This may encompass scientific and technological topics as well as materials relevant to business and industry. There will be discussion in the target language of topics relating to and generated by the teaching materials, with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to consolidate their linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which Spanish is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30468: Transitions to democracy

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: To understand the "third wave" of transitions to democracy which began in the last quarter of the 20th century by examining the general scholarly literature on this subject and the experience of a number of individual countries in four different regions of the world (Southern Europe, Latin America, East-Central Europe, the former USSR); to develop skills in comparative political analysis and seminar techniques.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate:
* a clear grasp of the key issues in democratization in each region;
* familiarity with theoretical arguments surrounding "third wave" transitions;
* the ability to critically evaluate these arguments by reference to national and cross-regional case studies.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit.
Content:
The unit will begin with a lecture introducing the "third wave" and a discussion of the nature of democracy to establish criteria. This will be followed by lectures on theories of transition, the debate over structure and agency, the significance of external influences and the role of civil society. Introductory lectures on the four regions will be followed by seminar case-studies of individual countries presented by students, each focusing on an aspect of transition highlighted by the experience of the country concerned. The countries and themes chosen will vary from time to time but at present are: Spain - the importance of agency and pacts; Greece - the role of the military; Argentina - neoliberal economic policies; Colombia - illiberal democracy; Venezuela - populism and democracy; Cuba - external pressure for democracy; Poland - civil society; Hungary - political parties and society; Ukraine - institutions; Georgia - political culture. The unit will end with a general discussion, after which students will write an essay comparing an aspect of transition in at least two different regions.
Key texts: S. Huntington The Third Wave. Democratization in the Late 20th Century (1991); D. Potter et al (eds) Democratization (1997).

EU30528: French national option F16: les scandales politiques en France

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20011

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To study the political scandals that are one of the most enduring and prominent feature of French politics. We will focus on three specific issues (1) the conditions under which scandals occur, (2) how scandals unfold, (3) the effects of scandals on the political system and their role in changing societal values. Learning objectives: on successful completion of this unit students should be able to :
* critically evaluate the impact of political scandals on French politics and society;
* locate and use confidently primary and secondary sources in French;
* discuss topical, social and political issues in French
Content:
After a series of introductory lectures relating to the specific nature of scandals in France and the role that judges, the media and intellectuals play in political scandals in France, the seminars themselves will focus on case studies ranging from the Dreyfus affair (1894-1906), the "affair" of the Rainbow Warrior, and the Blood transfusion scandal of the 1990's, to the most current scandals unfolding in France. Taught in French. Key text: R. Elgie (ed.), The Changing French Political System, London, Frank Cass, 2000.

EU30537: French stage 3A (Advanced beginners) (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20535 and take EU20536

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To build further on the French covered in French stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas. On completion of this unit students will be able to deal effectively with a wide variety of situations and contexts within a French-speaking environment, productively and receptively, in all four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to French-speaking countries and may include short works of literature. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30538: French stage 3B (3 credits)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French stage 3 A (EU30537).
Content:
A continuation of French stage 3 A (EU30537).

EU30543: French stage 3A (Advanced beginners) (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20541 and take EU20542
or equivalent.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
To build further on the French covered in French stage 2A and 2B in order to enhance the student's abilities in the four skill areas. On completion of this unit students will be able to deal effectively with a wide variety of situations and contexts within a French-speaking environment, productively and receptively, in all four skill areas.
Content:
This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary relating to a selection of topics. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to French-speaking countries and may include short works of literature. There will be discussion in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials, leading to small-scale research projects based on the same range of topics and incorporating the use of press reports and articles as well as audio and visual material. Students are encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, for instance by additional reading and/ or participating in informally arranged conversational groups and in events at which French is spoken. Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work.

EU30544: French stage 3B (6 credits)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX45CW40OR15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU30543
or equivalent.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
A continuation of French stage 3 A (EU30543).
Content:
A continuation of French stage 3 A (EU30543).

EU30548: Italian national option IT9: organised crime & democracy in Italy

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW33EX67
Requisites:
Aims: This unit has four main aims: 1. to provide students with a detailed theoretical/empirical understanding of organised crime in Italy; 2. to provide students with an appreciation of the theoretical debates associated with organised crime and its relationship with civil society and politics; 3. to enable students to develop a critical/analytical approach to the major issues raised by organised crime in Italy; 4. to help students improve research techniques through use of a case study.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students should: 1. have in-depth knowledge of the phenomenon of organised crime gangs in Italy, including a detailed understanding of their political, economic and social features as well as their relationships with politicians and businessmen; 2. be familiar with theories of organised crime and its political significance; 3. be familiar with the major debates about organised crime in Italy; 4. be able to respond in an informed manner to questions about the existence and persistence of organised crime in Italy and the threat which it poses to Italian democracy; 5. design and write a case study on an aspect of organised crime in Italy which demonstrates the empirical and theoretical knowledge detailed above.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Defining Italian organised crime; theoretical approaches to organised crime and democracy in Italy; criminal and civic culture; modernisation of criminal business and white collar crime; politics, clientelism and organised crime; La Mafia, Camorra, Ndrnagheta e Corona Sacra unita; the Alfieri Confederation - a case study; foreign criminal groups in Italy; the trials of Giulio Andreotti and Antonio Gava; Italy's fight against organised crime; challenges to Italian democracy.
Key texts:
* Arlacchi, P. (1986) Mafia Business, The Mafia Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, OUP: Oxford.
* Gambetta, D. (1993) The Sicilian Mafia, OUP: Oxford.
* Stile, A. (1995) Excellent Cadavers, The Mafia and the Death of the First Republic, Jonathan Cape: London.

EU30549: Italian national option IT10: Italy & migration

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33EX67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20071
Aims: This unit has three main aims: 1) To provide students with a theoretical framework for understanding the principal factors which lead to migratory movements. 2) To enable students to position different types of migration to, within and from Italy within this framework. 3) To enable students to critically evaluate the impact of migrations on Italian society.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete this unit successfully will: 1) Have detailed knowledge of the principal migratory movements to and from Italy from the early 1900s to the 21st century. 2) Be familiar with debates about 'Italians abroad'. 3) Be familiar with the social and political legacy of internal migration within Italy in the postwar period. 4) Be familiar with debates about contemporary African, Asian and East European migration to Italy.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Migration Theory; The Italian Diaspora in Europe and North America; Internal Migration in postwar Italy; Gender and Migration; Italy's transition to a country of immigration; Racism; The politicisation of immigration; Labour markets; regional economic political cultures. Key texts:
* Andall, J (2000) Gender, Migration and Domestic Service: The Politics of Black Women in Italy, Aldershot: Ashgate.
* Fortier, A (2000) Migrant Belongings, Oxford: Berg.
* Gabaccia, G (2000) Italy's Diasporas, London: UCL Press.
* Grillo, R & Pratt, J (2002) The Politics of Recognizing Difference: Multiculturalism Italian style, Aldershot: Ashgate.

EU30565: German national option G11: Zeitgeschichte im deutschen Film

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit aims to provide students with an insight into film as a reflection of Germany's social and political history in the 20th century.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit will be able to:
* undertake detailed formal and thematic analysis of German films;
* situate their analysis of German film in an appropriate socio-historical context;
* show an understanding of the cinema's role in German society.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Students will examine examples of German expressionist film, National Socialist era film, 'Trümmerfilme', New German Cinema and post-unfication cinema. Films studied will include: F.W. Murnau (dir.), Der letzte Mann (1924); Fritz Lang (dir.), Metropolis (1926); Detlef Sierck (dir.), La Habanera (1937); Wolfgang Staudte (dir.), Die Mörder sind unter uns (1946); Wim Wenders (dir.), Falsche Bewegung (1974); R.W. Fassbinder, Die Ehe der Maria Braun (1979); Tom Tykwer (dir.), Lola rennt (1998); Wolfgang Becker (dir.), Goodbye Lenin! (2003). The unit is taught in German.

EU30568: The politics of democracy & development in Latin America

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Aims: The purpose of this unit is to analyse in depth aspects of contemporary Latin American political, social and economic development. Theoretical frameworks for analysis will be applied to national case studies across the continent to allow students to assess democratic, development, risk analysis and current social and economic trends.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* understand the nature and limits of democratisation, and the forces which influence and shape it
* critically evaluate the link between economic, social and political development in Latin America
* apply theoretical frameworks to actual national case studies to evaluate current and future development.
Content:
A series of lectures to give students the theoretical tools if necessary for analysis and evaluation of Latin American development, including theory and practice of democratisation, the role of the military, the relationship between democracy and economics, the post-Cold War, post September 11th role of the US, the impact of the drugs trade, and the role of civil society. Students will apply theoretical frameworks to national case studies to evaluate the nature and limits of democracy, obstacles to further democratisation, conflict resolution and the nature and role of external influences.

EU30569: The post-Franco party political system in Spain

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33EX67
Requisites:
Aims: The purpose of this unit is to examine the nature of Spanish politics in the post-authoritarian period; analyse the reasons for successful transition from dictatorship to democracy; evaluate the modernisation of Spain under the PSOE government with particular reference to the key role played by European integration; assess more recent political developments under the current PP government.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* Understand the nature of the transition to democracy;
* Critically evaluate the role played by key actors and political parties;
* Apply theoretical frameworks to political developments in Spain.
Content:
The transition from dictatorship to democracy; socio-economic modernisation under the PSOE and PP; the role of European integration; Spain's system of regional autonomy.

EU30592: Germany in the global economy

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW30EX70
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take MN30085
Aims: The aim of this unit is to explore the economic, social and political impact of globalisation on Germany. Theoretical and historical frameworks will be applied by students to specific national or regional case studies to allow them to assess the multi-dimensional impact of globalisation on national economies and on individual firms.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* evaluate the nature and impact of globalisation on Germany;
* apply knowledge to analyse the opportunities and limitations globalisation represents for different regions and countries;
* critically evaluate the link between economic, social and political global developments;
* discuss issues raised in German.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. Language skills are also developed in this unit.
Content:
This course examines the effects of globalisation at the national and regional levels in Germany with particular emphasis on the business context. National and European adaptation strategies to globalisation as well as competing notions of globalisation's effects will be explored. Finally, the changes to the business environment will be analysed through individual firm case-studies. The unit is taught in German.

EU30593: Spain & Latin America in the global economy

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW30EX70
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take MN30085
Aims: The aim of this unit is to build on the ideas explored throughout the degree programme, concerning the economic, social and political impact of globalisation on Spain and Latin America. Theoretical and historical frameworks will be applied by students to specific national or regional case studies to allow them to assess the multi-dimensional impact of globalisation.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* evaluate the nature and impact of globalisation on Spain and Latin America;
* apply knowledge to analyse the opportunities and limitations globalisation represents for different regions and countries;
* critically evaluate the link between economic, social and political global developments;
* discuss issues raised in Spanish.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
This course will be divided into two related parts. The first part will focus on Spain in the global context, including modernisation since the 1980s, inward FDI, the expansion of Spanish business interests into Latin America, and Spanish business within the European context.The second half will focus on Latin America in the global context, focusing on the political and economic causes and consequences of liberalisation and structural adjustment in the 1980s. Special emphasis will be placed on the roles of the World Bank, WTO and IMF, the issues of trade, debt and FDI, and the social implications of Neoliberal restructuring.

EU30594: France in the global economy

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW30EX70
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take MN30085
Aims: The aim of this unit is to explore the economic, social and political impact of globalisation on France. Theoretical and historical frameworks will be applied by students to specific national or regional case studies to allow them to assess the multi-dimensional impact of globalisation on national economies and on individual firms.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* evaluate the nature and impact of globalisation on France;
* apply knowledge to analyse the opportunities and limitations globalisation represents for different regions and countries;
* critically evaluate the link between economic, social and political global developments;
* discuss issues raised in French.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. Language skills are also developed in this unit.
Content:

* The political and institutional frameworks of globalisation, at national and international levels;
* Rival national conceptions of globalisation and interpretations of its effects;
* National and European adaptation strategies;
* Sectoral patterns of internationalisation (including inward and outward FDI);
* Individual firm case-studies; The unit is taught in French.

EU30595: International marketing communications (French)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX60PR40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take MN20081
Aims: To develop students' understanding of the applications of the principles of marketing from their Second Year and ally it to their own experience on placement, passing on to the international context. It also aims to place the marketing function within social and organisational networks of communication.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of the Unit the student will have an appreciation of the interplay between the social, political and practical elements of the marketing mix within (particularly though not exclusively) the context of advertising, and be able to demonstrate this knowledge through seminar presentations on a given communications brief, and examination performance.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. Language skills are also developed in this unit.
Content:
To include:
* The ubiquity of the advertising communications message;
* Communications theory and practice: mass communications, PR and crisis management;
* Cultural elements and their potential and actual outcomes on the marketing mix;
* Social evolutions and their impact on marketing;
* Case studies;
* Student communications strategy presentations.

