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Professor Steve Jones
Professor Steve Jones

Press Release - 02 November 2006

Scientist argues why “creationism is wrong and evolution is right” at public lecture

One of the UK’s best-known scientists will describe why he believes that creationism is wrong and evolution is right at free public lecture taking place next week (5.15-6.15pm, Monday 6 November 2006).

Steve Jones, professor of genetics at University College London, has been a prominent opponent of those who claim that creationism - the idea that the universe was created by a supreme being - provides a valid alternative to evolution.

His comments have come as a handful of scientists and Christian groups try to get the creationist theory of ‘intelligent design’ taught as an alternative to evolution in schools.

The overwhelming majority of scientists throughout the world passionately disagree with these groups, and point to the vast amount of scientifically-collected evidence which supports evolution – and the lack of a testable hypothesis in intelligent design.

For these reasons many scientists have refused to engage with the creationist lobby because they believe it might give the impression that there was any debate amongst the scientific community over the validity of evolution – which is widely accepted as true.

“We are delighted to have one of the UK’s leading scientists kicking-off our new season of Millennium Lectures, and look forward to hearing Professor Jones’ argument,” said Stuart Macdonald, a postgraduate student and part of the committee that organised the talk as part of the annual Millennium Lectures series in the Department of Chemistry.

“The issue of creationism, and in particular its teaching in schools, has caused much concern amongst scientists around the world, so it will be particularly interesting to hear from one of the most prominent speakers on evolution to hear what he has to say on the issue.”

Professor Jones is one of the best known contemporary popular writers on the subject of evolution. In 1996 his writing won him the Royal Society Michael Faraday prize for his contributions to the public understanding of science.

He is also a television presenter and presented In the Blood, a six-part TV series on human genetics first broadcast in 1996.

The lecture will take place at 5.15 - 6.15pm on Monday 6 November 2006 in lecture theatre 8W 1.1. No tickets are required, just turn up on the evening.


The University of Bath is one of the UK's leading universities, with an international reputation for quality research and teaching. View a full list of the University's press releases: http://www.bath.ac.uk/news/

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