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 University | Catalogues for 2005/06 | for UGs | for PGs

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School for Health, Unit Catalogue 2005/06


FH10034: Functional anatomy (SX10001)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop a basic understanding of the human musculo-skeletal system. On completion of this unit students should be able to: Classify and identify skeletal bones and muscles. Describe the structure and function of the muscular system. Demonstrate an understanding of muscle actions in human movements.
Content:
Skeletal construction; structure of bone and connective tissue, types of bone: long, thin, flat, irregular. Axial and appendicular skeleton. Names of major bones. Joint types; immovable, slightly moveable, freely moveable (synovial). Muscular system: muscle tissue, names of major muscles. Types of movement; flexion, extension, rotation, adduction, abduction, circumduction. Relationship of muscular system to skeletal system; identification of major muscle groups, origins, insertions and actions of main muscles. Practical analysis of limb movement. Types of muscular contraction including; isometric, isotonic, isokinetic, concentric, eccentric.

FH10035: Sports performance 1 (SX10003)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: PR60CW40
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Demonstrate improved personal competence in a range of sports;
* Demonstrate cognitive and psychomotor competencies in specific sports;
* Demonstrate a basic understanding of the physiological, psychological, and organisational basis of specific sports;
* Analyse performance from the perspective of performer and coach/educator;
* Evaluate the employment of strategies, tactics and training principles applied in specific situations to prepare for, and improve performance;
* Demonstrate an understanding of the scope of interaction between a performer, coach educator and sports scientist.
Content:
Students will experience sport from the perspective of performer and coach/educator: the module will cover skill development sessions on 2 sports chosen from the following list: Invasion Games
*, Net/Wall Games, Striking/Fielding Games, Aesthetic Activities, Aquatic Activities, Athletics Activities and Combat Activities. The rules and regulations associated with each sport will be covered together with their interpretation and application with respect to improved personal performance. Personal performance will be enhanced by the teaching and subsequent practice of tactics and strategies geared to the need of each individual. Physiological & psychological demands will be discussed, and opportunities for performance enhancement through the application of sports science highlighted. Each sports course will include preparation for performance through a study of appropriate training principles and methods.

FH10036: Introduction to sport & exercise psychology (SX10006)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce students to the fields of psychology that relate to sport performance and exercise participation. On completion of this unit students will be able to: Examine motor skill learning and development; discuss the nature and measurement of personality in the context of sport and exercise; and identify the key psychological concepts of sport performance and exercise participation.
Content:
Fields of psychology: Introduction to cognitive and developmental psychology to sport and exercise; Motor skill learning and development: Characteristics of skilled performance; theories of learning; movement control and the function of the brain; information processing; memory; transfer of learning; guidance and feedback in sport performance; Personality and trait theories: Personality theory; socialisation theory; interactionist approach to sport and exercise; Concepts of Sport and exercise psychology: anxiety, stress & arousal; self confidence & self esteem; attention & concentration; motivation.

FH10037: Sports performance 2 (SX10007)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: PR60CW40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH10035

Aims & Learning Objectives:
On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Demonstrate improved personal competence in a range of sports;
* Demonstrate cognitive and psychomotor competencies in specific sports;
* Demonstrate a basic understanding of the physiological, psychological, and organisational basis of specific sports;
* Analyse performance from the perspective of performer and coach/educator;
* Evaluate the employment of strategies, tactics and training principles applied in specific situations to prepare for, and improve performance;
* Demonstrate an understanding of the scope of interaction between a performer, coach educator and sports scientist.
Content:
Students will experience sport from the perspective of performer and coach/educator: the module will cover skill development sessions on 2 sports chosen from the following list: Invasion Games
*, Net/Wall Games, Striking/Fielding Games, Aesthetic Activities, Aquatic Activities, Atheletics Activities and Combat Activities. The rules and regulations associated with each sport will be covered together with their interpretation and application with respect to improved personal performance. Personal performance will be enhanced by the teaching and subsequent practice of tactics and strategies geared to the need of each individual. Physiological & psychological demands will be discussed, and opportunities for performance enhancement through the application of sports science highlighted. Each sports course will include preparation for performance through a study of appropriate training principles and methods.

FH10038: Introduction to human biomechanics (SX10011)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW20EX80
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take FH10034. Before taking this unit you must take MA10103 or have A-level Mathematics.

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide students with basic scientific knowledge and understanding of biomechanical aspects of human locomotion and sport performance and to provide experience of carrying out simple biomechanical measurements. At the completion of this unit students should be able to: Describe the structure and function of the neuromuscular system and analyse co-ordinated human movements. Demonstrate an understanding of biomechanical concepts relating to general human movement and sport performance. Use video cameras and simple measurement devices to record and analyse the kinematics of human movements in a directed group situation. Identify the structure and content of biomechanical scientific reports.Produce a biomechanical report.
Content:
Neuromuscular structure and function of skeletal muscle; fibres and fibre types, nerve supply to muscle, sliding theory of muscle contraction. Production of force and factors affecting co-ordinated movements. Linear kinematics; displacement, velocity and acceleration. Fundamentals of projectile motion. Angular kinematics; rotation, angular displacement, velocity and acceleration. Newton's laws of motion; Basic techniques for analysing human movement; operation and use of video equipment, photocells and other techniques for motion measurements.

FH10040: Introduction to study skills and research methods (SX10031)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW 100%
Requisites:
After taking this unit you must take FH20049

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce to students the study skills and methods of analysis for the study of Sport and Exercise using the scientific method. On completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Utilise a computer and appropriate programs for word-processing, basic statistical analysis and the retrieval of information through the world wide web (www).
* Describe the various research approaches and designs, and the statistical (if appropriate) treatments accompanying them. Demonstrate an understanding of how various research designs control for threats to validity and reliability. Demonstrate a basic understanding of probability, null hypotheses, hypothesis testing, measures of central tendency and variability, and the Normal distribution/ sampling error.
Content:
Word processing; preparation of spreadsheets; use of statistical software packages; Retrieval of sources of information (library and www); Research design and experimental control; Basic statistical techniques; Literature Reviewing; Referencing.

FH10099: Introduction to supporting special needs

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW50PR50
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce, develop and refine key practice skills for supporting a range of special needs.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students will be able to:
* Identify a range of special needs with reference to diagnosis, presentation and cause
* Discuss the implications for the individual, their carers and for professionals with respect to:
- Communication
- Access and equality
- Learning and independence
* Describe a range of interventions, therapies and support packages commonly used with individuals with special needs
* Summarise current initiatives and policies for individuals with special needs in education, health and social care.
* Formulate and refine their own support skills through interaction with other students and reflection on their own practice.
Skills:
* Team working
* Effective communication with colleagues and clients
* Developing and planning skills and time management
* Problem solving and decision-making
* Refining and improving own practice
* Analysis of case studies and work situations
* Evaluation of different intervention strategies, self evaluation
* Questioning, seeking advice
* E-study and ICT.
Content:
1. Information and facts about: range of special needs, diagnosis and cause; implications for individuals with additional learning /physical /sensory /behavioural /medical needs in a range of contexts (and other people associated with them).
2. Methods, processes and agreed 'good practice' strategies relating to: assessment of individual's needs; support offered to individual; developing and refining own practice skills; building relationships and communicating with individuals with special needs.
3. Significant principles and policies linked with good practice; legislation and guidance from government, professional bodies, voluntary/charitable groups and special interest groups.

FH10100: Supporting individuals with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW50PR50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH10099
Aims: To inform, develop and refine key practice skills in supporting and educating individuals with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD).
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students will be able to:
* Identify features of ASD with reference to range of diagnostic criteria
* Describe theories associated with possible causes of ASD
* Discuss the challenges faced by individuals with ASD arising from their diagnosis with respect to
- Communication and social interaction
- Cognition and Learning
- Behaviour
* Describe a range of interventions commonly used with individuals with ASD
* Select and justify appropriate strategies for supporting individuals with ASD in a range of contexts
* Formulate and refine their own ASD support skills through interaction with other students and reflection on own practice
* Identify areas of good practice and reflect critically upon their appropriateness for the student&ęs prevailing care environment.
Skills:
* Team working
* Effective communication with colleagues and clients
* Developing and planning skills and time management
* Problem solving and decision-making
* Refining and improving own practice
* Analysis of case studies and work situations
* Evaluation of different intervention strategies, self evaluation
* Questioning, seeking advice
* E-study and ICT.
Content:
1. Information and facts about: diagnosis and prevalence of ASD; presentation of ASD within an education and home environment; effect of ASD on individual, their family and others; effect of one's own experiences, values and beliefs on one's behaviour.
2. Methods, techniques and processes relating to: assessment of ASD; interventions and therapies used to support and educate those with ASD; developing and refining individual practice skills; building relationships and communicating with individuals with ASD.
3. Significant theories and principles associated with: biological, psychological and behavioural explanations of ASD; some intervention practices.

FH10101: Supporting individuals with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD)

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW50PR50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH10099
Aims: To inform, develop and refine key practice skills in supporting and educating individuals with emotional and behavioural disorders.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students will be able to:
* Describe the presentation of an individual with EBD with reference to overt behaviour and any diagnostic criteria
* Discuss possible causes and link with issues of self esteem, attention and activity levels, motivation, conduct disorders, other special needs
* Reflect on implications for individual with EBD, their family/carers, their peers and professionals involved
* Complete functional analysis of behaviour for individuals
* Identify approaches, interventions and support packages for individuals with EBD
* Formulate and refine their own support skills for individuals with EBD through interaction with other students and reflection on own practice
* Identify areas of good practice and reflect critically upon their appropriateness for the student&ęs prevailing care environment.
Skills:
* Team working
* Effective communication with colleagues and clients
* Developing and planning skills and time management
* Problem solving and decision-making
* Refining and improving own practice
* Analysis of case studies and work situations
* Evaluation of different intervention strategies, self evaluation
* Questioning, seeking advice
* E-study and ICT.
Content:
1. Information and facts about: assessment of EBD; presentation and possible causes; implications for individuals and others in their lives; how student's own experiences, values and beliefs can affect their own behaviour
2. Method, techniques and processes relating to: assessment of EBD; functional analysis of behaviour; anger management; self esteem and social skill development; developing and refining own practice skills; building and maintaining relationships with individuals with EBD
3. Significant theories, policies and principles linked with good practice including biological, psychological and behavioural explanations of EBD; guidance from government, employers, professional bodies and other interested groups.

FH10102: Supporting individuals with learning difficulties

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW50PR50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH10099
Aims: To inform, develop and refine key practice skills in supporting and educating individuals with learning difficulties/disabilities.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students will be able to:
* Describe the range of learning difficulties/disabilities with reference to specific diagnosis, assessment criteria and/or profiles of functioning
* Discuss the implications for the individual, their family/carers, and professionals involved
* Identify key issues in education, health and social care practice and discuss in relation to individuals with learning difficulties/disabilities
* Describe support strategies that may be appropriate for individuals with learning difficulties/disabilities in education, health and social care
* Develop and refine their own support skills for individuals with learning difficulties/disabilities through interaction with other students and reflection on own practice
* Identify areas of good practice and reflect critically upon their appropriateness for the student's prevailing care environment.
Skills:
* Team working
* Effective communication with colleagues and clients
* Developing and planning skills and time management
* Problem solving and decision-making
* Refining and improving own practice
* Analysis of case studies and work situations
* Evaluation of different intervention strategies, self evaluation
* Questioning, seeking advice
* E-study and ICT.
Content:
1. Information and facts about: diagnosis and assessment of learning difficulties/disabilities; prevalence; and effect of learning difficulties/disabilities on the individual, their parents/carers and associated professionals
2. Methods, processes and agreed 'good practice' relating to: assessment of an individual (including any diagnosis); development of support package for an individual; strategies for groups within different contexts; developing and refining own practice skills; building relationships and communicating with individuals with learning difficulties/disabilities
3. Significant principles and policies linked with good practice including guidance from government, voluntary/charitable groups, advocates, professional bodies, views of individuals with learning difficulties/disabilities and colleagues/other students.