EU30596: International marketing communications (German)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX60PR40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take MN20081
Aims: To develop students' understanding of the applications of the principles of marketing from their Second Year and ally it to their own experience on placement, passing on to the international context. It also aims to place the marketing function within social and organisational networks of communication.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of the Unit the student will have an appreciation of the interplay between the social, political and practical elements of the marketing mix within (particularly though not exclusively) the context of advertising, and be able to demonstrate this knowledge through seminar presentations on a given communications brief, and examination performance.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit. Language skills are also developed in this unit.
Content:
To include:
* Communications theory and practice: mass communications, PR and crisis management;
* Cultural elements and their potential and actual outcomes on the marketing mix;
* The country-of-origin effect in the German context;
* Case studies;
* Student communications strategy presentations.

EU30597: International marketing communications (Spanish)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX60PR40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take MN20081
Aims: To develop students' understanding of the principles of marketing from their Second Year and to ally it to their own experience on placement, passing on to the international context. It also aims to place the marketing function within social and organisational networks of communication.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of the Unit students shall have an understanding of the interrelation between social, political and practical elements of international marketing within (particularly but not exclusively) the context of advertising in Spain. Students will be able to demonstrate this knowledge through seminar presentations on a given communications brief, and examination performance.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
The unit examines the application of theory to specific products, campaigns and case studies. It also focuses on theory and practice of mass communications, the role of PR, and the impact of national on marketing practice.

EU30623: French written and spoken language 4

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: To develop advanced language skills in the comprehension and production of written French; to provide a structured but informal context for the development of a variety of advanced oral skills.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit students will be able to:
* demonstrate comprehension of a variety of registers and styles of written and oral French;
* develop strategies for the analysis of language usage;
* express themselves in written and oral French with fluency and accuracy, with sensitivity to the needs of reader or interlocutor.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit.
Content:

Written language: translation from French into English; summarization and rewriting in French; language commentary in French; analysis of style and register (contemporary literary, political, social).
Spoken language: explication and debate, through lector-led group discussion and individual presentation, using material covering a wide range of cultural, political, social subjects.

EU30625: French written & oral communication in the international business context

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Aims: To enhance French written and oral skills within the international business context.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit students will be able to:
* demonstrate comprehension of a variety of registers and styles of written and oral French;
* develop strategies for the analysis of language usage; express themselves in written and oral French with fluency and accuracy, with sensitivity to the needs of reader or interlocutor.
* to enhance French written and oral skills within the international business context.
Skills:
Skills in precision in the use of written and spoken language, in reading advanced texts and critically judging the quality of their contents and structure, and in effective and idiomatic communication in the target language, are taught and assessed in this unit.
Content:
All classes focus on material and topics relevant to the international business context. Materials used in the unit are drawn from across a variety of registers (e.g. business, political, advertising etc.) found in French-language publications, but with reference also to English material, as well as European Union material and corporate communications. Students are encouraged to use materials and experience from their placement year in business. Exploitation of these texts and materials is aimed at increasing presentational skills within a framework of sound and well-elaborated argumentation. In addition to written communication skills, classes with the lector stimulate the development of oral communication skills.
Exercises in written communication classes include: transposition of English texts into appropriate registers for a given context, e.g. report writing, professional advice etc. commentary in French of the linguistic and situational features of text; elaboration of arguments etc; specific grammatical problems. Exercises in oral communication (language) classes include: presentations (individual and group) on prepared topics; development of interpersonal skills required in meetings and negotiations; reports in French on business and political items from French audio-visual material; specific grammatical, phonetic or other linguistic problems.

EU30628: German written & spoken language 4

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: To refine and develop students' command of written and spoken German.
Learning Outcomes:
Students will be able to translate competently from German into English in a variety of contemporary registers, produce a précis in sophisticated German of a complex English text on a subject of broad contemporary interest, write coherent, well-argued and grammatically correct essays in German in response to issues raised in complex German texts, converse fluently in German on contemporary issues and deliver sophisticated oral presentations on topics of their choice.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit.
Content:

Written language:
(a) Translation from German into English is the focus of one of the two weekly hours. Texts will be selected from colloquial as well as formal registers.
(b) The second weekly hour is devoted to the production of German in summarisation and essay-writing exercises.
Spoken language: The emphasis is on project work carried out both on a group and an individual basis, with topics of an appropriately complex and controversial nature.

EU30630: German written & oral communication in the international business context

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to keep up the level of linguistic fluency achieved during the year abroad and to further enhance German written and oral skills within the international business context.
Learning Outcomes:
To enable students to give a professional presentation and chair a discussion , making full use of appropriate techniques; to employ the relevant strategies for analysing and producing more demanding and complex German texts.
Skills:
Skills in precision in the use of written and spoken language, in reading advanced texts and critically judging the quality of their contents and structure, and in effective and idiomatic communication in the target language, are taught and assessed in this unit.
Content:
In Oral Communication Classes, special attention is paid to presentation techniques and discussion skills. In semester 2 students are also specifically prepared for their oral examination.
Exercises in Written Communication include advanced techniques of summarisation, methods of comparative text analysis, abstraction of argumentation, and conceptualisation of commentary writing. Regarding language students will study certain sophisticated linguistic points, i.e. reported speech, correct use of quotations, and a variety of stylistic means and expressions.
In both components of the unit classes focus on material and topics relevant to the international business context. The emphasis will be on issues of European economic integration and problems related to the globalisation of economic processes.

EU30634: Italian written and spoken language 4

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of this unit in the first semester are to: refine students' competences in written and spoken Italian; to extend the range of vocabulary and linguistic registers, including the political and social; to train students in translating complex passages from and into Italian in a variety of registers and with challenging grammar and syntax; to enable students to express complex ideas and arguments in writing; to draw upon the students' period of residence in Italy in order to strengthen listening abilities and oral fluency. In the second semester, the aims are to: complete students training in the translation of Italian in a variety of registers; train them in writing a well argued essay in Italian; provide them with a wider vocabulary in the target language; strengthen further their oral fluency.
Learning Outcomes:
Students should be able to:
* translate complex texts from and into Italian without the use of a dictionary
* express their ideas and present a written argument in clear, correct Italian
* understand different registers and replicate them in the target language
* converse fluently on a variety of topics
* analyse and summarise audio-visual material
* acquire a wide vocabulary in the target language
* deliver well-structured oral presentations in Italian on social, political and cultural topics.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit.
Content:

Written Language: prose, translation, and essay writing classes based on excerpts from the press, contemporary writers and specialised journals.
Spoken Language: oral presentations, lector-organised discussion and debate on political, social and cultural topics; analysis of audio-visual material.

EU30637: Russian written and spoken language 4

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: To consolidate advanced knowledge of Russian grammar, lexis and vocabulary. To develop advanced translation skills, enabling students to translate modern literary Russian into English with minimal use of a dictionary. To enable students to produce idiomatic Russian, translate complex English passages and express complex ideas and arguments in writing without reference tools. To enhance fluency in spoken Russian and in listening comprehension and to develop summarisation skills.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to:
* translate complex texts from and into Russian without the aid of a dictionary
* express ideas and present a complex argument in writing to a high degree of accuracy
* understand and summarise normal broadcast material
* deliver well-structured oral presentations in Russian on social, political and cultural topics
* converse fluently on a variety of topics.
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit.
Content:

Written Language: translation into and from Russian, particularly modern literary Russian, and discussion of grammatical points, lexis etc; production of written Russian on contemporary political, social and cultural issues.
Spoken Language: discussion of selected topics on a range of themes (culture, politics in Russia etc); summarisation of broadcast material.
Key Text: D. Offord, Using Russian (Cambridge: 1996).

EU30640: Spanish written and spoken language 4

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: To develop advanced language skills in the comprehension and production of written Spanish; to provide a structured but informal context for the development of a variety of advanced oral skills.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit students will be able to:
* show a high level of communication skills in both written and oral Spanish in terms of fluency, accuracy and appropriateness of language use.
* display consolidation of grammatical accuracy in use of language
* demonstrate skills in comprehension and usage of a variety of registers and styles of written and oral Spanish;
* develop strategies for the analysis of language usage (including cultural, political, social contexts).
Skills:
Skills in precision and creativity in the use of written and spoken language, effective communication in the target language and translation are taught and assessed in this unit.
Content:

Written Language: translation from Spanish into English; textual analysis, abstraction and development of argumentation, summarization; language commentary in Spanish; analysis of style and register (contemporary literary, political, social).
Spoken language: group debate and discussion, through teacher-led group discussion and individual presentation, using material covering a wide range of cultural, political, social subjects.

EU30642: Spanish written and oral communication in the international business context

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment: EX50CW30OR20
Requisites:
Aims: The aims of this unit are to:
* maintain and develop the high level of linguistic fluency achieved during the year abroad
* consolidate grammatical accuracy in written and spoken communication
* develop skills in critical analysis of texts and production of written reports, summaries and analyses.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of the unit students shall have maintained and developed the communicative skills acquired hitherto on the programme and have knowledge of their more specific application in written and spoken communication.
Skills:
Skills in precision in the use of written and spoken language, in reading advanced texts and critically judging the quality of their contents and structure, and in effective and idiomatic communication in the target language, are taught and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Classes focus on materials and topics relevant to Spain, Latin America and the international business context. Students will use texts in English and Spanish as a basis for development of skills in summarisation, abstraction of argumentation, commentary and critical analysis.

EU30643: European film

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Academic Year
Assessment: ES60CW40
Requisites:
Aims: To develop an understanding of the nature and role of cinema in contemporary Europe, with particular reference to the formation and articulation of identity, in relation to wider cultural and social issues including marginalisation, exile, gender, and exclusion. To develop an understanding of key theoretical concepts in which to situate filmic discourse.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate familiarity with a wide range of European films and be able to evaluate their significance in relation to contemporary European culture and identity
* analyse filmic texts critically, and discuss findings using an appropriate range of critical and theoretical concepts
* compare the works of a variety of contemporary directors, and account for the similarities/differences which are revealed
* discuss and understand broad theoretical concepts in relation to contemporary film
* demonstrate familiarity with contemporary European film production, distribution, and exhibition
* prepare, edit, and use audiovisual material, including film clips for seminar and other presentations
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Topics for study include: film and identity (European; national; subjective); film and memory; the nature of filmic autobiography; film and history; film and society; class, ethnicity, and sexuality within contemporary European films; film and the environment; history, myth, and memory in European film; film theory; critical concepts, including genre. Films to be studied will be chosen from the works of a wide range of European directors, including, by way of example: Atkin, Bergman, Boorman, Boyle, Chukrai, Davies, Frears, Kassovitz, Kurys, Loach, Malle, Mikhalkov, Moretti, Ramsay, Sanders-Brahms, Tarkovskii, Tornatore, Truffaut, Varda, Veysset, Wenders.

EU30644: German national option G12: Protest und Widerstand

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20042
Aims: This unit aims to provide an overview of protest and oppositional movements in Germany since the Second World War, focusing in particular on the phenomenon of 'New Social Movements' in the Federal Republic since the 1960s.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit will be able to:
* show an understanding of the role of social movements and protest groups in the democratic process in Germany
* explore the relationship between identity and political activism
* undertake detailed analysis of different oppositional strategies and forms of activism in the light of relevant theory.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, effective communication in the target language, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
Topics examined will include the außerparlamentarische Opposition of the mid to late 1960s, the emergence of left-wing terrorism in the 1970s, the Women's Movement, the Green Movement, Bürgerinitiativen, the New Peace Movement, and the Gay and Lesbian Movement, as well as opposition in the GDR and more recent anti-globalisation protests. The unit is taught in German.

EU30660: French national option F19: Travelling identities: postcolonial culture in literature and the visual arts

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU20009
Aims:
* To examine two-way travel between France and abroad, paying particular attention to depictions of the 'other' in a range of travel narratives, both literary and artistic, which span the twentieth century.
* To provide an introduction to the contexts and terms of postcolonial studies.
* To explore the relationship between France and former colonial territories through the study of a wide variety of genres, both visual and verbal.
Learning Outcomes:
A student who completes the unit will be able to:
* demonstrate understanding of the contexts and terms of postcolonial studies.
* engage in comparative analysis of interdisciplinary production.
* show knowledge of the complexity, and the interconnectedness, of postcolonial French and wider francophone identities.
Skills:
Critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/ conduct/ reporting of non-quantitative research are taught in this unit. Skills in effective learning and language are also developed.
Content:
Edward W. Said's Orientalism (1978) will be used as a theoretical starting point to underpin readings of various texts, both visual and verbal. Historical background will be provided by examining extracts of colonial travel writing, painting and poster art. Artistic trends such as japonisme and the influence of so-called primitive art in the production of European artists will also be studied. Various authors' interaction with the exotic 'other' in texts, such as Henri Michaux's Ecuador (1929) and Un Barbare en Asie (1933), will be explored to highlight complex issues of colonialist exoticist stereotypes. The second half of this course will concentrate on the relationship between France and former colonial territories through representative texts, such as L'Étranger (1942) and Le premier homme (published posthumously 1994) by Albert Camus. It will focus equally on works which provide a counterpoint to such representations, such as Azouz Begag's Le gone du Chaâba (1986) and Ahmed de Bourgogne (2001).

