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Andrew McLaughlin in the University of Bath Press Office on 01225 386 883 or 07966 341 357 For free tickets contact Sheila Willmott on 01225 386 631 or e-mail s.d.willmott@bath.ac.uk

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At 2 km long, the Akshi bridge in Japan is the longest bridge in the world.

Internal News - 21 March 2005

Free public lecture on bridges

Anyone who has ever looked at a bridge and made instant decision on whether they liked it or hated it will be able to find out why at a free public lecture next week (Wednesday 23 March 2005).

From the two thousand year old Segovian viaduct in Spain to the two kilometre long Akashi in Japan (the longest in the world), bridges have provided the world with many striking landmarks, as well as uniting areas of land separated by rivers and other natural features.

According to Professor Tim Ibell, who will be giving the lecture, the aesthetic qualities of a bridge can be broken down into a number of simple rules which make it possible to quantify whether a bridge design will be pleasing to the eye, or not. He will give the details of these rules to his audience.

“The aesthetics of bridges have always played a large role in their design and it is this, coupled with the purity of structure which they exhibit, which makes bridges a delight for civil engineers," said Professor Ibell, head of the Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering at the University of Bath.

“The aesthetics of bridges have always played a large role in their design and it is this, coupled with the purity of structure which they exhibit, which makes bridges a delight for civil engineers," said Professor Ibell, head of the Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering at the University of Bath.

For free tickets contact Sheila Willmott on 01225 386 631 or e-mail s.d.willmott@bath.ac.uk