FH10103: Asperger's syndrome - care and support

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH10099
Aims: To inform, develop and refine the key practice skills used in supporting and caring for individuals with Asperger's Syndrome (AS).
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit students will be able to:
* Identify typical AS characteristics with reference to a range of diagnostic criteria.
* Describe the theories associated with causes of AS.
* Analyse the AS induced challenges faced by individuals with AS in the areas of
- Communication,
- Cognition and Learning
- Behaviour, Emotional and Social Interaction.
* Evaluate a range of interventions commonly used with individuals with AS or ASD.
* Select and justify appropriate strategies for supporting individuals with AS in a variety of contexts.
* Formulate and refine their own AS support skills through interaction with other students and reflection on their current practice.
* Identify areas of good practice and reflect critically upon their appropriateness for the student's prevailing care environment.
Skills:
* Team working both on-line and in the workplace
* Communication within and across institutions
* Developing planning skills and work management
* Decision-making
* Refining and Improving own practice
* Analysis of case studies and work situations
* Evaluation of different intervention strategies, self-evaluation
* Questioning, seeking evidence
* E-study and ICT.
Content:
1. Information and facts about: The diagnostic criteria, prevalence and co-morbidity of AS with other conditions. How AS affects the lives of those with AS and their families. How one's own experiences, values and beliefs can affect one's own behaviour.
2. Methods techniques and processes relating to: The assessment of AS. Interventions and therapies used to support and educate those with AS. Developing and refining individual practice skills. Building relationships and communicating with individuals with AS.
3. Significant theories and principles associated with: Biological, psychological and behavioural explanations of AS.

FH20041: Physiology of sports performance (SX20009)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX70CW30
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH10034 and take BB10089 and take XX10044

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce the concepts of physiological adaptation to training for sport and develop knowledge of associated basic laboratory techniques. On completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Demonstrate an understanding of how the body adapts to exercise and appreciate the specificity of training;
* Demonstrate and understanding of the appropriate techniques that are available for the investigation of changes that occur with regular training;
* Demonstrate an understanding of and be able to determine oxygen uptake, energy expenditure during exercise, mechanical efficiency, and peak power in a laboratory environment;
* Demonstrate an understanding of the physiological factors that limit performance across a range of different types of exercise.
Content:
Energy expenditure, measurement of work and power. Skeletal muscle; structure function and adaptations to training. Circulatory adaptations to exercise; adaptations to training. Respiratory responses to exercise; limitations to maximal performance. Acid-base balance. Physiology and principles of training; evaluating performance.

FH20042: Psychological dynamics of sport (SX20010)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH10036

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To examine the psychological dynamics of structured sport environments and sports teams, in an attempt to understand those factors that contribute to, and inhibit successful performance. On completion of this unit, students should be able to examine and understand:
* The effects of competitive and co-operative sport environments upon performance and behaviour.
* The current theoretical and methodological issues that underpin the study of the sports environment.
* The contributing factors to the psychological dynamics of the sports team.
* The role of the sport psychologist in the provision of interventions to enhance team productivity.
Content:
Understanding Sport Environments: Positive and negative effects of competition and co-operation; sport oreintation and motivational climates; social factors influencing the competitive process (e.g. crowd / audience, home advantage, etc); leadership and coaching dynamics. Personal and Situational Influences Upon Team Dynamics: A conceptual framework for the study of sports teams; team cohesion and performance; social loafing and productivity losses; collective efficacy and team performance. Applied Interventions: Team goal setting, psychological profiling of teams / squads; team building techniques; fostering communication; developing role clarity; enhancing leadership.

FH20044: Physiology of fitness and health (SX20015)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX70CW30
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH20041 and take XX10044

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce the physiological adaptations that occur as a result of regular exercise and to understand how these adaptations may improve health, fitness and well-being. On completion of this unit students should be able to: Understand some of the relationships between exercise, health and fitness. Determine key aspects of health and fitness in a wide range of the population including specific groups such as the sedentary and elderly. Evaluate the results of certain health/fitness tests and begin to prescribe forms of exercise that would elicit improvements in health/fitness.
Content:
Factors limiting health and fitness. Work tests to evaluate cardiorepiratory fitness. Training for Health and Fitness. Exercise and the musculoskeletal and Neauromuscular systems. Body composition Nutrition and Health.

FH20045: Psychology of exercise and health (SX20016)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX50CW25OR25
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH10036 and take FH20042

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To examine the psychological aspects that underpin exercise participation. On completion of this unit students should be able to: Explain the psychological benefits of exercise, the motives for exercise participation, and the strategies used to enhance exercise adherence. Understand the harmful psychological problems associated with exercise participation. Explain the work of the exercise profession to promote physical activity, and address exercise adherence issues from a public health perspective.
Content:
Psychological benefits of exercise: Mechanisms & hypotheses; self-esteem issues with exercise; mood enhancement profiling. Exercise motivation: Theories of exercise motivation; exercise adherence; applied motivational interventions; exercise climate - theory and manipulation by instructors & fitness leaders. Issues of psychological well-being: Harmful psychological effects of exercise; exercise addiction; over-training; eating disorders; special populations & exercise issues (e.g. obesity). The Exercise Professional: Prediction and measurement of exercise adherence; promotion of exercise; GP referral schemes and exercise prescription.

FH20046: Study year abroad (SX20029)

Credits: 60
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
(i) To assist the student to develop communication skills and to develop the ability to work in an environment with an unfamiliar culture.
(ii) To develop the self confidence and maturity to operate effectively with people from a different cultural background.
(iii) In the case of students attending courses taught and examined in a foreign language, to develop the appropriate language skills for study in the host language.
(iv) In the case of students attending courses taught and examined in English, to develop general communication skills in the host language.
Content:
The student should follow a course equivalent to 60 University of Bath credits. Programmes of work will be decided by negotiation between the Director of Studies at Bath, the host University and the student. Courses should not duplicate courses given in the Bath degree but should complement the Bath programme. Language courses and courses relating to aspects of the host country should be considered in addition to the Sport and Exercise topics.

FH20047: Industrial placement (SX20030)

Credits: 60
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
(i) To provide practical experience in the application of knowledge and skills gained at University, by working on a significant research project or other professional activity in an approved laboratory or organisation working in Sport and Exercise Science related activities.
(ii) To develop skills in oral and written communication, time management, problem solving, group working and decision making.
Content:
The content varies from placement to placement. In choosing the placement, the University will try to ensure that the project offers adequate opportunities for the student to demonstrate competence in a significance number of the following skills. Application of academic knowledge, Practical ability, Computational skill, Analytical and problem solving skill, Innovation and originality, Time management, Writing skills, Oral expression, Interpersonal skills, Responsibility and reliability.

FH20048: Basis of sport biomechanics (SX20032)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW40EX60
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH10038 and take FH10039

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide students with the knowledge and experience of the scientific concepts of human and sport biomechanics. At the completion of this unit students should be able to: Interpret linear and angular kinematics of human movement and sport performance. Demonstrate an understanding of kinetic data in general human movement and sport performance. Use kinematic and kinetic measurement devices to record and analyse human movements in a directed group situation. Present a biomechanical report.
Content:
Linear kinematics; kinematic analysis of sport applications. Analysis of projectile motion in sport. Relationship between linear and angular motion. Linear kinetics; force, work, energy, power and inertia in human movement. Angular kinetics; torque, levers, moment of inertia, angular momentum in sport. Video, EMG and Force plate analysis for the analysis of human movement

FH20049: Research and communication skills (SX20034)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH10040

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop a critical analysis of sport and exercise science related literature and gain experience in preparing and presenting scientific reports in a variety of communication modes. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: Locate, select, retrieve, collate, analyse and synthesise literature and data from secondary and primary sources to inform specific research questions, or to solve problems using an evidence-based practice approach. Demonstrate an appreciation and basic understanding of a variety of statistical analyses adopted in the primary literature. Demonstrate an appreciation of the skills required to critically appraise scientific papers/ reports/ documents. Demonstrate a critical appreciation of how to write a scientific paper. As part of a team, undertake a Critically Appraised Topic (CAT) and communicate the findings in an oral presentation and in written form. Defend the CAT and respond appropriately to critical questions.
Content:
Research design including Randomised Controlled Trials; Literature searching and critical reviewing; How to read a paper; How to write a paper; How to give a presentation (oral or poster); The use of PowerPoint, Word and Excel to create OHP and projected presentations; Research proposal development; Qualitative designs and methods.

FH20050: Performance assessment (SX20035)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW60PR40
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To extend the students' laboratory based practical skills in the areas of sport and exercise biomechanics, physiology and psychology. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: Describe the principles of quality control and quality assessment from a laboratory perspective. Conduct appropriate biomechanical testing using prescribed methodologies and techniques. Undertake a wide range of sports physiology tests on athletes. Utilise psychological tests to assist athletes and others to improve their performance.
Content:
Biomechanics: Motion analysis systems; force plate analysis; electromyographic analysis of movement; match/game analysis. Physiology: Lactate, glucose, blood gas analysis; VO2 max testing; running economy, critical power testing, laboratory based and portable gas analysis systems. Psychology: Profile of mood states, biofeedback (EEG, EMG, GSR).

FH20051: BSc One year combined industrial placement & study abroad (SX20039)

Credits: 60
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Content:
Placement & Study Abroad

FH20052: Applications in sport biomechanics (SX20041)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH20048
Aims: To enhance understanding of the use of biomechanics as applied to the technical analysis of selected sports.
Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this unit students should be able to: Demonstrate understanding of the biomechanical issues that influence specific sport techniques. Conduct an independent literature search and produce a biomechanical literature review. Communicate verbally the findings of a sport biomechanics investigation.
Skills:
Interrogation and synthesis of scientific information - facilitated and assessed. Searching for scientific material - facilitated. Construction of a scientific review - taught, facilitated and assessed. Information technology - facilitated and assessed. Working independently - taught and facilitated. Written communication - taught, facilitated and assessed. Spoken communication - facilitated and assessed.
Content:
Directed reading material related to the biomechanical analysis of sports techniques. Structure and content of a scientific literature review. Referencing of scientific material.

FH20053: Directed readings in sport science (SX20042)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH20049 and in taking this unit you cannot take ME20248
Aims: To enhance the students' knowledge and understanding of aspects of psychology, physiology, and biomechanics through selected directed readings related to training in sport. To encourage students to gain a multidisciplinary appreciation of aspects of sport science so as they can synthesise and apply scientific principles to sport training practice.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of the unit, students should be able to: Select and relate appropriate sport training techniques and methods. Explain scientific principles of various psychological, biomechanical, and physiological techniques as they relate to sport training.
Skills:
Interrogation and synthesis of scientific information (facilitated and assessed). Independent learning (facilitated.) Written communication (assessed). Oral communication (facilitated and formatively assessed).
Content:
Directed readings in sport science encompassing the following areas of study; the training of perceptual motor skills, mental skills training, analysis and development of techniques, posture and proportionality, strength and power training, flexibility, speed training, and anaerobic and aerobic training.