EU30669: Nationalism and regionalism: comparing Europe and South-East Asia

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES67CW33
Requisites:
Aims: To reassess knowledge of European politics from a comparative, South-East Asian perspective. To compare the identity and integration process of the European Union and the Association of South-East Asians Nations. To review potentially Eurocentric understandings of key political concepts such as sovereignty, integration, nationalism, legitimacy, identity and human rights in the light of Asian experiences of colonialism and non-democratic regimes. To undertake regional comparisons using these concepts. To gain insights into the South-East Asian region's complex political dynamics through case studies of individual countries and regional organizations, thereby shedding light on the uniqueness of European politics and integration.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the course, students should be able to demonstrate:
* The ability to analyse political concepts with regards to a possible Eurocentric perspective
* Critical understanding of the interplay between nationalism and multilevel governance across the EU and ASEAN
* Understanding of how regional organisations differ in their approach to international politics
* Skills to compare political and regional models across Europe and South-East Asia
* Familiarity with the countries of South-East Asia and their political regimes
* A grasp of post-colonial theory and its implications for nation-building in post-colonial countries
* Knowledge of nationalism theory and its applications to both European and South-East Asian nations.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgement, reasoned argument, and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are developed and assessed in this unit.
Content:
The unit is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars.
Week 1: Nation-building and regional integration: How are the two reconciled?
Week 2: 'Asian Values' and the ASEAN culture of consensus
Week 3: Sovereignty vs. Federalism: Rethinking EU discourse
Week 4: Regional identity-building: The EU and ASEAN compared
Week 5: Consumer culture: Comparing the European single market and the ASEAN brand
Week 6: Universal human rights? European and Asian perspectives
Week 7: Nationalism theory: Imagining communities across continents
Week 8: Post-colonialism and its implications for nation-building in South-East Asia
Week 9: From pariahs to powerhouses: Comparing Germany and Vietnam
Week 10: Multi-level governance and the future of the nation-state.

EU40375: French language for Engineers 6

Credits: 5
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES70OR30
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To maintain and develop further the students' general language skills, particularly oral skills. To refine skills in relation to report writing. To provide practice in oral presentation and to introduce techniques appropriate to informal liaison interpreting. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Carry out detailed discussion with colleagues or strangers. Understand and converse freely with French engineers on technical matters. Act as a go-between in a familiar technical subject between a French engineer and an English speaking engineer. Recognise different styles of interaction and colloquial language. Follow arguments in newspapers and produce accurate information from texts. Read technical material in French in their own field and provide orally either a translation or a summary. Write in a well organised style with main ideas clearly expressed, and produce reports in French.
Content:
Report writing. Discussion of current political and cultural affairs and country related topics. Introduction to interpretation.

EU40377: German language for Engineers 6

Credits: 5
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES70OR30
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take EU40375

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To maintain and develop further the students general language skills, particularly oral skills. To refine skills in relation to report writing. To provide practice in oral presentation and to introduce techniques appropriate to informal liaison interpreting. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Carry out detailed discussion with colleagues or strangers. Understand and converse freely with German engineers on technical matters. Act as a go-between in a familiar technical subject between a German engineer and an English speaking engineer. Recognise different styles of interaction and colloquial language. Follow arguments in newspapers and produce accurate information from texts. Read technical material in German in their own field and provide orally either a translation or a summary. Write in a well organised style with main ideas clearly expressed, and produce reports in German.
Content:
Report writing. Discussion of current political and cultural affairs and country related topics. Introduction to interpretation.

XX20086: French comparative employee relations

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take MN10079

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce students to comparative frameworks for analysing employment relations in Western European countries: to give students a basic understanding of employment relations in Western European countries, with particular emphasis on France and Britain. After successfully completing this course, students should be able to apply theories of employment relations to specific cases, understand and explain differences between national employment relations systems.
Content:
The course will include lectures on managing the employment relationship, trade unions, industrial conflict, the State and the law, theories of employment relations, comparative frameworks; and explaining 'societal' difference.

Postgraduate units:


EU50303: English to French translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50304: French to English translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50305: English to French consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50306: French liaison interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of liaison interpreting, with a view to equipping them to work professionally in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the appropriate standard.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have developed a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and acquired an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, they will be able to function successfully as liaison interpreters in a range of non-specialised environments.
Skills:
Liaison interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to switch rapidly between language directions while acting as intermediary in a dialogue, applying linguistic knowledge so as to deliver a satisfactory performance for the clients or users. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a number of sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills, as well as note-taking. The focus of the subsequent teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical liaison interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing students' confidence and improving their ability to handle real work situations. Situations of this kind are simulated by means of role-play scenarios: typically, a scenario will be selected in advance - thus allowing students to prepare the subject matter - and students take turns in the role of an interpreter &«hired&ª to provide interpretation from and into English, the other participants being two tutors who are native speakers of the languages involved. Frequent use is made of the TV studio for these classes, with the role-plays being videotaped for subsequent analysis by the students and their instructors. As well as linguistic questions, this analysis covers cultural and ethical issues, including the concept of advocacy.

EU50307: English to French simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50308: English to Russian translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50309: Russian to English translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50310: English to Russian consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Unit for the MA in Interpreting & Translating.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
The aim of these units is to maximise each student's interpreting potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for work as consecutive interpreters. Students who complete the units successfully will have assimilated the principles and techniques of consecutive interpreting and be able to apply these in practice to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a speech lasting several minutes.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Students will at first be asked to deliver impromptu as well as prepared speeches in Russian on a variety of topics, to allow the class to practise summarisation, note-taking and delivery. Thereafter, the English-language materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. By the end of the course, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50311: English to Russian simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50312: Italian to English translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50313: English to Italian consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50314: Italian liaison interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of liaison interpreting, with a view to equipping them to work professionally in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the appropriate standard.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have developed a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and acquired an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, they will be able to function successfully as liaison interpreters in a range of non-specialised environments.
Skills:
Liaison interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to switch rapidly between language directions while acting as intermediary in a dialogue, applying linguistic knowledge so as to deliver a satisfactory performance for the clients or users. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a number of sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills, as well as note-taking. The focus of the subsequent teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical liaison interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing students' confidence and improving their ability to handle real work situations. Situations of this kind are simulated by means of role-play scenarios: typically, a scenario will be selected in advance - thus allowing students to prepare the subject matter - and students take turns in the role of an interpreter &«hired&ª to provide interpretation from and into English, the other participants being two tutors who are native speakers of the languages involved. Frequent use is made of the TV studio for these classes, with the role-plays being videotaped for subsequent analysis by the students and their instructors. As well as linguistic questions, this analysis covers cultural and ethical issues, including the concept of advocacy.

EU50315: English to Italian simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50316: German to English translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50317: English to German consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50318: German liaison interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of liaison interpreting, with a view to equipping them to work professionally in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the appropriate standard.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have developed a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and acquired an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, they will be able to function successfully as liaison interpreters in a range of non-specialised environments.
Skills:
Liaison interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to switch rapidly between language directions while acting as intermediary in a dialogue, applying linguistic knowledge so as to deliver a satisfactory performance for the clients or users. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a number of sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills, as well as note-taking. The focus of the subsequent teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical liaison interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing students' confidence and improving their ability to handle real work situations. Situations of this kind are simulated by means of role-play scenarios: typically, a scenario will be selected in advance - thus allowing students to prepare the subject matter - and students take turns in the role of an interpreter &«hired&ª to provide interpretation from and into English, the other participants being two tutors who are native speakers of the languages involved. Frequent use is made of the TV studio for these classes, with the role-plays being videotaped for subsequent analysis by the students and their instructors. As well as linguistic questions, this analysis covers cultural and ethical issues, including the concept of advocacy.

EU50319: English to German simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50320: Japanese to English translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50321: English to Japanese translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50322: Japanese liaison interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of liaison interpreting, with a view to equipping them to work professionally in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the appropriate standard.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have developed a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and acquired an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, they will be able to function successfully as liaison interpreters in a range of non-specialised environments.
Skills:
Liaison interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to switch rapidly between language directions while acting as intermediary in a dialogue, applying linguistic knowledge so as to deliver a satisfactory performance for the clients or users. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a number of sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills, as well as note-taking. The focus of the subsequent teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical liaison interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing students' confidence and improving their ability to handle real work situations. Situations of this kind are simulated by means of role-play scenarios: typically, a scenario will be selected in advance - thus allowing students to prepare the subject matter - and students take turns in the role of an interpreter &«hired&ª to provide interpretation from and into English, the other participants being two tutors who are native speakers of the languages involved. Frequent use is made of the TV studio for these classes, with the role-plays being videotaped for subsequent analysis by the students and their instructors. As well as linguistic questions, this analysis covers cultural and ethical issues, including the concept of advocacy.

EU50323: English to Japanese simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50324: English to Japanese consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50326: Conferences

Credits: 0
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment:
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to provide students with realistic practice in simultaneous interpreting.
Learning Outcomes:
These conferences replicate the environment of a multilingual meeting. Students who have taken part in them will be equipped to cope with actual working conditions and therefore able to demonstrate their interpreting skills more effectively.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience.
Content:
The programme of conferences runs from late in Semester 1 to the end of Semester 2. The different language sections take turns to draw up an agenda and then chair the meeting. Students are organised into teams for the combinations of languages used at each conference (to cover all of these, four conferences are normally held on each topic, with students attending those at which their languages are represented). Native-speaker delegates play appropriate roles during the proceedings. The original speeches are recorded for subsequent student practice.

EU50331: English to French simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50335: English to Russian simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50339: English to Italian simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50343: English to German simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50347: English to Japanese simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50350: Spanish to English translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50352: Institutions of the European Union

Credits: 0
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment:
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to familiarise students with the history, structure and functioning of the EU institutions so as to inform and underpin their work in the translation and interpreting units.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate an appropriate knowledge and understanding of these topics in their translation and interpreting activities.
Skills:
The emphasis in this unit is on developing:
* the intellectual skill required to assimilate a potentially complex and unfamiliar body of information;
* the transferable key skills of listening, analysing information and relating this to data and materials that are likely to be encountered in other contexts;
* the practical ability to deploy a functional knowledge of the EU and its institutions as part of professional language work.
Content:
The unit will deal chronologically with the development of the EU from the establishment of the European Coal and Steel Community and the EEC in the 1950s to the proposed EU Constitution. Attention will be focused on the accompanying changes in the legislative process and the roles of the various institutions. A brief account will be given of the structure and internal organisation of each institution, and of how the Union and its policies are financed. The major policy areas will be outlined, in particular agriculture, Structural Fund operations and development activities. Lastly, a number of current issues will be discussed, such as institutional reform and the scope for further enlargement. Students are expected to do appropriate background reading.

EU50354: Basic international law & practical legal translation

Credits: 0
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment:
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to familiarise students with the basic concepts of international law and introduce them to legal translation, so as to inform and underpin their work in the translation and interpreting units.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate an appropriate knowledge and understanding of the principles of international law in their translation and interpreting activities.
Skills:
The emphasis in this unit is on developing:
* the intellectual skill required to assimilate a potentially complex and unfamiliar body of information;
* the transferable key skills of listening, analysing information and relating this to data and materials that are likely to be encountered in other contexts;
* the practical ability to deploy a functional knowledge of international law as part of professional language work.
Content:
This unit is a combination of lectures and translation seminars. While the lectures are open to all students, the seminars are geared to specific language combinations; the principal languages used will be French, German and Italian. Additional sessions may be arranged for other languages. The lectures will first deal with the bases and development of international law, including concepts such as the nation-state and sovereignty, the structure of treaties, standard clauses and treaty language. They will then look at the UN and its agencies (examining the concepts of intervention, interference and peacekeeping), NATO, the OSCE and the European security architecture. Students are expected to do appropriate background reading. In the translation seminars, students will work on legal texts from organisations such as the United Nations and the Council of Europe, including the Commission and Court of Human Rights.

