Text only

 University | Catalogues for 2005/06 | for UGs | for PGs

University of Bath logo - link to University home page
 

 

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Unit Catalogue 2005/06


ME10001: Experimentation, engineering skills & applied engineering

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW 15%, CW 15%, CW 15%, CW 15%, CW 15%, CW 15%, CW 10%
Requisites:
Aims:
* Consolidate the written and graphical presentation of experimental data. Understand uncertainty in experimental measurements.
* Provide an appreciation of practical engineering skills.
* Introduce students to computer aided design.
* Use of word processors, spreadsheets, databases and the world wide web.
* To integrate engineering science and applications within the different engineering disciplines.
* To offer an insight into challenging and interesting topics within engineering.
* To provide students with an insight into different branches of engineering offered in the MEng programme.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Interpret and communicate experimental results with analysis in a precise format.
* Recognise and model potential observed uncertainty in engineering problems.
* Carry out simple design tasks using CAD.
* Search for information in online databases and the web.
* Apply engineering science to engineering problems.
* Appreciate the relevance of engineering science in the context of their application to engineering.
* Understand the focus of the different branches of engineering and their interrelationships.
* Make a more informed decision about the branch of engineering in which they chose to specialise.
Skills:
Written communication; oral communication; data acquisition, handling and analysis; working independently; working as part of a group.
Content:
Interpretation and communication of experimental results and analysis. Experimental and measurement techniques. Uncertainty in engineering problems. Workshop skills. Oral presentation to small group. History of technology. The Institutions. The business as a system. Business structures and the influence of the size and ownership. Concepts of value added. Aircraft wing design. Automotive engine design. Computer controlled manufacture. Product design. Manufacturing systems concepts.

ME10002: Mathematics 1

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW 10%, EX 90%
Requisites:
Aims:
* To reinforce algebra and calculus skills.
* To introduce basic concepts with which the students may not be familiar.
* To provide a mathematical underpinning for subsequent work.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Handle circular and hyperbolic functions. Differentiate and integrate elementary functions. Use partial differentiation and complex numbers, vectors and matrices. Be able to sketch curves and use information from the calculus to analyse critical points. Use polar as well as cartesian co-ordinate systems.
Skills:
Numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Algebraic manipulation and roots of polynomials. Standard functions (sine, cosine, exponential, logarithm, trigonometric identities). Differentiation (derivative of a sum, product, quotient, function of a function, implicit, tangent, and normal to a curve, maxima, minima, points of inflexion). Partial fractions. Integration (use of partial fractions and substitution, integration by parts, areas and volumes of revolution). Curve sketching. Taylor and binomial expansions. Arithmetical and geometrical progressions. Polar co-ordinates. complex numbers. Introduction to vectors and matrices. Further methods of differentiation and integration; partial differentiation.

ME10003: Thermofluids 1

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX 100%
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce the student to the concepts and basic equations of thermodynamics.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Understand the basic concepts of thermodynamics. Apply the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics to engineering problems.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Introduction and definitions of thermodynamics; properties; work and heat transfer; Equation of state for a perfect gas. First law of thermodynamics, non-flow and steady flow energy equations. Second law of thermodynamics and entropy. Thermodynamic cycles and heat engines, standard air cycles.

ME10004: Solid mechanics 1

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX 100%
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce the fundamental principles of statics, kinematics and dynamics as applied in an engineering context. To develop judgement in system description and modelling.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand the nature of statical determinacy and free body diagrams. Analyse pin-jointed frames.
* Formulate and solve equations of motion.
* Apply Newton's laws to problems of non-constant acceleration. Calculate work done by forces and torques.
* Understand power, efficiency, kinetic and potential energy of a mechanical system.
* Calculate stresses and strains for simple cases of loading and displacement.
* Analyse problems of rotational and combined motion.
Skills:
Numeracy; problem solving; working independently.
Content:
Statical determinacy; free body diagrams; pin-jointed frames; tension coefficients. Free body systems in dynamics; friction; Newton's laws; non-constant acceleration; energy and momentum. Stress and strain; statical indeterminacy; torsion. Rotational motion; moments of inertia; combined motion; geared systems.

ME10006: Design materials & manufacturing 1

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW 40%, CW 10%, CW 10%, CW 5%, EX 35%
Requisites:
Aims:
* To introduce students to the concept of the design process and visual thinking.
* To introduce basic manufacturing processes
* To show the link between design and manufacture.
* To develop self-instructional learning skills.
* To become familiar with engineering artefacts and processes
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Produce and interpret engineering drawings for manufacture and assembly.
* Make freehand engineering sketches.
* Understand the processes of machining, forming and joining and the heat treatment of metals.
* Select from an extending range of traditional manufacturing processes.
* Use a workbook approach for self-learning.
Skills:
Problem solving; written communication; working as part of a group; leadership.
Content:
Machining, forming, heat treatment, mechanical joints, liquid phase joints. British Standards. Sketching. Dimensioning. Tolerancing. Layouts. Orthogonal, Isometric projections.

ME10009: Thermofluids 2

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW 15%, EX 85%
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10003
Aims: To introduce the student to more basic equations of fluid mechanics and to apply the equations to engineering problems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand the basic concepts of fluid mechanics.
* Apply the continuity, momentum and Bernoulli&s equations to engineering problems.
* Use dimensional analysis.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Stress and viscosity; fluid statics; pressure, forces and moments; fluid kinematics; continuity equation; Bernoulli equation; Bernoulli equation with losses and external work; momentum equation for a control volume; dimensional analysis and similarity; introduction to Flight. Thermofluids laboratory experiment.

ME10010: Solid mechanics 2

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW 15%, EX 85%
Requisites:
Aims:
* To promote further understanding of the fundamental principles of mechanics.
* To introduce engineering bending theory.
* To apply principles of dynamical modelling to different rotating and reciprocating machines.
* To introduce concepts of stress and strain transformation.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Calculate shear forces, bending moments and deflections in beams. Determine the stress and strain states of simple structural forms; manipulate stress and strain transformation equations, and understand Mohr's circle. Analyse the state of balance of a system comprising rotating masses, and determine effects of unbalance. Analyse the motion of a rigid body in space using vector analysis. Calculate velocities and accelerations in a linkage mechanism.
Skills:
Numeracy; problem solving; working independently.
Content:
Simple bending theory. Torque transmission/shear stress: clutches; belt drives. Balancing of rotating masses: flywheels; rotating and reciprocating machines. Slope and deflection of beams. Stress transformations and Mohr's circle. Pressure vessels. Introduction to spatial dynamics and degrees of freedom. Vector methods and theory of gyroscopes. Analysis of linkage mechanisms. Solid Mechanics laboratory experiment.

ME10012: Design materials & manufacturing 2

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW 25%, CW 25%, CW 10%, CW 5%, EX 35%
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10006
Aims:
* To introduce the component elements of design.
* To enable the student to become acquainted with the basic principles of design, and the design process.
* To provide fundamental knowledge about metals, their structure and properties.
* To provide a holistic view of the process and decisions to be taken in real design problems.
* To become familiar with engineering artefacts and processes.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Analyse, select and integrate standard components into detailed designs. Develop a partial requirement specification from a design brief. Analyse a problem and select a solution from a range of alternatives. Produce detailed drawings of components to ensure that they perform the desired function and can be manufactured. Define the key mechanical properties of metals. Compare and contrast some of the common metals used for engineering manufacture. Explain how the mechanical properties of metals can be related to their microstructure. Identify the features and limitations of various processes.
Skills:
Problem solving; written communication; working as part of group.
Content:
The design process; principles of design; Elements: springs, bearings, seals, fixing and fastening systems, power transmission systems. Electric motors. Design & Make Activities. Study guide. Introduction to manufacturing. Mechanical properties of metals. Selection of materials. Microstructure. Casting. Alloys.

ME10130: Experimentation, engineering skills & applied engineering with French

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW 24%, CW 23%, CW 23%, CW 15%, CW 15%
Requisites:
Aims:
* Consolidate the written and graphical presentation of experimental data. Understand uncertainty in experimental measurements.
* Provide an appreciation of practical engineering skills.
* Introduce students to computer aided design.
* Use of word processors, spreadsheets, databases and the world wide web.
* To integrate engineering science and applications within the different engineering disciplines.
* To offer an insight into challenging and interesting topics within engineering.
* To provide students with an insight into different branches of engineering offered in the MEng programme.
* To introduce students to technical vocabulary in the French language.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Interpret and communicate experimental results with analysis in a precise format.
* Recognise and model potential observed uncertainty in engineering problems.
* Carry out simple design tasks using CAD.
* Search for information in online databases and the web.
* Apply engineering science to engineering problems.
* Appreciate the relevance of engineering science in the context of their application to engineering.
* Understand the focus of the different branches of engineering and their interrelationships.
* Make a more informed decision about the branch of engineering in which they chose to specialise.
* Explain the working of simple physical phenomena in French. Read and understand simple technical texts in French.
Skills:
Written communication; oral communication; data acquisition, handling and analysis; working independently; working as part of a group; communicating in the French language.
Content:
Interpretation and communication of experimental results and analysis. Experimental and measurement techniques. Uncertainty in engineering problems. Workshop skills. Oral presentation to small group. History of technology. The Institutions. The business as a system. Business structures and the influence of the size and ownership. Concepts of value added. Aircraft wing design. Automotive engine design. Computer controlled manufacture. Product design. Manufacturing systems concepts. Technical language.

ME10132: Experimentation, engineering skills & applied engineering with German

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW 24%, CW 23%, CW 23%, CW 15%, CW 15%
Requisites:
Aims:
* Consolidate the written and graphical presentation of experimental data. Understand uncertainty in experimental measurements.
* Provide an appreciation of practical engineering skills.
* Introduce students to computer aided design.
* Use of word processors, spreadsheets, databases and the world wide web.
* To integrate engineering science and applications within the different engineering disciplines.
* To offer an insight into challenging and interesting topics within engineering.
* To provide students with an insight into different branches of engineering offered in the MEng programme.
* To introduce students to technical vocabulary in the German language.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Interpret and communicate experimental results with analysis in a precise format.
* Recognise and model potential observed uncertainty in engineering problems.
* Carry out simple design tasks using CAD.
* Search for information in online databases and the web.
* Apply engineering science to engineering problems.
* Appreciate the relevance of engineering science in the context of their application to engineering.
* Understand the focus of the different branches of engineering and their interrelationships.
* Make a more informed decision about the branch of engineering in which they chose to specialise.
* Explain the working of simple physical phenomena in German. Read and understand simple technical texts in German.
Skills:
Written communication; oral communication; data acquisition, handling and analysis; working independently; working as part of a group; communicating in the German language.
Content:
Interpretation and communication of experimental results and analysis. Experimental and measurement techniques. Uncertainty in engineering problems. Workshop skills. Oral presentation to small group. History of technology. The Institutions. The business as a system. Business structures and the influence of the size and ownership. Concepts of value added. Aircraft wing design. Automotive engine design. Computer controlled manufacture. Product design. Manufacturing systems concepts. Technical language.

ME10138: Mathematics for Electrical Engineering 1

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: This is the first of two first year units intended to lead to confident and error free manipulation and use of standard mathematical functions and relationships in the context of engineering mathematics. Proofs, where introduced, are of a constructive kind, i.e. they are examples of useful and standard methods of wide applicability in the technical problems of communication, control, electronics and power systems. The unit will consolidate and extend topics met at A-level, so that students may improve their fluency and understanding of applicable mathematics. Tutorial sessions will be conducted to enable students to develop solving skills and their mathematical intuition.
Learning Outcomes:
Fluency in the basic concepts of calculus, complex numbers, ordinary differential equations and matrix manipulations. An understanding of the meaning of Fourier Series and how to determine Fourier Series representations of periodic functions.
Skills:
As 'Learning Outcomes' but also includes (i) error-free manipulation, (ii) logical and tidy presentation of mathematical arguments and (iii) the avoidance of slovenly constructs such as the double negative.
Content:
Complex numbers: Definition, conjugate, addition, multiplication and division, modulus and argument, polar form, solution of quadratic equations, De Moivre's theorem, roots. Differentiation: Definition as a limiting process, standard differential of products and quotients, function of a function rule, maxima, minima and critical points, parametric differentiation. Integration: Definition, inverse of differentiation, standard integrals, use of substitution, use of partial fractions, integration by parts, mean and RMS. Matrices and vectors: Definition of matrix, addition and compatibility, multiplication (definition and why), definition of determinant, solution of linear systems using Cramer's rule, Gauss-Jordan and Gaussian Elimination (comparative speed of algorithms). Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations: Categorisation of ODEs (order, linear/nonlinear, IVP/BVP), Separation of Variables and Integrating factor for 1st order ODEs, solution of higher order equations with constant coefficients using Particular Integrals and Complementary Functions, Cauchy-Euler equations, systems of linear equations. Fourier Series: Definition and interpretation, use of symmetries of functions, solution of ODE systems.

ME10139: Mathematics for Electrical Engineers 2

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10138
Aims: This is the second of two first year units intended to lead to confident and error free manipulation and use of standard mathematical functions and relationships in the context of engineering mathematics. Proofs, where introduced, are of a constructive kind, i.e. they are examples of useful and standard methods of wide applicability in the technical problems of communication, control, electronics and power systems. The unit will consolidate and extend topics met at A-level, so that students may improve their fluency and understanding of applicable mathematics. The topics covered are Laplace Transforms, Probability, Statistics, Sequences and Series, three-dimensional vectors.
Learning Outcomes:
Confident and accurate mastery of the above topics. Ability to think within and around the topics.
Skills:
Ability to apply the techniques of Laplace Transforms, Probability, Statistics, Sequences and Series, three-dimensional vectors correctly.
Content:
Laplace Transforms: Definition, properties, transforms of common functions, transforms of derivatives, inverse transforms, solutions of ODEs. Probability and Statistics: Simple probability, compound events, complementary events, independent events, addition and multiplication laws. Probability density function, cumulative distribution, discrete and continuous variables, binomial distribution, Gaussian distribution. Sequences: Definition, explicit form and recurrence relations, limits, arithmetic and geometric progressions, solution of recurrence relations. Series: Sums of series, Binomial expansions, Taylors series, D'Alembert's convergence test, radius of convergence. Vectors: Definition, sum, modulus, unit vector, scalar and vector products, co-planarity and independence, scalar triple product, equations of lines and planes, distances between points and lines, points and planes, and between lines.

ME10144: Fluid mechanics 1

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take AR10059

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To give students a knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics. Objectives: By the end of the course, the student should be able to:
* determine hydrostatic forces
* relate viscosity to buoyancy in considering the settlement of particles
* describe the principles and practice of pressure measurement
* understand the basic principles of fluid flow and the analysis of different types of flow
Content:
Properties of fluids Hydrostatics Forces on submerged surfaces Bouyancy and stability Hydrodynamics Bernoulli Equation Applications of Bernoulli Momentum Equation Hagen-poiseuille Laminar/Turbulent Flow Pipe friction, losses

ME10232: Materials science 1 (EG10040)

Credits: 3
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop a lively interest in the available range of building materials, founded on an understanding of their microstructure and properties and their practical advantages and limits.
Content:
Building materials. Resources, usage and cost.. Mechanical properties; stress, strain, strength stiffness, strain energy, toughness. Bonding and Packing of Atoms The periodic table. Primary (ionic, covalent, and metallic) and secondary (dipolar) bonding. Packing of equal and unequal size atoms. Imperfections in crystals. Point and line defects, grain boundaries. Metals and Alloys Iron and steel; phase diagram for Fe-C system, Heat treatment of steels. Alloy steels. Other metals. Glass, Ceramics and Concrete Glass structure, composition. and properties. Volume-temperature relationships. Traditional and engineering ceramics. Sheet silicates. Clay bodies. Manufacture of cement. Special cements. Setting and strength of concrete. Stone as a building material. Polymeric Material and Wood Polymerisation. Amorphous and crystalline polymers. Thermosets and thermoplastics. Structure and deformation of the wood cell. Properties of timber and its products.

ME10285: Instrumentation, electronics & electrical drives

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW 15%, CW 15%, CW 24%, CW 23%, CW 23%
Requisites:
Aims:
* To provide an introduction to measurement, instrumentation and signal processing.
* To provide an introduction to electromagnetic actuation systems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Match an indicating instrument or data recorder to a given signal source and estimate the accuracy of the indicated output.
* Select a suitable transducer type for a particular measurement application.
* Describe the shielding and guarding techniques that are necessary to keep extraneous signals in the environment from affecting the signals in a measurement system.
* Understand the basic amplification circuits used for instrumentation.
* Understand the basic operation of DC motors, stepper motors and three phase induction motors, including speed control and starting methods.
* Select appropriate drives for simple applications.
(i) understand the characteristics of elementary AC circuits and components.
(ii) be able to use strain gauges, LVDTs, accelerometers and capacitance transducers.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; written communication; working independently.
Content:
Transducers, strain gauges,: operating principles, characteristics, selection based on application requirements. Measurement of voltage, current and resistance. Use of bridge circuits. Matching of instruments to signal sources. Thevenin's theorem. Explanation of concepts of accuracy, systematic and random errors, noise, linearity and repeatability of measurements. Signal amplification; amplifier types, signal buffers and instrumentation amplifiers.. Brief description of guarding and shielding techniques. A-D conversion, data presentation. Electromagnetic energy conversion - electromagnetic induction, Faraday's and Ampere's laws. Operating characteristics of stepper, DC, brushless and induction motors. Rated motor data and voltage-speed-torque-current-power relationships. Starting and speed control of motors. Power electronic converters and their use for speed control. Elements of AC theory, capacitors and inductors, mutual inductance, transformers. The linearly variable differential transformer (LVDT) application and associated instrumentation. Capacitance transducers. Accelerometers. Amplifier errors and drift. AC characteristics, band-width, signal-to-noise ratio. Electrical noise, AC bridges, advantages of narrow bandwidth amplification and detection. Resonant circuits.

ME20013: Systems & control

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX85PR15
Requisites:
Aims:
* To examine the behaviour of a variety of physical systems commonly used in control applications.
* To develop an understanding of the operational behaviour of control systems, this to allow the application of classical control theory to system analysis and design.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Predict the behaviour of simple control systems.
* Determine a control system's frequency response and stability characteristics.
* Improve steady state and dynamic performance using compensation techniques.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
System modelling. Open and closed loop control. Block diagram representation. Block diagram manipulation. Transfer functions and Laplace notation. Transient performance of simple systems. System errors. Frequency response representation of systems. Bode diagrams. System stability assessment techniques. System identification. Compensation techniques. Control laboratory experiment.

ME20014: Modelling techniques 1

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Aims:
* To continue to develop algorithm design and programming techniques in C++.
* To acquire a large variety of numerical and mathematical techniques to be used for those engineering problems modelled in terms of ODEs.
* To provide a strong mathematical and computational foundation for solving equations arising in the modelling of engineering systems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand how the various standard ordinary differential equations (ODEs) arise in engineering.
* Understand and use numerical techniques in the solution of such ODEs.
* Understand and apply the techniques of Fourier series and Laplace transforms to ODEs.
* Understand the use of object orientation and its relation to C++ classes.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Numerical solution of ordinary differential evolution equations using Euler's method and the Runge-Kutta methods, including reduction to first order form and numerical stability analysis. Numerical solution of two-point ordinary differential boundary value problems using a direct method (the tridiagonal matrix algorithm and an indirect method (the shooting method). Local and Global Truncation Errors: choosing a suitable numerical method and the improvement of accuracy. Translating engineering problem statements in English into ODEs, and hence into C++ software. C++ classes, private and public member data and functions, constructors and destructors and their relationship with memory management, data hiding, and Fourier Series and Laplace transforms.

