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CM10251: Computing as a science and engineering discipline

Follow this link for further information on academic years Academic Year: 2019/0
Further information on owning departmentsOwning Department/School: Department of Computer Science
Further information on credits Credits: 12      [equivalent to 24 CATS credits]
Further information on notional study hours Notional Study Hours: 240
Further information on unit levels Level: Certificate (FHEQ level 4)
Further information on teaching periods Period:
Academic Year
Further information on unit assessment Assessment Summary: CW 50%, EX 50%
Further information on unit assessment Assessment Detail:
  • Coursework 1 (CW 20%)
  • Coursework 2 (CW 30%)
  • Examination (EX 50%)
Further information on supplementary assessment Supplementary Assessment:
CM10251 Coursework (where allowed by programme regulations)
Further information on requisites Requisites: While taking this module you must take CM10227
Further information on descriptions Description: Aims:
1. To provide a foundation for understanding of Computer Science in the context of contemporary scientific and engineering practice and its role in wider society.
2. To introduce the concepts of method and process as they are used in computing as a science and engineering discipline.
3. To foster principled thinking about rigour and validity in Computer Science
4. To develop the ability of new Computer Science students to define and articulate a problem through analysis and integration of a variety of relevant and authoritative information sources.
5. To introduce concepts of software quality and measurement as challenges in the context of 'fitness for purpose' and the role of a specification.
6. To develop students' appreciation for the importance of validity for the formulation and testing of claims, so that students may develop arguments about the integrity of new technologies and allied advancements in Computer Science.
7. To exemplify rigour and validity in Computer Science by exposing new Computer Science students to contemporary research work.
8. To found and exercise students' abilities in group project definition, monitoring and evaluation.
9. To apply technical knowledge in a manner that tolerates ambiguity and respects the need to negotiate with stakeholders.
10. To equip new computer science students with abilities to construct arguments about the professional, social and ethical issues involved in the development and exploitation of Computer Science knowledge.

Learning Outcomes:
On completion of the unit the students will be able to:
1. Analyse relevant information to define a Computer Science problem and to construct a software requirements specification that encapsulates it
2. Use a modular strategy to construct High-Level Architectural models of software systems that reflect non-functional requirements, including performance, security and reliability.
3. Systematically test software based on a software requirements specification.
4. Explain how the scientific method relates to empirical testing of software
5. Prepare and present clear, succinct, critical and comparative accounts of group project work in a manner that is appropriate for a defined audience.
6. Identify and discuss potential ethical issues in sociotechnical systems as inherent aspects of Computer Science research and professional practice.

Skills:
Information analysis, report writing, presentation skills, group working, critical reflection, identification of opportunities for personal development.

Content:
Software complexity, abstraction and modularity.
The lifecycle concept and agility in software engineering
Scientific method and hypothesis testing (disconfirmability) and the problem of indeterminacy in sociotechnical systems.
Review processes in assuring scientific and engineering knowledge (peer review and quality cycles).
Software quality and testing, including security as a system-wide property in sociotechnical systems
Specification of software requirements.
Project management and collaborative work (scheduling, task allocation, monitoring, risk analysis and mitigation).
Exemplars of contemporary research work in Human-Computer Interaction, Media Technology, Artificial Intelligence, and Mathematical Foundations.
Scientific ethics (e.g. plagiarism, falsification, misreporting).
Professional codes of conduct.
Further information on programme availabilityProgramme availability:

CM10251 is Compulsory on the following programmes:

Department of Computer Science
  • USCM-AFB06 : BSc(Hons) Computer Science (Year 1)
  • USCM-AAB07 : BSc(Hons) Computer Science with Study year abroad (Year 1)
  • USCM-AKB07 : BSc(Hons) Computer Science with Year long work placement (Year 1)
  • USCM-AFB20 : BSc(Hons) Computer Science and Mathematics (Year 1)
  • USCM-AAB20 : BSc(Hons) Computer Science and Mathematics with Study year abroad (Year 1)
  • USCM-AKB20 : BSc(Hons) Computer Science and Mathematics with Year long work placement (Year 1)
  • USCM-AFM01 : MComp(Hons) Computer Science (Year 1)
  • USCM-AAM02 : MComp(Hons) Computer Science with Study year abroad (Year 1)
  • USCM-AKM02 : MComp(Hons) Computer Science with Year long work placement (Year 1)
  • USCM-AFM14 : MComp(Hons) Computer Science and Mathematics (Year 1)
  • USCM-AAM14 : MComp(Hons) Computer Science and Mathematics with Study year abroad (Year 1)
  • USCM-AKM14 : MComp(Hons) Computer Science and Mathematics with Year long work placement (Year 1)

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