EU50355: Law of the European Union

Credits: 0
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment:
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to familiarise students with key aspects of the law of the European Union so as to inform and underpin their work in the translation and interpreting units.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate an appropriate knowledge and understanding of these topics in their translation and interpreting activities.
Skills:
The emphasis in this unit is on developing:
* the intellectual skill required to assimilate a potentially complex and unfamiliar body of information;
* the transferable key skills of listening, analysing information and relating this to data and materials that are likely to be encountered in other contexts;
* the practical ability to deploy a functional knowledge of EU law as part of professional language work.
Content:
The unit deals with the nature of EU legislation and the legislative process and explores a number of concepts specific to EU law, looking in particular at the function of the European Court of Justice. It will include a case-study tracking the progress of a case to and through the ECJ and also examine EU law in the context of enlargement of the Union. There will be a discussion of the development of environmental law and of European law in relation to human rights, including the Council of Europe and the European Court of Human Rights. Students are expected to do appropriate background reading.

EU50357: English to Spanish consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50358: Spanish liaison interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of liaison interpreting, with a view to equipping them to work professionally in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the appropriate standard.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have developed a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and acquired an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, they will be able to function successfully as liaison interpreters in a range of non-specialised environments.
Skills:
Liaison interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to switch rapidly between language directions while acting as intermediary in a dialogue, applying linguistic knowledge so as to deliver a satisfactory performance for the clients or users. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a number of sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills, as well as note-taking. The focus of the subsequent teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical liaison interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing students' confidence and improving their ability to handle real work situations. Situations of this kind are simulated by means of role-play scenarios: typically, a scenario will be selected in advance - thus allowing students to prepare the subject matter - and students take turns in the role of an interpreter &«hired&ª to provide interpretation from and into English, the other participants being two tutors who are native speakers of the languages involved. Frequent use is made of the TV studio for these classes, with the role-plays being videotaped for subsequent analysis by the students and their instructors. As well as linguistic questions, this analysis covers cultural and ethical issues, including the concept of advocacy.

EU50359: English to Spanish simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50363: English to Spanish simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50366: Russian liaison interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of liaison interpreting, with a view to equipping them to work professionally in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the appropriate standard.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have developed a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and acquired an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, they will be able to function successfully as liaison interpreters in a range of non-specialised environments.
Skills:
Liaison interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to switch rapidly between language directions while acting as intermediary in a dialogue, applying linguistic knowledge so as to deliver a satisfactory performance for the clients or users. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a number of sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills, as well as note-taking. The focus of the subsequent teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical liaison interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing students' confidence and improving their ability to handle real work situations. Situations of this kind are simulated by means of role-play scenarios: typically, a scenario will be selected in advance - thus allowing students to prepare the subject matter - and students take turns in the role of an interpreter &«hired&ª to provide interpretation from and into English, the other participants being two tutors who are native speakers of the languages involved. Frequent use is made of the TV studio for these classes, with the role-plays being videotaped for subsequent analysis by the students and their instructors. As well as linguistic questions, this analysis covers cultural and ethical issues, including the concept of advocacy.

EU50378: Business Japanese

Credits: 0
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment:
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to enhance each student's business Japanese skills and introduce them to various aspects of business culture and practice.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate these language and communication skills in the context of their interpreting and translating work.
Skills:
The emphasis in this unit is on developing:
* the communication skills required for presenting arguments and information, conducting discussions and negotiating in a business context;
* the transferable key skills of listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance;
* the ability to adapt to different cultural environments and operate professionally with an appropriate awareness of linguistic, cultural and business practices.
Content:
Listening, speaking, reading and writing are equally emphasised. The materials used will be selected with the specific needs of the relevant markets for translators/interpreters in mind. An appropriate balance is maintained between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts, tailored to the requirements of the core units. In addition, summarising skills in the target language will be taught as a necessary part of the work of both translators and interpreters.

EU50379: English to Italian translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50390: English to Chinese translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50391: Chinese to English translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50392: English to Chinese simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50393: English to Chinese consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50394: Business Chinese

Credits: 0
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment:
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to enhance each student's business Chinese skills and introduce them to various aspects of business culture and practice.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate these language and communication skills in the context of their interpreting and translating work.
Skills:
The emphasis in this unit is on developing:
* the communication skills required for presenting arguments and information, conducting discussions and negotiating in a business context;
* the transferable key skills of listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance;
* the ability to adapt to different cultural environments and operate professionally with an appropriate awareness of linguistic, cultural and business practices.
Content:
Listening, speaking, reading and writing are equally emphasised. The materials used will be selected with the specific needs of the relevant markets for translators/interpreters in mind. An appropriate balance is maintained between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts, tailored to the requirements of the core units. In addition, summarising skills in the target language will be taught as a necessary part of the work of both translators and interpreters.

EU50395: Business English

Credits: 0
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment:
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to enhance each student's business English skills and introduce them to various aspects of business culture and practice.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate these language and communication skills in the context of their interpreting and translating work.
Skills:
The emphasis in this unit is on developing:
* the communication skills required for presenting arguments and information, conducting discussions and negotiating in a business context;
* the transferable key skills of listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance;
* the ability to adapt to different cultural environments and operate professionally with an appropriate awareness of linguistic, cultural and business practices.
Content:
Listening, speaking, reading and writing are equally emphasised. The materials used will be selected with the specific needs of the relevant markets for translators/interpreters in mind. An appropriate balance is maintained between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts, tailored to the requirements of the core units. In addition, summarising skills in the target language will be taught as a necessary part of the work of both translators and interpreters.

EU50398: English to Chinese simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50402: Chinese liaison interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of liaison interpreting, with a view to equipping them to work professionally in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the appropriate standard.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have developed a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and acquired an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, they will be able to function successfully as liaison interpreters in a range of non-specialised environments.
Skills:
Liaison interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to switch rapidly between language directions while acting as intermediary in a dialogue, applying linguistic knowledge so as to deliver a satisfactory performance for the clients or users. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a number of sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills, as well as note-taking. The focus of the subsequent teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical liaison interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing students' confidence and improving their ability to handle real work situations. Situations of this kind are simulated by means of role-play scenarios: typically, a scenario will be selected in advance - thus allowing students to prepare the subject matter - and students take turns in the role of an interpreter &«hired&ª to provide interpretation from and into English, the other participants being two tutors who are native speakers of the languages involved. Frequent use is made of the TV studio for these classes, with the role-plays being videotaped for subsequent analysis by the students and their instructors. As well as linguistic questions, this analysis covers cultural and ethical issues, including the concept of advocacy.

EU50425: English to Spanish translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50427: Approaches to professional work

Credits: 0
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment:
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to encourage students to focus on some of the practical aspects of working as a professional linguist, in particular their use of English and the importance of background knowledge and research.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who have followed the activities contained in the unit should therefore be able to demonstrate an appropriate awareness of these factors in their translation and interpreting activities and be prepared for making the transition from training to professional work.
Skills:
The emphasis in this unit is on developing:
* sophisticated communication skills of the kind required for language work at the professional level, in particular an awareness of register and nuance;
* the transferable key skills of written expression, presenting and analysing arguments, background research and self-critique;
* a practical knowledge of the translation industry and its operation, in particular the importance of self-presentation and the various routes available into professional work.
Content:
The content falls into two parts: (a) developing English language skills through translation and (b) the work of the professional linguist. Both will be delivered mainly through visits by practising professionals.
Part (a) is designed to raise students' awareness of ways in which English can be manipulated effectively. Sessions will include a variety of workshop-based activities involving pair and small group work and will focus on skills such as accuracy, clarity and flexibility. Depending on students' needs, materials will be selected to illustrate particular aspects of language and structure which are problematic, as well as to provide practice in using English to translate a variety of styles and registers.
Part (b) will deal with the background knowledge and awareness of contemporary developments that need to be acquired in order to prepare for professional assignments. The programme will also deal with some of the practicalities of starting work as a translator and/or interpreter and the problems faced by newly qualified translators and interpreters in the early stages of their careers.

EU50435: Comparative European politics

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit aims to provide a focussed discussion of political change in contemporary Europe, centered around two broad issues. Firstly, are we about to witness major changes in party systems, including the futher decline of 'mainstream' parties? Secondly, are we witnessing the 'end of history' (Fukuyama, 1989/1992) - the universal triumph of (liberal) democracy, or is democracy a more fragile flower?
Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this unit, students should be able to demonstrate: an appropriate level of both empirical and theoretical knowledge relating to these two broad themes; a similar knowledge of key concepts relating to these themes; a detailed knowledge of at least one topic within these themes and the ability to write and talk about it critically and clearly. Skills:
1. Ability to use IT, including the Internet for learning and research. F
2. Ability to select, analyse and present numerical data. F
3. Ability to select and use appropriate ideas to produce a coherent response to a pre-set question. TFA
4. Ability to select, summarise and synthesise written information from multiple sources. TFA
5. Ability to develop rigorous arguments through precise use of concepts and models. TFA
6. Ability to work as a team. F
7. Ability to engage in effective oral academic communication. TF
8. Ability to work to specifications and meet deadlines. FA
Content:

i) The Stability of European Party Systems;
ii) Crisis or Revival on the Centre-Right in Europe?;
iii) Is there a Social Democratic Third Way' in Europe?;
iv) The Rise of Extreme Right and Populist Parties: Has the Bubble Burst?;
v) Regional and Micro-nationalist Parties: towards a Europe of the Regions?;
vi) Green Parties, Radical Democracy and the Challenge of Corporate Globalisation;
vii) The Rise of the Referendum and the Internet: New Direct Democracy or New Danger?;
viii) Democratisation in Spain and Southern Europe: Still on the Periphery?;
ix) Democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe: Irreversible Trend?;
x) Federalism, Multi-Level Governance and the Future of Europe;
xi) The Impace of Terrorism in Europe.

EU50436: European union policies & policy-making

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is twofold. The first aim is to offer an analysis of the framework in which policy-making in the EU is set. All governments in the contemporary world have to contend with numerous constraints, which limit their margin of manoeuvre and their realistic policy options, for instance, the forces of local cultural resistance and the logic of subsidiarity. This is even more true of the EU in that it has few of the attributes of government as traditionally understood, has to accommodate an enormously wide variety of national political cultures and is involved in a process of redefining both its major external relations (with the USA in particular) and its internal identity and composition (enlargement). The second aim of the unit is to assess some of the major policy issues that confront the EU as it enters the 21st century. Time constraints limit these to the most crucial issues of the moment, including the future of the Euro, the social policy consequences of integration, migratory flows and attempts to control them and the embryonic security and defence policy. The unit will not deal with the basic institutional processes of EU policy-making, with which it is assumed that students are already broadly familiar.
Learning Outcomes:
A student who completes this unit successfully will be able to demonstrate a good understanding of:
* Relations between EU member states and between the EU and other international actors;
* Political debate within the EU over the main policies being developed by the EU;
* Current dilemmas facing the EU as it embarks on the dual processes of widening and deepening;
* Future dilemmas facing the EU as European integration progresses.
Skills:
Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking, precision in the use of written and spoken language, exercise of independent judgment, reasoned argument, teamwork and the planning/conduct/reporting of non-quantitative research are taught and assessed in this unit. Skills in effective learning are developed in this unit.
Content:
The first set of lectures examines external influences on European integration. Lectures in this part of the course include: The United States and a uniting Europe; the EU and East/Central Europe; the EU and world politics.The second part of the Unit examines a number of key EU policies including the Common Foreign and Security Policy; the Common European Security and Defence Policy; Social Policy; Economic and Monetary Union. Part Three of the Unit examines future challenges to European integration including lectures on Euroscepticism; Towards a EU Constitution.

EU50437: Societal modernisation and political renewal

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: The unit aims to:
* distinguish different conceptualisations of societal change and modernisation in European societies;
* identify major reasons for the imperative of accelerated modernisation;
* explore different dimensions of the project of societal modernisation;
* examine with regard to political modernisation, in particular, the ambivalence between processes of depoliticisation and political renewal;
* assess controversial debates about possible options and pathways of modernisation.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who have successfully completed this unit will be able:
* to understand major reasons for and dimensions of the ongoing modernisation process in European societies;
* to use major concepts and theoretical models to describe and discuss ongoing processes of societal transformation;
* to distinguish and critically assess different concepts and strategies of modernisation;
* to understand and critically evaluate suggestions and debates on political modernisation, in particular.
Skills:
The key skills the unit will hone and further develop are:
* Advanced research skills in identifying, locating and exploiting a wide range of descriptive, evaluative and theoretical literature.
* Intellectual skills of conceptual, original and independent thinking, critical analysis, synthesis and reasoned argument.
* Skills of assessment and judgement in relation to the soundness of competing arguments and scenarios, including the reporting and assessing of qualitative and quantitative data.
* Generic and transferable skills related to the oral and written presentation of ideas.
* Skills of self-direction, self-evaluation and time management.
Content:
Lectures and Seminars will cover the following main topics:
* Different Perspectives on the Transformation of European Societies.
* Key Parameters in the Modernisation Process.
* The Challenge of Multi-culturalism.
* Work, Employment and Welfare State.
* Dilemmas of Modernisation: Efficiency, Effectiveness and Legitimacy.
* Veto-players and Structural Barriers to Reform.
* Local Empowerment and Social Capital.
* Civil Society and Local Governance.
* Participatory Struggles and Democratic Renewal.
* Depoliticisation, Delegation and Post-democratic Politics.