ME20015: Thermofluids 3

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX85OT15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10009
Aims: To develop the students ability to apply the principals of thermodynamics, heat transfer to problems of engineering importance.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Understand the thermodynamic principles, characteristics of gas turbines, steam turbines and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) cycles, together with related energy conservation and environmental issues. Solve simple heat transfer problems (including steady-state and trained conduction in solids, convection, radiation, and the design of heat exchangers).
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
THERMODYNAMICS Steam plant: superheating, reheating, CHP and combined cycles. Gas turbines and jet engines: intercooling, reheating and introduction to jet propulsion. Introduction to emissions and the environment.
HEAT TRANSFER: Heat conduction: steady-state and transient conduction in solids (including composite slabs and cylinders). Convective heat transfer: dimensional analysis and empirical correlations. Introduction to radiation. Heat exchangers: design using the LMTD method. Thermofluids laboratory experiment.

ME20016: Solid mechanics 3

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX85OT15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10010
Aims:
* To introduce the vibrations of mechanical systems in a one degree of freedom context.
* To introduce the theory of torsion in non-circular and open- sections, dual axis bending and the concept of fatigue failure.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Set up the equations of motion for systems with one degree of freedom; find natural frequencies of free motion; calculate rates of decay from viscous damping and vice versa; determine motions resulting from a sinusoidal force, unbalance and base excitation.
* Estimate maximum responses using shock spectra.
* Calculate shaft critical speeds.
* Calculate torsional stiffness and strength values for closed and open structural sections.
* Predict bending stresses in dual axis bending.
* Predict the fatigue life of some simple structural forms based on S-N calculations.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
One degree of freedom systems: free and forced vibration; base excited motion; unbalance excitation; vibration isolation. Torsion of open and closed structural sections, dual axis bending. Stress concentration, fatigue strength and cumulative damage in structural components. Solid mechanics laboratory experiment.

ME20017: Solid mechanics 3 with French

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX70TE15OT15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10286
Aims:
* To introduce the vibrations of mechanical systems in a one degree of freedom context.
* To introduce the theory of torsion in non-circular and open- sections, dual axis bending and the concept of fatigue failure.
* To review the content of the first year Solid Mechanics units in the French language.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Set up the equations of motion for systems with one degree of freedom; find natural frequencies of free motion; calculate rates of decay from viscous damping and vice versa; determine motions resulting from a sinusoidal force, unbalance and base excitation.
* Estimate maximum responses using shock spectra.
* Calculate shaft critical speeds.
* Calculate torsional stiffness and strength values for closed and open structural sections.
* Predict bending stresses in dual axis bending.
* Predict the fatigue life of some simple structural forms based on S-N calculations.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently; communicating in the French language.
Content:
One degree of freedom systems: free and forced vibration; base excited motion; unbalance excitation; vibration isolation. Torsion of open and closed structural sections, dual axis bending. Stress concentration, fatigue strength and cumulative damage in structural components. Review of structural mechanics in French. Solid mechanics laboratory experiment.

ME20018: Design 3

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10012
Aims:
* To show how engineering sub-assemblies comprise both standard and bespoke designed components.
* To demonstrate the importance of optimisation within an iterative design process in contrast to adequate design in terms of functionality, geometry and material selection.
* To show how a successful design can be achieved by integrating analytical skills from the engineering sciences.
* To introduce design methods and design for X approaches.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Design a sub-assembly in detail using correctly selected components and design ancillary items to meet a requirement.
* Design an engineering product.
* Recognise the importance of completing comprehensive design analysis, component drawings and sub-assembly drawings in order to achieve a successful solution.
* Understand engineering product characteristics.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; IT; working as part of a group; leadership.
Content:
Embodiment design: To include shafts, coupling, keyway, welded and bolted joint design, bearing, pulley, gear analysis. combined loadings, design factors and optimisation techniques.

ME20020: Experimentation & applied engineering

Credits: 5
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: PR60CW40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10005 and take ME10007

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To illustrate the systems approach to engineering.To illustrate the integration of engineering science, control, electronics, design, materials, manufacture and business for product-based engineering applications.To demonstrate the interaction of the different engineering disciplines in the design of products. To develop the student's understanding of laboratory practice and of instrumentation using microcomputers including signal processing and analysis techniques.To provide an understanding of the design of experiments.After taking this unit the student should be able to:Appreciate the breadth of application of science and technological subjects to engineering product design and development. Understand the interrelationships of different disciplines within engineering. Apply material from other science and technological units to experimentation content.
Content:
Laboratory experiments in : Engine Test. Aerofoil test. Flexible Manufacturing System. Space Frame. Supporting lectures on: Topics as appropriate to support individual experiments and investigations. Product and system investigations on: Aircraft High Lift Flap system and Undercarriage System. Automobile Active Suspension System. Product Packaging. Flexible Manufacturing System/Guided Vehicle/Robot. Logic-based Autonomous Machine. Hip replacement Prosthesis or Ergonomics & Human/System Interaction.

ME20021: Modelling techniques 2

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20014 and in taking this unit you cannot take ME20199
Aims:
* To continue to develop algorithm design and programming techniques in C++.
* To acquire a large variety of numerical and mathematical techniques to be used for those engineering problems modelled in terms of PDEs.
* To provide a strong mathematical and computational foundation for solving equations arising in the modelling of engineering systems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand how the various standard partial differential equations (PDEs) arise in engineering.
* Understand and use numerical and analytical techniques in the solution of such PDEs.
* Understand and apply the techniques of Fourier series and transforms.
* Understand and apply pointers, class inheritance and polymorphism in C++.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Fourier's equation of heat conduction, Laplace's equation and Poisson's equation: derivation, numerical solution and analytical solutions. The wave equation: derivation, D'Alembert's solution, separation of variables solution, numerical solution using Method of Characteristics. Fourier series: application in ODEs and PDEs governing various engineering systems. Fourier Transforms: definition, general results, application in solving ODEs and PDEs. C++ pointers, base classes, derived classes and polymorphism.

ME20022: Thermofluids 4

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX85OT15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20015
Aims: To develop the student's ability to apply the principles of fluid dynamics to problems of engineering importance at high and low speeds.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Calculate the flow over an arbitrary two-dimensional aerofoil by a variety of techniques with various degrees of approximation.
* Calculate the skin friction and drag caused by boundary-layer flow over external surfaces.
* Calculate the pressure losses in duct/pipe networks.
* Understand the effects of compressibility on fluid flow and solve engineering problems dealing with high-speed aerodynamics.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
AEROFOIL CHARACTERISTICS: lift and drag on aerofoils, centre of pressure and aerodynamic centre, aerodynamic stall. VISCOUS FLOWS: Introduction to effects of fluid viscosity, laminar and turbulent pipe flows, Reynolds experiment, effects of roughness, minor losses, boundary layers in zero pressure gradients, transition, effect of pressure gradient, including flow separation. COMPRESSIBLE FLOW: Mach number and speed of sound. Shock waves. Area-change. Flow through a converging-diverging nozzle. Application to rockets and aerospace engineering.
FLUID-DYNAMIC MACHINES: Euler's equation, radial and axial flow pumps and turbines.
HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE: History of fluid dynamics and flight in the 20th and 21st century.
AEROFOIL CHARACTERISTICS LABORATORY: measure lift and moment coefficients versus angle of attack, determine centre of pressure and aerodynamic centre, examine aerodynamic stall and Reynolds number effects. Thermofluids laboratory experiment.

ME20023: Solid mechanics 4

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX85OT15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20016
Aims:
* To extend the student's knowledge of the vibrations of mechanical systems into the multi-degree of freedom context.
* To examine techniques for the reduction of vibrations.
* To introduce more advanced concepts of structural analysis, including finite element analysis of redundant frameworks and buckling of struts.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Determine buckling loads for simple one degree of freedom systems and elastic struts.
* Understand the influence of imperfection on buckling.
* Formulate equations of motion from simple Lagrangian functions. Formulate mass, damping and stiffness matrices.
* Obtain natural frequencies and mode shapes of multi-degree of freedom systems.
* Find the response of systems with several degrees of freedom to harmonic excitation. Introduction to modal coordinates.
* Describe practical ways of reducing vibration.
* Recognise mechanisms, and statically determinate and indeterminate (redundant) structures.
* Assemble stiffness matrices for frameworks.
* Determine the displacement and member forces of redundant structures.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Introduction to buckling: one degree of freedom systems; strut buckling; effective length; imperfect struts. Lagrangian methods: virtual work and energy. Vibrations in multi-degree of freedom systems; practical control measures. Introduction to finite element analysis: redundant structures; stiffness matrix method. Solid mechanics laboratory experiment.

ME20024: Mecanique generale

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX75OR25
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20017
Aims:
* To extend the students understanding of the French notation and mathematical methods for problem solving by teaching the subject entirely in the French language and hence contribute to their technical communication ability.
* To introduce additional methods of analysis in the fields of kinematics, kinetics and analytical mechanics and to develop judgement in selecting the most suitable approach to analysing mechanical problems.
* To extend the students knowledge of the vibrations of mechanical systems for one degree of freedom systems.
* To examine techniques for the reduction of vibrations.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Describe complex motions of particles and bodies using vector analysis; formulate equations of motion using vector analysis or Lagrange methods; calculate work done by forces/torque; determine kinetic and potential energy of a system; formulate and solve one degree of freedom vibration problems, reason out and discuss in the language any problems encountered by the course.
Skills:
Problem solving: numeracy; working independently; communicating in the French language.
Content:
Kinematics: motion of particle, motion of body. Kinetics: Newton&s laws, momentum, moment of momentum, moment of inertia, kinetic and potential energy. Lagrange methods. One degree of freedom vibration systems: free and forced vibration; base excited motion; unbalance excitation; vibration isolation.

ME20025: Design 4

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10012
Aims:
* To introduce the student to the techniques and constraints of professional design practice. To make the student understand standard design methods, key aspects of a specification and systematic methods for problem solving.
* To make the student aware of the special features of design embodiment; including the stages in developing a product after the design stage; the problems and benefits of working in a team; ergonomics and aesthetics issues.
* To further introduce design for X approaches
* To introduce design issues relating to degree programme themes.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Apply standard design methods and value engineering techniques. Understand the complete design process. Produce complete product or machine design.
* Work in a small team to design a product or system for the market place. Understand theme related design issues.
Skills:
Problem solving; working as part of a group; IT; leadership.
Content:
Design for:- safety, ergonomics, life cycle design, automatic assembly, reliability. Material selection and applications and finishes. Costing, quality assurance and design development. Engineering issues relating to degree themes.

ME20026: Manufacturing

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10012
Aims:
* To introduce the student to the elements of manufacturing systems and processes.
* To provide an understanding of material behaviour for manufacturability.
* To increase the student knowledge and appreciation of surface processing and treatment.
* To gain understanding of how manufacturing systems are designed, operated and controlled.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand material yielding and its application in material shaping.
* Calculate forces acting on cutting tools and select optimum operating conditions.
* Describe some of the commonly used techniques for surface treatment.
* Design appropriate surface hardening, coating or smoothing process to some industrial products.
* Understand how manufacturing systems are designed.
* Design a manufacturing system for the assembly of products.
* Understand how the flow of work through a production system is controlled.
* Understand how quality is controlled in a production system.
* Understand the requirement and role of other functions needed to manage manufacture.
Skills:
Problem solving; working independently.
Content:
Syllabus: Plastic deformation and idealised stress-strain curves. Yield Criteria and plastic work.Force analysis in metal cutting and tool life. Cutting Force measurements and tool failure. Surface treatment: case hardening, coating and smooting. Process and Assembly planning. Process capability, process choice, assembly line balancing. Production control. Capacity Planning, Order Acceptance, Release and Control, Push and Pull systems, MRP, JIT and Stock Control. Quality of conformance, quality costs, Inspection, SQC. Cost and financial Control. Maintenance, Sales and Marketing, Supply Chains. Case study on assembly system design integrated with IT, R&D and HR.

ME20070: Solid mechanics 3 with German

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX70TE15OT15
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10287
Aims:
* To introduce the vibrations of mechanical systems in a one degree of freedom context.
* To introduce the theory of torsion in non-circular and open- sections, dual axis bending and the concept of fatigue failure.
* To review the content of the first year Solid Mechanics units in the German language.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Set up the equations of motion for systems with one degree of freedom; find natural frequencies of free motion; calculate rates of decay from viscous damping and vice versa; determine motions resulting from a sinusoidal force, unbalance and base excitation.
* Estimate maximum responses using shock spectra.
* Calculate shaft critical speeds.
* Calculate torsional stiffness and strength values for closed and open structural sections.
* Predict bending stresses in dual axis bending.
* Predict the fatigue life of some simple structural forms based on S-N calculations.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently; communicating in the German language.
Content:
One degree of freedom systems: free and forced vibration; base excited motion; unbalance excitation; vibration isolation. Torsion of open and closed structural sections, dual axis bending. Stress concentration, fatigue strength and cumulative damage in structural components. Review of structural mechanics in German. Solid mechanics laboratory experiment.

ME20071: Allgemeine mechanik

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX75OR25
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20070
Aims:
* To extend the students understanding of the German notation and mathematical methods for problem solving by teaching the subject entirely in the German language and hence contribute to their technical communication ability.
* To introduce additional methods of analysis in the fields of kinematics, kinetics and analytical mechanics and to develop judgement in selecting the most suitable approach to analysing mechanical problems.
* To extend the students knowledge of the vibrations of mechanical systems for one degree of freedom systems.
* To examine techniques for the reduction of vibrations
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Describe complex motions of particles and bodies using vector analysis; formulate equations of motion using vector analysis or Lagrange methods; calculate work done by forces/torque; determine kinetic and potential energy of a system; formulate and solve one degree of freedom vibration problems, reason out and discuss in the language any problems encountered by the course.
Skills:
Problem solving: numeracy; working independently; communicating in the German language.
Content:
Kinematics: motion of particle, motion of body. Kinetics: Newton&s laws, momentum, moment of momentum, moment of inertia, kinetic and potential energy. Lagrange methods. One degree of freedom vibration systems: free and forced vibration; base excited motion; unbalance excitation; vibration isolation.

ME20120: Industrial placement

Credits: 60
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment:
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Please see the Director of Studies for more information about the industrial placement year.

ME20134: Fluid mechanics 2

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10144

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims: To give students a knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics. Objectives: By the end of the course, the student should be able to:
* analyse flows in a network of pipes
* understand and be able to apply dimensional analysis
* understand the fluid mechanics principles which govern the behaviour of hydraulic machines
Content:
Networks, branched pipes Dimensional Analysis Hydraulic Machines Euler equation Radial flow machines Axial flow machines Water Hammer/surge Cavitation

ME20198: Mathematical modelling 1

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take XX10052

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop programming techniques in C++. To acquire a variety of numerical and mathematical techniques to be used for engineering problems modelled in terms of ODEs. To provide a strong mathematical and computational foundation for solving equations arising in the modelling of engineering systems. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Explain how the various standard ordinary differential equations (ODEs) arise in engineering. Use numerical techniques in the solution of such ODEs. Understand and apply the techniques of Fourier series and transforms to ODEs.
Content:
Numerical solution of ordinary differential evolution equations using Euler's method and the Runge-Kutta methods, including reduction to first order form and numerical stability analysis. Numerical solution of two-point ordinary differential boundary value problems using a direct method (the tridiagonal matrix algorithm) and an indirect method (the shooting method). Local and Global Truncation Errors: choosing a suitable numerical method and the improvement of accuracy. Gaussian Elimination: algorithm and code development, use a Least Squares fitting of experimental data, and in the determination of matrix eigenvalues.

ME20199: Mathematical modelling 2

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To continue to develop algorithm design and programming techniques in C++. To acquire a large variety of numerical and mathematical techniques to be used for those engineering problems modelled in terms of PDEs. To provide a strong mathematical and computational foundation for solving equations arising in the modelling of engineering systems. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Explain how the various standard partial differential equations (PDEs) arise in engineering. Us numerical techniques in the solution of such PDEs.
Content:
Derivation and numerical solution of Fourier's equation of heat conduction, Laplace's equation, Poisson's equation and Wave equation.

ME20246: Metals & alloys (EG20009)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10232 or take ME10245

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce the principles of alloy constitution and show their application to the thermal and mechanical treatment of engineering alloys. On completion the student should be able to identify common types of alloy phase, describe strengthening mechanisms in alloys systems, interpret simple binary phase diagrams, describe the effects of heat treatments on steels, Al and Ti alloys., describe the process of 'shape memory' in specific alloy systems.
Content:
The properties and structure of metals, dislocations and strengthening methods of metals including solid solution strengthening, precipitation hardening, grain size (Hall-Petch) and cold work using high strength alloy steels, aluminium alloys and titanium alloys as specific examples. Solid solutions and intermetallic phases. Phase diagrams of binary systems, invariant reactions. Equilibrium microstructures using tie lines and lever rule. Coring. Departures from equilibrium, quenching, hardenability and tempering of steels. Shape memory alloys.

ME20248: Introduction to materials for sports science (EG20030)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To understand the science underlying the use of materials in applications used in sport. To appreciate the nature of the physical stresses imposed on materials, both natural and artificial, and how the materials react to stresses. To explore the use of high technology advanced materials in sports applications.
Content:
An introduction to mechanical properties: the nature of elastic stress and elastic strain. The elastic limit. Types of stress and strain. Elastic compliance. Plastic deformation and fracture. Energy absorption during loading and fracture, energy release. Specific stress and specific strain. Compare and contrast metals, ceramics and polymers as sporting materials. The limitations of homogeneous materials. Composite materials and why they are used in sport. The law of mixtures for composite materials. Natural and artificial composites; several examples of each, outlining the structure and properties. Comparison of natural composites ( wood, bone, skin etc) with artificial composites. Case studies of sports equipment , e.g. sport shoes, football studs, racquets, vaulting pole, sports bicycle; the method of construction and the performance advantages that ensue.

ME20249: Industrial training (EG20032)

Credits: 60
Level: Intermediate
Academic Year
Assessment:
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Please see the Director of Studies for more detailed information about the Aims & Learning Objectives of the Industrial training year.

ME20250: Solid body mechanics 3 (EG20075)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80PR20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10238 and take ME10239

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To expand on statics and dynamics knowledge gained in first year Solid Mechanics courses to cover more advanced structural mechanics topics and to introduce dynamics topics dealing with vibrations as applied to sports engineering applications. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Determine Euler buckling loads for sections in compression; Calculate stresses and deflections of beams made from composite materials; Calculate shear stresses and twist in non-circular bars; Determine resonant frequencies in single and two degree of freedom systems.
Content:
Buckling of struts; Bending of composite beams; Torsion of bars made from non-circular sections; Principles of vibration, resonance, single, two and three degrees of freedom systems; whirling and balancing of shafts. Associated Laboratory experiments: Euler Buckling Loads, Measurement of Natural Frequencies.

ME20251: Fluid mechanics & aerodynamics (EG20076)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX80PR20
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give the students a knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics and aerodynamics. After taking this unit the students should be able to: Determine hydrostatic forces, buoyancy describe the principles and practice of pressure measurement, understand the basic principles of fluid flow and the analysis of different types of flow. Determine the drag contribution from an arbitrary shaped body.
Content:
Hydrostatic Equation, Forces on Submerged Surfaces, Bouyancy, Bernoulli Equation, Momentum Equation, Laminar/Turbulent Flow Laminar and turbulent flow Drag of bluff and streamlined bodies.

