Posts Tagged ‘cancer’

University patents new diagnostic technique

A team led by Professor Tony James and Dr Steve Bull from our Department of Chemistry has patented a technique they hope will help with the early diagnosis of diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson’s disease.

University drug offers huge potential for women’s health

A recent clinical study on a drug designed at the University has confirmed its potential in targeting the gynaecological disease endometriosis.

Collaborating with CERN to target cancer

A new research project between our University and CERN is working to improve the effectiveness of a major cancer treatment

Cancer treatment is target of new collaboration

A new research collaboration between our University and CERN is working to improve the effectiveness of a major cancer treatment.

Bath Cancer MOOC is one of FutureLearn’s highest rated courses

We have received excellent feedback about our first ever MOOC (Massive open online course) titled ‘Inside Cancer: how genes influence cancer development’.

9th CR@B Symposium - Cancer Research at Bath: Wed 9 Apr

A showcase of presentations and posters highlighting cancer research activities taking place in Bath and Manchester

Students go over the edge for worldwide cancer research

Around 30 students, staff and friends of the University's Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology will be taking part in a charity abseil by the Clifton Suspension Bridge in the morning of Wednesday 26 February to raise money for the leading international cancer research charity AICR (The Association for International Cancer Research).

Lecture to explore cancer research

Join us to learn more about our cutting-edge cancer research at Bath - Thu 27 Feb

Our first MOOC has started!

Our first MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) started last week, and has already had fantastic feedback.

Our first MOOC has started!

Our first MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) started last week, and has already had fantastic feedback.

Lorenzo Caggiano on daffodils & anti-cancer drugs (BBC radio)

Dr Lorenzo Caggiano from our Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology talks to the BBC's Saturday Surgery programme about daffodils, their anti-cancer properties and latest research into new cancer treatments.

Tony James picks up Daiwa Adrian Prize

A team led by Professor Tony James from our Department of Chemistry has been awarded a Daiwa Adrian Prize for their work developing diagnostic devices to target age-related diseases.

Watch the trailer for our first MOOC

Our first MOOC is open for registration on the Futurelearn platform

Why ibuprofen may stop cancers from developing

Latest research by scientists from our Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology has shown why the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen might stop certain cancers from developing.

Better detection for Alzheimer’s and cancers

A new chemical discovery will lead to better monitoring and treatment for cancers and degenerative diseases, according to latest research by our scientists.

Scientists to develop new detection technology for lifesciences research

Our chemists are working with industry and the Research Complex at Harwell to develop a new suite of fluorescent nanoparticles to enable a straightforward multiplexing technology for immunoassays and cell and tissue imaging.

Research leads to new social network for young people with cancer

Research from the University’s School of Management is enabling young people with cancer to find support from a new social network site.

Bath Professor recognised by European Life Sciences Award

Professor Barry Potter (Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology) has been named “Investigator of the Year 2012” at the European Life Sciences Award ceremony held in Hamburg, Germany. This prestigious award recognises outstanding accomplishments in the global life sciences arena, specifically at the interface of chemistry with biology and medicine.

Why glowing ‘soot’ could be the key to delivering drugs to cancer cells

Researchers from our Department of Chemistry have found that nano-scale tubes made of carbon could be used to safely penetrate human cells and deliver anti-cancer medicines or modified DNA molecules for gene therapy. Although there is a long way to go before the concept can undergo medical trials, a team led by Dr Sofia Pascu from the University’s Department of Chemistry has shown how these tubes could be used as a ‘cargo carrier’, to break through the outer membranes of cells that some useful therapeutic molecules would otherwise be unable to enter.

New understanding of cells could help in search for cancer cure

Our researchers have developed a new approach to studying cells that gives a much clearer picture of the intricate details of how they work.