EU50438: Culture & identity in Europe

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of this unit is to explore the links between politics and culture and the formation and expression of both national and European identity. The module will examine the main theoretical approaches focussing particularly on the essentialist vs constructivist interpretation, the extensive debates around European identity and explores whether this kind of trans-national identity is possible, or even desirable. An important theme to be studied is the fragmentation and diversity of local, regional and national identities in the context of European integration. Students will be expected to discuss the concept of Europeanisation and its effect on collective and territorial identities. Particular emphasis will be placed on the creation of a European identity with its own political structures, culture and history.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will be able:
* To demonstrate a good theoretical knowledge of concepts of identity and culture.
* To relate them to the current political debates about the construction of Europe.
* To engage in discussions about the future scenarios concerning the development of European political institutions and cultural identities.
Content:
The first part of this module will provide a theoretical background for the analysis of the concepts of culture and identity. A theoretical overview of these concepts will be presented, and a lecture on modernism and postmodernism will follow. The module will then explore the construction of political identities, from national to trans-national with a discussion of both the political and cultural dimension of this construction. The module will then explore the process of Europeanisation and its impact on both national cultures and sub-cultures and will discuss in parallel the effects of cultural fragmentation within both European and national contexts. Emphasis will be placed upon the political background to the cultural and social policies of the European Commission and its attempt to create a 'European Culture and Identity'. Lectures will include: Introduction to 'Culture' and 'Identity', From Modernism to Postmodernism, From the Nation-State to a trans-national identity, Is there a European culture? Is there a European identity?, Building Europe: the political structuring of cultural identities, European Citizenship : a way forward?, Immigration and Identity in Europe, Regionalism, Territorial Identities, Constructing the European City and Is there life after Jurassic Park, or is European Film just another dinosaur?

EU50469: French to English consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50470: French to English simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50471: Russian to English consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50472: Russian to English simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50473: Italian to English consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50474: Italian to English simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50475: German to English consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50476: German to English simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50477: Japanese to English simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50478: Japanese to English consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50480: French to English simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50482: Russian to English simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50484: Italian to English simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50486: German to English simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50487: Japanese to English simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback. Content:This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50489: Spanish to English consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50490: Spanish to English simultaneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50492: Spanish to English simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50493: Chinese to English simulataneous interpreting 1

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting, with a view to equipping them for a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group progress to the next stage of preparation for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated the basic principles and techniques of simultaneous interpreting. They will understand how to approach the tasks involved and be able to work on their own initiative to improve the skills that are required. They will have started to develop a strategy for dealing with different contexts and scenarios and to acquire an awareness of the interpreter's relationship with the clients or users. Students will understand and be equipped to deal with the various practical issues and expectations that this entails. In practice, students will be able to produce a satisfactory interpretation of a non-specialised speech lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The teaching programme begins with a short series of classes involving listening skills and discourse analysis, as an introduction to the practical exercise of simultaneous interpreting. Students move quickly on to &«shadowing&ª, on-sight exercises and then interpreting in the booth. The materials used are graduated in difficulty. A programme of practice materials will be provided for students to work on in their own time; as they become more proficient, the simulated conferences are a further opportunity for realistic practice. By the end of the unit, students will be expected to have enhanced their ability to convey shades of meaning, tone and register. To facilitate this, a combination of native speakers reading a wide variety of transcripts plus live recordings covering different fields will be used. The focus of the methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical interpreting techniques.

EU50494: Chinese to English consecutive interpreting

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in consecutive interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of consecutive interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of consecutive interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Consecutive interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, memory, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the full substance of an extended speech in one language immediately after it has been delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
The programme begins with a series of practical sessions designed to improve listening, memorisation and analytical skills. This also includes an introduction to note-taking. Thereafter, the materials used are graduated in length and difficulty. Students will also be provided with a programme of practice materials to work on in their own time. In Semester 2, increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The focus of the teaching methodology is to enable students to evolve their own practical consecutive interpreting techniques, thereby enhancing their ability to handle real work situations.

EU50495: Chinese to English simultaneous interpreting 2

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: OR100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in simultaneous interpreting that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore have developed an expertise that enables them to tackle a wide range of simultaneous interpreting assignments with confidence and success, including those of a more specialised nature. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of simultaneous interpreters and their relationship with particular clients or users. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal effectively with all the various practical issues that these entail. In practice, students will be able to produce competent interpretations of speeches lasting several minutes.
Skills:
Simultaneous interpreting is an exercise in direct communication between individuals that involves transferable key skills such as listening, analysing arguments, oral expression and an awareness of one's own performance. The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to cope with the highly challenging task of conveying the substance of a spoken message in one language while it is being delivered in another, applying sophisticated linguistic knowledge to provide a satisfactory service for the audience. All these skills are developed progressively through classwork and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to simultaneous interpreting, based on the methodology adopted in the corresponding unit in Semester 1. Increasing use is made of live speakers delivering semi-improvised materials (i.e. an outline of the speech is prepared in advance, but the main substance is provided in an ad hoc manner by the speaker, thereby replicating the idiosyncrasies and patterns of delivery frequently experienced in real life). The materials used are graduated in difficulty and cover a wide range of current topics. Practice materials are provided for students to work on in their own time. A programme of simulated conferences provides a further opportunity for realistic practice (see EU50326).

EU50497: English to German translation

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in translation that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this particular field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of translators and their relationship with a particular client or end-user. They will thus know how to meet the expectations of the latter and be able to deal competently with all the various practical issues that these entail.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the expertise required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit adopts a practical approach to translation, using materials of an increasingly challenging nature. These will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind; the balance between business, scientific, political, social, economic and legal texts will be tailored to this particular language combination. During this process, the following issues, in particular, will be addressed and discussed:
* the practical principles to be applied to translation work in general;
* the intended end-user of the text and the kind of style/register that is involved;
* the reference tools or sources that could be used;
* where to look for guidance on translation and/or language issues;
* how to organise working processes so as to produce the best possible translation in the time available;
* how to ensure consistency in translation, use of language and presentation.

EU50506: Concepts and theories in the study of contemporary European politics

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW25ES50OT25
Requisites:
Aims: This unit aims to:
* Raise an awareness for the peculiarities of political science as a semi-science;
* Deepen and broaden the students' understanding of common concepts and theories required for political research;
* Provide an overview of important methodological traditions and schools of thought;
* Develop awareness of the limitations and restrictions of scientific research into political and sociological issues;
* Develop familiarity with the major theoretical approaches used in contemporary political research;
* Develop the ability to locate their own work conceptually in established methodological traditions.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate:
* A clear grasp of the major theoretical approaches used in contemporary political research;
* An understanding of the differences between these major theoretical approaches and their research-relevant implications;
* An ability to evaluate the usefulness of these approaches in relation to the study of contemporary European politics;
* Skills to analyse and compare the major theoretical approaches and concepts as they apply to the study of contemporary European politics.
Skills:
The key skills the unit will hone and further develop are:
* Advanced research skills in identifying, locating and exploiting a wide range of descriptive, evaluative and theoretical literature.
* Intellectual skills of conceptual, original and independent thinking, critical analysis, synthesis and reasoned argument.
* Skills of assessment and judgement in relation to the soundness of competing arguments and scenarios, including the reporting and assessing of qualitative and quantitative data.
* Generic and transferable skills related to the oral and written presentation of ideas.
* Skills of self-direction, self-evaluation and time management.
Content:

Introduction
* European Studies - Political Sociology - Political Research
Part 1 : Different kinds of Political Research
* Comparative research projects
* Theory oriented research projects
* Research projects focusing on policy analysis
* Academic work at post-graduate level
Part 2 : Theoretical approaches and their practical application
* Realism
* Institutionalism and Neo-Institutionalism
* Rational choice
* Post-Marxism, Critical Theory, Neo-Marxism Post-Structuralism, Constructionism, Post-modernism
* Functionalism and Systems Theory.

EU50508: European political economy

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: The course is meant to provide an overview of the process of European Integration from the distinct point of view of the political economy. The theoretical background in which the course is set is represented by the traditional political scientists' definition of political economy, mainly deriving from the tradition of International Relations and related theories of European integration. European integration and policies will be therefore assessed in the light of the different interpretative and heuristic tools provided by the theories analysed with a special attention towards the explanation of change in the adoption of policy from the competing theoretical perspectives focusing on institutions, economic interests and ideological paradigms. The policies considered rage from trade policy, to EMU and to unemployment and migratory policies.
Learning Outcomes:
Students successfully completing this unit will have achieved the following:
1. an understanding of different theoretical approaches to European Political Economy;
2. a knowledge and understanding of globalisation and its different definitions;
3. a more in-depth knowledge of a specific issue area within EPE.
Skills:
The skills the unit will develop are:
* Advanced research skills in identifying, locating and exploiting a wade range of descriptive, evaluative and theoretical literature.
* Intellectual skills of conceptual, original and independent thinking, critical analysis, synthesis and reasoned argument.
* Skills of assessment and judgement in relation to the soundness of competing arguments and scenarios including the reporting and assessing of qualitative and quantitative data.
* Generic and transferable skills related to the oral and written presentation of ideas.
* Skills of self-direction, self-evaluation and time-management.
Content:
Lectures and seminars cover:
* European Political Economy at the crossroads between economics and politics
* European Monetary Union: what is it and how did it happen?
* The ECB between growth and stability
* EMU and the European Employment Strategy Employment Policies in the EU
* The progress towards the social dimension in Europe
* Industrial policy in the EU@ the quest for competitiveness
* Trade and the European Union
* US and EU Trade
* Globalisation and the impact on the labour markets
* Globalisation the new global division of labour and European migratory policy.

EU50512: MA in Contemporary European studies (Euromasters) dissertation

Credits: 24
Level: Masters
Dissertation period
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:
Aims: The dissertation provides students with an opportunity to pursue in some depth one academic topic they encountered within the degree which interests them especially. More specifically, the dissertation provides students with the opportunity to design and complete a research project drawing on the assistance of a designated academic supervisor.
Learning Outcomes:
Students successfully completing this unit will have:
* practiced and developed skills required to pursue independent learning, with limited supervision;
* undertaken primary research relevant to the chosen field of study and/or;
* demonstrated an ability to develop a level of conceptual and theoretical analysis commensurate with a Masters level degree.
Skills:
The skills the unit will develop are:
* Advanced research skills in identifying, locating and exploiting a wide range of descriptive, evaluative and theoretical literature.
* Intellectual skills of conceptual, original and independent thinking, critical analysis, synthesis and reasoned argument.
* Skills of assessment and judgement in relation to the soundness of competing arguments and scenarios including the reporting and assessing of qualitative and quantitative data.
* Generic and transferable skills related to the oral and written presentation of ideas.
* Skills of self-direction, self-evaluation and time-management.
Content:
A topic relevant to the previous modules of the degree.

EU50514: Film and Critical Theory

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide students with a systematic understanding of film theory and major critical concepts. On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate a conceptual understanding of, and develop critiques of, film theory
* analyse critically a range of filmic images and discourse in the light of current research and scholarship
* explain the development of, and relationships between, a variety of critical stances, giving evidence of critical awareness of contemporary debate in the field.
Content:
This unit will explore key elements of modern critical theory which inform current debate in film studies, and will include topics such as semiotics, psychoanalysis, Marxism, realism, feminism, queer theory, auteur theory, postmodernism, genre, reception theory.

