University of Bath

Indigenous pedagogical reform in sub-Saharan Africa: the ‘one to five’ student network system

In this seminar, Dr Rafael Mitchell will discuss how top ranking students are assigned to support a group of five or six peers in a school in Tigray, Ethiopia.

15 Mar 201812.00pm
to
15 Mar 20181.00pm
Free
Group of Ethiopian children smiling
The paper addresses this mechanism of peer learning and social control alongside other recent politically-inspired innovations. Photo courtesy of Trevor Cole on Unsplash.

Drawing from ethnographic fieldwork at a government primary school in Tigray, Ethiopia, this talk introduces the ‘one-to-five’ student network system, whereby top ranking students are assigned to support a group of five or six peers.

Dr Rafael Mitchell will discuss this mechanism of peer learning and social control alongside other recent politically-inspired innovations which are grounded in collectivist values and reflect a mixture of indigenous and Marxist influences. The paper also takes into account the extent to which these practices are best conceived in terms of progressivism or formalism, as well as their value in promoting student learning.

This event is part of a seminar series organised by the Learning, Pedagogy and Diversity Research Cluster in the Department of Education.