ME20252: Sports materials (EG20077)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10241

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To identify and describe the behaviour of engineering metal alloys, polymers, fibres, textiles, wood species and ceramics used in sport. To examine the performance of these materials in sports applications using case studies.
Content:
Metal alloys: extension of the introductory treatment in year 1 to encompass the more exotic materials currently being used in sport. Polymers, fibres and textiles: structure and properties of polymers, polymerisation, linear, branched and cross-linked polymers, rubbers (elastomers), viscoelasticity, glass transition temperature, creep, stress relaxation, hysteresis, damping. Fibre structure, melt spinning, cold drawing, ultra-stiff fibres, carbon and aramid fibres. Textiles, flexible fibre assemblies, weaving, design of 2-D and 3-D weaves, non-wovens, textile terminology, synthetic and natural fibres and fabrics, comfort factors in clothing. Wood: structure and properties of wood, density, mechanical properties, hardness, impact resistance, moisture-dependence, natural durability and preservation, selection, countries of origin, environmental issues, sustainability. Ceramics: structure and properties, fracture behaviour, statistics of strength for mechanical design, enhancement of toughness. Case studies. Tennis, badminton and squash rackets; Rowing boats; Sports shoes and clothing; Golf balls and clubs.

ME20253: Sports technology group project (EG20078)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: ES80OR20
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide experience of seeking, retrieval, organisation and presentation of information in a technological field. To provide experience of working in a group and of being responsible for a significant part of a project. To provide an opportunity to analyse the functional requirements of an item of sports equipment and the ways in which they are met in existing products. To explore the links between design, manufacture and choice of materials in the development of sports equipment. To provide an opportunity to make an oral presentation on a researched subject. On completion of the unit the student should be able to: prepare an in-depth critical technical assessment of a piece of equipment and be able to make a coherent oral presentation of researched material.
Content:
Small groups of students will be assigned to study a specific piece of sports equipment. Wherever possible, the assignments will be based on the student's sporting speciality. Under the direction of a supervisor, the groups will work on the preparation of a technical report covering the function, structure, manufacture and fitness for purpose of commercially available examples of the assigned item of sports equipment. An oral presentation of the group's findings will be made at a conference within the Department.

ME20254: Polymers & composites (EG20080)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW20EX80
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce polymers and polymer matrix composite materials and show their application in engineering applications. On completion the student should be able to classify polymers as thermoplastics or thermosets, have some idea of relating structure to properties to applications and understand the principles of fiber reinforcement of polymers which result in the strength, stiffness and toughness of engineering composites.
Content:
Polymers Homopolymers, copolymers,linear, crosslinked, tacticity, plastics, rubbers, fibres, molecular weight.; Glass transition temperature effect of structure.; Molecular motion: nature of vitrification; Viscoelasticity effect of temperature rate and structure; Crystallinity. Morphology effect of molecular structure; Elastomers. Chemical nature, vulcanisation; Stereospecific polymerisation, kinetic theory of rubber elasticity; Additives. Fillers, plasticisers, antistatic agents; Degradation: thermal, ultra-violet, stabilisers. Composites History of composite materials. Categorization into particle- and fibre-reinforced systems. Nature of fibre reinforcement (glass, carbon, Kevlar fibres and whiskers) and matrix materials (thermosets, thermoplastics and metal alloys). Comparison of mechanical properties with other engineering materials. Anisotropy. Longitudinal and transverse elastic moduli of FRPs, Rule of Mixtures, hybrid composites. Determination of modulus of elasticity at any angle. Strength of composites parallel and perpendicular to fibres, Krenchel coefficients. Load transfer in composites, interfacial shear, critical fibre lengths, critical aspect ratio. Inter-laminar shear strength. Toughness of composites, Cook-Gordon effect, fracture energy of composites. Fatigue and creep of composites, S-N curves, residual strength, damage mechanisms. Engineering applications for composites, fabrication, joining and repair. Designing with composites, application of software. Natural fibre composites and structural timber composites.

ME20255: Materials testing and evaluation (EG20081)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW20EX80
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide introduction to the techniques that are commonly used for measuring the mechanical properties of materials. To provide an introduction to the techniques that are commonly used for the identification or evaluation of materials. To provide an understanding of the principles that the techniques are based upon and an appreciation of their areas of application. On completion of the course the student should be able to select an appropriate measurement technique to provide specified materials property information and have an appreciation of the interpretation, accuracy and reproducibility of the technique's output.
Content:
Mechanical testing techniques for measurement of the elastic moduli and strengths of materials subjected to: tensile; bending; torsional and compressive loading. Techniques for the measurement of toughness, hardness, friction, wear, fatigue and creep. Dynamical mechanical measurements of polymers and composites. Statistical techniques employed in mechanical properties data analysis: normal distribution; sample size; Weibull distribution. Techniques employed in the identification and evaluation of materials: optical microscopy, sample preparation, image analysis; infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy; powder X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction materials index; scanning electron microscope, electron probe microanalysis. Nondestructive testing: dye penetrant, magnetic particle, X-ray, eddy current, ultrasonics.

ME20256: Sports technology topics (EG20083)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To investigate issues of design, function, athlete/equipment coupling, performance, manufacture, materials selection and marketing for a selected sports product, system or technology, e.g. golf clubs, ice sport technology. Learning
Objectives: After taking this unit the student should be able to identify critical issues relating to the specific sports product, system or technology in relationship to function, performance and compatibility with the athlete. Innovative aspects of the design of the equipment, materials selection options and possibly marketing strategies will be understood.
Skills:
Intellectual skills include the development of critical abilities needed to retrieve and assess information (taught and facilitated). Professional skills include the ability to appreciate the scientific, engineering, design, manufacturing and business principles relevant to the sports industry (taught and facilitated). Practical skills include the development of the students' competence in oral and written communication (assessed). Key skills include self-learning and web-based learning (facilitated).
Content:
The student will select a Sports Technology Topic and a sports product, system or technology will be taken and analysed with respect to features such as strength, stiffness, durability, vibration characteristics, inertia, forces and moments, materials, design, manufacture, fitness for purpose and market appeal. Alternatively an individual sports system or technology will be thoroughly analysed. Emphasis will be placed on aspects of innovation in the development and design of a new sports product, system or technology.

ME20257: Sports technology management 1 (EG20084)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX70CW30
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give an appreciation of the contextual factors involved in sports technology management After taking this Unit the student should be able to: Explain the contextual issues within which a sports equipment manufacturer operates.
Content:
Special features of sport; strategic planning; organisational culture and change management; financial management; marketing management; legal factors; contextual studies (human resource management, player management, facility management, event management, sports performance development issues).

ME20258: Sports technology management 2 (EG20085)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX70CW30
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20257

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give students an understanding of the contributions made by engineers and technologists towards a firm achieving its commercial goals by means of effective product and market-related policies and practices. After taking this Unit the student should be able to: Describe the commercial aspects of sports equipment manufacturing.
Content:
Special features of sport equipment manufacture; strategic planning; organisational culture and change management; financial management; marketing management; legal factors.

ME20259: Laboratory Programme II (EG20092)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To familiarise the student with the methods available for the measurement and observation of materials structures and properties. To develop practical and organisational skills for laboratory work. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Set up and carry out experiments to determine the microscopic structure and mechanical properties of metals and polymers. Set up methods of electrical signal measurement, recording and processing. Set up experiments to carry out vibration analysis of equipment.
Content:
Electron and Optical microscopy of metals and polymers. Spectroscopy. Mechanical properties and testing of materials, electrical measurements and data logging, vibration analysis.

ME20260: Instrumentation & measurement II (EG20103)

Credits: 3
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10243

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide an introduction to measurement, instrumentation and signal processing. After taking this Unit the student should be able to: (i) understand the characteristics of elementary AC circuits and components(ii) be able to use LVDTs and capacitance transducers;(iii)understand the characteristics of elementary digital circuits and components(iv) be able to set up timing devices and circuits.
Content:
Elements of AC theory, capacitors and inductors, mutual inductance, transformers. The linearly variable differential transformer (LVDT) application and associated instrumentation. Capacitance transducers. Electrical noise, AC bridges, advantages of narrow bandwidth amplification and detection. Resonant circuits, Q, oscillators, quartz crystal oscillators. Elements of digital circuits, gates, truth tables, counters. Timing, light gates and their integration with digital counter circuits.

ME20261: IT packages (EG20117)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To understand the operation and application of standard software packages used in engineering.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Make use of a range of widely used software packages to investigate engineering problems. Appreciate the ways in which software packages are used to analyse engineered products.
Skills:
Intellectual skills include the development (assessed). Key skills include self-learning and software-based learning (facilitated).
Content:
The unit will be a hands-on introduction to the principles and operation of commercially available engineering software packages. The capabilities of the packages will be introduced by examples of their application to realistic engineering problems. The packages included will be selected from: Electrical circuit simulation. Statistical analysis. Materials selection. Solid modelling/FEAMotion analysis. Image analysis. Mathematical analysis.

ME20262: Introduction to biomechanics and biomaterials (EG20122)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce students to the basic concepts in biomechanics and biomaterials including the applications of solid mechanics within a biomechanics context, the principles relating to biomaterials such as biocompatibility, bioactivity, and the use of biomaterials within the body. After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles and applications of biomechanics and biomaterials within a medical engineering context.
Content:
Systems of levers within the body. Determination of joint loading from external and muscular loading. Mechanical properties of soft and hard tissues. Types of implants and the materials commonly used to manufacture them. Gait analysis and determination of loading on implants. Implant testing methods; British and ISO standards. In-vivo and in-vitro experimentation. Ethical issues relating to animal and human experimentation.

ME20263: Materials science 2 (EG20125)

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Aims: This unit develops from the introductory ideas of structure of materials presented in the first year and uses those ideas to show how the basic mechanics and physical properties of constructional materials are determined by their molecular and crystaline nature. The unit forms a basis for the further development of an understanding of design aspects of materials at the macroscopic rather than the atomic level. The unit identifies a number of aspects of the behaviour of building materials of specific importance to the engineer, with emphasis being on problems of design and selection of materials for given service conditions.
Learning Outcomes:
The successful student will be able to demonstrate an enhanced understanding of the relationship between microstructure and properties, and an understanding of behaviour which affects the long term performance of construction materials.
Skills:
Ability to apply knowledge of properties and modes of failure of materials to civil engineering design.
Content:
* Classification of engineering materials according to type and properties.
* Elastic behaviour, linear and non-linear. The elastic moduli, anistropy; elastic properties of crystals and polycrystals; composite materials. rubber elasticity.
* Viscoelastic behaviour and time dependent effects.
* Strength of engineering materials. Theoretical and actual strenghts of solids; improving the strength of real materials. Problems of designing with brittle materials.
* Longer term effects. Fatigue and creep (introductory).
* Durability of metals and plastics. Corrosion and environmental attack (introductory).
* Engineering design: The process of engineering design in relation to materials evaluation and selection; relevance of measured properties to service conditions.
* Short-term mechanical effects: Time-dependent behaviour of metals, plastics, concrete, timber; creep and fatigue; combined effects of fatigue and corrosion.
* Long term chemical behaviour: Durability and ageing; changes in materials properties in service conditions. Corrosion and protection of metals and alloys; environmental degredation of plastics; chemical degradation of concrete - sulphate attack, conversion of HAC etc.; biodeterioration of timber and protection methods; flammability and fire damage to building materials. Long term stability of adhesives and adhesive bonds.

ME30029: Control systems

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20013
Aims: To develop an understanding of the techniques available for the analysis and design of practical continuous-time control systems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Interpret a control system specification.
* Design and predict the behaviour of practical continuous-time control systems.
* Use Matlab/Simulink software to undertake design tasks.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; IT; working independently.
Content:
Analysis of control system transient response using Laplace transforms. Linearisation of non-linear systems. Estimation of continuous-time transient response using the s-plane. System design specifications. Control system design and analysis using Root Locus Methods. State-space design. Use of Matlab/Simulink software to design and analyse control systems. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30030: Structural mechanics

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20023 or (take ME20024 or take ME20071)
Aims:
* To broaden the understanding of Solid Mechanics to include material and geometric nonlinearity.
* To introduce concepts of bending and stretching in plate and shell structures.
* To introduce the elements of incremental and deformation plasticity theory.
* To underline the importance of energy and energy absorption in the general context.
* To introduce post-buckling theory.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Calculate stresses and deformations in thick cylinders under a variety of loading conditions.
* Understand the nature of plastic yielding.
* Determine deflections and critical loads of laterally loaded and in-plane loaded plates.
* Determine load-deflection responses of simple plastic mechanisms and their relation to energy absorption.
* Understand some of the implications of nonlinear effects in structural systems.
* Understand energy absorption in simple crashworthiness models.
Skills:
Problem solving: numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Stresses and deformation of pressurised thick cylinders. Yield criteria. Introduction to incremental plasticity. Linear bending theory for circular plates. Buckling of struts and rectangular plates. Deformation theory of plasticity. Plastic mechanisms. Energy absorption. Introduction to crashworthiness. Phenomenology of post-buckling. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30031: Thermofluid systems

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20022
Aims: To understand how thermodynamics and fluid mechanics can be applied to engineering systems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Calculate pressure losses and flow distributions in duct/pipe networks.
* Perform cavitation calculations on simple systems.
* Analyse open channel flow systems.
* Calculate the thermodynamic properties of gas-vapour mixtures.
* Perform combustion calculations involving dissociation.
* Carry out 2nd Law analysis on systems.
* Perform compressible flow calculations including the effects of friction and heat transfer.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Pipe flows and networks. Cavitation. Open channel flow. Gas vapour mixtures. Combustion. Rayleigh flow. Fanno flow. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30032: Aerodynamics

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20022
Aims: To improve the students' understanding of fundamentals of inviscid and viscous flow, principles of lift and drag, turbulence and compressibility.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Estimate lift for an arbitrary aerofoil cross-sections.
* Calculate the load distributions over an arbitrary three-dimensional wing.
* Apply the boundary layer equations to laminar and turbulent flow.
* Estimate the drag, and predict lift and drag at high Mach numbers.
Skills:
Problem solving and numeracy (taught and assessed).
Content:
Incompressible flow over aerofoils: irrotational flow over a circular cylinder, Kutta-Joukowski theorem, thin aerofoil theory, cambered and flapped aerofoil, vortex panel method, high-lift devices.
Incompressible flow over finite wings: induced drag, lifting-line theory, general lift distribution, lifting-surface theory, delta wings.
Fundamentals of viscous flow: viscosity and stress, fluid acceleration, conservation of mass and momentum.
Boundary layers: boundary layer equations, zero pressure gradient, separation, similarity solutions, arbitrary pressure gradient, boundary layer control in laminar flow, other thin shear flows.
Flow instabilities, transition and turbulence: stability theory, instability over a flat plate, factors affecting instability and transition, turbulent transport of momentum, turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate, turbulent drag reduction and separation control, turbulence measurement.
Lift and drag at high Mach numbers: Mach number regimes, normal and oblique shock waves, expansion waves, shock-expansion theory for supersonic aerofoils, subsonic and transonic flow over aerofoils, linearised supersonic flow, wings and influence of sweepback. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30033: Mechanical vibrations & noise

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20023 or take ME20024 or take ME20071
Aims:
* To introduce quantitative aspects of noise control and to give an appreciation of some of the problems involved.
* To acquaint the student with more advanced aspects of vibration.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Calculate sound pressure level given relevant power and material data. Estimate the reduction in sound pressure level that could be achieved by the use of a barrier or enclosure.
* Convert equations of motion into principal coordinates.
* Describe how to measure normal modes of structures.
* Apply harmonic balance to solve Rayleigh&s equation to obtain limit cycle solutions and also to solve Duffing&s equation and thus to explain jump phenomena.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Response of the ear, noise exposure, code of practice; noise isolation and absorption; barriers and enclosures. modal analysis and testing; nonlinearity. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30036: Manufacturing processes & analysis

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20019
Aims:
* To introduce the student to methods of analysis in forming processes.
* To introduce the student to the use of numerical and experimental techniques.
* To gain knowledge of simulation and modelling of manufacturing processes.
* To gain understanding on how analytical methods are applied to industrial processes.
* To provide the students with an appreciation and understanding of advanced non traditional material removal and shaping processes.
* To introduce the students to the methods and of beam technology and their application in industry.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Compare and contrast methods of analysis.
* Application of analytical, numerical and simulation methods in the manufacturing of metallic parts.
* Identify appropriate methods of analysis to selected manufacturing processes.
* Select processing parameters that are necessary to the analysis and modelling of -forming processes.
* Compare various modes of deformation in forming operations.
* Select appropriate tool and operational parameters to non-traditional processing operations.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; IT; working independently.
Content:
Syllabus: Introduction to analytical and numerical analysis in manufacturing. Work formulae. Force equilibrium methods. Slip line field theory. Limit analysis Upper and Lower Bound Techniques. Numerical methods. Visio-plasticity. Non-traditional material cutting operations; ECM, EDM, water jet cutting. Beam technology applications (e.g. Laser, Ion, Ultrasonic) and their industrial application to welding and metal removal. The course includes a self-study section that expands student knowledge on selected processing techniques. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30037: Internal combustion engine technology

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20015 and After taking this module you must take ME40047
Aims:
* To examine the technology, operation and application of IC engines.
* To analyse the criteria governing IC engine design, performance, combustion and emissions.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Discuss the parameters that define IC engine performance.
* Identify the distinct operating characteristics of different classifications of IC engines.
* Understand and predict the thermodynamic and mechanical constrains governing design.
* Explain the environmental issues concerning future IC engine development.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Thermodynamic and mechanical principles; combustion and fuels; spark and compression ignition engines; turbocharging; fuelling systems; induction, in-cylinder and exhaust processes; emission formation and reduction/prevention; automotive emission legislation; case studies; introduction to IC engine simulation techniques. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30041: Aircraft stability & control

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20022
Aims:
* To give an understanding of the principles of aircraft stability and the significance of the permitted centre of gravity limits which must be considered when loading an aircraft.
* To enable the student to understand and analyse both flight test and wind tunnel results pertaining to aircraft static stability.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Estimate stability margins for any given conventional or tail-less aircraft.
* Analyse and interpret both wind tunnel and flight test results concerned with aircraft static stability and trim.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Rigid aircraft behaviour. Basic specification of forces and moment on an aircraft. Properties of aerofoils and controls. Static stability criterion. Static and manoeuvre margins, both stick fixed and stick free. Flight test measurements and wind tunnel analysis. Springs and weights in the elevator circuit. Power assistance for the pilot and artificial feel. Dynamic stability: an introduction. Stability derivatives. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30042: Manufacturing systems techniques

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20026
Aims:
* To introduce the student to advanced methods in manufacturing systems.
* To develop expertise in the design of manufacturing systems.
* To develop expertise in CNC programming and CAD/CAM integration.
* To gain understanding of automation and process control.
* To increase student knowledge and skills in synthesising and analysing the elements required in the design of work cells.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Plan operations for product manufacture.
* Assemble products.
* Produce NC part programs.
* Produce robot path programs.
* Use integrated CAD/CAM software.
* Design suitable work holding arrangements.
* Design plant layout and materials handling systems.
* Establish effective working methods and environment.
* Understand the interlink between productivity and good planing.
* Design integrated workplace environments.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy: IT; working independently; written communication.
Content:
Syllabus: Process planning and time estimating. Assembly planning. Quality planing. The design and choice of jigs, fixtures, tooling and gauges. Historical aspects of NC. Types of NC system. Machine tool controllers. Machine level programming. APT part programming. Computer aided part programming. Integrated CAD/CAM systems. Plant layout techniques. To-From analysis. Materials handling and work movement methodologies. Work Study, method study, work measurement, activity sampling and ergonomics. System design and evaluation, methodology and gauging systems. Case study on NC machining and its applications. Case study on process planing and material handling. Topics for self study that may be examined.