EU50515: Film Business 1

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:

* To provide students with a wide critical overview of the contemporary film industry, through detailed examination of its primary structures and concerns.
* To enable students to make an original contribution on the present and future configuration of the European film industry On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* show a conceptual understanding of the structural and economic organisation of the European film industry, and evaluate critically the relationship between producers, distributors, exhibitors, and audiences;
* assess the particular problems facing European film companies in the light of Hollywood domination and the impact of globalisation;
* compare and evaluate the various approaches to film production favoured by different European countries;
* understand the creative elements of the film industry, in particular the role of the director;
* analyse the significance of genre, the star system, and audience response.
Content:
This unit will provide an interface between students, academic staff, and outside speakers representing relevant areas of the film industry. It will enable students not only to achieve their objectives of understanding the structure and working of the film industry, but also to identify and define potential career paths within the industry. Topics receiving particular focus will include: pre-production; production; European funding, including questions of subsidy; European co-production; distribution; exhibition; directing; scripting and animation.

EU50516: Film Business II

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU50515

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To consolidate critical awareness of the contemporary film industry, its primary structures and concerns, with particular focus upon questions of exhibition and dissemination at regional and local level, in relation to issues of audience and consumption, and the future of the European film industry. Learning objectives: On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* demonstrate conceptual understanding of the relationship between the structural and economic organisation of the European film industry and of questions of distribution and exhibition at regional and local level;
* communicate an original assessment of the particular problems facing European film exhibition, and analyse audience response and the need for wider dissemination;
* examine critically the role of regional film societies and film festivals in the dissemination of film culture;
* contribute to the debate on academic and educational structures in relation to film culture.
Content:
This unit will provide an interface between students, academics, and outside speakers representing relevant areas of the film industry and culture at international, national, and local levels. It will enable students to increase their understanding of the structure and function of the film industry, in the broader context of public information and education, and to assess the importance of a thriving European film culture in relation to identity and representation. Students will continue to identify and define potential career and research pathways. Topics receiving particular focus will include: the organisation, day-to-day running, and cultural role of independent cinemas; the role of regional film societies within a national and European context; the organisation and function of regional film festivals; the social process circulating between production, film and consumption; film and education; the role of the British Film Institute; academic research and publication.

EU50517: Research Methods 1

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide a systematic understanding of the techniques and methodologies of research, encompassing both general presentational and organisational skills, and the specific analytical techniques and strategies required to research film material and visual images. Learning objectives: On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* evaluate critically the problems presented by various research objectives, and propose a range of suitable strategies;
* identify, access and evaluate a variety of sources including libraries; data bases; the web;
* discriminate between conflicting source material, and communicate ideas in a logical and coherent manner;
* analyse film narrative in relation to camera techniques, visual images, and diegetic and non-diegetic sound;
* demonstrate a comprehensive practical understanding of the discourse of film theory and criticism;
* make presentations using edited video material and other audiovisual aids
* write a short research paper including a bibliography and filmography, using a suitable referencing system.
Content:
This unit will combine critical, theoretical, and practical approaches, and will include such elements as: basic IT and Library skills; presentational skills; close analysis of film sequences in relation to camera techniques, visual images, and diegetic and non-diegetic sound; study of technical terminology and the language of critical theory; preparation of video and other audio visual material; essay writing; referencing; and constructing bibliographies and filmographies.

EU50518: Research Methods II

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take EU50517

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: Building upon the research techniques and methodologies acquired in Research Methods I, this unit will consolidate and develop a range of specific and transferable skills in relation to the practice and presentation of academic research. It will extend critical awareness, and writing and editorial abilities; and will incorporate the strategies required for planning, structuring, and carrying out a sustained piece of research. Learning objectives: On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* evaluate critically the problems presented by various research objectives, and propose appropriate strategies;
* access and evaluate data in order to formulate enhanced use of primary and secondary source material;
* demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge
* communicate conclusions of their research to specialist and non-specialist audiences;
* analyse complex filmic narrative with originality from a variety of critical perspectives.
Content:
This unit will combine critical, theoretical, and practical approaches, and will run in conjunction with various workshops organised at faculty level. It will include such elements as: cultural research; literature reviews; writing for publication; analysing primary and secondary material; detailed analysis of a range of filmic narratives and genres; the identification and structuring of a research project.

EU50519: History & Cinema

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide a systematic understanding of the history and development of European cinema, in relation to key movements and landmarks in European culture. Learning objectives: On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate a systematic understanding of the historical development of European cinema in relation to the wider context of European culture and history;
* analyse critically the shifting relationship between film and other cultural discourse (art, literature, music, and photography) which marked twentieth century thought and understanding;
* demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the achievements and significance of key filmic movements;
* evaluate critically the influence of past movements and directors upon the contemporary language of cinema.
Content:
This unit will provide a critical account of the history of European cinema, and will focus, in particular, upon a number of key movements within that history, including: Soviet silent film; Surrealism; Italian Neo-Realism; French New Wave; Defa and New German Cinema; British New Wave.

EU50520: European Film and Society

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:

* To foster critical awareness of the interaction between film and society in a European context
* To determine the extent to which European directors use film in the interrogation of contemporary social and political issues. Learning objectives: On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the specificities of contemporary European cinema(s) in relation to their social, political and cultural contexts
* demonstrate conceptual comprehension of the social, political and economic contexts in which films are produced and consumed
* analyse critically ways in which film may be seen to contribute to the creation of identities within society at local, regional, and national level
* explain the increasing significance of marginalised and traditionally excluded voices within contemporary European film.
Content:
This unit will examine a corpus of films in relation to the following topics: contemporary political thought; environmental issues; the city and urban/rural confrontation; utopia and dystopia; exclusion and marginalisation; totalitarianism.

EU50521: Techniques and Technologies

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33OT67
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To enhance critical understanding of the language of film through the acquisition of key practical skills. Learning objectives: On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate a critical understanding of the techniques of film and video making, and assess the relationship between artistic and technological objectives;
* isolate and identify the technical components of film footage, and analyse their contribution to filmic narrative;
* demonstrate originality in the application of relevant technical and formal skills;
* explore the relationship between image and diegetic and non-diegetic sound.
Content:
This unit will provide an introduction to the basic techniques of filmic discourse; it will also provide elementary technical training through the use of video and DVD technology. The unit will focus in particular on: camera skills; editing; lighting; sound techniques, including mixing and dubbing; music.

EU50522: Film and Identity

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To foster the evaluation of the role of European cinema in the articulation, interrogation, and construction of subjective and collective identities, with particular reference to autobiographical memory. Learning objectives: On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate understanding of the role of visual images within the processes of remembering and the creation of historical narratives;
* demonstrate understanding of the nature and theory of autobiographical discourse, and account for its centrality within postmodern European film and culture;
* analyse critically filmic autobiography within the context of current critical debate concerning first person camera, the auteur theory, and theories of identity;
Content:
This unit will examine questions of identity in relation to memory and history, with particular reference to autobiography, and will include such elements as: the construction of identities (subjective; regional; national), and the nature of the Other; the theory and practice of filmic autobiography; the topographies of childhood; the autobiographical discourse of female directors; first person camera; the relationship between history, myth and identity; self-reflexivity and postmodernism in autobiographical film.

EU50523: Images in Transit: Film and Border Crossings

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW33ES67
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To reach a comprehensive understanding of European cinema's exploration and articulation of areas of transition and change, whether geographical, linguistic, generic, or temporal, in relation to the insecure identities of postmodernism, and the cultural and historical movements and events that have shaped contemporary Europe. Learning objectives: On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
* demonstrate originality in the analysis of the spatio-temporal language of film, in relation to the depiction of journey and change;
* evaluate critically the significance of migration and change within contemporary European film and culture;
* analyse critically the complex relationship between visual images, moving images, and language in filmic discourse.
Content:
This unit will examine the filmic articulation and cultural significance of such issues as: the theme of journey and time-travel; migration and change; the movement from text to image in literary adaptation, and from still to moving images in photography and film; directors and films in transition between Europe and the States; the shifting boundaries between past and present, history and memory.

EU50524: MA in European Cinema Studies Dissertation

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Dissertation period
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To enable students to undertake systematic and original research in an appropriate area of European cinema. Learning objectives: On successful completion of this unit, students will have demonstrated:
* self-direction and originality in selecting, planning and implementing an appropriate research topic;
* the ability to construct arguments which make a contribution to current academic debate in the field of film studies;
* the ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, and to demonstrate originality in tackling and solving problems.
Content:
A theoretical and critical analysis of an appropriate topic in film studies.

EU50525: MA in European Cinema Studies Film Project

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Dissertation period
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To enable students to demonstrate systematic and comprehensive understanding of film techniques through an original film composition. Learning objectives: On successful completion of this unit, students will have demonstrated:
* self-direction and originality in selecting, planning and implementing an appropriate subject;
* the ability to construct an original short film, to demonstrate the relevance of the chosen methodology and to provide a critical evaluation of the result;
* the ability to deal with complex theoretical and practical issues both systematically and creatively, and to demonstrate originality in tackling and solving problems;
Content:
A short film accompanied by a detailed shooting script and/or story board, and an evaluative report.

EU50566: Theory of language

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW 100%
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take EU50545 and take EU50546
Aims:
* To provide students with a systematic understanding and critical awareness of theories and concepts in relation to grammatical aspects of language and to language in use, using research which is at the leading edge;
* To develop in students a comprehensive understanding of the techniques of research and scholarship in the field of EFL;
* To develop in students a more critical awareness and understanding of their own language teaching approaches and methods through an examination of the language itself, proposing - where appropriate - new hypotheses.
Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this unit the student will be able to:
* Identify systematically and creatively the kinds of linguistic knowledge that all language users possess;
* Critically analyse informal spoken and formal (written and spoken) discourse, including ethnography of communication and pragmatics, in terms of linguistic theory, demonstrating originality and self-direction;
* Communicate to specialist and non-specialist audiences the pedagogical implications of discourse theories;
* Demonstrate that they have advanced their knowledge and understanding and developed their critical skills to a high level.
Skills:
The following key skills will be facilitated, so that by the end of this unit students will be better able to:
* structure and communicate ideas effectively orally;
* manage time and work to deadlines;
* participate effectively in groups;
* assess the relevance and importance of the ideas of others;
* evaluate their own performance critically;
* manage personal and professional development and learning. The following key skills are also assessed, so students will be able to demonstrate, through their assignment, that they are able to:
* reason critically;
* evaluate information critically;
* synthesise information form a variety of sources and identify connections;
* analyse and interpret;
* demonstrate and exercise independent thought;
* structure and communicate ideas effectively in writing.
Content:
The unit will address the following areas; some of these will be individual sessions while others will be themes combined in one session or appearing across more than one session:
* Definition of grammar;
* Morphology;
* Syntax;
* Phrase Structure Grammar;
* Semantics;
* Phonetics and Phonology;
* Stress and intonation;
* Spoken discourse;
* Formal discourse;
* Style, context and register.

EU50567: English language teaching

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW 100%
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take EU50545 and take EU50546
Aims:
* To provide students with a systematic understanding of concepts and theories related to teaching English as a second language, developing a critical awareness of current problems and making use of insights from EFL research;
* To develop conceptual understanding, which enables students to evaluate these EFL concepts and theories critically and - where appropriate - to propose new hypotheses;
* To enable students to apply with originality the insights they gain from both this unit and from the Theory of Language unit to their teaching;
* To enhance the professional practice of students through more critical awareness and understanding of their own language teaching approaches and methods.
Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this unit the students will be able to:
* Identify the needs of learners, dealing with the complexities involved both systematically and creatively, demonstrating self-direction and originality and making sound judgements in the absence of complete data;
* Design a programme to meet the needs of a particular learner demonstrating autonomy at a professional or equivalent level;
* Critically analyse the English language they will teach in the classroom, and design, write and adapt materials for teaching English, developing these skills to a high level;
* Implement a needs analysis programme, making sound judgements in complex and unpredictable situations, and critically evaluate both this programme and the materials they have developed;
* Communicate to specialist and non-specialist audiences the complexities of needs analysis and the pedagogic underpinning of lesson planning.
Skills:
The following key skills will be facilitated, so that by the end of this unit students will be better able to:
* structure and communicate ideas effectively orally;
* manage time and work to deadlines;
* participate effectively in groups;
* assess the relevance and importance of the ideas of others;
* evaluate their own performance critically;
* manage personal and professional development and learning;
* identify and solve problems. The following key skills are also assessed, so students will be able to demonstrate, through their assignment, that they are able to:
* reason critically;
* evaluate information critically;
* synthesise information form a variety of sources and identify connections;
* analyse and interpret;
* demonstrate and exercise independent thought;
* plan, conduct and report on an individual investigation;
* structure and communicate ideas effectively in writing.
Content:
The unit will address the following areas; some of these will be individual sessions while others will be themes combined in one session or appearing across more than one session:
* Needs analysis;
* Lesson planning;
* Teaching pronunciation;
* Teaching vocabulary;
* Receptive skills;
* Spoken English skills;
* Written English skills;
* Materials.