FH20104: Introduction to sport medicine

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take PA10238 and take BB10089 and take FH10034
Aims: To understand the cause, range, recognition, nature, treatment and prevention of sporting injuries and illnesses and the impact of drugs on sporting injuries.
Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Recognise, analyse and describe the treatment and rehabilitation of a number of common injuries of soft tissues, bones and ligaments.
* Be aware of the emergency procedures to be adopted in all sporting injury scenarios, including a management plan for implementing these procedures.
* Describe some of the problems associated with diagnosis in a sporting setting.
* Be aware of the impact of technology and its use on the treatment and diagnoses of sporting injuries.
* Discuss, and explain the common methods used to prevent injuries in various sporting activities.
* Describe the use of different therapeutic drugs for treating the more common sporting injuries.
Skills:
* Information technology - taught and facilitated
* Working independently - taught and facilitated
* Written communication - taught, facilitated and assessed
* Spoken communication - taught and facilitated
* Problem solving - taught, facilitated and assessed
* Working as part of a group - taught, facilitated and assessed.
Content:
Role of the sport team doctor; biomechanics of injury - mechanisms, loading types, bone remodelling; emergency treatment in sport injury; drugs in sport; sports surgery; sports radiology; sports rehabilitation.

FH30054: Exercise physiology (SX30022)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW30EX70
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH20041 and take FH20044 and take FH20050

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To examine the physiological systems involved in various forms of exercise and to consider the approaches that have been used to overcome or minimise potential limitations to performance. At the completion of this unit students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of (i) the physiological strain induced by performance of exercise in different ambient temperatures and atmospheric pressures, and (ii) the associated adaptation to exercising in these environments.
Demonstrate an understanding of (i) the metabolic changes induced by specific forms of exercise, often in specific circumstances / environments and (ii) other factors that potentially limit performance of various forms of exercise.
Demonstrate an understanding of the role of potentially important macro- and micronutrients in enhancing performance and facilitating recovery from various forms of exercise.
Content:
Exercise at altitude: acute physiological effects of altitude and effect on performance, adaptation to altitude and effect on performance at altitude and on return to sea level. Thermoregulation: temperature regulation in hot, cold and humid environments and associated acclimatisation. Metabolism: substrate metabolism during prolonged exercise and the role of macronutrient supplementation (carbohydrate and fat). Protein requirements: protein requirements during various forms of exercise and the effect of protein supplementation. Ergogenic acids: an overview including examples of specific ergogenic acides. Exercise and immunity: exercise-induced disturbance to immunity and the role of nutritional intervention. Exercise and oxidative stress: the effect of exercise-induced oxidative stress and the role of nutritional intervention.

FH30055: Psychology of elite sports performance (SX30023)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH20042 and take FH20045

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To understand the psychological preparation of the elite sports performer. On completion of this unit students should be able to: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the contribution psychological concepts make to elite performance. Assess the individual needs of an athlete, and make recommendations concerning particular strategies of psychological preparation for their sport. Understand the issues of practice, ethics and professional conduct when working with elite performers.
Content:
Psychological demands of the elite performer: Arousal, stress & anxiety of elite performance (theories & research); self-confidence - problems and enhancement; motivational challenges; attention / concentration demands and flexibility. Mental preparation for performance: Psychological assessment models & tools; stress-management techniques; attention-focus training; development of self-confidence; goal setting with elite performers; intervention packaging and programmes; monitoring & evaluation of techniques. Professional Elements: Issues of practice; codes of ethics & conduct; professional organisations (BASES. BPS).

FH30056: Sport biomechanics (SX30024)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH20048

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To understand and apply scientific concepts in biomechanics in the analysis of sport and exercise movements. To interpret data in a way that is useful to sports scientists and coaches. To appreciate the role of modelling in biomechanics. On completion of this unit students should be able to: Interpret ground reaction forces in sport and exercise activities. Determine internal joint forces and muscle moments using inverse dynamic and quasi-static techniques. Evaluate methods for determining human body segmental inertia parameters. Demonstrate an understanding of the influence of data processing and error in kinematic and kinetic data management. Assess technique using kinetic analyses to determine the role and function of specific muscle groups in dynamic human activity. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of modelling in biomechanics.
Content:
Application of biomechanical principles to the understanding and analysis of selected sport or exercise activities. Sources of errors in biomechanical measurement. The use of kinematic and kinetic analyses for enhancing understanding of technique in sporting and exercise activities. Future directions in biomechanics.

FH30057: Sports medicine (SX30025)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To study the cause, range, recognition, nature, treatment and prevention of sporting injuries and illnesses and the impact of legal and illegal drugs on sporting injuries. On completion of this unit students should be able to: Recognise and describe the treatment and rehabilitation of a number of common injuries of soft tissues bones and ligaments. Describe the use of different therapeutic drugs for treating the more common sporting injuries. Explain the common methods used to prevent injuries in various sporting activities.
Content:
Managing sports injuries - a system approach. Emergency procedures - ABC. Assessing sports injuries. Treatment modalities; cryotherapy; ultrasound. Preventing sports injuries; rules, protective equipment. Injuries to specific sites; shoulder, arm chest, knees, ankle, head, back. Sports specific injuries; running, football, rugby, athletics. Health conditions related to sport; HIV, Hepatitis B.

FH30058: Research Project Analysis (SX30026)

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW10OR15RT75
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To complete the data analysis and interpretation phases of a research project and to produce a final research project report. At the completion of this unit students should have: Produced the results and discussion sections of their individual research project. Produced a final research project report. Defended their project work in a viva-voce examination.
Content:
A final report will be produced including an abstract, introduction and review, methods, results, discussion, references and appendices sections. The report should contain evidence of (a) Application of knowledge and skills acquired during the course and (b) Further study of current research positions in the field of the project. The student will defend the report and it's conclusions at a 'viva-voce' examination. (Maximum project size 10,000 words)

FH30059: Physical activity and health across the human lifespan (SX30027)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take FH30064

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To allow students to actively engage in current debates within Sport and Exercise Science in any area that has the potential to affect health and quality of life throughout an individual's lifetime. On completion of this unit students should be able to: Demonstrate the ability to synthesise current opinion on various complex unresolved arguments in Sport and Exercise Science that have the potential to affect health and quality of life at any stage of an individual's lifetime. Demonstrate the ability to use an evidence-based approach to draw together various lines of evidence that both support and refute alternate perspectives of current controversies.
Content:
Lectures provide contextual information and introduce the different problems/debates covered during the unit. Contextual information includes; epidemiology of physical activity and chronic diseases, changing population demographics and the 'greying' society, economic implications of physical inactivity/changing population demographics, and principles and practice of behaviour modification strategies. The problem-based learning sessions address topical controversies in Sport and Exercise Science that are relevant to the aims of the unit, including controversies that are partially resolved and others that are far from resolution.

FH30060: Research project development (SX30033)

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW10OR15RT75
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH10039

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop a research project proposal, and to plan and collect data to support the proposal. At the completion of this unit students should have: Planned and produced a research project proposal. Discussed and agreed the overall project design. Written an appropriate review of literature. Planned and collected data. Written the methods section of the final report.
Content:
Development of research ideas. Each student will prepare a research proposal for the project in a chosen topic of study. Each student will have an individual project but may be required to produce plans for co-operative work with other students in some areas of data acquisition. Writing a research proposal. Choosing an appropriate experimental design and statistical analysis. Presentation of research project in written and oral format. Collection of project data. Production of literature review and methods sections of the project.

FH30061: Research seminar (SX30036)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To extend knowledge and highten awareness of a range of contemporary sports and exercise science issues including developments in technology and global sport. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: Demonstrate understanding of contemporary issues facing sports and exercise science and scientists. Demonstrate awareness of current issues particulary relevant to sport developments in the United Kingdom.
Content:
Ten seminar presentations over two semesters in selected research based topics given by departmental and visiting research staff.

FH30062: Directed study (SX30037)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW60OR40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH30054 and take FH30055 and take FH30056
Any two of the above three pre requisites.
Aims & Learning Objectives:
To extend knowledge and understanding of selected aspects of FH30054, FH30055, FH30056 and to critically review other topics outside the scope of the laboratory environment. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: Demonstrate an in depth knowledge and understanding of selected topics in sport and exercise biomechanics, physiology and psychology.
Content:
Directed topics in sports and exercise biomechanics, physiology and psychology to include computer simulation of human movement and sports equipment, altitude adaptations and training principles, ethics and confidentiality in sports psychology.

FH30063: Research seminar (SX30038)

Credits: 3
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH30061

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To extend knowledge and heighten awareness of a range of contemporary sports and exercise science issues including developments in technology and global sport. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: Demonstrate understanding of contemporary issues facing sports and exercise science and scientists. Demonstrate awareness of current issues particularly relevant to sport developments in the United Kingdom.
Content:
Ten seminar presentations over two semesters in selected research based topics given by departmental and visiting research staff.

FH30064: Theoretical biomechanics (SX30040)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH30056

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To synthesise and apply scientific concepts in sport and exercise biomechanics and to appreciate the contribution of methodological advances in analysing human motion. At the completion of this unit students should be able to: Demonstrate effective integration of written material in biomechanics.
Content:
Directed research level biomechanics reference material including texts in three dimensional analysis, motor control, inertia parameters, computer simulation, non-rigid body modelling, elite sport performance, and measurement accuracy and reliability issues.

Postgraduate units:


FH50001: Health informatics - an overview

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
* Introduce the history and development of informatics as a specialty and its role and adoption in healthcare
* Distinguish between data, information and knowledge and to promote an understanding of their hierarchical interrelationship
* Set the scene for an electronic patient record that draws on all areas of healthcare informatics. On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Appraise the influences of history and policy on the current position of informatics as a specialty within healthcare
* Describe the data-knowledge hierarchy and explain its relevance to healthcare issues
* Analyse the concept of the electronic patient record as a linking structure between all areas of informatics.
Content:
This unit will introduce the student to the concept and history of informatics and explore its place in society and healthcare. This will include the following topics:
* What is health informatics
* The national and global context for healthcare informatics
* The hierarchy of data, information, knowledge and its significance in healthcare
* The development of the EPR and its relationship to all other aspects of healthcare informatics

FH50002: Techniques for research, evaluation & information retreival & analysis

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
* Introduce key research concepts applicable to healthcare informatics
* Define key strategies for finding and evaluating information sources
* Introduce the key statistical concepts and techniques relevant to healthcare informatics. On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Identify and critically appraise appropriate sources of research information
* Demonstrate understanding of the use of different research techniques used in healthcare
* Demonstrate an ability to apply fundamental statistical concepts used in healthcare audit and research.
Content:
This unit will introduce the student to the main tools that are used in information management and explore why they are of importance to the healthcare professional. This will include the following topics:
* Searching for information and appraisal skills
* Qualitative methods (questionnaire, focus groups, interviews (structured & unstructured), ethnographic analysis)
* Quantitative assessment and questionnaire design
* Needs assessment - and tools to achieve this
* Requirements analysis
* Modelling - testing hypothesis
* Research statistics
* Audit. The unit leads naturally into the Applied Research Methods Unit in which where students will focus in detail on the appropriate use and evidence for effectiveness of specific methods as applied to their research projects.

FH50003: Knowledge, information & data

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50001 and take FH50002

Aims & Learning Objectives:
* Examine the coding, classification and storage of data with a study of the systems and quality assurance processes that are in place
* Study the implications of storing personal and confidential data and the strategies required in healthcare. On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Explain the principles of data storage and data interpretation
* Critically appraise systems for information management in healthcare including issues of quality assurance
* Advise on the issues of data protection and confidentiality legislation in relation to the electronic healthcare environment.
Content:
In addition to exploring the philosophy of knowledge, this unit explores some of the practical issues encountered throughout healthcare and will enable the student to discuss strategies for the secure management of data. This will include the following topics:
* Derivation and interpretation of information and knowledge
* Data collection in healthcare
* Data quality and Coding
* Data protection, security and confidentiality.