ME30045: Aerospace structures 1

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX75CW25
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20023 or (take ME20024 or take ME20071)
Aims: To introduce appropriate techniques for the loading, stress analysis and failure prediction of aircraft structures.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Determine critical gust and manoeuvre load cases for an aircraft.
* Construct shear force, bending moment and torque diagrams.
* Design aircraft structures by accounting for static strength, buckling and fatigue failure.
* Use, and have a basic understanding of, computer packages for structural analysis and design.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently; written communication.
Content:
Influence of speed, altitude, geometry, weight and stiffness on aircraft loads. Gust and manoeuvre envelope. Shear force, bending moment and torque diagrams. Shear flow and shear centre of open and close sections. Fracture strength and crack propagation, including safe-life and damage-tolerant design. Shear buckling and tension fields - analysis and design of ribs and spars. Compression buckling of stiffened panels - analysis and design of wing panels. Use of computer packages for structural analysis and design. Introduction to structural optimisation. Topics for self learning that could be examined.

ME30058: Fluid power

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20022
Aims: To give the student an appreciation of the transmission of power using hydraulic and pneumatic systems. To give detail of typical applications in mobile and industrial fields.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Analyse the operation of fluid power system components and select the correct type and size for a given duty. Derive the equations of motion for typical fluid power systems and hence obtain their dynamic response. Design fluid power systems for simple applications.
Skills:
Numeracy; problem solving; working independently.
Content:
Types of hydraulic fluid and their physical properties, contamination control. Hydraulic pump and motor types, flow and pressure control valves, accumulators and hydrostatic transmissions. Valve and pump controlled hydraulic circuits and their design, system efficiency considerations. Fluid compressibility, system stiffness. Servo systems and electrohydraulic valves. Flow fluctuation and noise effects. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30059: Geometric modelling

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX70CW30
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20021
Aims:
* To introduce the ideas used in fully three dimensional CADCAM systems.
* To give hands-on experience in writing software for such systems.
* To introduce the ideas of constraint and rule based systems.
* To illustrate geometric modelling and its applications.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand the fundamental concepts of geometric modelling and the algorithms and data structures used in it.
* Understand the implications for efficiency and the domain of these algorithms.
* Write programs for such things as ray tracing to produce three dimensional graphics.
* Understand the ideas of constraint modelling and resolution.
* Use a configuration space model to simulate, analysis and optimise a mechanism system.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; IT; working independently; written communication.
Content:
Wire frame and other precursors to geometric models. Boundary representation models. Set theoretic (or CSG) models. Parametric curves and bi-parametric patches, the Bernstein basis. Bzier curves, B-splines and NURBS, implicit solids and surfaces. Non-manifold geometric models. feature recognition. Machining geometric models. Rapid prototyping and geometric modelling. The medial axis transform and FE mesh generatic.. Blends and fillets. Minkowski sums. Kernal modellers, APIs and GUIs. Rendering geometric models, volume visualisation. Numerical accuracy problems in geometric models. Integral properties of geometric models. Procedural shape definition. Types of engineering constraints. Constraint based systems. Techniques for constraint resolution, optimisation methods. Form of a constraint modelling system, its underlying language and structure. Constraint based description of mechanism and their performance. Multidimensional modelling and C-space. Case study examples. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30061: Biomechanics

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20023 or take ME20024 or take ME20071
Aims:
* To introduce the student to applications of mechanics in a biological and clinical context.
* To provide an insight into the forces and motions in human joints, and the mechanical properties of a variety of hard and soft tissues.
* To give an appreciation of the functional requirements of replacement joints and fracture fixation systems.
* To impart an awareness of the materials and manufacturing technology associated with the design of replacement joints and fracture fixture systems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Relate the principles of mechanics to biological tissues, the major load bearing joints and to the management of fractures.
* Appreciate the range of technology used in the medical device industry and the problems associated with the performance of artificial joints and fracture fixation systems in the aggressive environment of the human body.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
BIOMECHANICS OF NATURAL JOINTS: Introduction to musculo-skeletal system, connective tissues ,anatomical structures of synovial joints, biomechanics of articular cartilage, biomechanics of bone, lubrication of natural joints.
KINEMATICS AND DYNAMICS OF SYNOVIAL JOINTS: Hip joint, knee joint, ankle and foot, elbow and shoulder, wrist and hand, spine.
BIOMATERIALS: General requirements, biocompatibility, lubrication and wear.
ARTIFICIAL JOINTS: Joint disorders, history of joint replacement, methods of fixation, functional adaptation of prosthesis/bone composite structure.
BIOMECHANICS OF FRACTURE FIXATION: Biomechanics of fracture, healing, methods of fracture fixation and stabilisation
ENGINEERING STUDIES IN BIOMECHANICS: Engineering techniques in biomechanical testing, in vivo and in vitro testing of implants, future perspectives.
Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30067: Vehicle dynamics

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30033
Aims: To give the student an appreciation of factors affecting vehicle dynamics, including ride comfort and handling.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Describe and analyse the operation of a vehicle suspension and predict vehicle ride behaviour and steady state handling performance.
* Explain the physical principles of road vehicle aerodynamic design.
Skills:
Numeracy; problem solving; working independently.
Content:
* Disturbance and sensitivity.
* Basic suspension systems.
* System frequencies $ bounce, pitch and roll.
* Tyre behaviour. Front/rear suspensions - Springs and dampers.
* Roll centre.
* Load Transfer. Steady state handling characteristics.
* Drag & Lift.
* Economy & Performance. Aerodynamic Design.

ME30068: Group business & design project - I

Credits: 12
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20020 and take ME20026
Aims:
* To give each student the experience of a real engineering design situation as part of a group.
* To locate the contribution of the engineer, whether in design, R & D, manufacture, in the context of securing the firms broad commercial goals by means of effective product and market related policies and practices.
* To introduce the students to the issues associated with entrepreneurship.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the technical process that is engineering design.
* Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the business and entrepreneural aspects of engineering.
* Work in a multi-disciplinary team.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; written communication; oral communication; working as part of a group; leadership.
Content:
Evaluation study. Business lectures and workshops. Business game. Case studies. Seminar.

ME30142: Advanced Machinery Processes

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Aims: To provide a basic understanding of machine processes employed in the and their integration into high volume product generating facilities.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Understand and compare the issues involved in creating e.g. packaging for different products such as food and pharmaceuticals and their forms. To be able to describe appropriate processes and systems for their manufacture and appreciate their strengths and limitations.
Skills:
Problem solving; working independently; written communication.
Content:
* Introduction to high volume machine processes in industries such as the food and pharmaceutical sectors.
* Product Description: Covering aspects of liquids, granules, soft and rigid objects. How these are handled within high volume lines.
* Materials and Forms: To cover machine systems such as fillers, sealers, erectors, check weighers, intermediate handling equipment, stacking labelling and coding.
* Process Requirements: Covering aspects of product generation such as, machine sequencing, finishing and inspection, palletisation, conveyor selection and timing diagrams.
* Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30195: Life support engineering

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20023 or take ME20024 or take ME20071
Aims: To introduce the student to applications of technology in life support systems used in clinical and other situations including diving, submarines, automotive, aerospace and space.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Appreciate the factors relating to human physiology that need to be supported by life support systems.
* Relate engineering principles to the design of life support systems.
* Formulate basic mathematical models of life support systems and set operating parameters associated with equipment used in clinical, underwater, automotive, aerospace and space applications
Skills:
Problem solving: numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Human physiology including metabolism, kidneys and cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and nervous systems. Principles of clinical life support systems including anaesthesia workstations and ventilators; dialysis; artificial heart and pacemakers. Aspects relating to underwater, aerospace and space applications; gas production, storage and delivery and microgravity. Use of airbags and seat belts in automotive applications. Requirements for operation in extreme environments including fire fighting, chemical and biological applications. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30197: Business processes

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW40EX60
Requisites:
Aims: To provide:
* An understanding of the various business processes required to operate a manufacturing business.
* A knowledge of business economics and its use in decision making.
* An understanding of project costing
* An understanding of various business processes such as TQM, change management and BPR
* A knowledge of business strategy.
* An understanding of marketing strategy and techniques.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Analyse supply and demand data.
* Carry out financial appraisals of engineering projects
* Take part in the implementation of TQM, BPR and other operations management techniques.
* Write a mission statement and analyse and develop an engineering businesses strategy.
* Analyse market data and develop alternative marketing strategies.
Skills:
Problem solving; written communication; working independently.
Content:
Business Economics - supply demand, elasticity, financial markets. Project Accounting - Cost cash flow, ROI NPV, resource planning . Marketing - Price, the marketing mix, advertising, promotion, budgets. Operations - TQM, change management, BPR, SUR and other initiatives. Strategy - Missions, objectives, internal and external analysis, options, implementation. Topics for self study that could be examained.

ME30217: Vehicle Engineering

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide knowledge relating to vehicle design and an understanding of the operation and performance of the important sub-systems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand the vehicle design process.
* Analyse the performance of transmission and driveline systems. Understand the operation of major vehicle sub-systems.
* Analyse aspects of vehicle and powertrain control.
* Understand the operation and performance of braking systems. Understand the principles of vehicle performance testing.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Vehicle design; manufacturing processes; materials selection; transmissions; driveline; control; performance testing; braking systems.

ME30218: Aircraft propulsion

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20015 and take ME20022
Aims:
* To provide knowledge of the development, performance and design of gas-turbine aeroengines.
* To apply the fundamentals of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics to the performance and design of aircraft and aeroengines.
* To introduce the basic mechanics of turbomachinery.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand the fundamental differences between the performance characteristics of turbojet, turbofan and turboprop engines.
* Analyse thermodynamic cycles for turboprop, turboshaft, turbojet and turbofan engines.
* Understand principles and performance of compressor, turbine, combustor, intake and exhaust nozzle.
* Calculate performance of engines at design and off-design conditions. Understand basic turbomachinery design.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Birth of jet engine; engine classification; operational envelope; thrusts and efficiencies; thermodynamic cycles (turboshaft, turbojet, turbofan); combustors; intakes (subsonic and supersonic), afterburners and nozzles; design and off-design performance; turbine cooling. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30219: Aircraft performance & design

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20015 and take ME20022
Aims: To introduce the basic mechanics of flight and the factors affecting the design of fixed-wing aircraft. To provide a broad outline of the performance characteristics of aircraft engines and their impact on aircraft performance. To introduce methods for the initial sizing of aircraft using principal design parameters.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Predict the performance of a fixed-wing aircraft in level, climbing and turning flight; understand and apply aircraft specifications within the Airworthiness Regulations; calculate take-off and landing distances and understand the balance field length concept. Construct a constraints diagram for the critical flight phases for estimation of wing and engine requirements.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Standard atmosphere and aircraft speed definitions; level flight, climb and field performance; use of a drag polar; range equations and turning flight. Performance characteristics of thrust and power producing engines. Take-off and landing distance calculations, WAT limits and the balanced field length. Payload-range diagrams and constraints diagrams for preliminary aircraft sizing; considerations for aircraft design. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30227: Engineering project - BEng

Credits: 18
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30068
Aims:
* To enable the student to effectively communicate a major piece of project work.
* To give the student experience in working in a research environment or on an industry based design project.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Plan, organise and conduct an engineering project to meet the requirements of the initial aims; present all stages of the project work via written documentation and oral presentations.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; written communication; oral communication; IT; data acquisition, handling and analysis; working idependently.
Content:
Projects may be undertaken on an individual or a linked basis. Projects will normally contain at least 2 of the following elements - analytical, computational, experimental aspects.

ME30264: Materials selection in engineering design (EG30022)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: To co-ordinate previous studies of structural materials, first by an introduction to the classes of engineering materials followed by consideration of composite materials. Examination of the selection of materials for real engineering applications follows.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: describe the various types of engineering materials, fibre composites, their manufacture and characteristics; discuss theoretical models for strength and stiffness of composites; describe the overall process of engineering design, and the place in it of materials selection; deduce from standard test results the materials information required for design; analyse materials requirements and propose solutions to the selection problem in specified design situations.
Content:
Introduction to engineering materials, composites and their applications in engineering. Nature of engineering materials, of fibre composite materials, manufacturing processes, elastic behaviour; elements of classical thin laminate theory, strength, toughness; the use of commercial software for designing with composites. The design process; the designer and materials selection. Design aspects of elastic properties, strength and fracture toughness. Design procedures for creep in metals and plastics, extrapolation methods. Fatigue, master diagrams for design purposes, damage accumulation laws, application of fracture mechanics, designing against fatigue. Non-destructive evaluation of materials and component quality. Selection of a manufacturing process. Formalised procedures for materials selection.

ME30265: Biomedical & natural materials (EG30028)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: This course aims to give an appreciation of a range of topics that relate to the structure and properties of natural materials and the way in which natural and synthetic materials are linked at the interface between medicine and engineering.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this unit the student should demonstrate an understanding of the structure and properties of biological tissues, have knowledge of a range of materials that can be used to replace both soft and hard tissues of the body and be aware of the extent and the limitations of replacement components in terms of design and materials. The student will have developed the skills necessary to work as part of a small team in preparing a group presentation and to produce a substantial individual report in a selected area of biomedical materials.
Skills:
Facilitated intellectual and professional key skills.
Content:
1. Biological materials The importance of the structure/properties relationship in 'engineering' materials. Mechanical properties - units and definitions. Stress, strain, Young's modulus, density, specific mechanical properties, toughness, elastic and viscoelastic deformation, damping. The principal hard and soft tissues in the body and their main anatomical functions: bone, teeth, cartilage, tendons & ligaments, skin, arterial wall, cervical tissue. Chemical and physical compositions: main chemical constituents - hydroxyapatite, dentine and enamel, aminoacids and mucopolysaccharides, proteoglycans (proteins), collagen, elastin. Crystalline and amorphous structures, polymers and composites. Performance of natural materials under stress: brittleness and toughness, yielding (plastic behaviour), fatigue, creep (viscoelasticity), rubbery behaviour, damping. Efficiency of bone structures. Mechanical response of hard and soft tissues in terms of their structures.
2. Prosthetics Use of biomaterials for replacement and repair of hard and soft tissues. Functional considerations - forces on joints, cyclic loading, wear and tear, body environment Materials used for implant purposes - metals, alloys, ceramics, polymers, composites, coatings. Applications in the fields of orthopaedics, cardiovascular, dental, ocular, drug delivery and wound healing Evaluation of biomaterials - biocompatibility testing, corrosion, wear, deterioration.

ME30266: Aerospace Materials (EG30061)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: The aim of the unit is to give engineering students an understanding of the nature of aerospace materials and how this determines their successful application in aerospace structures and machines.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: appreciate the properties of engineering materials and how they arise. Understand the key areas of manufacturing technology which allow fabrication of the critical engineering component, the importance of the correct choice of material and the factors limiting the service life of the component, the significance of the manufacturing route in determining the economics and engineering viability of the component and methods for fault detection and life prediction.
Content:
Introduction, history and classification of aerospace materials. Materials for airframes-Aluminium Alloys; manufacturing route, heat treatments, properties, joining techniques. Titanium Alloys. Super-plastic forming. Diffusion bonding. Production, properties and applications Stainless and Maraging steels. Properties, fabrication and applications. Alloys and components for aeroengines. Manufacturing processes, properties, applications and failure modes. Steel, Titanium alloys, Honeycombs, High temperature alloys. Polycrystalline, directionally solidified and single crystal blades. Future technology. Thermal barrier coatings. Principles, processing and performance. Long Fibre Composites. Critical Fibre length. Aerospace manufacturing processes. Types of fibre and matrix. Composite honeycombs. Composites and design. Comparison of carbon fibre composites and aluminium alloys. Laminate analysis/ design. Material coupling. Failure criteria (strength and stiffness). Repair Systems. Metal matrix Composites. Degradation processes and control. NDT, its role in quality control and in in-service inspection of aircraft. Review of types of defect found in aircraft and their hazards. X-ray inspection, sources, recording, sensitivity, radiation safety. Dye penetrant crack detection. Ultrasonic testing, ultrasonic wave propagation and reflection. Transducers, coupling. A-scan, b-scan, c-scan, shear wave and surface wave inspection techniques. Electrical methods, eddy current, potential drop, magnetic methods. Special inspection problems posed by composite materials. "The ageing aircraft programme".

ME30268: The practice of engineering and technology: the human and social dimension (EG30104)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW40ES60
Requisites:
Aims: To familiarise the student with the organisation of science, engineering and technology as collective human enterprises, laying some emphasis on areas associated particularly with technical communication, funding, and professional ethics where there may be differences of opinion and potential conflict.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking the unit students should inter alia be able to discuss science technology and engineering as collective human enterprises, making reference to such aspects as technical communication, funding, and professional, social and environmental responsibility; take a responsible part in a group project; play a responsible part in an oral presentation of the findings of a group project; recognise the inherently mutable nature of the prevailing social paradigm; engage fairly with matters of controversy and formulate their own opinions.
Skills:
Facilitated - intellectual, practical, key
Content:
Contemporary science & engineering: organisation, funding, communication, and professional responsibility. Ethics and values: some principles and implications. Sustainability: implications for science, engineering & technology; Professional responsibility / social responsibility: duty to employer, the Public Interest, environmental preservation. Reasoning and "truth" in science, engineering and in other disciplines: politics, economics, ethics. Science, technology, engineering and progress The prevailing social paradigm: other paradigms? Funding of science & engineering: possible conflicts of interest, piper and tune? Openness of research. Publication of science & engineering: guest authorship, ghost writing, financial interest. Intellectual property: and the public good, patenting of natural products.

ME30269: Finite element analysis (EG30106)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20250
Aims: To understand the mathematical basis of the finite element analysis (FEA). To develop the critical use of commercial finite element software. To develop finite element methods for the study of stress analysis.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Describe the mathematical formulation of the finite element method when applied to linear elastic problems. Use a commercially available finite-element package to analyse linear stress-strain problems in solid bodies. Critically assess the approximate solutions so produced.
Skills:
Intellectual skills include the development of the ability to construct finite element models of engineering components, to input physical constants and to predict response of the component to an external input such as stress or increase in temperature. (taught and facilitated). Professional skills include the ability to operate a finite element package in an engineering environment (taught and facilitated). Practical skills include the development of the students' competence in the operation of an FEA package (assessed). Key skills include self-learning and software-based learning (facilitated).
Content:
Review of numerical analysis methods in engineering. Stress analysis fundamentals of stress strain relations, compatibility. Matrix stiffness method. Manual application to simple structural problems. Elements types, nodes and meshing. Use of ANSYS to solve linear stress analysis problems. Pre and post processing. Comparisons with exact solutions.

