Archive for the ‘CSCT’ Category

STEM4Britain at the Houses of Parliament

Second year PhD student Bethan Charles travelled to the Houses of Parliament to attend STEM for Britain Annual poster competition

Taking Marie-Curie on a Eurotrip

Read the CSCT blog about the 5th Marie Curie Alumni Association Annual Conference and General Assembly in Leuven, Belgium

CSCT Blog: Bath Taps Into Science 2018

The Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies share their experiences at the recent Bath Taps into Science Festival

5 steps for having a top-koality research visit

Students describe their research in a limerick

Doctoral students at the University of Bath have been challenged to use their rhyming skills to describe their PhD research on social media in the form of a limerick.

The story about GSK, robots and PhD students

Six students from the CSCT visited GlaxoSmithKline’s Research & Development sites in Stevenage

First company joins Sustainable Technologies Business Acceleration Hub

Battery research to help super-charge electric vehicle revolution

Researchers from our Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies are part of a consortium of academic and industry partners awarded Government funding to improve battery technology.

The paper making water safer

Our researchers have developed a revolutionary paper sensor for detecting toxic compounds in water

Just a small piece of paper can make water consumption safer

A revolutionary microbial-based paper sensor has been developed by researchers at the University of Bath, creating a cheap, sustainable and recyclable device for detecting toxic compounds in water.

CSCT Blog: Italian Women Inventors & Innovators Prize

We speak to Isabella Poli, an MSCA-FIRE fellow at the CSCT who was selected as a finalist in the ITWIIN 2017 competition.

Simple water test could prevent crippling bone disease

Researchers from our Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Water Innovation & Research Centre have developed a simple colour-changing test for fluoride levels in water that tell you if the water is safe to drink. They are working with charity The Nasio Trust to develop a test that can be used in remote areas of Africa where high levels of fluoride in the drinking water causes the crippling bone disease fluorosis.

Volunteering at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 2017

CSCT student Suzy Wallace blogs about her experience of helping at The Summer Science Exhibition.

CSCT expert comments on water research

Antoine Buchard, Whorrod Research Fellow at the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies, discusses Carnegie Mellon research paper that has been published in Green Chemistry.

Home is where clean water flows

Vicky De Groof, CSCT student, blogs about her experience at the 5th IWA Young Water Professionals BeNeLux (Belgium-Netherlands-Luxembourg) conference.

European Materials Research Society meeting: Two years on!

Suzy Wallace {postgrad student) is working towards her PhD on 'Overcoming the efficiency bottleneck of metal sulfide solar cells' with Professor Aron Walsh, Professor Chris Bowen and Professor Mark Weller.

Over 200 gather for successful 8th CSCT Summer Showcase

Organised by PhD students, the annual CSCT Summer Showcase brought together academics, students and industrial representatives from around the world, to participate in talks, panel discussions, polls, ignite talks on this year's theme of circular economy.

Video: Making biodegradable plastic from sugar & fizz

Scientists in the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies have developed a new, much safer way of making BPA-free biodegradable plastic from sugar and carbon dioxide.

Scientists make plastic from sugar and carbon dioxide

Researchers from our Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies have developed a new type of sustainable, biodegradable plastic from sugar and carbon dioxide. The plastic is a safer, BPA-free alternative to using petrochemicals.

Scientists make biodegradable microbeads from cellulose

Scientists and engineers from our Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies have developed biodegradable cellulose microbeads from a sustainable source that could potentially replace harmful plastic ones that contribute to ocean pollution.