FH50004: Effective communication

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50001 and take FH50002

Aims & Learning Objectives:
* Provide an overview of the theoretical aspects of communication and the process of communication with patients and in healthcare organisations
* Outline the effective use of technology in healthcare communication
* Introduce the concept of data exchange and the importance of standards to facilitate data transfer. On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Distinguish between the main theories of communication and their relevance to communication with patients and colleagues in the healthcare environment
* Analyse the uses of technology for communication in a healthcare environment
* Explain the significance of, and main standards pertaining to, data exchange in healthcare informatics.
Content:
Communication in healthcare ranges from the professional - patient interaction to the silent exchange of data between two computers. This unit explores the full range and the role of communication within a modern healthcare system. This will include the following topics:
* Communication theories and their application in healthcare communication
* Effective use of technology and communication of information through different media
* Data exchange and standards.

FH50005: Remote healthcare

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50001 and take FH50002

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Provide a grounding in the technology used in telemedicine and possible future developments Demonstrate the use of a defined question set to analyse the requirements and planning for a telemedicine service. On completion of this unit students will be able to: Critically analyse the requirements for a remote healthcare service using a structured methodology for resource planning and strategy
* Describe current and analyse possible developments for telemedicine technology.
Content:
Access to healthcare has been highly dependant on distance from a major conurbation, but with the advent of technology and the potential for rapid dissemination of data and information, this dependency is changing. This unit examines the strategy and planning required for the implementation of telemedicine and remote healthcare systems and explores the many issues, political and practical. This will include the following topics:
* Communication systems and networks
* Telemedicine systems and technology
* Virtual consultations
* Resource planning and strategy

FH50006: Clinical systems

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50001 and take FH50002

Aims & Learning Objectives:
* Define key techniques and modelling methodologies for system analysis and design
* Explore the application of decision support systems in patient care
* Outline the development and issues relating to implementation of the EHR. On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Develop, analyse and evaluate a system using modelling techniques
* Evaluate the role and application of decision support in clinical systems to improve patient care
* Discuss the significance of and issues relating to the implementation of the EHR.
Content:
The design and management of systems and processes has led to debate since the beginning of time. Any healthcare environment brings its own unique challenges to the systems designer, and this unit explores how systems in healthcare may be modelled and how systems can be built in to enhance the healthcare process. This will include the following topics:
* System development and analysis using modelling techniques
* Decision support systems
* EHR - longitudinal health record

FH50007: Governance & organisational change

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50001 and take FH50002

Aims & Learning Objectives:
* Define the term governance and explore the history of the process
* Explore the ways in which the healthcare organisation develops and changes and what factors influence this process. On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Define the role of governance in a modern healthcare system
* Analyse the role of audit in the implementation of organisational change
* Develop the concept of healthcare as a "learning organisation".
Content:
Healthcare is provided by a wide range of highly skilled independent healthcare professionals, but of supreme importance is the maintenance of standards, not only within a healthcare unit, but also between units. This unit explores the issues of regulation, risk management and change in practice. This will include the following topics:
* Introduction to clinical governance
* Implications of clinical governance on HI and vice-versa
* Changing practice
* Organisational change
* Risk analysis
* Health process re-engineering
* How informatics enables learning organisation

FH50008: Patient informatics

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50001 and take FH50002

Aims & Learning Objectives:
* Define the concept of the "informed patient" and its relationship to the development of patient informatics
* Define the fundamental aspects of Evidence Based Practice and its contribution to patient care
* Outline the possibilities and issues for using technology to facilitate patient access to information. On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Explain and discuss the elements contributing to the "informed patient"
* Explain the significance of critical appraisal and evaluation of information for evidence based practice
* Analyse the issues related to using technology to integrate information into practice for patient access.
Content:
Patients have increasing access to information from a growing range of sources. How healthcare professionals make their voice heard above the clamour of quackery and how professionals may work with patients to inform them is the main theme of this unit. Moving beyond that, the unit also explores how patients' experiences of healthcare may be improved with better management systems and a greater access to quality information. This will include the following topics:
* Concept of informed patient
* Models of illness
* Access to information
* Assessment of quality
* Patient information systems
* Self help groups
* Compliance to treatment

FH50009: Applied research methods

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50001 and take FH50002 and take FH50003 and take FH50004 and take FH50005 and take FH50006 and take FH50007 and take FH50008 and (take FH50010 or take FH50011)

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To acquire the skills of planning independent research. Students will be able to complete a literature review and write a research proposal. To explore in depth the tools for research, focusing specifically on the project chosen for the project phase of the MSc.
On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Define the most appropriate tools for a given research situation and perform a detailed appraisal
* Critically appraise questionnaire design and structure
* Discuss the merits of qualitative vs quantitative research as tools in healthcare studies.
Content:
It builds on the techniques covered in Unit 2, and linked in with the residential component ensures that the student has the necessary tools and knowledge of their appropriate uses to progress with their research project. This will include the following topics:
* Project management
* Define specific tools according to project that is being created
* Qualitative methods
* Quantitative methods. Students will undertake an original piece of work which will comprise a literature/conceptual review and project or research proposal that may comprise theoretical, empirical or design components. Students completing the Diploma will be assessed on this report. Students progressing to the Masters degree will be assessed and will use this work as the basis for the study in either the Research Dissertation unit or the Work-related Project unit.

FH50010: Human computer interaction

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50001 and take FH50002

Aims & Learning Objectives:
* Introduce aspects of human-computer interaction in healthcare
* Identify HCI aspects of user requirements and systematic processes for their analysis
* Introduce an HCI evaluation approach. On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Define and discuss the significance of human-computer interaction
* Evaluate usability and define user interface requirements using a systematic approach
* Demonstrate understanding of user system requirements and techniques for ensuring user participation in system design.
Content:
HCI theory and methods for:
* User requirements analysis
* User interface design
* Usability evaluation

FH50011: The internet & health

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50001 and take FH50002

Aims & Learning Objectives:
* Identify the key factors that influence e-Commerce in the healthcare environment
* Explore the future directions of e-Health
* Use a theoretical framework for e-learning to explore the process of learning in this context. On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Differentiate the key drivers for the use and development of e-Commerce and it's application to e-Health
* Critically evaluate the usefulness and possible outcome of future developments in e-Health
* Demonstrate understanding of the theoretical aspects of education and their application to e-learning.
Content:
Use of the Internet and access to it are growing throughout the world. How does this link in, what are the effects and what are the benefits to healthcare? How e-commerce is relevant to healthcare and the lessons learned are also discussed in this unit. This will include the following topics:
* E-learning - online, teaching and assessment - the application of theory to online learning
* E-commerce
* E-health

FH50012: Research project

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50009

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide students with the opportunity to carry out an independent research project by putting into practice some of the methods, theories and skills that they have learned. On completion of the Unit students should be able to survey the literature related to a broadly specified area of informatics and present an orderly written survey that places an individual project undertaking in a healthcare context. They should be able to identify the tasks to be completed, plan a scheme of work, and complete the project to the standard expected of a professional in a healthcare function. They should be able to identify the appropriate research methodology, collect data and information as appropriate and critically evaluate this against their research question. They should be able to demonstrate the successful completion of these tasks in a well structured and coherently written dissertation.
Content:
The student will carry out a substantial research project of their own design, in healthcare informatics, under the joint supervision of a practitioner in healthcare informatics and an academic supervisor.

FH50013: Work-based project

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50009

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide students with the opportunity to carry out an independent project of direct relevance to their role within a healthcare organisation by putting into practice some of the methods, theories and skills that they have learned.
Content:
The student will carry out a substantial work-related project of their own design, in healthcare informatics, under the joint supervision of a practitioner in healthcare informatics and an academic supervisor. On completion of the Unit students should be able to survey the knowledge base related to a specified area of informatics within a healthcare context and present an orderly written proposal for an individual project to be undertaken in a healthcare workplace. They should be able to identify the tasks to be completed, plan a scheme of work, and complete the project to the standard expected of a professional in a healthcare function. They should be able to identify the appropriate investigative/research methodology, collect data and information as appropriate and critically evaluate this against their project objectives. They should be able to demonstrate the successful completion of these tasks in a well structured and coherently written project report.

FH50014: Fundamentals

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW ES
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide an understanding of the physiology of normal bone, joint and inflammation and to apply this to explain the pathophysiological process underlying osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Identify population groups at high risk of osteoporosis and to take steps to confirm the diagnosis and treat them in a primary care setting. Define, assess and measure disability in the rheumatic patient and to produce a plan for the management of this disability in the context of a GP-led Primary Care Team. Explain the pathophysiology of pain perception, outline the psychological and experiential components of pain and undertake the assessment, measurement and treatment of pain originating from the muscoloskeletal system.
Content:
* Pathophysiology of the musculoskeletal system, outlining structure of bones and synovial joints and their contribution to the body's stability, support and movement;
* Osteoporosis and metabolic bone disorders, including osteomalacia and Paget's disease, with particular emphasis on bone formation, resorption, the pros and cons of HRT and disease prevention;
* Disability and handicap; the concept of multidisciplinary team in primary care;
* Pain, its physiology and psychology, the theories and concepts in helping patients deal with pain outlining current cognitive and behavioural therapies.

FH50015: Clinical Practice

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW ES
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To understand and assess common rheumatic disorders with an appropriate history, examination and investigation in order to form a working diagnosis and management plan and critically appraise evidence base for treatments of rheumatic disease. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Apply the GALS locomotion examination to the rheumatic disease patient as the basis for clinical assessment for diagnosis. Describe the clinical symptoms and signs which distinguish inflammatory joint disease from other conditions. List the members and describe the function of the GP led primary care team in the care of the rheumatic patient. Outline the main groups of drugs used in arthritis and describe the efficacy, side effects and monitoring programme for each of the currently/commonly used Disease Modifying Anti Rheumatic Drugs to a patient. Describe the key epidemiological factors in osteoarthritis and describe how this information is used in the context of management of that disease. Examine the treatment choices in osteoarthritis and the principles of selecting a patient for joint replacement surgery. Explain the design methodologies and tools commonly used in clinical research, write a research protocol, ethics committee submission and grant application for a clinical research project. Evaluate a published clinical research study and undertake a simple statistical evaluation for research. Describe the audit cycle, the benefits and applications of clinical audit and undertake a complete audit in primary care practice.
Content:
* Rapid screening technique - gait, arms, legs, spine (GALS);
* The multi-skilled health professional team;
* Clinical aspects of osteoarthritis, risk factors, epidemiology, common presenting features and management principles;
* Main groups of drugs used in arthritis;
* Research and audit in General Practice.

FH50016: The Spine

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW ES
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide an understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of back pain in a primary care setting. After taking this unit, the student should be able to: Undertake an evaluation of a patient presenting with low back pain to detect red flags and evidence of serious spinal pathology and to correctly categorise the patient according to the guidelines issued by the Royal College of General Practitioners. Examine all regions of the spine in the assessment of the patient with back and neck pain. Explain the psychosocial aspects of back pain and factors accounting for secondary disability. Evaluate the evidence base for the management of spinal pain and be able to select an appropriate treatment plan for a patient.
Content:
* Functional anatomy and pathology revision outlining current concepts of effects of ageing and injury on spinal structures. Explanation of sources and localisation of spinal pain with discussion of referred pain. Algorithms for differentiating between mechanical low back pain and serious 'red flag' conditions;
* Diagnosis treatment and management of back pain using clinical cases;
* Psychological and occupational barriers. Patient options for acute and chronic mechanical problems, surgery and other interventions for prolapsed intervertebral disc and spinal stenosis.