ME30270: Group design project 1 (EG30107)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To enable the student to show creativity and initiative in carrying out a design project within a specific topic area. To give each student the experience of a real design situation as part of a group. To explore the contribution of the technologist or engineer, whether in the design, R&D or manufacture of a commercial product. To examine the role of the technologist or engineer in the context of market related policies and practices including promotion and distribution.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion, the student should be able to communicate effectively on a major piece of project work. The student should be able to work effectively within a team recognising their own and others' contributions. The student should be able to analyse a problem, synthesise information both from within the course and from external sources and apply their knowledge to an industry based design project.
Skills:
Facilitated intellectual, professional, practical key skills.
Content:
Each group will be assigned a specific design project. They will work in a multidisciplinary team to plan, organise and conduct a project to meet the requirements of the original aims. The work will be presented at designated stages in the form of oral presentations, drawings and written documentation.

ME30271: Group design project 2 (EG30108)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW80OR10OT10
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30270
Aims: To enable the student to show creativity and initiative in carrying out a design project within a specific topic area. To give each student the experience of a real design situation as part of a group. To explore the contribution of the technologist or engineer, whether in the design, R&D or manufacture of a commercial product. To examine the role of the technologist or engineer in the context of market related policies and practices including promotion and distribution.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion, the student should be able to communicate effectively on a major piece of project work. The student should be able to work effectively within a team recognising their own and others' contributions. The student should be able to analyse a problem, synthesise information both from within the course and from external sources and apply their knowledge to an industry based design project.
Skills:
Facilitated intellectual, professional, practical key skills.
Content:
Each group will be assigned a specific design project. They will work in a multidisciplinary team to plan, organise and conduct a project to meet the requirements of the original aims. The work will be presented at designated stages in the form of oral presentations, drawings, written documentation and a poster.

ME30272: Instrumentation 3 (EG30109)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10243 and take ME20260
Aims: To provide an introduction to advanced instrumentation and measurement techniques employed in modern sports engineering. After taking this Unit the student should: (i) understand the advantages and areas of application of non contact instrumentation techniques. (ii) appreciate techniques available for data transmission; (iii) be aware of issues involved in the interfacing of measurement instruments to host computers; (iv) have an appreciation of the instrumentation system design process.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking the unit students should be capable of using advanced instrumentation and measurement techniques in the field of engineering.
Skills:
Facilitated -intellectual, practical, key.
Content:
Properties of laser light, semiconductor laser diodes, photodiodes, laser range finding, laser profilometry, optical fibres, interferometry, etalons, optical fibre strain gauge. Signal transmission methodologies: AM, FM, PCM, digital transmission protocols. Fibre optic transmission, elements of telemetry. Interfacing: data transfer control, serial and parallel interfaces, local area networks. Advances in Sports Engineering instrumentation, topics covered will be selected from: velocity measurement by doppler radar; uses of the Global Positioning System; transponder tag timing of sporting events; video image processing for motion analysis.

ME30273: Surfaces & interfaces (EG30110)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW20EX80
Requisites:
Aims: To stimulate the intellectual development of students by encouraging their engagement with aspects of the science of surfaces and interfaces which have a practical bearing in the context of engineering.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking the unit students should inter alia be able to engage with aspects of the science of surfaces and interfaces which have a practical bearing in the context of engineering.
Skills:
Facilitated - intellectual, practical, key.
Content:
1. Basic surface science Solid surface energies, spreading and wetting, multicomponent systems: surface excess, Langmuir-Blodget films 'Practical' surfaces: metals and polymers: importance of "clean" surfaces in joining technology.
2. Characterisation of solid surfaces: profilometry, contact angles,
3. Adhesion Theories of adhesion, pretreatments, interfacial tensions and interfacial forces.Tests of adhesion, mode of failure, environmental durability. Selection and use of adhesives, paints, coatings.
4. Joining technology for electrical components. Fluxes, surface preparation.
5. Degradation (corrosion) as surface -linked phenomena: cool (aqueous) corrosion of metals, hot corrosion of metals, degradation of polymers.
6. Tribology: friction, lubrication, wear, types of wear.

ME30274: Individual sports engineering project 1 (EG30111)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide the student with the opportunity to show creativity and initiative in carrying out a demanding investigation within a specific topic area. To provide a thorough preparation for the final year experimental project in Semester 2.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion, the student should be able to write an extended literature review in the field of his project, define the objectives of the project and present detailed plans for an experimental programme in the relevant area.
Skills:
Facilitated intellectual, professional, practical key skills.
Content:
Each student will be assigned a project area and will prepare an extended critical review of the literature and plan an experimental programme relevant to the topic area. Each project may include design, analytical, computational and experimental aspects.

ME30275: Individual sports engineering project 2 (EG30112)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW80OR20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30274
Aims: To provide the student with the opportunity to show creativity and initiative in carrying out a demanding investigation within a specific topic area. To complete a final year experimental project and communicate the results effectively both in written form and as an oral presentation.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion, the student will have written an extended literature review in the field of his project, defined the objectives of the project and carried out an experimental programme in the relevant area. The student will have developed the skills necessary to communicate effectively the results of a major piece of project work both orally and in the form of a substantial report.
Skills:
Facilitated intellectual, professional, practical key skills.
Content:
Each student will execute an experimental programme relevant to the topic area which may include design, analytical and computational aspects.

ME30276: Individual sports technology project 1 (EG30115)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide the student with the opportunity to show creativity and initiative in carrying out a demanding investigation within a specific topic area. To provide a thorough preparation for the final year experimental project in Semester 2.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion, the student should be able to write an extended literature review in the field of his project, define the objectives of the project and present detailed plans for an experimental programme in the relevant area.
Skills:
Facilitated intellectual, professional, practical key skills.
Content:
Each student will be assigned a project area and will prepare an extended critical review of the literature and plan an experimental programme relevant to the topic area. Each project may include design, analytical, computational and experimental aspects.

ME30277: Individual sports technology project 2 (EG30116)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW80OR20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30276
Aims: To provide the student with the opportunity to show creativity and initiative in carrying out a demanding investigation within a specific topic area. To complete a final year experimental project and communicate the results effectively both in written form and as an oral presentation.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion, the student will have written an extended literature review in the field of his project, defined the objectives of the project and carried out an experimental programme in the relevant area. The student will have developed the skills necessary to communicate effectively the results of a major piece of project work both orally and in the form of a substantial report.
Skills:
Facilitated intellectual, professional, practical key skills.
Content:
Each student will execute an experimental programme relevant to the topic area which may include design, analytical and computational aspects.

ME30278: Group design project (EG30119)

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW80OR10OT10
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30270
Aims: To enable the student to show creativity and initiative in carrying out a design project within a specific topic area. To give each student the experience of a real design situation as part of a group. To explore the contribution of the technologist or engineer, whether in the design, R&D or manufacture of a commercial product. To examine the role of the technologist or engineer in the context of market related policies and practices including promotion and distribution.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion, the student should be able to communicate effectively on a major piece of project work. The student should be able to work effectively within a team recognising their own and others' contributions. The student should be able to analyse a problem, synthesise information both from within the course and from external sources and apply their knowledge to an industry based design project.
Skills:
Facilitated intellectual, professional, practical key skills.
Content:
Each group will be assigned a specific design project. They will work in a multidisciplinary team to plan, organise and conduct a project to meet the requirements of the original aims. The work will be presented at designated stages in the form of oral presentations, drawings, written documentation and a poster.

ME30290: Medical physics

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Students must have A-level Physics in order to undertake this unit.
Aims:
The aim of this unit is to introduce the application of physics and engineering to medicine, for both diagnosis and therapy.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* outline the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of x rays, gamma rays, radio frequency radiation, magnetic fields, electrons, neutrons, radionuclides and ultrasonic waves;
* describe the physical principles underlying specific areas of medical imaging and ionising radiation therapy;
* relate the quality of medical images to the physical principles underlying the equipment associated with their production, use, measurement and evaluation;
* perform basic calculations on medical applications of ultrasound, ionising radiations and magnetic resonance imaging.
* Describe the principles of measurement of physiological actions, and associated means of signal processing and interpretation.
Skills:
Numeracy T/F A, Problem Solving T/F A.
Content:
Introduction (1 hour): Introduction to applications of physics and engineering to medicine. Diagnosis and therapy. Physical properties of body tissues. Safety aspects.
Ultrasonics (6 hours): Generation and structure of ultrasonic fields; Near field and far field of transducers, focused fields and pulsed fields. Arrays. Field measurements. Nonlinear propagation. Attenuation, absorption and scatter of tissue. Plane wave reflection and transmission at interfaces. Imaging system design and performance. Doppler principle. Continuous wave and pulsed Doppler instruments. Doppler imaging. Clinical applications. Exposure measurement and safety.
Ionising radiation (6 hours):Generation and character of photon beams, absorption and scattering processes in tissue, including the effects of incident energy and tissue inhomogeneity. Generation and character of ionising particles, electrons, and heavier particles. Radiodiagnostic techniques and equipment, plain radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography. Radiotherapeutic techniques, teletherapy, brachytherapy principles of dosimetry. Radiation protection.
Nuclear medicine (5 hours) Radioactivity, nuclear transformations, radionuclide production and radiopharmaceuticals, radiation detection and measurement. Equipment, clinical practice, imaging and non-imaging, therapy. Radionuclide dosimetry
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (4 hours): Production of cross-sectional images of tissue properties, and function, using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Spatial resolution, dynamic range, imaging speed, contrast enhancement and safety.
Physiological measurement (2 hours). Bioelectric potentials: cardiac, neurological, muscular sources: transducers, signal processing, interpretation: flow and pressure measurement, safety
Seminars in special topics including radiofrequency ablation and medical uses of lasers.

ME30293: Digital design

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20021 and take ME20025 and take ME20026
Aims:
* To provide an understanding of: the use of CAD in the overall design process; the different types of modeller and their applications; the relevant communications and information technologies to support distributed working.
* To give experience in the use of CAD techniques.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Describe the different types of CAD modelling and communications systems, what they offer and their application to the overall design process; in particular to the design of machines/mechanisms. Understand the CAD requirements of typical companies.
* Appreciate how CAD techniques can be applied to different application areas.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; IT; working independently; written communication.
Content:
Computer aids for design, their relation to design needs, application to mechanism/machine design. Basic two and three dimensional drafting entities, manipulation, storage within system, transformations. Ideas of solid modelling, feature-based modelling, and constraint modelling. Graphics interface languages, parametrics. Communications technology: historical background, carriers, transmission; networks - LANs, WANs; standards $ ISO, TCP/IP. Data representation and exchange: data and information in engineering; data types; mark-up languages; CAD data exchange. Computer-supported co-operative work (CSCW): dimensions of communication in design; classification of CSCW approaches; critical assessment of the technologies. Topics for self study that may be examined.

ME30294: Product design and development

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20025 and take ME20026
Aims:
* To illustrate the stages of product design processes, methods for creativity and styling, awareness of human factors and ergonomics.
* To provide awareness of the product design discipline and typical activities undertaken.
* To introduce strategic, cultural, organisational and technological aspects of product development in a global context, including consideration of knowledge management issues, models of the new product introduction (NPI) process, management of the NPI process, product development strategies, sustainable development issues.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Describe typical product design processes; appreciate user requirements such as style, form and interaction.
* Identify the key elements of successful products.
* Describe the historic context of global product development.
* Outline strategic, organisational, human and cultural factors that should be taken into account when developing products for a global market.
* Describe approaches to sustainable development.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently; written communication.
Content:
Product design: user requirements, form, styling, functionality. Creativity, concept generation, concept evaluation. Human factors, ergonomics. Examples of successful products and best practice. Product development: historical and cultural context. Human aspects: communities of practice; critical situations; methods for knowledge sharing, cultural issues. Strategic aspects: managing the design process; product platform and strategy; mass customisation; late and local configuration, issues of and approaches to sustainable development. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME30295: Electronics, signals and drives

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20021 and take ME20025
Aims:
* To provide a practical understanding of microcontrollers, logic and signal processing and introduce related design methods; to introduce the concept of signals and describe methods for their processing and recording.
* To provide an understanding of various electrical devices and methods for their selection in a variety of engineering applications, and to introduce the concepts of performance of electro-mechanical systems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Describe the elements of information coding and simple signal conversion.
* Understand the basics of micro-controllers and their use.
* Specify and select suitable instrumentation equipment for a variety of control and data collection purposes.
* Describe the principles of various electrical drives and their selection criteria for practical application in product design.
* Apply drive selection techniques and evaluate performance for particular applications.
* Make use of appropriate manufacturers& catalogues.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; written communication; working independently.
Content:
Microcontroller fundamentals: registers, RAM, ROM, input/output. Assembly code. Applications: a selection from: display driving, motion control, data logging, serial communications to a PC. Operational amplifiers, non-ideal characteristics and circuit applications; noise sources, interference, shielding and grounding techniques, filtering; signal conversion, modulation and multiplexing; examples of transducer families including strain gauges, piezo and digital devices; signal conditioning circuits; transducer and system performance, and selection criteria. Stepper motors and servo motors: types, operational characteristics and models; control techniques for stepper and servo motors; modern drives for stepper and servo motors; determination and characterisation of load cycles; drive selection criteria for various product applications; auxiliary elements of an electro-mechanical drive system; safety, reliability, performance, cost, size/weight and efficiency; design of drive systems for classical applications; manufacturers' catalogues and their use in product design. Topics for self study that may be examined.

ME30297: Rehabilitation engineering

Credits: 6
Level: Honours
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80PR20
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce the rehabilitation engineering as a specific speciality and describe the nature of the problems encountered and the solutions which can be provided for individuals with differing degree of disability. After taking this unit the student should be able to: have a broad understanding of the nature of disabilities and the role of engineering in their support, including knowledge of the major items of equipment available with an emphasis on the engineering involved, and a feel for some of the current areas of research. They should also be able to apply their engineering skills to the particular problems of designing such devices, and able to deal with the complex ergonomic issues involved.
Content:
Major disabilities. The major disabling conditions, what causes them and what handicaps result, together with an indication of the number of people affected.
Support equipment. An introduction to the major areas of support equipment with a discussion of the engineering involved, and areas of current development including Mobility, Communication, Daily Living, Equipment, Patient handling, FES, Visual and auditory support, Orthotics and prosthetics, Robotics, Smart homes and telecare.
Designing for the disabled. An introduction to the problem of designing equipment with the complex human interface that disabled people present. Design methodologies that seek to deal with these problems will be outlined. Although theoretical, many examples will be given of both the problems and the effectiveness of different methodologies, and a clear indication of the multi-disciplinary nature of such work.
Equipment provision. An outline of the provision of support equipment in the UK, including health and social services, wheelchair centres, etc, together with an indication of other support provision such as the disabled living centres and REMAP. A comparison with provision elsewhere in the world will be given.
Future trends. A trawl of some of the more experimental techniques being explored to assist people with disabilities, with an emphasis on the engineering involved.
Practical work will include attendance at clinics in a hospital environment and domiscillary visits with social services, together with visits to a DLC and wheelchair centre. It will also include involvement in design exercises with the necessary exposure to clients, therapists and other clinicians, and first stage evaluation work.

ME40034: Mecanique vibratoire

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
In taking this unit you cannot take ME30072 and before taking this unit you must take ME20024 and while taking this unit you must take EU40375
Aims:
* To extend the students' knowledge in the field of vibrations by teaching the subject entirely in the French language and to consolidate the students understanding of the French notation and mathematical methods for problem solving.
* To review the knowledge of mechanical vibrations with one degree of freedom and to extend to multi-degrees of freedom and continuous systems.
* Introduction in finite element analysis.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Derive the equation of motion of vibrating systems by using vector or analytical methods.
* Calculate or approximate the natural frequency of conservative and dissipative mechanical systems.
* Describe possible mode shapes of mechanical systems by using matrix methods.
* Formulate mass, damping and stiffness matrices.
* Produce simplified finite element formulations.
* Reason out and discuss in the language any problems encountered by the course.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently; French language.
Content:
Review of one degree of freedom vibration systems. Vibrations in multi-degree of freedom systems. Vibrations of linear elastic continuum. Approximation methods. Introduction to finite element analysis. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME40046: Manufacturing automation, modelling & simulation

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX60CW40
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30035 or take ME30029
Aims:
* To develop an understanding of the use and benefits of modelling and simulation in manufacturing systems design and operation.
* To introduce the building blocks of automation and to show how these can be applied to the design of robotic and automated systems.
* To examine the advanced and technical aspects of current automation technology looking at robotic systems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Model and simulate the operation of a small manufacturing system.
* Use simulation as a manufacturing system design technique.
* Justify the use of manufacturing modelling and simulation.
* Understand the techniques required for the specification of robotic and automated cells.
* Appreciate the use of sensing in automated facilities.
* Undertake a cost evaluation for proposed systems and be able to recommend hard or flexible automation.
* Specify the safety requirements within an automated environment. Examine design for automated assembly.
Skills:
Problem solving; IT; working independently; written communication.
Content:
Modelling and Simulation: Definitions. types of models. Modelling methodologies. Validation and Verification. Justification, benefits and uses of simulation. Modelling Manufacturing Systems: Discrete event and continuous approaches to simulation. Discrete event computer languages. Visually interactive simulation. Use of mathematical and statistical models, distributions and random numbers, queuing models and inventory systems. Modelling breakdowns, conveyors, workflow and tool flow. Utilisation statistics. Model verification and validation. Simulation of manufacturing systems. Information Models: Information flows within manufacture. Levels of detail. IDEF models. Automation Peripherals (e.g. Vibratory bowl feeders). Sensors (e.g. limit switches, proximity switches, photoelectric sensors). Robot definitions, mechanical configurations, Sensing & Machine Vision. Grippers & Tooling. Hard V's Flexible Automation. Safety. Applications (e.g.: Aerospace, Automotive, Pharmaceutical & Electronics). Mobile Robots. Current Research Advancements. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME40047: Powertrain & transportation systems

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30037 and take ME30217
Aims:
* To introduce the students to the broader social and economic factors which govern the design and development of vehicles and transportation systems.
* To provide a knowledge of alternative automotive powertrain systems and advanced engine developments.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Identify and understand the different alternative automotive propulsion systems and their operating characteristics.
* Describe the advanced IC engine developments taking place with regard to achieving lower fuel consumption and emissions.
* Explain the impact of environmental and social issues on transport legislation and vehicle manufacture.
Skills:
Problem solving; written communication; working as part of a group; numeracy.
Content:
Technology implications of developing alternative automotive propulsion systems IC engine emission characteristics and emission reduction developments. Use of alternative fuels, technological and resource implications: Natural gas, Bio-gas, Methane, Hydrogen. Alternative automotive powertrains including regenerative and hybrid systems. The industrial base for vehicle manufacturing and the drivers for technological change. The global and legislative perspective on transport issues. Environmental aspects and the use of natural resources. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME40049: Innovation and advanced design

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30294
Aims:
* To provide an understanding of the processes whereby the effect of a product can be evaluated.
* To provide an understanding of innovation in an industrial context.
* To introduce a number of innovation techniques, particularly the TRIZ method.
* To introduce a number of advanced design techniques and methods, including design management techniques to enable innovation to be executed and managed.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand the processes of innovation.
* Use a number of innovation methods and techniques.
* Apply the processes to the development of new products.
* Understand the effects of change on the processes and markets. Understand the concept of product architecture and will be able to apply a number of advanced techniques such as QFD to their work.
* Understand the economics of product development, and the impact of time and cost overruns.
Skills:
Problem solving; IT; working independently; written communication.
Content:
Discipline in innovation, Creative processes, TRIZ, Inventive principles, Predictable evolution, Function analysis, Marketing innovation, Case studies. The product development process and problem definition for innovation. Product trade offs. Quality function deployment. Product architecture. Incremental design strategies. Managing design information. Product development team studies. Case studies. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME40050: Special topics in aerodynamics

