Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Environment

Research Themes

I-SEE seeks to focus, connect and integrate research on sustainable energy and the environment across all disciplines at the University.

  • Energy efficiency improvement and demand reduction

    Energy efficiency improvement and demand reduction

    Increasing the efficiency with which we generate, distribute and transmit energy is vital for ensuring sustainability, as is making energy-consuming products more efficient.

  • Future energy sources and energy storage

    Future energy sources and energy storage

    Finding more sustainable ‘clean’ sources of energy and methods for storing available energy is an important challenge for meeting the 60% emissions targets set by the UK Government.

  • Energy generation, transmission and distribution

    Energy generation, transmission and distribution

    The generation, transmission and distribution of energy creates a significant carbon footprint. To reduce it, more energy derived from renewable sources must enter the grid.

  • Low carbon transportation and alternative fuels

    Low carbon transportation and advanced/alternative/sustainable fuels

    The environmental impact of transport could be reduced by more efficient engines and hybrid, electric, hydrogen and biofuel powered vehicles.

  • Environmental sustainability

    Environmental sustainability

    Environmental sustainability is the core ethos behind the development of I-SEE at the University of Bath. Our research addresses each of the three pillars of sustainability: social, environmental and economic.

  • Effective policy & practice around sustainable behaviour

    Effective policy & practice around sustainable behaviour

    Technological and engineering advances towards sustainability must be underpinned by effective policy, regulation and social acceptability.

  • The economics and ethics of sustainability

    The economics and ethics of sustainability

    Society's adoption of a sustainable ethos will depend not only on the availability of technology and willingness to adopt change, but also on the economics of the change.