FH50017: Upper Limb

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW ES
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide an understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of upper limb pain in a primary care setting. After taking this unit, the student should be able to: Undertake an evaluation of a patient presenting with pain to the upper limb. Examine all regions of the upper limb in the assessment of the patient. Evaluate the evidence base for the management of upper limb pain and be able to select an appropriate treatment plan for a patient.
Content:
* Structure and function of the shoulder, outlining an appropriate examination approach in primary care;
* Specific elbow problems frequently encountered in general practice;
* General work or sports-related problems of the upper limb and overuse syndromes, e.g. RSI and work-related upper limb disorders;
* Joint injection techniques.

FH50018: The Lower Limb

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW ES
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide an understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of lower limb pain in a primary care setting. After taking this unit, the student should be able to: Undertake an evaluation of a patient presenting with pain to the lower limb. Examine all regions of the lower limb in the assessment of the patient. Evaluate the evidence base for the management of lower limb pain and be able to select an appropriate treatment plan for a patient.
Content:
* Common hip conditions, e.g. osteoarthritis, groin pain and trochanteric bursitis, disorders of the knee and ankle and management of heel and foot pain;
* Range of normality and common conditions in young babies and children, e.g. congenital hip dislocation. Testing and differentiating between click and chunks, non-accidental injury and common causes of limp in older children;
* Conditions affecting people in their teens and early twenties, mostly activity-related e.g. chondromalacia patellae, Osgood Schlatter diseaes and osteochrondritis dissecans. Common sport and activity related problems in adults.

FH50019: Inflammatory Conditions

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW ES
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide an understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Recognise the clinical features and outline the requirements to make a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Discriminate those clinical and laboratory features indicating active inflammatory synovitis. Formulate a management plan for a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Define the diagnostic features in spondyloarthropathy, the connective tissue diseases, gout, polymyalgia rheumatica and fibromyalgia. Explain the clinical presention and management of children with inflammatory joint diseases.
Content:
* Epidemiology, pathology, diagnostic criteria and presentation patterns in inflammatory arthritis. Difficulties and psychological effects arising from flares of the disease. Suitable drug therapies and the patients care team approach;
* Characteristic features of groups of conditions, e.g. seronegative spondyloarthropathies. Autoimmune Connective tissue disease;
* Polymyalgia rheumatica, gout, fibromyalgia, juvenile chronic arthritis and virus-related arthritis including musculoskeletal conditions possibly associated with rubella, HIV infection, parvovirus and erythema nodosum.

FH50020: Clinical Skills

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Demonstrate the practical application of theoretical knowledge of rheumatology in the primary care setting. After completing this unit the student should be able to: Take a history and conduct a clinical examination of a patient presenting with a musculoskeletal disorder. Assess the situations in which steroid injections should be administered, to identify the site of injection and the method of administration of these injections to the key sites of the upper and lower limbs. Demonstrate appropriate communication skills with patients in eliciting symptoms, and imparting advice and complex information regarding the management of rheumatic disease.
Content:
Attendance at one of each of three residential group teaching sessions provides:
* Examination skills of Upper Limb;
* Examination skills of Lower Limb;
* Examination skills of the Spine;
* Teaching with patients;
* Injection techniques.

FH50032: Injuries and Rehabilitation 1

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: PR EX OR
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50022 and take FH50024 and while taking this unit you must take FH50033 and in taking this unit you cannot take FH50027 or take FH50028

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the management and rehabilitation of sports and training injuries. To acquire knowledge, skills and clinical expertise to practice competently and independently in a primary care setting. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Understand the causes and types of injury to the upper limb and axial skeleton. Take a history and perform a clinical examination. Demonstrate an understanding of mechanism of injury. Indentify and explain sport and training specific injuries. Outline the principles of preventing injury. Demonstrate an understanding of an appropriate rehabilitation programme.
Content:
* Epidemiology of sports and training injuries
* Pathophysiology of inflammation, injury and tissue repair
* Diagnosis and management of regional injuries
* Principles of conservative management of injury and injury prevention
* Treatment modalities
* First Aid and basic life support
* Management of emergencies and sporting trauma
* Non-mechanical pathology of the musculoskeletal system.

FH50033: Injuries and Rehabilitation 2

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: PR EX OR
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50022 and take FH50024 and while taking this unit you must take FH50032 and in taking this unit you cannot take FH50027 or take FH50028

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the management and rehabilitation of sports and training injuries. To acquire skills, knowledge and expertise to practice competently and independently in a primary care setting. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Understand the causes and types of injury to the lower limb. Take a history and perform a clinical examination. Demonstrate an understanding of mechanism of injury. Indentify and explain sport and training specific injuries. Outline the principles of preventing injury. Demonstrate an understanding of an appropriate rehabilitation programme.
Content:
* Epidemiology of sports and training injuries
* Pathophysiology of inflammation, injury and tissue repair
* Diagnosis and management of regional injuries
* Principles of conservative management of injury and injury prevention
* Treatment modalities
* First Aid and basic life support
* Management of emergencies and sporting trauma
* Non-mechanical pathology of the musculoskeletal system

FH50065: Exploring the nature of mental health and well-being

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW50ES40OR10
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aim
To provide a broad introduction to the work of the Mental Health Services and the delivery of mental health practice based on the evidence of what is working for people.
Learning Objectives
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Describe the workings of the NHS and Social Care and set the provision of mental health care services in to a whole systems context (knowledge and understanding)
2. Explain the role of evidence in the provision of mental health care and critically evaluate key sources of evidence (knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
3. Explain the ethical issues that govern working in the mental health services and evaluate their implications for mental health practice (professional practical skill, knowledge and understanding)
4. Assess the primary and secondary care roles for healthcare professionals in delivering mental health and social care (intellectual skill)
5. Reflect on their own practices in their area of work and identify areas for continuous improvement (personal transferable skill)
6. Begin to understand the importance of portfolio building as evidence of learning in both work and educational settings.
Content:
* Introduction to the whole system which provides mental health care and support
* Introduction to working in Mental Health and looking after our own.
* Exploring Work-based learning and research
* To broaden your understanding of Supervision and Accountability
* Evidence based service delivery and critical appraisal, what these mean in working life.
* Understanding the value of networks and networking in getting to the right information.

FH50066: Values and knowledge

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW70ES30
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50065 and while taking this unit you must take FH50067

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aim
To provide a thorough review of the key disease states and conditions that are grouped together as mental health problem areas.
Learning Objectives
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Describe the presentation of a variety of mental health conditions (knowledge and understanding)
2. Appraise and assess the drug and other treatment types/interventions available to mental health practitioners in the care of clients (knowledge and understanding, professional practical skills)
3. Assess the primary and secondary care roles for health and social care professionals in the provision of care for each condition (professional practical skill)
4. Reflect on own practice in this area and identify areas for continuous improvement (personal transferable skill)
5. Examine the values that underpin practice and how to apply this in your work
6. Build a portfolio of evidence for own practice and personal and professional development.
Content:
Each of the following states will be discussed in terms of the symptoms/presentations, appropriate and available therapies and roles of the different health and social care professionals and agencies involved in the provision of care and support:
* Anxiety
* Depression
* Schizophrenia
* Substance misuse
* Eating disorders
* Manic depression and other psychoses.

FH50067: Practice skills

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW80OT20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50065 and while taking this unit you must take FH50066

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aim
To develop and refine the key practice skills used in delivering mental health care and support.
Learning Objectives
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Demonstrate and evaluate the key practice skills needed for providing mental health care and support (professional practical skills, knowledge and understanding)
2. Choose the appropriate practical skill for any given professional situation/ client(s) (knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
3. Reflect on their own practice in this area and identify areas for continuous improvement (personal transferable skill).
Content:
* Counselling and relationship making
* Active listening
* Solution-focused skills
* Psycho-educational skills
* Assessment skills
* Intervention skills
* Appraisal and evaluation skills
* Self help methods.

FH50068: The sports doctor

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:
Aims: The Unit aim is to interpret the role of the sports doctor in a wide variety of sport and exercise medicine contexts by applying theoretical knowledge of primary care sports medicine to the role of the team doctor.
Knowledge and Understanding: After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Discuss the relationship between exercise, health and medicine including the role, benefit and risk of exercise
* Examine the effects of a number of common illnesses on exercise, the effects of exercise in the course of illness and illness that may result from exercise
* Critically analyse the role of the team doctor in the treatment of sports related problems and the prevention and management of injuries.
* Give evidence-based clinical advice to individuals or organisations regarding the effects and management of environmental factors in a variety of sport and exercise contexts.
* Explain the procedures involved in giving initial first aid and managing emergency situations in a range of sport and exercise medicine contexts.
* Explain the particular needs of the disabled, women and children with respect to exercise.
Skills:
On completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Plan and manage their own learning through reflecting on and analysing their own learning needs.
* Integrate and critically evaluate information gathered from a wide range of resources including the unit resource book, text books, journal articles, web pages and other online resources. An appreciation for a hierarchy of evidence should be displayed.
* Communicate effectively with colleagues and tutors through asynchronous online discussions.
Content:
* Exercise, Health and Medicine - effects and risks of exercise and importance of rest in management of medical problems.
* Team Doctor - role and responsibilities
* Effects of the Environment: altitude and pressure/heat and cold - adaptation of the body to temperature changes and the effect on performance and risk of vigorous exercise in these conditions
* Emergency Care - first aid care to acute injuries, head/spinal injuries, basic and advanced life support
* Exercise and Disease - benefits/risks of exercise in diabetes, respiratory and cardiovascular disease, physiological adaptations to high levels of exercise sometimes confused with disease
* Exercise and Disease: viral infections and other medical disorders
* Special groups: the disabled, women and children.

FH50071: Exercise physiology

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to develop a critical appreciation of the physiological adaptations of the body to exercise and the environment and to introduce the principles of physiological assessment of exercise.
Knowledge and Understanding: After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Identify cases of overtraining and justify the diagnosis.
* Advise on appropriate nutrition for sportspeople.
* Discuss the effects of environmental factors on performance.
* Select and justify methods of exercise testing for the assessment of athlete performance.
* Critically evaluate training programmes for men, women and children with reference to how the body adapts to exercise.
* Critically analyse and evaluate physiological data.
* Critically evaluate the effect of exercise on sporting performance
Skills:
On completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Plan and manage their own learning through reflecting on and analysing their own learning needs.
* Integrate and critically evaluate information gathered from a wide range of resources including the unit resource book, text books, journal articles, web pages and other online resources. An appreciation for a hierarchy of evidence should be displayed.
* Communicate effectively with colleagues and tutors through asynchronous online discussions.
Content:
Exercise and muscle function. Mechanisms which resynthesise ATP, physiological responses to exercise in men, women and children, mechanisms of fatigue. Nutrition, training methods and the use of exercise testing. The effects of environmental factors on performance.
* Exercise and muscle - structure of muscle tissue and the physiology of its function, together with a definition of exercise
* Energetics - role of ATP and associated metabolic processes. Mechanisms for fatigue
* Responses to exercise - muscle responses to submaximal and maximal exercises and requirements for effective cardiopulmonary function and endoctrinological responses to exercise. Physiological characteristics of men, women and children
* Adaptations to exercise - cardiopulmonary and metabolic responses to exercise, changes that occur in skeletal muscle and age/sex-linked aspects of adaptation
* Nutrition - principles of a sound diet in relation to athletic needs. Importance of hydration and effectiveness of nutritional supplements
* Training - fitness in context of training and biological markers of overtraining
* Exercise testing - assessments of aerobic and anaerobic capacity. Comparing and interpreting field and laboratory-based tests
* Environmental factors - effects of circadian rhythms on performance and physiological adaptations that take place in extremes of temperature hypo and hyperbaric conditions.