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30032
Aims:
* To introduce the basic concepts of helicopter flight and the fundamentals of rotor aerodynamics.
* To introduce the elements of acoustics relevant to aircraft noise.
* To introduce the fundamental elements of space flight.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Discuss flow through a rotor and hence design considerations for a single main rotor helicopter.
* Apply analytical methods to predict the performance of a rotor.
* Derive the wave equation and elementary solutions.
* Calculate the noise radiated by simple aerodynamic sources.
* Characterise the noise from rotating sources
* Develop a scaling law for jet noise.
* Describe different types of satellite and their applications; derive the basic equations of orbital motion; calculate velocity changes for typical transfer orbits; perform basic rocket performance calculations.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Introduction to rotor aerodynamics. Actuator disc and blade element theories. Thrust and power predictions of a rotor in hover, vertical and forward flight; performance of a single main rotor helicopter; recent advances and challenges in helicopter designs; the wave equation; acoustic source mechanisms; sound from solid bodies; sound from rotating sources; jet noise; satellite applications, orbital mechanics; orbital transfers; basic rocketry. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME40051: Advanced control

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30029
Aims:
* To give an understanding of sampled data system theory with reference to the digital control of dynamical systems.
* To provide an introduction to modern control theory and to explore the links between this and classical control.
* To show how modern control techniques can be used to control physical systems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Evaluate the behaviour of single input/single output digital control systems and determine system stability.
* Understand the problems associated with sampling signals.
* Select appropriate methods to improve control systems performance. Represent and analyse both continuous-time and discrete-time systems described in state variable forms.
* Understand the key features of neural and fuzzy controllers.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Nature of sampled signals; selection of sample rate; aliasing; prefiltering. The Z transform. Open-loop and closed-loop digital control; stability of closed-loop digital systems. Root locus; estimation of the transient response using the Z-plane. Frequency response of discrete-time systems. Digital design techniques; approximation methods; digital PID controllers. Adaptive control. State representation of physical systems; non-uniqueness of states. Controllability and observability. Time response of continuous- and discrete-time systems. Observers and state feedback; modal control. Parameter estimation. Introduction to neural networks and fuzzy control. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME40054: Computational fluid dynamics

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30031
Aims:
* To introduce the full Navier-Stokes equations and give the physical significance of each term in the equations.
* To introduce the student to CFD techniques appropriate for practical engineering applications (the finite-volume method).
* To introduce the student to the use of commercial CFD packages, the importance of validation and the need for caution in applying the underlying models for turbulent flow.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Use CFD codes to compute 2D flows and understand the physical significance of the solutions.
* Compute rates of heat transfer and shear stress.
* Set up viscous fluid flow and heat transfer problems using a commercial code (with regular and possibly body-fitted grids), and extract features of the computed solutions for interpretation and validation.
Skills:
Problem solving; IT; numeracy; working independently; written communication.
Content:
LAMINAR FLOW: Navier-Stokes equations and energy equations; physical significance of the terms. Discretisation and solution of the non-linear equations using the finite-volume method. Pressure-velocity coupling. Alternative mesh structures.
TURBULENT FLOW: Introduction to computational models of turbulence. Application to the computation of developing boundary layers and recirculating flows. Other methods of simulation and limitations of the current generation of turbulence models.

ME40055: Energy & the environment

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX60ES20CW20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30068
Aims:
* To understand the energy balances within the major regions of the world, their environmental consequences and sustainability.
* To introduce assessment techniques for evaluating projects in terms of energy use and environmental impact.
* To understand the relationship between alternative energy technologies and the societies in which they develop and to participate in discussion of energy and environmental options.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Evaluate the life cycle of major energy projects, and present the results in a form that will enable decision makers to comprehend fully their energy and environmental consequences.
* Develop the key features of sustainable energy strategies for countries from different regions of the world in terms of their economic development, indigenous energy resources, and environmental consequences.
* Participate in local and national debates over large and small-scale development projects with an understanding of limitations placed on them by economic, physical, and environmental constraints.
Skills:
Problem solving,; written communication; working independently.
Content:
ENERGY RESOURCES: Fossil fuels (oil, natural gas, coal); Primary electricity (hydro and nuclear power); Renewable energy sources; Substitutable and non-substitutable resources.
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION: Pollutant emissions from fossil fuel combustion: local, regional and global effects; nuclear power and environmental sustainability: technologies, radioactive emissions and waste disposal; Environmental and related impacts of renewable energy systems.
ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES : Economic assessment (including discounted cash flow investment appraisal); Thermodynamic (energy and exergy) analysis; Environmental life-cycle assessment; Qualitative environmental risks.
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: "People, planet and prosperity"; the sustainability equation; principles and practice of sustainable development; 'The Natural Step' and its system conditions; Environmental footprint analysis; Local Agenda 21; Sustainable energy options.
ENERGY AND SOCIETY : The technology-society relationship; Alternative energy technologies; Energy conservation; Energy and transport.
ENERGY STRATEGIES: Major world producers and users; Energy systems modelling; UK energy issues and. Strategies; Energy and the developing world: basic human needs, the role of biofuels, and 'appropriate'energy technologies; Case study: comparative energy studies of selected industrialised and developing countries.
Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME40057: Finite element analysis

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30030
Aims:
* To develop the students' appreciation of the mathematical basis of the finite-element method.
* To develop the critical use of commercial finite-element software.
* To develop finite element methods for the study of vibrations.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand the mathematical formulation of the finite element method when applied to linear problems.
* Use a commercially available finite-element package to analyse linear stress-strain problems in solid bodies.
* Critically assess the approximate solutions so produced.
* Use a commercially available element package to model vibration problems.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; IT; written communication; working independently.
Content:
Introduction to finite elements as applied to a continuum; displacement formulation. shape functions; numerical integration; Hands-on use of a commercially available finite element package to solve problems in linear stress analysis. Pre and post processing. Model definition if 1D, 2D, 3D representations, symmetry, choice of element type, mesh density requirements. Model validation by comparison with exact analytical solution. Examples in modal analysis.

ME40060: Heat transfer

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30031 or take ME30037
Aims: To extend the student's ability to model thermal conduction in solids, and convective heat transfer in fluids.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand the concepts and equations governing heat transfer by conduction and be able to solve heat transfer problems of engineering importance.
* Understand the concepts and equations governing heat transfer by convection and be able to solve heat transfer problems of engineering importance.
* Understand the concepts and equations governing heat transfer by radiation and be able to solve heat transfer problems of engineering importance.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently; written communication.
Content:
HEAT CONDUCTION: Derivation of the general equation of conduction. Analytical and numerical solution of selected steady-state and transient conduction problems.
CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER: Review of the basic concepts of buoyancy-driven and forced convection. Derivation of the boundary layer momentum and energy equations for laminar flow. Turbulence and its effect on heat transfer, empirical methods of solution for turbulent flow. Laminar and turbulent flow in engineering heat transfer applications. Thermal Resistances and the lumped system approach. Convective boiling heat transfer.
THERMAL RADIATION: Review of principles of radiative heat transfer. Formulation of radiation equations for numerical solution and application to engineering heat transfer problems. Heat transfer problems involving combined modes of conduction, convection and radiation heat transfer.
Topic for self study that could be examined.

ME40064: System modelling & simulation

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30041 or take ME30217 or take ME50151
Aims: To introduce the students of procedures for establishing mathematical models of engineering systems. To introduce commercial software packages for the solution of the mathematical models and to examine the relative merits of different approaches.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Make the realistic judgements necessary to develop mathematical models of complex engineering systems. Undertake a critical appraisal of the simulation results and to have an appreciation of the limitations imposed by the assumptions made and the method of solution adopted. Apply commercial software packages for the prediction of engineering systems performance. Assess the reliability of the results in the presence of modelling uncertainty and parameter variations.
Skills:
Problem solving; IT; written communication; numeracy; working independently.
Content:
Role of simulation in design. Analysis of dynamic systems in the time domain and frequency domain. Linearisation methods. Modelling of discontinuities and non-linearities. Simulink and Matlab modelling. System identification. Bond Graphs. Spreadsheets.

ME40069: Engineering project

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims:
* To enable the student to show creativity and initiative in carrying out a demanding investigation or design project within a specific topic area.
* To enable the student to synthesise information from both within the total course and from external sources.
* To enable the student to communicate effectively a major piece of project work.
* To give the student experience in working in a research environment or on an industry based design project.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Plan, organise and conduct an engineering project to meet the requirements of the initial aims.
* Present the project work via written documentation and oral presentations.
Skills:
Problem solving; written communication; oral communication; IT; working independently.
Content:
The final year engineering projects will either be defined as "Design" or "Research" in content. Whether classified as design or research, projects may be undertaken on an individual or a linked basis. RESEARCH PROJECTS will contain at least 2 of the 3 following elements - analytical, computational, experimental aspects. DESIGN PROJECTS will contain specification, design, analysis, manufacture and test work.

ME40072: Schwingungslehre

Credits: 3
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME20071 and take EU30376 and while taking this unit you must take EU40377 and in taking this unit you cannot take ME40034
Aims:
* To extend the students' knowledge in the field of vibrations by teaching the subject entirely in the German language and to consolidate the students understanding of the German notation and mathematical methods for problem solving.
* To review the knowledge of mechanical vibrations with one degree of freedom and to extend to multi-degrees of freedom and continuous systems.
* Introduction in finite element analysis.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Derive the equation of motion of vibrating systems by using vector or analytical methods.
* Calculate or approximate the natural frequency of conservative and dissipative mechanical systems.
* Describe possible mode shapes of mechanical systems by using matrix methods.
* Formulate mass, damping and stiffness matrices.
* Produce simplified finite element formulations.
* Reason out and discuss in the language any problems encountered by the course.
Skills:
Problem solving; working independently; numeracy; German language.
Content:
Review of one degree of freedom vibration systems. Vibrations in multi-degree of freedom systems. Vibrations of linear elastic continuum. Approximation methods. Introduction to finite element analysis. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME40140: Machines and products in society

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW40EX60
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30068
Aims: To discuss the safety, legal, environmental, product protection aspects of machines and products.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand the legal issues controlling design of machinery.
* Carry out a detailed hazard analysis and risk assessment.
* Understand the use of design standards to achieve a safe design.
* Appreciate environmental considerations;
* Understand means for product/process protection.
* The key learning objective is to understand and be able to know how to apply European legislation in terms of health and safety.
Skills:
Problem solving; written communication; working independently.
Content:
The course tends towards machinery design and the machinery directive, its application and use guest lecturers where appropriate. Safety and legal requirements; EC directives, standards, risk assessment, design for safety, employee protection, product liability, contamination. Environmental: noise and vibration, packaging waste, recycling. Product/process protection: patent system, trademarks, and copyright legislation. In general products/case studies will be used to highlight health and safety requirements. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME40212: Biomimetics

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50PR50
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30264 or take ME30266
Aims:
* To introduce the materials, structures and mechanisms of natural organisms.
* To show how organisms can be analysed as engineering structures using standard techniques.
* To extract principles of biological structures and reformulate them as engineering structures.
* To use concepts from biology to solve problems in engineering.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand fundamental concepts of biological design such as scaling, hierarchy of structures and materials, designing for high strains and low loads, energy conservation, adaptive design, damage control.
* Understand the implications of biology for advanced engineering and product design.
Skills:
Problem solving; written communication; working independently.
Content:
Biological fibres, fillers and ceramics; composites; soft structures; inflatable structures; mechanical properties and testing; structural hierarchy; control of fracture; scaling; factors of safety; cellular materials; design of skeletons and other supportive structures; locomotion (walking, running, flying, swimming); power amplification mechanisms; design of plants, prestressing; deployable structures; design of simple robots; tough materials (armour, blast containment); design for fatigue; adaptive structures; smart materials; neutral networks; genetic algorithms and programming; structures made by animals and their environmental advantages; architecture. Topics for self study that could be examined.

ME40213: Specialist design 1

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30043
Aims:
* To illustrate the totality of the product development process.
* To allow synthesis of information and skills from within other parts of the undergraduate programme and from external sources.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* To improve effective communication of a major piece of design project work.
* Prepare a project proposal, evaluate potential project proposals, conduct initial stages of a design project.
Skills:
Problem solving; IT; working independently.
Content:
Students are expected (in consultation with supervisory staff) to generate their own project activity which should be appropriate for the current unit and to lead into the unit, Specialist Design Project II. The outline of the project is required by the end of week 2 at which stage it is reviewed by staff. The Department reserves the right to reject a proposed outline redirect the student. The outline should include details of tasks to be undertaken during the (first) semester. These could include: related background reading of selected texts and/or papers, market analysis; initial concept generation; preparation of a portfolio of existing and/or original design ideas; preparation of manufacturing drawings of designs to allow manufacture of proof of concept ideas. Students who do not complete this unit satisfactorily are not able to take the unit Specialist Design Project II in the following semester; instead they take the MEng Engineering Project ME40069.

ME40214: Specialist design 2

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME40213
Aims:
* To provide the opportunity for creative long term design project work.
* To illustrate the totality of the product development process.
* To allow synthesis of information and skills from within other parts of the undergraduate programme and from external sources.
* To improve effective communication of a major piece of design project work.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Plan project work, conduct the various stages of a design project, which may include procurement, test development, etc.
* Present the results of a design project via written documentation and oral presentations
Skills:
Problem solving; written communication; oral communication; IT; working independently.
Content:
Entry to this unit is dependent upon satisfactory completion of Specialist Design Project I. Students continue the work initially started in this previous unit under the guidance of a supervisor and are encouraged to produce design files as they proceed. Areas that may be involved in the project work include: creation of concept and/or prototype designs; detailed designs of some or more aspects of a proposed design; analysis of proposed designs; manufacture of a proposed design; testing of a physical prototype; other forms of assessment of design; consideration of full production of a design.

ME40220: Aerospace structures II

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW33EX67
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30045
Aims: To introduce advanced techniques of analysis and design of aircraft structures.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Analyse and design an aircraft wing for aeroelastic considerations.
* Design and analyse composite structures.
* Analyse post-buckling behaviour of stiffened panels.
* Formulate structural optimisation problems.
* Describe various optimisation methods applicable to structural designs.
* Use appropriate optimisation methods to design structures for given requirements.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; written communication; IT; working independently.
Content:
Wing divergence and classical flutter. Analysis and design of composite structures. Analysis of post-buckled stiffened panels. Formulation of structural optimisation problems. Optimisation methods in structural designs: mathematical programming and heuristic methods.

ME40228: Group business & design project - II

Credits: 18
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30068
Aims:
* To give each student the experience of a real design situation as part of a group.
* This unit builds on the evaluation stage, leading to a detailed design that takes into account both engineering and business aspects.
* To present these results in written and oral form and to practising engineers at an exhibition.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Demonstrate detailed knowledge and understanding of the technical process that is engineering design.
* Demonstrate detailed knowledge and understanding of the commercial aspects of engineering.
* Work in a multi-disciplinary team.
* Develop a business plan.
Skills:
Working in a team; problem solving; numeracy; written communication; oral communication; IT; leadership.
Content:
Detail Design/Detailed Commercial Study. Numerical analysis of machines. Design for manufacture. CAD. Business Plan. Exhibition presentation.

ME40229: Integrated industrial project

Credits: 18
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30068
Aims:
* To give each student the experience of a real design environment on placement in either the UK or abroad.
* This unit builds on the evaluation stage leading to a detailed design that takes into account both engineering and commercial aspects.
* To present these results in written and oral form and to practising engineers at an exhibition.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Demonstrate detailed knowledge and understanding of the technical process that is engineering design.
* Demonstrate detailed knowledge and understanding of the commercial aspects of engineering.
* Work in a multi-disciplinary team.
Skills:
Working in a team; problem solving; numeracy; written communication; oral communication; IT.
Content:
Detail Design/Detailed Commercial Study. Numerical analysis of machines. Design for manufacture. CAD. Business Plan.

ME40279: Masters sports engineering project 1 (EG40113)

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW80OR20
Requisites:
Aims: To provide the student with the opportunity to show creativity and initiative in planning and initiating work on a demanding Master&s level experimental project in a specific topic area. To complete a literature survey within the chosen field and begin a programme of experiments. To communicate the results effectively in written form accompanied by engineering drawings where appropriate.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion, the student will have defined the objectives of the Master&s level project, written a review in the field of his project and started preliminary experimental work on the experimental programme in the relevant area. The student will have developed the skills necessary to communicate effectively the results of their research in the form of a substantial report including detailed engineering analysis where relevant.
Skills:
Facilitated intellectual, professional, practical key skills.
Content:
Each student will execute an experimental programme relevant to the topic area which may include business, design, analytical and computational aspects.

ME40280: Masters sports engineering project 2 (EG40114)

Credits: 18
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW80OR20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME40279
Aims: To provide the student with the opportunity to show creativity and initiative in planning and initiating work on a demanding Master&s level experimental project in a specific topic area. To complete a literature survey within the chosen field and carry out an extensive programme of experimental work. To communicate the results effectively both in written form accompanied by engineering drawings where appropriate and orally in form of a presentation.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion, the student will have defined the objectives of the Master&s level project, written a review in the field of the project, completed an extensive experimental programme of work and analysed the results appropriately. The student will have developed the skills necessary to communicate effectively the results of their research in the form of a substantial report including detailed engineering analysis where relevant and in the form of an oral presentation.
Skills:
Facilitated intellectual, professional, practical key skills.
Content:
Each student will execute an experimental programme relevant to the topic area which may include business, design, analytical and computational aspects.

ME40281: Individual Master's project (EG40120)

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW80OR20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you mus
Aims: To provide the student with the opportunity to show creativity and initiative in carrying out a demanding investigation within a specific topic area. To complete an individual project and communicate the results effectively both in written form and as an oral presentation, accompanied by engineering drawings where appropriate.
Learning Outcomes:
On completion, the student will have defined the objectives of the project, written a review in the field of their project and carried out an experimental programme in the relevant area. The student will have developed the skills necessary to communicate effectively the results of a major piece of project work both orally and in the form of a substantial report including detailed drawings where relevant.
Skills:
Facilitated intellectual, professional, practical key skills.
Content:
Each student will execute an experimental programme relevant to the topic area which may include design, analytical and computational aspects.

ME40282: Advanced sports engineering (EG40123)

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: To extend the intellectual development of master's level sports engineering students by exposing them to advanced aspects of sports engineering based on the understanding of core elements of science and engineering.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking the unit students should be able to apply level 3 engineering science to the analysis of the behaviour of sports equipment.
Skills:
Facilitated - intellectual, practical, key. Content:The unit is delivered as a series of case studies in advanced sports engineering topics. By way of example these might include: (1) The dynamic interaction between bats and balls, rackets and shuttlecocks, golf clubs and golf balls etc. (2) Circular motion including the analysis of spinning wheels, bicycles on banking, speed skaters and hammer throwing, using gyroscopic principles, moment of inertia, etc. (3) Force and energy control, including damping and impact in relation to shock absorption, mountain bike suspension, crumple zones, airbags, etc. (4) Aerodynamics or hydrodynamics of balls in flight, javelins, shuttlecocks, hammers and swimmers, exploring the principles of drag, lift, the Bernoulli effect, boundary layers, etc.