EU50582: Editing & revision

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the full range of skills and techniques in editing and revision that are required to embark on a career as a professional linguist in this specialised field. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a wide range of editing and revising assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and coherent finished texts in English that represent an improvement of the original versions. Students will also have gained a comprehensive understanding of the role of the editor/reviser in the process of generating a document for a particular client or end-user. They will thus be able to deal competently with all stages of this process, from liaising with the original author through to publication.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the skills required for professional work. Editing and revising are exercises in communication that involve transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, practice and constructive feedback, and can be deployed when performance is assessed through realistic editing and revision assignments.
Content:

* Students will first be introduced to the concept of language benchmarking, and encouraged to develop their own hierarchies of reference materials. The practical processes involved in the generation of multilingual documents will be explained and discussed.
* After an introduction to the basic skills and techniques involved in this exercise, they will move on to more complex and sophisticated materials. These will be genuine documents, for the most part provided by the language services of international organisations.
* Particular emphasis will be placed on the editing of English texts produced by non-native speakers, and on working with texts that will subsequently be translated into other languages.
* In the latter stages of the syllabus, students will consider issues of content/substance as well as language, of the kind they are likely to encounter in professional work.
* In particular, students will work through scenarios in which they have to collaborate with the original author to ensure that the text produced accurately reflects that person's intentions.

EU50584: Proofreading

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the skills and techniques in proofreading that are required for professional work. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the necessary standard.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should be able to deal with a range of complex linguistic issues in both a systematic and creative way, so as to produce entirely accurate finished texts in English that eliminate any errors and/or imperfections of the original versions. They will also have developed the ability to make sound judgements, on their own initiative, on questions of usage and professional practice, equipping them for employment in this highly specialised field. Students should have acquired a comprehensive understanding of the role of the proofreader in the process of generating a document for a particular client or end-user, together with an awareness of the practical issues this involves.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in these units is the ability to make the kind of linguistic and substantive judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the skills required for professional work. Proofreading is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction, concentration and an awareness of one's own performance. These skills are developed gradually through classwork, practice and constructive feedback, and can be deployed when performance is assessed through realistic proofreading assignments.
Content:

* Students will first be introduced to the conventions of proofreading and the relationship between these and the language benchmarking and hierarchies of reference materials that are established in the core units of the TPLS programme on editing and revision. The nature and demands of the role of the proofreader in document production will be explained and discussed, and how this differs from that of the editor/reviser.
* As students move on to practical proofreading tasks, the materials used will become increasingly complex and sophisticated; these will be genuine documents (for the most part provided by the language services of international organisations), including English texts produced by non-native speakers. Some assignments will involve working in teams in order to meet deadlines.
* In the latter stages of the syllabus, students will consider issues of text ownership and content/substance as well as those of linguistic detail, usage and convention, of the kind they are likely to encounter in professional work.

EU50585: Translation management

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50OT50
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the skills and understanding of management systems that are required for a variety of linguistic and administrative work in the translation industry. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the necessary standard.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should be able to demonstrate qualities of the kind needed for employment in this specialised sector, e.g. the ability to plan and implement tasks at a professional level and to take independent decisions in a range of complex situations. In particular, they should be able to approach with confidence the practical professional tasks of managing a translation project and coordinating the work of freelance translators. They should also have acquired an awareness of the context in which these operations are carried out, and of the differing demands of clients, translation businesses and the translators themselves.
Skills:
This unit teaches students a knowledge and understanding of the processes involved in a particular area of professional translation. It enables them to make the kind of linguistic and administrative judgements that will result in the production of the best possible translation for the client. Students will enhance their interpersonal and communication skills by learning how to liaise with both corporate and individual clients and how to obtain the best results from subcontracted freelance translators, where necessary by working with them as a team. All these skills are developed through the use of real-life scenarios based on genuine case studies.
Content:

* It will first be explained to students how a translation business operates in practice, focusing especially on the relationships between the business and its clients on the one hand and its freelance translators on the other.
* Particular attention will be given to the issue of quality control at the different stages of the translation process, and the implications for all the parties concerned.
* Students will then consider a range of case studies drawn from the experience of the tutors and Syntacta (the Department's own language services business, which will be involved in the delivery of the unit). In their assessed coursework, they will be asked to analyse the options for decision-making at various key points, thereby generating a debate on the possible outcomes.
* For their final assessment, students will work through a translation project scenario as a management team, responding collectively to the issues and challenges that arise and producing an agreed report.

EU50586: Précis writing for the United Nations

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to equip students with the skills and techniques in précis writing that are required for professional work. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the necessary standard.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should be able to deal with a range of complex linguistic issues in both a systematic and creative way, so as to produce competent summary records of the type required by the United Nations agencies. They will also have developed the ability to make sound judgements, on their own initiative, on questions of content and analysis, with an awareness of the practical implications of their decisions. Students should have acquired a comprehensive knowledge of the context in which professional précis writers operate and of their role in documenting the proceedings of different bodies.
Skills:
This unit develops the sophisticated mental and analytical processes required for successful spoken-language activities such as interpreting and précis writing, in which the key skills of listening and analysing information are crucial. By applying these in practice, students are able to build up the techniques required for professional work. Précis writing also involves an element of teamwork, and by operating in teams at simulated conferences, students are equipped to cope with actual working conditions and therefore able to demonstrate more effectively the techniques they have been taught. The teaching, learning and assessment methods are based throughout on realistic professional scenarios. Theory is consistently integrated with practice to ensure that students understand the rationale for what they are doing.
Content:

* Students will first be introduced to the role of the précis writer and the function of summary records in the United Nations system.
* The next stage focuses on developing listening, note-taking and analytical skills similar to those used by consecutive interpreters, initially using English-only materials.
* Students will then work on a range of examples of actual summary records produced for UN agencies, with the benefit of audio recordings of the original speeches. Particular attention will be given to the decisions made on which elements of the speeches to include, and to the specific requirements of UN in-house usage.
* As well as using further recordings of UN meetings for practical exercises and coursework, students will operate in teams at the regular simulated conferences organised for the MA/Diploma in Interpreting and Translating. Complete summary records will be produced to a deadline immediately after these events.

EU50587: Enterprise skills for linguists

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW50OT50
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to provide students with a general introduction to working in the translation industry, and in particular the implications of setting up in business as a freelance translator.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should be able to demonstrate qualities of the kind needed for employment in this specialised sector, including the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility and tackling and solving problems independently and in an original way. Students will have acquired a practical knowledge of how freelance translators establish themselves in their profession. They should know what is required to deliver a high-quality product and be capable of dealing successfully with both agencies and individual clients.In addition, they should have gained an understanding of commercial and regulatory practices and procedures as they affect small businesses and the self-employed.
Skills:
This unit teaches students a knowledge and understanding of the professional qualities, abilities and approaches that are required of newcomers to the translation industry. They will learn how to market themselves and their services through effective communication and presentation, and how to maintain successful relationships with clients and work-providers. Students will be shown strategies for dealing with time-management and other practical business issues, and look at ways of developing their businesses and/or career prospects.
Content:

* Students will first be introduced to the concept of setting up and operating as a small translation business. The various options and requirements in terms of location, equipment, record keeping and financial and business planning will be explained and discussed.
* The main difficulty for newcomers to the translation industry is establishing their professional credibility without the benefit of a substantial track record. Students will be shown how to optimise their profile and overcome this problem by means of targeted and effective marketing and promotion.
* A wide range of practical scenarios will then be explored, drawn from the experience of the tutors and Syntacta (the Department's own language services business, which will be involved in the delivery of the unit). The issues raised will be discussed from the standpoint of all the parties concerned (i.e. clients, translation businesses or agencies, freelance translators).
* In their assessed coursework, students will be asked to report on how such issues might best be resolved, and to consider how a newly established translation business could be developed.

EU50588: Dissertation/Project

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Dissertation period
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of the dissertation/project is to allow students to demonstrate that they have acquired a comprehensive understanding of the issues and processes involved in some particular aspect of professional work which they have explored in an original way.
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this unit, students will have identified a number of issues relevant to professional work and explored these in a systematic and creative way within a clear theoretical framework. They will have demonstrated a full understanding and a critical awareness of these issues, and developed further insight into the work of the professional linguist.
Skills:
The dissertation/project requires students to exercise self-direction in selecting, planning and implementing an appropriate topic. They must use original and independent thinking to deal with complex linguistic issues, and in tackling and solving problems.
Content:
The dissertation/project can take one of two forms: a thesis-type dissertation on a topic covered by the taught programme, or an extended translation with a commentary. In both cases, students are allocated a supervisor who advises them on their choice of project and monitors its execution. The normal length for both types is around 15,000 words (in the case of translation projects, 10,000 for the translation and 5,000 for the commentary; these figures do not include the source text).

EU50598: Concepts and theories in the study of contemporary European politics

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50ES50
Requisites:
Aims: This unit aims to:
* Raise an awareness for the peculiarities of political science as a semi-science;
* Deepen and broaden the students' understanding of common concepts and theories required for political research;
* Provide an overview of important methodological traditions and schools of thought;
* Develop awareness of the limitations and restrictions of scientific research into political and sociological issues;
* Develop familiarity with the major theoretical approaches used in contemporary political research;
* Develop the ability to locate their own work conceptually in established methodological traditions.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate:
* A clear grasp of the major theoretical approaches used in contemporary political research;
* An understanding of the differences between these major theoretical approaches and their research-relevant implications;
* An ability to evaluate the usefulness of these approaches in relation to the study of contemporary European politics;
* Skills to analyse and compare the major theoretical approaches and concepts as they apply to the study of contemporary European politics.
Skills:
The key skills the unit will hone and further develop are:
* Advanced research skills in identifying, locating and exploiting a wide range of descriptive, evaluative and theoretical literature.
* Intellectual skills of conceptual, original and independent thinking, critical analysis, synthesis and reasoned argument.
* Skills of assessment and judgement in relation to the soundness of competing arguments and scenarios, including the reporting and assessing of qualitative and quantitative data.
* Generic and transferable skills related to the oral and written presentation of ideas.
* Skills of self-direction, self-evaluation and time management.
Content:

* Normative theories versus analytical theories;
* Rational Choice;
* Institutionalism;
* Functionalism;
* Post-marxism, Critical Theory, Neo-marxism;
* Realism;
* Constructivism, Postmodernism;
* Nationalism;
* The State;
* Power;
* Democracy, Democratisation, Democratic Renewal;
* Civil Society.

EU50604: The politics of sustainability: risk, security and stability

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: The unit aims to:
* explore the different dimensions of the politics of sustainability;
* investigate how European Union politics and policy integrate these different dimensions;
* analyse the politics of sustainability within the context of international security and stability;
* examine how the EU contributes to the global politics of sustainability.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who have successfully completed this unit will:
* be able to analyse the politics of sustainability not simply as the management of environmental issues, but also as the politics of sustainable social relations, sustainable economy and sustainable peace;
* see the politics of sustainability as a major factor influencing and shaping international relations;
* have detailed knowledge about national sustainability programmes and the internationalisation of sustainability politics at European and international level;
* have detailed knowledge of political goals and actors and policy instruments shaping the politics of sustainability.
Skills:
The key skills the unit will hone and further develop are:
* Advanced research skills in identifying, locating and exploiting a wide range of descriptive, evaluative and theoretical literature.
* Intellectual skills of conceptual, original and independent thinking, critical analysis, synthesis and reasoned argument.
* Skills of assessment and judgement in relation to the soundness of competing arguments and scenarios, including the reporting and assessing of qualitative and quantitative data.
* Generic and transferable skills related to the oral and written presentation of ideas.
* Skills of self-direction, self-evaluation and time management.
Content:
Lectures and Seminars will cover the following main topics:
* Sustainability: A Contested Concept and its political dimensions
* Resource scarcity, resource conflicts and eco-terrorism in the World Risk Society
* Environment and Security: Environmental causes and consequences of military conflicts
* Achieving Sustainability: Policy Principles and Instruments
* Towards new patterns of production and consumption
* The Europeanisation of Environmental Politics
* International regimes and leadership conflicts between Europe and the US
* Environmental regulations and world trade
* Sustainability in the politics of the World Bank and the WTO
* Structural Adjustment Programmes as a source of conflict
* Socio-economic development paths and alternative futures.