FH50072: The sporting mind

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to develop an understanding of the role of psychology in sport with emphasis on the psychological response of the athlete to injury and 'burnout'.
Knowledge and Understanding: After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Evaluate evidence-based practice in person-centred approaches to helping individual athletes.
* Evaluate how motivation and the effects of stress and anxiety relate to performance.
* Identify and evaluate factors which predispose athletes to injury and which influence the psychological reactions of the athlete to injury.
* Critically analyse how the effectiveness of treatments for injured athletes may be influenced by psychological factors.
* Analyse critically the relationship between team cohesion and performance and apply theories of leadership to the context of sport.
Skills:
On completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Plan and manage their own learning through reflecting on and analysing their own learning needs.
* Integrate and critically evaluate information gathered from a wide range of resources including the unit resource book, text books, journal articles, web pages and other online resources. An appreciation for a hierarchy of evidence should be displayed.
* Communicate effectively with colleagues and tutors through asynchronous online discussions.
Content:
Person-centred approaches and their effectiveness in helping individual athletes. Motivation and the effects of stress and anxiety in relation to performance. Factors which predispose athletes to injury and which influence the psychological reactions of the athlete to injury. The effects of team cohesion on performance and explain theories of leadership in the context of sport.
* Personality and the athlete - how the personality is defined by examining the main themes and methods of measuring personality. Problems and possibilities of research and importance of a person centred approach to athletes.
* Motivation - factors that define motivation and relating knowledge of processes of motivation to rehabilitation. Links between arousal and motivation and the importance of self-belief
* Causal attribution in sport - basic principles of attribution theory and the major research findings in the context of sport. Relevance of theory and research to medical practice
* Stress and anxiety in sport - methods of measurement and effect on performance
* Psychology of injury - psychological factors that predispose to injury, reaction of athlete to injury and the importance of the psychological dimension in rehabilitation
* Psychological preparation of the athlete - strategies to prepare an athlete for performance and discussion of the athlete's needs in development of psychological preparation skills
* Social psychology of sport - psychological background to aggression and how it may be controlled. Development of team cohesion and theories of leadership in sport.

FH50073: Doping, ethics and the law

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to:
* encourage exploration of the motivation for taking performance enhancing and therapeutic substances and the reasons for their control
* provide an up to date reference to current controls relating to performance enhancing and therapeutic substances
* promote discussion of ethical dilemmas and the law as they apply to sport and medicine and the relationship of sport to society and to government.
Knowledge and Understanding: After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Discuss the possible ethical dilemmas between the doctor and others involved in sport and the role of sport in society.
* Critically analyse the relationship between sport and politics and the impact of recent legislation on sport provision with reference to the historical context of drug abuse.
* Explain the consequences of breaking the law that relates to sport and medicine and advise on the appropriate steps to protect both medical practitioners, athletes and patients in law.
* Explain drug testing procedures during the competition and the training period, the penalties and the appeals procedure and the responsibilities of athletes, doctors and coaches.
* Critically interpret the WADA Code and the WADA list of banned substances for the purpose of providing effective medical support for athletes.
Skills:
On completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Plan and manage their own learning through reflecting on and analysing their own learning needs.
* Integrate and critically evaluate information gathered from a wide range of resources including the unit resource book, text books, journal articles, web pages and other online resources. An appreciation for a hierarchy of evidence should be displayed.
* Communicate effectively with colleagues and tutors through asynchronous online discussions.
Content:
Ethical dilemmas between the doctor and others involved in sport, the role of sport in society, the relationship between sport and politics and the impact of recent legislation on sport provision. The law as it relates to sport, the consequences of breaking the law and appropriate steps to protect yourself and your patients in law. The historical abuse of drugs in sport, the current list of banned substances and why they are banned, permitted drugs and signs of drug abuse. Testing procedures during competition and the training period, the penalties, appeals procedure and the responsibilities of athletes, doctors and coaches.
* History and meaning of doping - definition of doping and its history
* Athletes and drugs - reasons why athletes take drugs, clinical signs and symptoms
* Responsibilities - responsibilities of everyone involved in sport to discourage drug use in the interests of good health and fair competition
* Testing procedures - management of testing, in and out of competition, procedure for analysis of samples and implications for a positive rest in terms of sanctions and appeals
* Ethical dilemmas - confidentiality in sports medicine, rights of an individual, conflict between justifiable medical treatment and the doping regulations
* The law and sports medicine - laws of sport and their context within national laws. Professional ethical standards and their enforcement. The doctor-patient relationship and the doctor's responsibility in law
* Core legal issues and administration - legal issues of vicarious liability and misdiagnosis and the need to protect the patient from himself/herself
* Sport and society - sport in the context of politics, national culture, gender, children and social class. Competitive and recreational sport and need for education of sports coaches
* Sports Administration - administration of sport in the UK.

FH50074: Sports injuries

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to develop an understanding of the causes, prevention, diagnosis and investigation of sports injuries.
Knowledge and Understanding: After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Critically analyse the causes and principles of preventing avoidable sports specific injuries with reference to the dynamic stresses of individual sports.
* Select and justify appropriate investigations and clinical examinations to diagnose a sports related injury with reference to the current evidence base.
* Through critical engagement with current research and evidence in practice identify and justify the diagnosis of sports specific injuries with reference to patients' medical history.
Skills:
On completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Plan and manage their own learning through reflecting on and analysing their own learning needs.
* Integrate and critically evaluate information gathered from a wide range of resources including the unit resource book, text books, journal articles, web pages and other online resources. An appreciation for a hierarchy of evidence should be displayed.
* Communicate effectively with colleagues and tutors through asynchronous online discussions.
Content:
The types and causes of injury, examination and history taking of injuries to joints. The dynamic stresses of individual sports. Sport-specific injuries, diagnosis of injury, principles of preventing injury.
* Causes and types of injury - mechanisms of injury including importance of overuse
* The foot - normal foot movement, common problems, possible causes and management.
* The ankle - normal movement and common problems, possible causes and management.
* Shin and Calf - differential diagnosis and possible causes of lower leg pain including stress fractures, tibial-fibular dysfunction, nerve injury and compression
* The knee - differential diagnosis, causes and management of knee pain, including overuse and need to refer for specialist investigation and intervention
* The thigh - quadriceps and hamstring function, flexibility and strength
* The hip - problems related to bursitis, stress factor and adolescent hip conditions and effects of exercise on osteoarthritis
* The groin - adductor problems, disruption of groin and osteitis pubis pelvic stress fractures
* The Head - management of trauma to the head as well as facial and eye injuries
* The lumbar region - anatomical features of the spine with the mechanisms of injury and the common disorders with typical pain patterns
* The shoulder - impingement, instability and inflammation in context of soft tissue anatomy.
* The elbow - overuse , and nature of nerve entrapment syndromes in relation to exercise
* Wrist and hand - fractures to the carpus and nature/management of soft tissue lesions
* Sport-specific injuries - incidence of particular injuries to individual sports.

FH50075: Rehabilitation

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to develop knowledge and understanding of the principles of rehabilitation, their application to the management of sports injuries and in conjunction with or after medical problems.
Knowledge and Understanding: After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Assess the rehabilitation needs of an individual sportsperson, selecting and justifying appropriate investigations and referrals.
* Based upon the available evidence base develop a rehabilitation plan, selecting and justifying the appropriate medical and physical treatments for specific injuries.
* Compare and contrast the roles of the rehabilitation team in implementing a rehabilitation plan.
* Critically evaluate rehabilitation interventions for specific injuries in specific contexts.
* Identify the underlying causes of avoidable injury and advise on the prevention of further injury.
Skills:
On completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Plan and manage their own learning through reflecting on and analysing their own learning needs.
* Integrate and critically evaluate information gathered from a wide range of resources including the unit resource book, text books, journal articles, web pages and other online resources. An appreciation for a hierarchy of evidence should be displayed.
* Communicate effectively with colleagues and tutors through asynchronous online discussions.
Content:
The process of healing in relation to how appropriate rehabilitation measures may be applied. The assessment of soft tissue injury and the principles of physical treatment in rehabilitation, the range of medical and physical modalities and appropriateness of referrals. The advantages and disadvantages of medical treatments, role of complementary therapies, imaging techniques and the identification of appropriate techniques for specific injuries. The underlying causes of avoidable injury and the prevention of further injury. The role of the rehabilitation team.
* Mechanism of injury and nature of collagen tissues - the pathology injury to muscle, ligament and tendon, nature of pain and healing. Objectives of rehabilitation
* Principles of treatment 1-6 - theory and practice of rest, ice, compression and elevation, nature of mobilising techniques in restoring range of movement, muscle strength and proprioception. Use of electromagnetic modalities, massage, mobilisation, manipulation and traction, medical treatments in modifying inflammation/pain. Fracture repair, immobilisation and causes of delayed healing. Benefits and disadvantages of strapping and bracing. Advantages/disadvantages of commonly used complimentary techniques and their relationship to conventional treatments.
* Prevention of injury - elements of fitness, effects of muscle imbalance
* The psychology of injury - injury prone athlete and attitude associated with injury.
* Evaluation of injury - importance of history and, schemes of examination
* Imaging of sports injuries - nature and usefulness of imaging techniques
* The rehabilitation team - importance of medical team approach which is athlete centred
* Rehabilitation of common injuries to specific areas
* Rehabilitation of medical problems - role of exercise programmes.

FH50076: SEM in practice

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: OR70CW30
Requisites:
Aims & Learning Objectives:
This unit aims to provide the student with an opportunity to develop their practice experience and clinical examination skills, to acquire learning through clinical assessment and work-based experience and to study the running of a well-organised sports medicine clinic.
Knowledge and Understanding: After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Demonstrate the ability to practice first aid treatments, basic and advanced resuscitation techniques and the management of a spinal injury for the emergency care of an injured athlete.
* Take a history, select and carry out the appropriate clinical examination for sports related injuries in order to reach a diagnosis, including consideration of the mechanism and causes.
* Assess treatment options and plan rehabilitation for different sports-related problems, including acute conditions.
* Critically analyse sport and exercise medicine related cases with reference to the patient history, make a diagnosis and advise on appropriate investigations and/or referrals.
* Develop an evidence-based management plan for a variety of sport and exercise medicine related conditions making reference to the underlying mechanism and causes.
* Give advice to athletes concerning performance enhancement and injury avoidance.
Skills:
On completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Plan and manage their own learning through reflecting on and analysing their own learning needs.
* Integrate and critically evaluate information gathered from a wide range of resources including the unit resource book, text books, journal articles, web pages and other online resources. An appreciation for a hierarchy of evidence should be displayed.
* Communicate effectively with colleagues and tutors through asynchronous online discussions.
Content:
* A review of the biomechanics of the upper limb, lower limb and spine together with associated clinical examination techniques
* Practice of first aid and life support
* Common sports science evaluations in the laboratory and in the field
* Experience of the work of a sports coach as it applies to the prevention of injury and rehabilitation
* Practice of strapping and massage techniques
* Experience in the application of psychological testing
* The opportunity to introduce and discuss latest developments in sport and exercise medicine
* Experience of evaluating patients in a clinic and formulating a plan for their management
* Experience of sports science evaluations of patients in the laboratory
* Experience of a high level coaching session and the opportunity to further understand the relationship between coach and athlete.