ME40283: Sports vehicles (EG40124)

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME40282
Aims: The unit aims to introduce the specialist technologies employed in the design, manufacture, assessment, performance and improvement of sports vehicles. The scope of the unit embraces human-powered ground, air and water-borne vehicles.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking the unit students should be able to execute the engineering design and construction of vehicles in the context of a specific sport.
Skills:
Facilitated - intellectual, practical, key.
Content:
The unit is delivered as a series of case studies on sports vehicles. Examples might include:
(1) Bicycles: Motion, dynamics, balance, materials selection, gearing, manufacture.
(2) Windsurfers and yachts: Aerodynamics, hydrodynamics, materials optimisation, textiles, composites, manufacture.
(3) Hang gliders and gliders: Aerodynamics, lift, drag, materials selection, performance optimisation, record breaking.
(4) Canoes and rowing boats: Hydrodynamics, wood versus composites, construction, weight minimisation, competition classes, white water canoeing.
(5) Sledges and bobsleighs: Steel to ice interactions, friction, drag, design, centrifugal forces, classes of competition, materials of construction.

XX10118: Mathematics & computing 2

Credits: 6
Level: Certificate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW 25%, EX 75%
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10002
Aims:
* To extend the students previous knowledge of mathematics and provide the basic core of mathematical tools required throughout the engineering course.
* To introduce the student to statistical techniques used for data analysis. To give the student a sound basic knowledge of computer programming in C++ upon which they can subsequently build.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Employ elementary numerical methods for the solution of algebraic equations and integration.
* Set up and solve differential equations of typical engineering problems by analytical and numerical methods.
* Apply rules of partial differentiation to small increment and change of variable problems for functions of several variables.
* Solve simultaneous linear equations.
* Find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices. Interpret experimental data, carry out elementary statistical analysis and calculate best least-squares fit to data.
* Write well-structured simple programs in C++.
Skills:
Numeracy; IT; working independently.
Content:
First and second order differential equations with step and sinusoidal input, including simultaneous differential equations. Linear algebra; vectors, matrices and determinants, Gaussian elimination, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Newton-Raphson method, numerical integration, elementary nonlinear equations. Statistical analysis: normal distribution, probability, linear interpolation, curve fitting using least squares. C++: main variable types, input, output. Procedures, control stuctures.

XX20007: Design & innovation 1

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME10240 and take ME10242

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To create and develop designs relating to sports applications made up of manufactured and/or standard components. To demonstrate the importance of optimisation within an iterative design process in terms of functionality, geometry and material selection. To show how a successful design can be achieved by integrating analytical skills from the engineering sciences. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Design sports equipment and/or products in detail using correctly selected components and design ancillary items to meet a requirement. Recognise the importance of completing comprehensive design analysis, component drawings and sub-assembly drawings in order to achieve a successful solution.
Content:
Embodiment design: To include shafts, couplings, keyway, fixings, bearings, pulleys, gear analysis. combined loadings, design factors and optimisation techniques.

XX20008: Design & innovation 2

Credits: 6
Level: Intermediate
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take XX20007

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce the student to the techniques and constraints of professional design practice, with an emphasis on concurrent design practice. To make the student aware of standard design methods, key aspects of a specification and systematic methods for problem solving. To make the student aware of the special features of design embodiment; including the stages in developing a product after the design stage; problems and benefits of working in a team; ergonomics and aesthetics issues. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Produce a detailed design specification. Apply standard design methods and value engineering techniques. Incorporate and specify new materials and finishing methods. Cost and specify development and quality requirements. Produce a complete product design. Work in a small design team to design sports equipment, product or system for the market place. Produce technical sales literature.
Content:
ASPECTS OF CONCURRENT ENGINEERING: Specifications, design methods and value engineering. Design for; safety, ergonomics, life cycle design, reliability.
REFINEMENT PROCESSES: Material selection and applications and finishes. Costing, quality assurance and design development.

Postgraduate units:


ME50145: Introduction to hydraulic circuits & components

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: ES30PR60OR10
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide familiarisation with fluid power circuits in a practical way by introducing the participants to the main hydraulic components, their performance characteristics and the standard symbols used for their representation on circuit diagrams. After taking this unit the student should be able to: read circuit diagrams and understand the principles of circuit operation, in relation to the performance of the individual components themselves.
Content:
Control of Linear Motion: Load, friction and inertia effects. Directional control, speed control, acceleration and deceleration, pressure controls and related circuits. Pressure losses and energy considerations, electronically operated valves. Pumps and Motors: Types and characteristics, volumetric and mechanical efficiencies, torque and power, effects of cavitation. Control of Rotary Motion: Motor systems, hydrostatic transmission.

ME50147: Component selection for hydraulic systems

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To enable the student to appreciate the factors which influence the specification and performance of hydraulic components. To provide guidance in their selection and the basis for the sizing of actuators, valves, pumps, motors, filters, accumulators, and associated equipment with the requirements of the load and duty cycle in mind. After taking this unit the student should be able to: select a satisfactory supply system for low energy loss and noise levels with good controllability and give an understanding of the factors affecting overall system performance by examining interactions between system components.
Content:
Actuator Systems: Flow considerations, Pressure losses, Valve flow characteristics. Supply Systems: Sizing of accumulators, Selection of heat exchangers. Rotating Systems: Pump and motor characteristics, Hydrostatic transmissions. Noise and Vibration: Sources of noise in hydraulic system. Methods of noise and vibration reduction. Fluid Management: Classification of contamination levels, Filters and their selection, Fluid sampling techniques.

ME50148: Hydraulic systems design

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW40PR50OR10
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To build on the work of the FP1 and FP2 units by concentrating on various aspects that influence the design of hydraulic systems. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Select components for the design of hydraulic systems. Understand and analyse the performance of such systems.
Content:
Determination of System Loads: Concept of load locus, Duty cycles for various applications. Systems Technology: Valve control of actuators, Electrohydraulic valves, Displacement control for pumps and motors, Power economy. System Analysis: Fluid compressibility effects, Servo control dynamics. Design Exercises: Examples of linear actuator and motor applications, Use of Bathfp hydraulic system computer simulation package.

ME50150: Introduction to control for electrohydraulic systems

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: PR30EX70
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide the basic groundwork in control theory and its application for the evaluation of electrohydraulic systems. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Design and predict the behaviour of practical control systems involving hydraulic actuation. Analyse the stability and apply compensation of such systems.
Content:
System Analysis: Simple valve controlled actuator, First order system, Block diagrams, Frequency response, Effect of fluid compressibility and load inertia on the valve controlled actuator, Codas control systems software. Stability: Nyquist criterion, Bode plot, Nichols chart, Compensation. Hydraulic Equipment: Electrohydraulic valves, Pump controlled systems.

ME50151: Control systems

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To develop an understanding of the techniques available for the analysis and design of practical continuous-time control systems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit students should be able to:
* Interpret a control system specification.
* Predict the behaviour of practical continuous-time control systems involving linear and non-linear elements.
* Describe the principle features of microprocessor-controlled systems.
Skills:
Problem solving, numeracy, (taught and assessed).
Content:
Analysis of control system transient response using Laplace transforms. Estimation of continuous-time transient response using the s-plane. Control system design using Root Locus Method. Parameter sensitivity using Root Locus Method. Linearisation of non-linear systems. System design specifications. Control systems design and analysis software. Performance assessment of systems using the Nichols chart. Integrator wind-up and feedback compensation techniques. Introduction to microprocessor control.

ME50152: Structural mechanics

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To broaden th understanding of Solid Mechanics to include material and geometric nonlinearity. To introduce concepts of bending and stretching in plate and shell structures. To introduce the elements of incremental and deformation plasticity theory. To underline the importance of energy and energy absoprtion in the general context. To introduce post-buckling theory. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Calculate stresses and deformations in thick cylinders under a variety of loading conditions. Understand the nature of plastic yielding. Determine deflections and critical loads of laterally loaded and in-plane loaded plates. Determine load-deflection responses of simple plastic mechanisms and their relation to energy absorption. Understand some of the implications of nonlinear effects in structural systems.
Content:
Stresses and deformation of pressurised thick cylinders. Yield critera. Introduction to incremental plasticity. Linear bending and buckling theory for circular and rectangular plates. Deformation theory of plasticity. Plastic mechanisms. Energy absorption. Introduction to crashworthiness. Phenomenology of post-buckling.

ME50153: Thermofluid systems

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To extend student understanding of the thermodynamics of compressible flow in ducts, combustion and power generation and their effects on the environment. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Calculate the effects of compressibility in the flow through ducts with friction and heat transfer; Understand the thermodynamics of compressible flow through an isothermal duct. Calculate the thermodynamic properties of gas-vapour mixtures: perform combustion calculations involving dissociation; carry out second law analysis of power plant; understand the effects of power generation on the environment.
Content:
Adiabatic constant area flow with friction; heat addition in steady inviscid one dimensional flow; isothermal compressible flow in ducts; gas-vapour mixtures, air conditioning systems; combustion; second law, irreversibility and availability; combined cycles, CHP; the environment.

ME50154: Aerodynamics

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: To improve students' understanding of viscous flow, compressible flow and external aerodynamics.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Apply the boundary layer equations to laminar and turbulent flow.
* Determine the drag contribution from an arbitrary shaped body.
* Calculate the aerodynamics characteristics of aerofoils in supersonic flow.
* Predict the load distributions over an arbitrary three-dimensional wing.
Skills:
Problem solving, numeracy, written communication (taught and assessed), working independently.
Content:
INTRODUCTION TO TURBULENCE: drag of bluff and streamlined bodies. Laminar and turbulent flow over flat places. COMPRESSIBLE FLOW: oblique shocks and expansion waves; shock expansion theory for aerofoils. THREE DIMENSIONAL LIFTING SURFACES: horseshoe vortex model, lifting line models, Vortex Lattice Method.

ME50155: Mechanical vibrations & noise

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce quantitative aspects of noise control and to give an appreciation of some of the problems involved. To acquaint the student with more advanced aspects of vibration. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Calculate sound pressure level given relevant power and material data. Estimate the reduction in sound pressure level that could be achieved by the use of a barrier or enclosure. Convert equations of motion into principal coordinates. Describe how to measure normal modes of structures. Apply harmonic balance to solve Rayleighs equation to obtain limit cycle solutions and also to solve Duffings equation and thus to explain jump phenomena.
Content:
Response of the ear, noise exposure, code of practice; noise isolation and absorption; barriers and enclosures; modal analysis and testing; nonlinearity.

ME50159: Manufacturing processes & analysis

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce the student to the application of analytical, numerical and experimental techniques to the simulation and modelling of manufacturing processes. To provide the students with an appreciation and understanding of advanced non-traditional material removal processes and application of beam technology in industry. After taking this module the student should be able to: Compare and contrast methods of analysis and their application in the manufacturing of metallic parts. Apply appropriate simulation and modelling techniques to selected manufacturing processes. Select appropriate tool and operational parameters to non-traditional processing operations.
Content:
Syllabus: Introduction to analytical and numerical analysis in manufacturing Work formulae Force equilibrium methods Slip line field theory Limit analysis Upper and Lower Bound Techniques Numerical methods Visio-plasticity Non-traditional material cutting operations; ECM, EDM, water jet cutting Beam technology applications (e.g. laser, Ion, Ultrasonic) and their industrial application to welding and metal removal.

ME50161: Internal combustion engine technology

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: To examine the technology, operation and application of IC engines. To analyse the criteria governing IC engine design, performance, combustion and emissions.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* discuss the parameters that define IC engine performance;
* identify the distinct operating characteristics of different classifications of IC engines;
* understand and predict the thermodynamic and mechanical constrains governing design;
* explain the environmental issues concerning future IC engine developments.
Skills:
Problem solving, numeracy, written communication (taught and assessed), working independently.
Content:
Thermodynamic and mechanical principals; combustion and fuels; spark and compression ignition engines; turbocharging; fuelling systems; induction, in-cylinder and exhaust processes; emission formation and reduction/prevention; automotive emission legislation, case studies; introduction to IC engine simulation techniques.

ME50166: Aircraft stability & control

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give an understanding of the principles of aircraft stability and the significance of the permitted centre of gravity limits which must be considered when loading an aircraft. To enable the student to understand and analyse both flight test and wind tunnel results pertaining to aircraft static stability. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Estimate stability margins for any given conventional or tail-less aircraft. Analyse and interpret both wind tunnel and flight test results concerned with aircraft static stability and trim.
Content:
Rigid aircraft behaviour. Basic specification of forces and moment on an aircraft. Properties of aerofoils and controls. Static stability criterion. Static and manoeuvre margins, both stick fixed and stick free. Flight test measurements and wind tunnel analysis. Springs and weights in the elevator circuit. Power assistance for the pilot and artificial feel. Dynamic stability: an introduction. Stability derivatives.

ME50169: Aerospace structures 1

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW25EX75
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To teach appropriate techniques for the loading, stress analysis and failure prediction of aircraft structures. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Determine critical gust and manoeuvre load cases. Design aircraft structures by accounting for static strength, buckling and fatigue failure. Use, and have a basic understanding of, computer packages for structural analysis and design.
Content:
Gust and manoeuvre envelope. Shear force, bending moment and torque diagrams. Shear flow and shear centre of open and close sections. Fracture strength and crack propagation, including safe-life and damage-tolerant design. Shear buckling and tension fields - analysis and design of ribs and spars. Compression buckling of stiffened panels - analysis and design of wing and fuselage panels. Use of computer packages for structural analysis and design.

ME50170: Manufacturing automation, modelling & simulation

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW40EX60
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop an understanding of the use and benefits of modelling and simulation in manufacturing systems design and operation. To teach the students the building blocks of automation and how to apply these in the design of robotic and automated systems. To examine the advanced and technical aspects of current automation technology. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Model and simulate the operation of a small manufacturing system. Use simulation as a manufacturing system design technique. Justify the use of manufacturing modelling and simulation. Understand the techniques required for the specification of robotic and automated cells. Appreciate the use of sensing (including vision) in advanced robot control. Undertake a cost evaluation for proposed systems and be able to recommend hard or flexible automation. Specify the safety requirements within an automated environment. Examine design for automated assembly.
Content:
MODELLING & SIMULATION: Definitions. types of models. Modelling methodologies. Validation and Verification. Justification, benefits and uses of simulation. MODELLING MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS: Discrete event and continuous approaches to simulation. Discrete event computer languages. Visually interactive simulation. Use of mathematical and statistical models, distributions and random numbers, queuing models and inventory systems. Modelling breakdowns, conveyors, work flow and tool flow. Utilisation statistics. Model verification and validation. Simulation of manufacturing systems. MODELLING PRODUCTS: Geometric models. Product data models. Neutral formats and data exchange. API for manufacturing software libraries. INFORMATION MODELS: Information flows within manufacture. Levels of detail. IDEF models. Automation Peripherals (eg: Vibratory bowl feeders). Sensors (eg: limit switches, proximity switches, photoelectric sensors). Robot Sensing & Machine Vision. Grippers & Tooling. Hard V's Flexible Automation. Robot Control. Safety. Applications (eg: Aerospace, Automotive, Pharmaceutical & Electronics). Mobile Robots. Current Research Advancements.

ME50173: Research methodology

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
By the end of the course students should be able to:
* Structure existing knowledge in their field
* Derive theory from qualitative data
* Develop testable hypotheses
* Compile cogent research proposals
* Design experimental and observational programmes
* Analyse experimental and observational results
* Write publishable accounts of their research
* Defend the philosophy underlying their adopted and preferred research practices. Content: Philosophy of the research process Structuring complex problems Deriving theory from qualitative research Developing research proposals Testing hypotheses by experiment or observations (3 periods) Managing research processes analysis of data (2 periods) Publishing research Scientific creativity

ME50176: Project scoping

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW70OR10OT20
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide direction at the start of the major project period. To put to practical use the tools developed in the generic courses Information, Research & Computer Management Systems and/or Concurrent Engineering/Business Process Re-Engineering. To provide experience in project management (possibly with financial implications such as the need to handle a budget). To design an experimental rig (where appropriate). To give a period of familiarization of software and hardware (where appropriate). To facilitate progress to the main part of the project without waste of time and effort. To provide an understanding of the engineering context of the research area. During this module the student will: Produce an interim report of 2000 - 3000 words covering project specifications, literature survey, initial design and/or experimentation. Read material from a list of text book chapters and general review articles as directed by the tutor. Discuss the reading material in one-to-one tutorial with the tutor on a fortnightly basis. Prepare a 2000 - 3000 word detailed review of the subject. Prepare and present a seminar on the subject.

ME50177: Innovation & advanced design

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide an understanding of the processes whereby the effect of a product can be evaluated. To provide an understanding of innovation in an industrial context. To introduce a number of innovation techniques, particularly the TRIZ methodology. To introduce a number of advanced design techniques and methodologies, including design management techniques to enable the innovation process to be executed and managed. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Understand the processes of innovation. Use a number of innovation methods and techniques Apply the processes to the development of new products. Understand the effects of change on the processes and markets. Understand the concept of a product architecture and will be able to apply a number of advanced techniques such as QFD, DFM, and DFA to their work. Understand the economics of product development, and the impact of time and cost overruns.
Content:
Discipline in innovation, Creative processes, TRIZ, Inventive principles, Predictable evolution, Function analysis, Marketing innovation, Case studies. The product development process and problem definition for innovation. Project trade offs. Quality function deployment. Design for manufacture, assembly and life cycles. Product architecture. Incremental design strategies. Managing design information. Product development team studies. Case studies.

ME50178: Advanced control

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give an understanding of sampled data system theory with reference to the digital control of dynamical systems. To provide an introduction to modern control theory and to explore the links between this and classical control. To show how modern control techniques can be used to control physical systems. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Evaluate the behaviour of single input/single output digital control systems and determine system stability. Understand the problems associated with sampling signals. Select appropriate methods to improve control systems performance. Represent and analyse both continuous-time and discrete-time systems described in state variable forms. Understand the key features of neural and fuzzy controllers.
Content:
Nature of sampled signals; selection of sample rate; aliasing; prefiltering. The Z transform. Open-loop and closed-loop digital control; stability of closed-loop digital systems. Root locus; estimation of the transient response using the Z-plane. Frequency response of discrete-time systems. Digital design techniques; approximation methods; digital PID controllers. Adaptive control. State representation of physical systems; non-uniqueness of states. Controllability and observability. Time response of continuous- and discrete-time systems. Observers and state feedback; modal control. Parameter estimation. Introduction to neural networks and fuzzy control.

ME50181: Computational fluid dynamics

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce the full Navier-Stokes equations and give the physical significance of each term in the equations. To introduce the student to CFD techniques appropriate for practical engineering applications (the finite-volume method). To introduce the student to the use of commercial CFD packages, the importance of validation and the need for caution in applying the underlying models for turbulent flow. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Use CFD codes to compute 2D flows and understand the physical significance of the solutions. Compute rates of heat transfer and shear stress. Set up viscous fluid flow and heat transfer problems using a commercial code (with regular and possibly body-fitted grids), and extract features of the computed solutions for interpretation and validation.
Content:
LAMINAR FLOW: Navier-Stokes equations and energy equations; physical significance of the terms. Discretisation and solution of the non-linear equations using the finite-volume method. Pressure-velocity coupling. Alternative mesh structures. TURBULENT FLOW: Introduction to computational models of turbulence. Application to the computation of developing boundary layers and recirculation flows. Limitations of the current generation of turbulence models.