EU50605: The politics of migration

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: The units aims:
* To identify the main theoretical concepts adopted to analyse migration.
* To study the ways in which migration to Europe is managed politically.
* To explore the extent to which migration poses challenges to the concept of the nation-state.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit, students will:
* be familiar with the development of migration theory;
* be familiar with concepts related to transnationalism and diaspora;
* understand how the political management of migration by both sending and receiving countries impacts on varied (political, social, cultural) dimensions of the immigration process in Europe.
Skills:
The key skills the unit will hone and further develop are:
* Advanced research skills in identifying, locating and exploiting a wide range of descriptive, evaluative and theoretical literature.
* Intellectual skills of conceptual, original and independent thinking, critical analysis, synthesis and reasoned argument.
* Skills of assessment and judgement in relation to the soundness of competing arguments and scenarios, including the reporting and assessing of qualitative and quantitative data.
* Generic and transferable skills related to the oral and written presentation of ideas.
* Skills of self-direction, self-evaluation and time management.
Content:
Migration theory; globalisation and international migration; the country of origin context; undocumented migration; the management of migration; replacement migration; migration and the formation of diasporas; ethnic minorities and political transnationalism; immigration and political parties; transnational households; securitisation of migration policy in the EU.

EU50606: The European Union's common foreign and security policy

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit aims to:
* Identify and analyse the main currents in the academic and policy debate on the growing impact of the European Union as an international actor;
* Study and assess the resources, strengths and weaknesses of the European Union's CFSP;
* Examine the EU's gradual evolution from a regional trading bloc to a political project with global reach, including the political and institutional bases of the European integration project as it relates to CFSP;
* Offer a number of case studies of the EU's approach to and role in the great issues of international relations in the early twenty-first century. It will analyse the EU's preference for the deployment of "soft" diplomatic instruments (commercial agreements, economic and development aid, political pressures, promise of eventual membership) and its apparent reluctance to develop in any serious way more muscular, military instruments akin to those deployed by the US;
* Develop skills in comparative political analysis, in preparing briefing papers on case studies, and in conducting seminars.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate that they:
* Have acquired knowledge of the key concepts in the study, understanding, and analysis of CFSP;
* Are aware of major academic and policy debates about the nature of contemporary political processes related to CFSP;
* Can apply this knowledge and awareness to a wide range of CFSP-related issues and write sensibly and critically about them.
Skills:
The key skills the unit will hone and further develop are:
* Advanced research skills in identifying, locating and exploiting a wide range of descriptive, evaluative and theoretical literature.
* Intellectual skills of conceptual, original and independent thinking, critical analysis, synthesis and reasoned argument.
* Skills of assessment and judgement in relation to the soundness of competing arguments and scenarios, including the reporting and assessing of qualitative and quantitative data.
* Generic and transferable skills related to the oral and written presentation of ideas.
* Skills of self-direction, self-evaluation and time management.
Content:

* General Introduction and Orientation
* The Institutional Underpinnings of CFSP
* From CFSP to ESDP: integrating the defence dimension
* The European Convention: Prospects for reforming the CFSP System
* The EU and the Balkans: Baptism by Fire
* The EU and the Middle East Peace Process: Influence or Irrelevance?
* The EU and Russia: embracing the bear?
* Evaluating the impact of the CFSP.

EU50608: European politics in its international context since the end of the Cold War

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit aims to:
* Identify and analyse the main currents in the academic and policy debate on the changing nature of the relationship between European politics and the broader international context, with a specific focus on transatlantic relations since the late 1980s;
* Study and assess significant transformations in two major policy areas: foreign and security policy and economic and trade policy;
* Examine how these shifts have been further complicated by a growing tension over socio-cultural issues, which are themselves exacerbated by the phenomenon known as globalisation;
* Offer a number of case studies to examine the above phenomena in a global context, including on the relations between the EU and the USA, the Mediterranean, Latin America and Asia, as well as on the EU as global "good citizen"
* Develop skills in comparative political analysis, in preparing briefing papers on case studies, and in conducting seminars.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who complete the unit successfully will be able to demonstrate that they:
* Have acquired knowledge of the key concepts in the study, understanding, and analysis of European politics in its international context;
* Are aware of major academic and policy debates about the nature of contemporary political processes related to European politics in its international context;
* Can apply this knowledge and awareness to a wide range of issues related to European politics in its international context and write sensibly and critically about them.
Skills:
The key skills the unit will hone and further develop are:
* Advanced research skills in identifying, locating and exploiting a wide range of descriptive, evaluative and theoretical literature.
* Intellectual skills of conceptual, original and independent thinking, critical analysis, synthesis and reasoned argument.
* Skills of assessment and judgement in relation to the soundness of competing arguments and scenarios, including the reporting and assessing of qualitative and quantitative data.
* Generic and transferable skills related to the oral and written presentation of ideas.
* Skills of self-direction, self-evaluation and time management.
Content:

* General Introduction and Orientation
* The Problem of Europe as a Global Actor
* The Troubled Alliance: problems of divergence in the 1980s
* The Legacy of Reaganomics & the Single Market program
* The New Transatlantic Agenda
* Tensions over the Euro
* The Socio-Cultural Dimension of Transatlantic Relations
* False or True Crisis over the Atlantic?
* The EU and the Mediterranean: exporting stability?
* The EU, Latin America and Asia: the diplomacy of trade
* Humanitarianism, Multilateralism and Environmentalism: the EU as global "good citizen"?
* Evaluating the impact of the EU on the world stage.

EU50610: Britain and Europe

Credits: 9
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: This unit seeks to familiarise students with key issues in Britain's past, present and future relations with 'Europe', with a secondary perspective on trans-Atlantic relations.
Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this course students should be familiar with: i) debates about British identity; ii) debates about whether/why Britain has been an 'awkward partner'; iii) contemporary debates about Britain's relations with the EU; iv) debates about British relations with the wider world, especially the USA.
Skills:
Development of critical analysis skills, especially synthesising large quantities of information and applying appropriate theoretical frameworks; presentational and debating skills (although there is no seminar mark per se, students receive individual written comments on presentations from the seminar teacher).
Content:
This unit follows a largely chronological approach to the changing relations between Britain, Europe and the USA, especially in the post-1945 period. Although the lectures will largely follow chronology, the unit will engage in various key theoretical debates about the nature of international relations and the driving forces behind European integration.

EU50618: Specialist module essay

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Aims: The unit aims to:
* develop the students' independent research skills;
* provide an opportunity to tie together issued covered in individual units of the Specialist Module and integrate them into an overarching piece of research writing;
* provide a stepping stone towards the Dissertation Module.
Learning Outcomes:
Students who have successfully completed this unit will:
* have developed and carried out a research project that is not directly related to any lectures and seminars and that is not based on a research question provided by the lecturer;
* have produced a piece of academic writing that is more comprehensive, original and self-study based than the essays produced of the taught units fo the Core, National and Specialist modules;
* have developed an academic perspective that integrates the more narrowly defined focus of the individual units in the Specialist Module.
Skills:
The key skills the unit will hone and further develop are:
* Advanced research skills in identifying, locating and exploiting a wide range of descriptive, evaluative and theoretical literature;
* Intellectual skills of conceptual, original and independent thinking, critical analysis, synthesis and reasoned argument;
* Skills of assessment and judgement in relation to the soundness of competing arguments and scenarios, including the reporting and assessing of qualitative and quantitative data;
* Generic and transferable skills related to the oral and written presentation of ideas;
* Skills of self-direction, self-evaluation and time management.
Content:
Security issues depending on topic choice and research project design.

EU50645: Additional translation (Chinese to English)

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to complement the core translation units by introducing students wishing to focus on translating to a number of more specialised subject areas. It is also suitable for students taking other languages who wish to work additionally with this combination and have the necessary knowledge of Chinese. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a variety of more specialised translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained further experience of researching unfamiliar subject areas and terminology using a range of documentary and online resources, as well as the translation memory software installed on the University's computing system.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the skills required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. In addition, this unit places particular emphasis on research skills and acquiring the ability to deal with new and unfamiliar subject areas, including specific tasks such as glossary compilation. These skills are developed progressively through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to translation, using materials that are more diverse and/or specialised in nature than those used in the core translation units. The subject areas covered will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind, and are likely to include: legal documents such as agreements and contracts; banking and financial topics; a range of scientific and semi-technical materials; in-house documentation that requires the use of particular conventions and terminology. The texts chosen will be tailored to the practical demand for this particular language combination.

EU50646: Additional translation (French to English)

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW60ES40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to complement the core translation units by introducing students wishing to focus on translating to a number of more specialised subject areas. It is also suitable for students taking other languages who wish to work additionally with this combination and have the necessary knowledge of French. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a variety of more specialised translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained further experience of researching unfamiliar subject areas and terminology using a range of documentary and online resources, as well as the translation memory software installed on the University's computing system.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the skills required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. In addition, this unit places particular emphasis on research skills and acquiring the ability to deal with new and unfamiliar subject areas, including specific tasks such as glossary compilation. These skills are developed progressively through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to translation, using materials that are more diverse and/or specialised in nature than those used in the core translation units. The subject areas covered will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind, and are likely to include: legal documents such as agreements and contracts; banking and financial topics; a range of scientific and semi-technical materials; in-house documentation that requires the use of particular conventions and terminology. The texts chosen will be tailored to the practical demand for this particular language combination.

EU50647: Additional translation (German to English)

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to complement the core translation units by introducing students wishing to focus on translating to a number of more specialised subject areas. It is also suitable for students taking other languages who wish to work additionally with this combination and have the necessary knowledge of German. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a variety of more specialised translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained further experience of researching unfamiliar subject areas and terminology using a range of documentary and online resources, as well as the translation memory software installed on the University's computing system.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the skills required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. In addition, this unit places particular emphasis on research skills and acquiring the ability to deal with new and unfamiliar subject areas, including specific tasks such as glossary compilation. These skills are developed progressively through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to translation, using materials that are more diverse and/or specialised in nature than those used in the core translation units. The subject areas covered will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind, and are likely to include: legal documents such as agreements and contracts; banking and financial topics; a range of scientific and semi-technical materials; in-house documentation that requires the use of particular conventions and terminology. The texts chosen will be tailored to the practical demand for this particular language combination.

EU50648: Additional translation (Italian to English)

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to complement the core translation units by introducing students wishing to focus on translating to a number of more specialised subject areas. It is also suitable for students taking other languages who wish to work additionally with this combination and have the necessary knowledge of Italian. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a variety of more specialised translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained further experience of researching unfamiliar subject areas and terminology using a range of documentary and online resources, as well as the translation memory software installed on the University's computing system.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the skills required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. In addition, this unit places particular emphasis on research skills and acquiring the ability to deal with new and unfamiliar subject areas, including specific tasks such as glossary compilation. These skills are developed progressively through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to translation, using materials that are more diverse and/or specialised in nature than those used in the core translation units. The subject areas covered will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind, and are likely to include: legal documents such as agreements and contracts; banking and financial topics; a range of scientific and semi-technical materials; in-house documentation that requires the use of particular conventions and terminology. The texts chosen will be tailored to the practical demand for this particular language combination.

EU50649: Additional translation (Japanese to English)

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to complement the core translation units by introducing students wishing to focus on translating to a number of more specialised subject areas. It is also suitable for students taking other languages who wish to work additionally with this combination and have the necessary knowledge of Japanese. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a variety of more specialised translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained further experience of researching unfamiliar subject areas and terminology using a range of documentary and online resources, as well as the translation memory software installed on the University's computing system.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory end product for the client. By applying this in practice, students are able to build up the skills required for professional work. Translation is an exercise in communication that involves transferable key skills such as written expression, self-direction and an awareness of one's own performance, as well as IT and information retrieval abilities. In addition, this unit places particular emphasis on research skills and acquiring the ability to deal with new and unfamiliar subject areas, including specific tasks such as glossary compilation. These skills are developed progressively through classwork, marked assignments and constructive feedback.
Content:
This unit continues to build a practical approach to translation, using materials that are more diverse and/or specialised in nature than those used in the core translation units. The subject areas covered will be selected with the specific needs of the translation market in mind, and are likely to include: legal documents such as agreements and contracts; banking and financial topics; a range of scientific and semi-technical materials; in-house documentation that requires the use of particular conventions and terminology. The texts chosen will be tailored to the practical demand for this particular language combination.

EU50650: Additional translation (Russian to English)

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW60EX40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit is designed to complement the core translation units by introducing students wishing to focus on translating to a number of more specialised subject areas. It is also suitable for students taking other languages who wish to work additionally with this combination and have the necessary knowledge of Russian. The aim is to maximise each student's potential so that as many as possible of the group achieve the standard necessary for professional work.
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the unit, students should have assimilated all the principles and techniques of this area of professional work. They will therefore be able to tackle a variety of more specialised translation assignments with confidence and success. In this respect, they should have developed an expertise that enables them to work independently to produce entirely accurate and consistent versions in the target language. Students will also have gained further experience of researching unfamiliar subject areas and terminology using a range of documentary and online resources, as well as the translation memory software installed on the University's computing system.
Skills:
The main intellectual skill developed in this unit is the ability to make the kind of linguistic judgements that will produce a satisfactory e