FH50077: Research methods

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: ES100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To acquire the skills of planning independent research. On completion of this unit students will be able to:
* Define the most appropriate tools for a given research situation and perform a detailed appraisal, including , as appropriate comparison of merits of quantative v. qualitative methods
* Critically appraise questionnaire design and structure
* Explore in depth the tools for research, focusing specifically on the project chosen for the project phase of the MSc
* Complete a literature review and write a research proposal.
Content:
The unit ensures that the student has the necessary tools and knowledge of their appropriate uses to progress with their research project. This will include the following topics:
* Project management
* Definition of specific tools according to project that is being created
* Qualitative methods
* Quantitative methods Students will undertake an original piece of work which will comprise a literature/conceptual review and project or research proposal that may comprise theoretical, empirical or design components.

FH50078: Dissertation

Credits: 24
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Demonstrate an ability to collect relevant data on a chosen subject as part of a systematic review and critically analyse the data in relation to the published evidence. Demonstrate an ability to discuss the results and conclusions with regard to the original hypothesis. Demonstrate evidence of critical thinking and appraisal of the data presented. After completing this unit the student should have:
* Identified, reviewed and critically appraised a subject related to sports and exercise medicine.
Content:
The student will carry out a substantial research project of their own design, in sport and exercise medicine, under the joint supervision normally of a practitioner in SEM and an academic supervisor. Required content includes:
* Summary showing clearly stated objectives, appropriate methods, results and conclusions
* Introduction containing aim and background
* Literature Review
* Methodology
* Results -overall description of major and relevant findings
* Discussion -in the context of the aim, summarise major findings, discuss possible problems with the results, compare the results with previously published work, discuss the implications of the findings, suggest future work
* Conclusions -these will be related to the aim and justified by discussions
* References and bibliography.

FH50079: Introduction to practice-based research

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide a broad introduction to philosophy, history and key processes of research.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Describe the historical and philosophical approaches to research generally and research in practice in particular (knowledge and understanding, intellectual skills)
2. Distinguish the different research approaches and/or paradigms available for researchers to use (knowledge and understanding, intellectual skills)
3. Analyse and critically evaluate the different stages of the research process (knowledge and understanding, intellectual skills)
4. Critically evaluate the role of ethics and ethical approval in the research process and identify how this relates to own professional group or practice area (knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
5. Reflect on the process of research in own practice context (professional practical skill, transferable skill)
Skills:
See above and transferable skills:
* participate in online discussion and peer review, making appropriate use of the active learning approach and virtual learning environment
* undertake continuous review of personal development and learning needs whilst working on this unit and the programme.
Content:
* Development of contemporary research thinking
* Research Paradigms
* Key elements of practice based research
* Ethical issues
- Explaining purpose and value of work
- Risk assessment (interviewer and interviewee)
- Confidentiality
- Informed consent
- Data access and ownership
- Ethical versus legal.
* The role of regulation in practice based research
* The process of research: developing research questions, writing a protocol, project management.

FH50082: Evidence based practice in health

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an overview of evidence based practice. To present knowledge and develop competence in searching, accessing and using information relating to health. To critically evaluate the quality of evidence sources that are used in clinical and health practice.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Describe the type and functions of commonly available information resources (knowledge and understanding) and list the types of evidence from an EBM perspective (knowledge and understanding)
2. Critically appraise common types of literature (intellectual skill)
3. Describe and critically appraise the key components of a systematic review (knowledge and understanding)
4. Compare and critically evaluate the use of specialist centres, NHS bodies, the DoH, the pharmaceutical industry, private agencies and other sources in the provision of information for health (knowledge and understanding)
5. Describe and critically evaluate the role of national and international bodies producing reviews (knowledge and understanding, intellectual skill)
6. Reflect on their own interaction with the evidence base and identify areas for continuous improvement (transferable skill).
Skills:
See above.
Content:
* Introduction to evidence based practice
* the type and functions of commonly available information resources (primary, secondary and tertiary printed and electronic literature, including specialist resources)
* the structure, use and limitations of databases (for example Pharmline, Medline, EMBase)
* the content of commonly used web sites (DoH, NICE)
* trial design (patient selection, sample size calculation, blinding, controlling, randomising) and critical appraisal of trials
* Systematic reviews and meta analysis
* Tools of evidence based medicine
* Critical Appraisal
* Searching.

FH50088: Dissertation - masters programme

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: DS90OR10
Requisites:
Aims: To enable students to conduct a piece of independent research and to present their findings as a dissertation.
Learning Outcomes:
After completion of the dissertation the student will be able to:
1. Design a piece of independent study (Knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
2. Follow the process for obtaining ethical approval for research work (professional practical skill)
3. Collect data using appropriate tools and methodologies (knowledge and understanding)
4. Critically analyse data and draw appropriate conclusions/recommendations from these data (intellectual skill)
5. Critically evaluate the literature associated with a given research topic (intellectual skill)
6. Present information in an appropriate format. (personal transferable skill).
Skills:
See above.
Content:
The student will undertake a piece of work which will entail the following stages:
* Project Design
* Ethics Committee Approval
* Instrument/experimental design and piloting
* Data Collection
* Data Analysis
* Preparation of Conclusions
* Presentation of completed dissertation.

FH50089: Short research apprenticeship project

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW80OR20
Requisites:
Aims: To identify, refine and focus a research question, research approach and methodology for a research project and to develop an outline protocol and project plan.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Develop and justify by peer review a research question in an area suitable for conducting discrete research, (Intellectual skill, knowledge and understanding)
2. Prepare a research protocol or project plan which describes the key milestones in the completion of a research project (Intellectual skill, knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
3. Prepare, a research ethics proposal to a suitable and appropriate body (for example LREC, MREC or the School/University Research Ethics Committee), al (intellectual skill, professional practical skill, transferable skill)
4. Complete at least one cycle of a personal development plan and to identify goals in research and continuing professional development (professional practical skill, transferable skill)
5. Reflect on own development as a researcher within the timeframe of the PDP cycle (professional practical skill, transferable skill).
Skills:
See above.
Content:
Any area of health or related research for which an adequate level of supervision can be offered. The nature of the Short Research Apprenticeship Project is that participants 'learn-by-doing', and so they will be expected to demonstrate their ability to define a research question, design and conduct primary research. Although the research project will be on a small scale, students are required to produce a research plan and report, with reflective commentary, that conforms to acceptable standards of presentation.

FH50090: Long research apprenticeship project

Credits: 18
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
While taking this unit you must take FH50079 and take FH50089
Aims: To identify, refine and focus a research question, research approach and methodology for a substantial research project and to develop an outline protocol and project plan.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Develop and justify by peer review a research question in an area suitable for conducting discrete research, (Intellectual skill, knowledge and understanding)
2. Prepare a research protocol or project plan which describes the key milestones in the completion of a research project (Intellectual skill, knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
3. Prepare, a research ethics proposal to a suitable and appropriate body (for example LREC, MREC or the School/University Research Ethics Committee), al (intellectual skill, professional practical skill, transferable skill)
4. Complete at least one cycle of a personal development plan and to identify goals in research and continuing professional development (professional practical skill, transferable skill)
5. Reflect on own development as a researcher within the timeframe of the PDP cycle (professional practical skill, transferable skill) .
Skills:
See above.
Content:
Any area of health or related research for which an adequate level of supervision can be offered. The nature of the Long Research Apprenticeship Project is that participants continue 'learn-by-doing', and so will be expected to demonstrate their ability to define a significant research question, design and conduct primary research. Although the research project will be on a small scale, participants will be expected to demonstrate their ability to define a research question, design and conduct primary research and produce a substantial research report that conforms to acceptable standards of presentation. In addition, participants will be required to include a reflective commentary, which describes their development as a researcher.

FH50091: The policy context for mental health practice

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW60ES40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50065 and take FH50066 and take FH50067 and while taking this unit you must take FH50092 and take FH50093 and take FH50094 and take FH50095
Aims: To enable participants to critically understand the policies that impact on and develop Mental Health Practice.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Critically evaluate and appraise the policy context in which mental health practice is undertaken, and apply this critical knowledge and understanding in their practice context to promote positive change in mental health service delivery (intellectual skill, professional practical skills, knowledge and understanding)
2. Critically appraise the relationship between innovation in practice and the development of policy (intellectual skill, knowledge and understanding)
3. Describe and critique change management theory, including transactional and transformational leadership styles and identify appropriate opportunities to implement this in practice (intellectual skill, knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
4. Describe and evaluate governance and the importance of information management (knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
5. Evaluate and critically discuss the value of care pathways in relation to own area of practice (knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
6. Apply the key components of policy that impact on practice in your practice and reflect on your own practice and identify areas for continuous improvement (personal transferable skill)
Skills:
See above.
Content:
Governance
Whole systems
Law e.g. Mental health Bill; Codes of Conduct
Ethics
Social inclusion
Public participation
Culture
Diversity and equality.

FH50092: Motivation and change

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW70OT30
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50065 and take FH50066 and take FH50067 and take FH50091 and while taking this unit you must take FH50093 and take FH50094 and take FH50095
Aims: To enable participants to understand and develop strategies to promote positive change with individuals, teams and whole systems.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Critically evaluate and appraise the theory related to motivation and personal change (intellectual skill, knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
2. Demonstrate the skills of motivational interviewing in practice (professional practical skill)
3. Demonstrate an understanding of a range of theories related to engagement and therapeutic alliance and an ability to translate this knowledge in to action within own area of practice (intellectual skill, knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
4. Reflect on their own practice and identify areas for continuous improvement (personal transferable skill).
Skills:
See above.
Content:
* Decision making, accountability and responsibility
* Collaboration/cooperation
* Use of language and communication skills
* Andragogy and emancipation
* Resistance
* Engagement
* Interviewing and motivational skills.

FH50093: Research methods for mental health practice

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW80OR20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50065 and take FH50066 and take FH50067 and take FH50091 and take FH50092 and while taking this unit you must take FH50094 and take FH50095
Aims: To provide a thorough grounding in the various research methodologies and planning techniques that are used in practice-based research. To select and use appropriate methodologies in the design of a small-scale research project.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Differentiate/discriminate between the different types of research techniques available to mental health workers and make judgements about their use in particular practice contexts (knowledge and understanding; intellectual skills)
2. Critically evaluate the role of research in mental health practice (intellectual skills)
3. Explain and evaluate the role of evidence in practice (knowledge and understanding)
4. Identify and design a small-scale research project and present the project plan (knowledge and understanding; professional and practical; transferable key skills)
5. Evaluate the ethical issues involved in undertaking research in practice and describe the procedure for seeking ethical approval for research in own area of practice, which may include working with vulnerable people
6. To broaden understanding of the use and meaning of research in the wider world.
Skills:
See above.
Content:
* Introduction to research methods: the research question
* Qualitative research methods
* Quantitative research methods
* Mental health practice and health services research
* Evidence-based practice and critical appraisal: how research informs practice
* Ethical issues in research, research governance and ethics approval of research
* Context.

FH50094: Value based practice, leadership and team working

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW50OT50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50065 and take FH50066 and take FH50067 and take FH50091 and take FH50092 and take FH50093 and while taking this unit you must take FH50095
Aims: To enable participants to understand their own value base and explicitly model this in their practice, leadership and team working activity.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the theory related to value based leadership and practice (intellectual skills, knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
2. Develop a shared vision to promote positive change within own place of work (professional practical skill)
3. Demonstrate an understanding of own values and how these relate to own practice and leadership style (knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
4. Reflect on their own values (personal transferable skill)
5. Demonstrate positive changes for people you work with and model an effective team member/leader (professional practical skill).
Skills:
See above.
Content:
* Interviewing skills
- authenticity
- creative communication
- empathic listening
* Promoting positive risk-taking
* Assertiveness
* Delegation and accountability
* Tools and techniques
* Exploring values
* Leadership and team working.