ME50183: Finite element analysis

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW50EX50
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To develop the students' appreciation of the mathematical basis of the finite-element method. To develop the critical use of commercial finite-element software. To develop finite element methods for the study of vibrations. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Understand the mathematical formulation of the finite element method when applied to linear problems. Use a commercially available finite-element package to analyse linear stress-strain problems in solid bodies. Critically assess the approximate solutions so produced. Use a commercially available element package to model vibration problems.
Content:
Introduction to finite elements as applied to a continuum; displacement formulation. shape functions; numerical integration; Hands-on use of a commercially available finite element package to solve problems in linear stress analysis. Pre and post processing. Model definition if 1D, 2D, 3D representations, symmetry, choice of element type, mesh density requirements. Model validation by comparison with exact analytical solution. Examples in modal analysis.

ME50185: Dissertation

Credits: 30
Level: Masters
Academic Year
Dissertation period
Assessment: DS100
Requisites:

Content:
Dissertation

ME50186: Geometric modelling

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX70CW30
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce the ideas used in fully three dimensional CADCAM systems. To give hands-on experience in writing software for such systems. To introduce the ideas of constraint and rule based systems. To illustrate constraint modelling and its applications. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Understand the fundamental concepts of geometric modelling and the algorithms and data structures used in it. Understand the implications for efficiency and the domain of these algorithms. Write programs for such things as ray tracing to produce three dimensional graphics. Understand the ideas of constraint modelling and resolution. Use a constraint modelling system to simulate, analysis and optimise a mechanism system.
Content:
Wire frame and other precursors to geometric models. Boundary representation models. Set theoretic (or CSG) models. Parametric curves and bi-parametric patches, the Bernstein basis. Bezier curves, B-splines and NURBS, implicit solids and surfaces. Non-manifold geometric models. feature recognition. Machining geometric models. Rapid prototyping and geometric modelling. The medial axis transform and FE mesh generatic.. Blends and fillets. Minkowski sums. Kernal modellers, APIs and GUIs. Rendering geometric models, volume visualisation. Numerical accuracy problems in geometric models. Integral properties of geometric models. Procedural shape definition. Types of engineering constraints. Constraint based systems. Techniques for constraint resolution, optimisation methods. Form of a constraint modelling system, its underlying language and structure. Constraint based description of mechanism and their performance. Mechanism selection, storage of catalogues. Case study examples.

ME50187: Heat transfer

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW20EX80
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To reinforce the student's ability to model conduction in solids and radiation between surfaces. To introduce the student to convective heat transfer and to the solution of engineering heat transfer problems. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Understand the concepts and equations governing heat transfer by conduction and radiation, and to be able to solve heat transfer problems of engineering importance. Understand the concepts and equations governing convective heat transfer, and to be able to solve heat transfer problems of engineering importance.
Content:
HEAT CONDUCTION AND THERMAL RADIATION : Review of conduction, convection and radiation. Derivation of general equation of conduction. Analytical and numerical solution of selected steady-state and transient conduction problems. Blackbody and greybody radiation, solar radiation, view factors, radiant heat exchange between surfaces. Formulation of radiation equations for numerical solution and application to engineering problems. CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER : Review of basic concepts of buoyancy-driven and forced convection. Derivation of the boundary-layer momentum and energy equations for laminar flow. Turbulence and its effects on heat transfer. The Reynolds analogy between shear stress and heat flux. Solution of the laminar and turbulent boundary-layer equations and applications to engineering problems. The conjugate problem: combined conduction, convection and radiation.

ME50190: Systems modelling & simulation

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce the students of procedures for establishing mathematical models of engineering systems. To introduce commercial software packages for the solution of the mathematical models and to examine the relative merits of different approaches. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Make the realistic judgements necessary to develop mathematical models of complex engineering systems. Undertake a critical appraisal of the simulation results and to have an appreciation of the limitations imposed by the assumptions made and the method of solution adopted. Apply commercial software packages for the prediction of engineering systems performance.
Content:
Role of simulation in design. Analysis of dynamic systems in the time domain and frequency domain. Linearisation methods. Modelling of discontinuities and non-linearities. Bathfp modelling. Simulink and Matlab modelling. System identification.

ME50193: Vehicle dynamics

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To give the student an appreciation of factors affecting vehicle ride comfort and handling. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Describe and analyse the operation of a vehicle suspension and predict vehicle ride behaviour and steady state handling performance. Explain the physical principles of road vehicle aerodynamic design.
Content:
Disturbance and sensitivity. Basic suspension systems. System frequencies - bounce, pitch and roll. Anti-pitch and anti-squat. Tyre behaviour. Front/rear suspensions - Springs and dampers. Roll centre. Steady state handling characteristics. Airflows. Drag & Lift. Economy & Performance. Aerodynamic Design.

ME50194: Practical instrumentation techniques

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: PR100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide the basic groundwork in instrumentation and data acquisition techniques and their application.After taking this unit the student should be able to:Describe the operation of various types of transducer and instrumentation system.Select suitable transducers, signal conditioning and data acquisition systems for a particular application.
Content:
Transducers for measuring strain, speed, force, torque, displacement, velocity, acceleration, fluid flow, temperature, pressure. Operational amplifiers, filters and signal conditioning. Interconnections and noise. Digital to analog converters, analog to digital converters, computer data acquisition systems. Practical applications in engineering systems relevant to individual MSc programmes.

ME50201: Electromechanical energy conversion

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW30EX70
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide familiarisation with the fundamentals of electrical drive theory and applications in a practical way by introducing the participants to the principles of electromechanical energy conversion, AC and DC electrical motors, power electronics and variable-speed drives. After taking this unit the student should be able to: read electrical circuit diagrams, understand the principles of electrical motor operation, appreciate the role of power electronic devices and circuits, understand the requirements for efficient variable-speed operation and motion control.
Content:
Electromagnetism : voltage, current, flux, force, torque; DC, AC, three-phase system; Electric motors: types, sizes, supply requirements, torque/speed characteristic, starting/overloading problems, possibilities for variable-speed operation. Power electronics: devices (thyristors, bipolar transistors, FETs, IGBTs), configurations, converters, PWM, applications Noise: airborne noise due to PWM; electro-magnetic interference (EMI) pollution. Motion control: speed/position control for both DC and AC motors, supply requirements, control algorithms. Exercises: simulation exercise; AC & DC drive design examples; DC drive exercise; laboratory work.

ME50202: Servo-electric drive performance & control

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW20ES20EX60
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME50201

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To provide basic knowledge in application of control theory for electrical servo drives. To appreciate the factors which influence the specification and performance of components and sub-systems of electrical motor drive systems. To provide guidance in motor selection and converter selection. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Design and predict performance of a practical servo-electric motor drive system, including motor type and size, supply system (power converter) and control system. Model and analyse the designed system.
Content:
System components: motors, stepper motors, power electronic converters, sensors and instrumentation, control systems (analogue and digital). Motion control: principles, intelligent indexer control, multi-axis motion control. System analysis: block diagrams, frequency domain representation, plant stability. Modelling: all types of motors, power supplies, feedback devices. Control systems: motion control systems for DC and AC motors, scalar control, vector control, feedback processing, parameter estimation, condition monitoring, application of advanced control techniques. Exercises: case studies for DC and AC motors, design exercises (component selection & system modelling), computer-based exercises, laboratory work.

ME50205: Reading unit

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW60OR40
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
Aims To provide: an understanding of a specific subject not encountered in a normal University taught course syllabus; an understanding of the engineering context of a specific subject or research area. Learning Objectives: After taking this unit the student should be able to: Read material from a list of text book chapters and general review articles as prepared by the tutor. Discuss the reading material in a one-to-one tutorial with the tutor on a weekly basis. Prepare a detailed review of the subject. Prepare a seminar on the subject.
Content:
This is specific to the subject area of each individual course.

ME50206: Energy & the environment

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW20ES20EX60
Requisites:
Before taking this unit you must take ME30068

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To understand the energy balances within the major regions of the world, their environmental consequences and sustainability. . To introduce assessment techniques for evaluating projects in terms of energy use and environmental impact. To understand the relationship between alternative energy technologies and the societies in which they develop and to participate in discussion of energy and environmental options. After taking this unit the student should be able to: Evaluate the life cycle of major energy projects, and present the results in a form that will enable decision makers to fully comprehend their energy and environmental consequences. Develop the key features of sustainable energy strategies for countries from different regions of the world in terms of their economic development, indigenous energy resources, and environmental consequences. Participate in local and national debates over large and small-scale development projects with an understanding of limitations placed on them by economic, physical, and environmental constraints.
Content:
ENERGY RESOURCES : Fossil fuels (oil, natural gas, coal); Primary electricity (hydro and nuclear power); Renewable energy sources; Substitutable and non-substitutable resources. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION : Pollutant emissions from fossil fuel combustion: local, regional and global effects; nuclear power and environmental sustainability: technologies, radioactive emissions and waste disposal; Environmental and related impacts of remewable energy systems. ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES : Cost/benefit analysis; First and second law (energy and exergy) thermodynamic analysis; Environmental Life-cycle assessment; Qualitative environmental risks. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: "People, planet and prosperity"; the sustainability equation; principles and practice of sustainable developmenty; 'The Natural Step' and its system conditions; Environmental footprint analysis; Local Agenda 21: Sustainable energy options. ENERGY AND SOCIETY : The technology-society relationship; Alternative energy technologies; Energy conservation; Energy and transport. ENERGY STRATEGIES : Major world producers and users; Energy systems modelling; UK energy issues and strategies; Energy and the developing world: basic human needs, the role of biofuels, and 'appropriate' energy technologies; Case study; comparative energy studies of selected industrialised and developing countries.

ME50208: Power transmission systems

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW50ES40OR10
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To increase appreciation of all types of Power Transmission and Motion Control (PTMC) Systems. To allow the engineers to compare various PTMC variants and select appropriate solutions. After taking this unit the student should be able to: analyse the suitability of a PTMC system for the application. Select the most appropriate solutions taking due account of performance, flexibility, energy-efficiency, life-cycle costs and environmental impact. Perform basic design and predict the behaviour of hydraulic, electrical and mechanical systems.
Content:
Basics: energy, power, needs for controllable and efficient transmission of power. Hydraulic systems: pumps, valves, actuators, motors, typical applications, case studies. Pneumatic systems: compressors, valves, actuators, cleanliness & lubrication issues; case study. Electrical drive systems: AC and DC motors; power electronic converters; velocity control and position control, case study. Mechanical systems: types, applications, main features. Control systems: basic requirements, processing and feedback hardware. Exercises: simulation exercises, hydraulic design exercise, DC drive design exercise, laboratory work.

ME50216: Diploma project

Credits: 12
Level: Masters
Semester: 2
Assessment: CW60OR10OT30
Requisites:
Aims: To undertake a small-scale research project - an in-depth study of a specific topic area, including modelling, computational or experimental analysis. To put to practical use the tools developed in the generic course Research Methodology, and possibly Instrumentation Techniques (where appropriate). To provide experience in project management (possibly with financial implications such as the need to handle a budget). To provide experience in designing an experimental rig or selecting appropriate software packages and techniques for the modelling and analysis of engineering problems. To provide familiarization with the use of appropriate software and hardware (where appropriate). To provide an understanding of the engineering context of the research area.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to: Perform a literature survey and prepare a critical analysis and presentation on an engineering topic. Critically discuss reading material with regard to its relevance to the research project. Specify appropriate methods of instrumentation and laboratory data collection, and/or specify computer packages and techniques for the modelling and analysis of engineering problems. Prepare a 5000-7000 word report on an engineering subject, covering project specifications, literature survey, design, modelling, simulation or experimentation. Prepare and present a seminar on an engineering subject.
Skills:
Communication, I.T., Numeracy, Working with others, Problem Solving.
Content:
Self-study on the chosen topic. Application of suitable research methods. Writing an project report.

ME50221: Introduction to mechatronic design

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce the student to Mechatronics, a multi-discipline subject that offers new solutions to engineering design problems. To make the student aware that many traditional design approaches can be improved by taking a systems engineering approach, and questioning established tenets. To demonstrate how intelligent control, integrated with established mechanical design concepts, can achieve significant advances in design capabilities. To show that progress in multi-disciplinary design is much quicker than in traditional design. The course will make the student aware of the technologies involved in Mechatronics, how intelligent machines are designed and where there is a need for reconfigurable systems in today's environments. The student will learn to look at the widest facets of mechatronic design, beyond the purely engineering considerations, aspects such as whole life costs, environmental impact etc.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Critically assess different design solutions to a problem, balancing a mechatronic approach against purely mechanical solutions.
* Suggest new design approaches to given design problems and justify the improvements offered by a Mechatronics solution against a number of design and life criteria.
* Work in a small multi-discipline design team, understanding different design technologies and how they interact, producing a final mechatronic design specification.
Skills:
Problem solving, numeracy, written communication (taught and assessed), working independently.
Content:
Introduction to Mechatronics and the interaction between mechanical actuation and electronic control. Investigation into current design solutions to well known problems in automobile, aerospace, manufacture, farming etc. Alternative mechatronic solutions to these design solutions, in areas where Mechatronics may be appropriate. The wider aspects of engineering design today. Systems engineering in a wider, mechatronic design philosophy. Design of intelligent machines and systems. Pre-determined control as against agent technology. Industrial examples. Whole life analysis. Bespoke customisation. Reproducing the "confidence through evolution" concept in new mechatronic solutions.

ME50222: Mechatronic systems modelling & simulation

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW100
Requisites:

Aims & Learning Objectives:
To introduce the students to procedures for establishing mathematical models of engineering systems.To introduce commercial software packages for the solution of the mathematical models and to examine the relative merits of different approaches. After taking this unit the student should be able to:Make the realistic judgements necessary to develop mathematical models of complex engineering systems. Undertake a critical appraisal of the simulation results and to have an appreciation of the limitations imposed by the assumptions made and the method of solution adopted. Apply commercial software packages for the prediction of engineering systems performance.
Content:
Role of simulation in design. Analysis of dynamic systems in the time domain and frequency domain. Linearisation methods. Modelling of discontinuities and non-linearities. Bathfp modelling. Simulink and Matlab modelling. System identification.

ME50223: Vehicle Engineering

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: To provide knowledge relating to vehicle design and an understanding of the operation and performance of the important sub-systems.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Understand the vehicle design process.
* Analyse the performance of transmission and driveline systems.
* Understand the fluid power aspects of sub-system components.
* Analyse aspects of vehicle and powertrain control.
* Understand the operation and performance of braking systems.
* Understand the principles of vehicle performance testing.
Skills:
Problem solving, numeracy, written communication (taught and assessed), working independently.
Content:
Vehicle design; manufacturing processes; materials selection; transmissions; driveline; servo-hydraulics; control; performance testing; braking systems.

ME50224: Aircraft propulsion

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX100
Requisites:
Aims: To provide knowledge of the development, performance and design of gas-turbine aeroengines. To apply the fundamentals of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics to the performance and design of aircraft and aeroengines. To introduce the basic mechanics of turbomachinery.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:Understand the fundamental differences between the performance characteristics of turbojet, turbofan and turboprop engines. Analyse thermodynamic cycles for turboprop, turboshaft, turbojet and turbofan engines. Understand principles and performance of compressor, turbine, combustor, intake and exhaust nozzle. Calculate performance of engines at design and off-design conditions. Understand basic turbomachinery design.
Skills:
Problem solving and numeracy (taught and assessed).
Content:
Birth of jet engine; engine classification; operational envelope; thrusts and efficiencies; thermodynamic cycles (turboshaft, turbojet, turbofan); combustors; intakes (subsonic and supersonic), afterburners and nozzles; design and off-design performance; turbine cooling.

ME50225: Aircraft performance & design

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX80CW20
Requisites:
Aims: To introduce the basic mechanics of flight and the factors affecting the design of fixed-wing aircraft. To provide a broad outline of the performance characteristics of aircraft engines and their impact on aircraft performance. To introduce methods for the initial sizing of aircraft using principal design parameters.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* predict the performance of a fixed-wing aircraft in level, climbing and turning flight;
* understand and apply aircraft specifications within the Airworthiness Regulations;
* calculate take-off and landing distances and understand the balance field length concept;
* construct a constraints diagram for the critical flight phases for estimation of wing and engine requirements.
Skills:
Problem solving, numeracy, written communication (taught and assessed), working independently.
Content:
Standard atmosphere and aircraft speed definitions; level flight, climb and field performance; use of a drag polar; range equations and turning flight. Performance characteristics of thrust and power producing engines. Take-off and landing distance calculations, WAT limits and the balanced field length. Payload-range diagrams and constraints diagrams for preliminary aircraft sizing; considerations for aircraft design.

ME50226: Machines and products in society

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: CW40EX60
Requisites:
Aims: To discuss the safety, legal, environmental, product protection aspects of machines and products.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* understand the legal issues controlling design of machinery;
* carry out a detailed hazard analysis and risk assessment;
* understand the use of design standards to achieve a safe design;
* appreciate environmental considerations;
* understand means for product/process protection.
Skills:
Problem solving, numeracy, written communication (taught and assessed), working independently.
Content:
Safety and legal requirements: EC directives, standards, risk assessment, design for safety, employee protection, product liability, and contamination. Environmental: noise and vibration, packaging waste, recycling. Product/process protection: patent system, trade marks, copywright legislation.

ME50301: Digital design

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Aims: To provide an understanding of: the use of CAD in the overall design process; the different types of modeller and their applications; the relevant communications and information technologies to support distributed working. To give experience in the use of CAD techniques.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Describe the different types of CAD modelling and communications systems, what they offer and their application to the overall design process; in particular to the design of machines/mechanisms. Understand the CAD requirements of typical companies.
* Appreciate how CAD techniques can be applied to different application areas.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; IT; working independently; written communication.
Content:
Computer aids for design, their relation to design needs, application to mechanism/machine design. Basic two and three dimensional drafting entities, manipulation, storage within system, transformations. Ideas of solid modelling, feature-based modelling, and constraint modelling. Graphics interface languages, parametrics. Communications technology: historical background, carriers, transmission; networks - LANs, WANs; standards - ISO, TCP/IP. Data representation and exchange: data and information in engineering; data types; mark-up languages; CAD data exchange. Computer-supported co-operative work (CSCW): dimensions of communication in design; classification of CSCW approaches; critical assessment of the technologies. Topics for self study that may be examined.

ME50302: Product design and development

Credits: 6
Level: Masters
Semester: 1
Assessment: EX50CW50
Requisites:
Aims:
* To illustrate the stages of product design processes, methods for creativity and styling, awareness of human factors and ergonomics.
* To provide awareness of the product design discipline and typical activities undertaken.
* To introduce strategic, cultural, organisational and technological aspects of product development in a global context, including consideration of knowledge management issues, models of the new product introduction (NPI) process, management of the NPI process, product development strategies, sustainable development issues.
Learning Outcomes:
After taking this unit the student should be able to:
* Describe typical product design processes; appreciate user requirements such as style, form and interaction.
* Identify the key elements of successful products.
* Describe the historic context of global product development.
* Outline strategic, organisational, human and cultural factors that should be taken into account when developing products for a global market.
* Describe approaches to sustainable development.
Skills:
Problem solving; numeracy; working independently; written communication.
Content:
Product design: user requirements, form, styling, functionality. Creativity, concept generation, concept evaluation. Human factors, ergonomics. Examples of successful products and best practice. Product development: historical and cultural context. Human aspects: communities of practice; critical situations; methods for knowledge sharing, cultural issues. Strategic aspects: managing the design process; product platform and strategy; mass customisation; late and local configuration, issues of and approaches to sustainable development. Topics for self study that could be examined.

 

University | Catalogues for 2005/06 | for UGs | for PGs