FH50095: Promoting recovery and hope

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW90OT10
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take FH50065 and take FH50066 and take FH50067 and while taking this unit you must take FH50091 and take FH50092 and take FH50093 and take FH50094
Aims: To enable participants to work in partnership, to promote hope and optimism, towards a valued life-style and beyond the limits of any mental health problem.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Describe, critically evaluate and demonstrate in practice an understanding of complexity theory and an ability to work within complex systems (intellectual skills, knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
2. Demonstrate in practice an ability to work in partnership and make a difference (knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
3. Reflect on their own values and utilise this reflection to develop practice. (personal transferable skill).
Skills:
See above.
Content:
* Diversity
* Strengths-based assessment
* Charting relationships
* Challenging inequality
* Health promotion.

FH50096: Major dissertation

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aim - To enable students to conduct a piece of independent research and to present their findings as a dissertation.
Learning Objectives - After completion of the dissertation the student will be able to:
1. Design a piece of independent study (Knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
2. Follow the process for obtaining ethical approval for research work (professional practical skill)
3. Collect data using appropriate tools and methodologies (knowledge and understanding)
4. Critically analyse data and draw appropriate conclusions/recommendations from these data (intellectual skill)
5. Critically evaluate the literature associated with a given research topic (intellectual skill)
6. Present information in an appropriate format. (personal transferable skill).
Content:
The student will undertake a piece of work which will entail the following stages:
* Project Design
* Ethics Committee Approval
* Instrument/experimental design and piloting
* Data Collection
* Data Analysis
* Preparation of Conclusions
* Presentation of completed dissertation.

FH50105: Research design and methods

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an outline of the key approaches to designing qualitative, quantitative and mixed method research projects and give a comprehensive review and discussion of the key research methods used in practice based research in health.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Describe and critically review the key issues in research project design (knowledge and understanding, intellectual skill)
2. Determine the appropriate research design to use in different contexts across the research continuum and critically discuss their use (knowledge and understanding, intellectual skill)
3. Describe, critically distinguish and review the key research methods used in health research (knowledge and understanding, intellectual skill)
4. Determine the appropriate sampling approach to use in different contexts and critically discuss their use (knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
5. Determine the appropriate data collection technique to use in different contexts and designs, and critically discuss their use (knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
6. Determine the appropriate data analysis technique to use in different contexts and designs, and critically discuss their use (knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
7. Evaluate the different sorts of quality criteria applied to research in health (knowledge and understanding, intellectual skill)
8. Critically discuss ethical implications which arise in research project design (knowledge and understanding, intellectual skill)
9. Critically reflect on the use of different research methodologies in the conduct of different types of practice based research (professional practical skill, transferable skill).
Skills:
See above and Transferable Skills:
* participate in online discussion and peer review, making appropriate use of the active learning approach and virtual learning environment
* undertake continuous review of personal development and learning needs whilst working on this unit and the programme.
Content:
* The research continuum
* Theoretical traditions underpinning research
* Approaches to research
-Historical approach
-Survey Approach
-Descriptive Studies
* Experimental designs
* Observational designs
* Sampling approaches
* Data collection techniques
-Observation
-Questioning
-Measurement
* Analysis and Interpretation
-complexity of analysing data
-Describe and discriminate between different approaches to data analysis and interpretation
-Descriptive statistics
-Discourse analysis, narrative analysis, ethnographic analysis, phenomenological approaches, interpretive approaches
-Mixed methods in health research (review)
-Triangulation
* Quality and credibility of research
-Reliability, validity, sensitivity, generalisability and objectivity
-Meta evaluation
* Ethical Issues.

FH50106: The anatomy and biomechanics of movement

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: OT100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
The unit aim is to develop a comprehensive understanding of functional anatomy and biomechanics in the context of exercise and sport in the able-bodied and disabled population/exerciser/athlete.
Knowledge and Understanding - After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Critically analyse and compare movements with respect to their functional anatomy and the biomechanical principles involved.
* Discuss the functional anatomy of the upper limb, lower limb and spine and interpret how mechanical and physiological principles affect the type and range of movement in these body regions.
* Critically analyse the anatomical and biomechanical factors associated with the stability of the major joints and the body as a whole.
* Apply the principles of functional anatomy and biomechanics to the critical analysis of selected sport and exercise movements and their relationship to injury.
Skills:
On completion of this unit students should be able to:
* Plan and manage their own learning through reflecting on, and analysing, their own learning needs.
* Integrate and critically evaluate information gathered from a wide range of resources including the unit resource book, text books, journal articles, web pages and other online resources. An appreciation for a hierarchy of evidence should be displayed.
* Communicate effectively with colleagues and tutors through asynchronous on-line discussions.
Content:
The bones and joints in the human skeleton, the anatomy and range of movement of the elbow and the muscles and movement around the thigh. Different types of muscles and tendons, joints muscles and movement of the shoulder and the articulations at the tibiofibular joints and the ankle joint. The regions of the vertebral column where movements occur, muscles producing movement in the forearm, wrist and hand and the muscles and ligaments of the knee joint. Causes of nerve compression and typical sites of entrapment.
The mechanical principles of joint stability, the process of muscular force development and the differences between open and closed kinetic chain exercises. Different types of muscle contraction, the different types of movement possible and mechanical laws affecting human movement. Application of the principles of human movement to the analysis of walking and running gait and to the analysis of kicking and throwing. The unit is sub-divided into the following sections:
1. Basic Principles of Movement
2. Axial Skeleton- Spine and Core Stability
3. Axial Skeleton- The Head and Neck
4. Axial Skeleton- Nervous System
5. Lower Limb- Hip and Pelvis
6. Lower Limb- The Knee
7. Lower Limb- Ankle and Foot
8. Upper Limb- Shoulder
9. Upper Limb- Elbow to the Hand

FH60083: Research project preparation and planning

Credits: 12
Level: Doctoral
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW80OR20
Requisites:
Aims: To identify, refine and focus the research question, research approach and methodology of each individual&ęs research project and to develop an outline protocol and project plan.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Develop and defend by peer review a research question in an area suitable for conducting discrete research, and capable of enabling individual and novel contribution to the body of knowledge in this area (Intellectual skill, knowledge and understanding)
2. Prepare a research protocol or project plan which describes the key milestones in the completion of a novel research project (Intellectual skill, knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
3. Prepare, peer review and defend a research ethics proposal to a suitable and appropriate body (for example LREC, MREC or the School/University Research Ethics Committee), such that it is capable of attaining such approval (intellectual skill, professional practical skill, transferable skill)
4. Complete at least one cycle of a personal development plan and to identify goals in research and continuing professional development (professional practical skill, transferable skill)
5. Reflect on own development as a researcher within the timeframe of the PDP cycle (professional practical skill, transferable skill)
6. Participate in discussion and debate about developments at the forefront of health policy and practice (intellectual skill, professional practical skill).
Skills:
See above.
Content:
* Developing your research question
- Population, intervention, outcome
* Thinking about your sample
* Preliminary ideas on data collection
* Reporting your early ideas
* Producing a project plan and research protocol
* Obtaining necessary regulatory and ethical approvals
* Communicating and Presenting research ideas
* Skills for the competent researcher
- Learning Needs and PDPs
- Reflection on Practice
- Project Planning
- Presentation Skills
- Bibliographic and IT skills
- Ethical and legal issues
* Contemporary Issues in Health (expert witnesses).

FH60084: Professional issues in health 1 - policy

Credits: 12
Level: Doctoral
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Critically examine a relevant policy issue from a range of theoretical and practice-based perspectives (Intellectual Skill)
2. Determine the relevant literature on which such policy issues are based and critically appraise its significance in the development, and evolution, of policy (Knowledge and Understanding, Intellectual Skill)
3. Assess the impacts of the policy in service development and delivery (Knowledge and Understanding, Intellectual Skill)
4. Identify and articulate revisions and/or amendments to the policy in the light of your own experience in practice, thus contributing to the development of policy in your practice area (Intellectual Skill, Professional Practical Skill, transferable skill)
Skills:
See above.
Content:
Precise content for the Unit will be negotiated with the Director of Studies or Supervisory panel. Contributions from Expert Witnesses.

FH60085: Professional issues in health 2 - practice

Credits: 12
Level: Doctoral
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide a
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Critically examine a relevant practice issue from a range of theoretical and practice-based perspectives (Intellectual Skill)
2. Determine the relevant literature on which such practice issues are based and critically appraise its significance in the development, and evolution, of policy (Knowledge and Understanding, Intellectual Skill)
3. Assess the impacts of this practice issue in service or professional development and delivery (Knowledge and Understanding, Intellectual Skill)
4. Identify and articulate revisions and/or amendments to the practice or protocol in the light of your own experience in practice, thus contributing to the development of policy in your practice area (Intellectual Skill, Professional Practical Skill, transferable skill).
Skills:
See above.
Content:
Precise content for the Unit will be negotiated with the Director of Studies or Supervisory Panel. Contributions from Expert Witnesses.

FH60086: Research project design and development

Credits: 12
Level: Doctoral
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: CW80OR20
Requisites:
Aims: To provide a framework for the ongoing development of the individual's research project.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Refine and further develop the individual research question and present the outline of your developing ideas to peers (Intellectual skill, knowledge and understanding, transferable skill)
2. Maintain and amend a research protocol or project plan which describes the continuing key milestones in the completion of a novel research project (Intellectual skill, knowledge and understanding, professional practical skill)
3. Prepare an outline literature review for the area of your interest and summarise the key findings that impact upon your research question (intellectual skill)
4. Complete at least one cycle of a personal development plan and to identify goals in research and continuing professional development (professional practical skill, transferable skill)
5. Critically review and comment on the research designs and plans of other students and respond to comments and suggestions made by other participants on your own project proposals
6. Reflect on own development as a researcher within the timeframe of the PDP cycle (professional practical skill, transferable skill)
7. Participate in discussion and debate about developments at the forefront of health policy and practice (intellectual skill, professional practical skill).
Skills:
See above.
Content:
* Developing your research question
* Valuing literature and the meaning of data
* Communicating and Presenting research ideas
* Discussion of current service developments
* Skills for the competent researcher
- Teaching skills
- Communication skills
- Team working.

FH60087: Thesis for professional doctorate

Credits: 198
Level: Doctoral
Modular: no specific semester
Assessment: DS80OR20
Requisites:
Aims: To develop and complete an independent piece of work from initial design through to data collection, analysis, discussion and critical evaluation and ultimately, through publication.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the unit the student will be able to:
1. Design and obtain the necessary ethical approvals to conduct a piece of independent and novel research (professional practical skill)
2. Create and interpret new knowledge through original research, or other advanced scholarship of a quality to satisfy peer review, extend the forefront of their practice and merit publication (intellectual skill)
3. Conceptualise design and implement a project for the generation of new knowledge applications or understanding at the forefront of their practice and to adjust the project design in the light of unforeseen problems (intellectual skill, professional practical skill)
4. Exercise personal responsibility and largely autonomous initiative in complex and unpredictable situations in professional or equivalent environments (intellectual skill, professional practical skill)
5. Present their findings in a concise and cogent thesis and defend their argument in a viva voce examination (transferable skill).
Skills:
See above.
Content:
Negotiated with supervisory team and skills for the competent researcher:
* Exploitation of research and IPR
* Research management.

 

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