Posts Tagged ‘research’

New £60 million automotive facility to propel UK jobs and investment

The University of Bath has received significant new government investment to develop the Institute for Advanced Automotive Propulsion Systems.

Marriage makes men fatter, shows new research

Being married makes men gain weight, and the early days of fatherhood add to the problem, finds new research from Dr Joanna Syrda from our School of Management.

When estimating extinction risk, don’t leave out the males

Extinction risk for some species could be drastically underestimated because most demographic models of animal populations only analyse the number and fertility of females, dismissing male data as ‘noise’. Researchers from the Milner Centre for Evolution found that population growth in birds was very sensitive to the ratio of males to females in a population, which has previously been shown to affect mating behaviour.

Scientists make plastic from sugar and carbon dioxide

Researchers from our Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies have developed a new type of sustainable, biodegradable plastic from sugar and carbon dioxide. The plastic is a safer, BPA-free alternative to using petrochemicals.

Scientists make biodegradable microbeads from cellulose

Scientists and engineers from our Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies have developed biodegradable cellulose microbeads from a sustainable source that could potentially replace harmful plastic ones that contribute to ocean pollution.

‘Migrant work ethic’ exists, in the short term

Study proves migrant workers have a stronger ‘work ethic’ than UK-born workers on arrival in Britain

New research proves the ‘migrant work ethic’ exists, in the short term

The received wisdom that migrant workers have a stronger ‘work ethic’ than UK-born workers is proven for the first time, in a new study of Central and East European migrants, from the University of Bath’s School of Management.

Podcast: From Micelles to Materials

Karen Edler's research looks at ways to make materials that make themselves

“Last African dinosaur” discovered in Moroccan mine

One of the last dinosaurs living in Africa before their extinction 66 million years ago has been discovered in a phosphate mine in northern Morocco. A study of the fossil, led by the Milner Centre for Evolution, suggests that following the breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana in the middle of the Cretaceous period, a distinct dinosaur fauna evolved in Africa.

'Last African dinosaur' found in Morocco

66 million-year-old dinosaur fossil discovered in phosphate mine in northern Morocco

Promiscuity slows down evolution

Promiscuity mixes up the gene pool and dilutes genetic differences between populations

Promiscuity slows down evolution of new species

Promiscuity mixes up the gene pool and dilutes genetic differences between populations, slowing down the evolution of new species, says new research by an international team led by the University’s Milner Centre for Evolution.

South West business leaders identify top barriers to growth

Business leaders from the South’s West foremost companies have said that investment in research and innovation, the upgrading of infrastructure and the development of skills and talent pose some of the biggest barriers in securing economic growth for the region.

South West business leaders identify top barriers to growth

Business leaders from the South’s West foremost companies have said that investment in research and innovation, the upgrading of infrastructure and the development of skills and talent pose some of the biggest barriers in securing economic growth for the region.

Symptoms of ADHD can be beneficial

Hyperactivity and impulsiveness can be an advantage when it comes to entrepreneurship

People with ADHD can turn symptoms to their advantage as entrepreneurs

Hyperactivity and impulsiveness are symptoms that pose daily challenges to people living with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), but new research shows that they can be beneficial when it comes to entrepreneurship.

Dawkins’ fabled cooperative gene discovered in microbes

Geneticists from the Universities of Manchester and Bath are celebrating the discovery of the elusive ‘greenbeard gene’ that helps explain why organisms are more likely to cooperate with some individuals than others.

Dawkins’ fabled cooperative gene discovered in microbes

Geneticists from the Universities of Manchester and Bath are celebrating the discovery of the elusive ‘greenbeard gene’ that helps explain why organisms are more likely to cooperate with some individuals than others.

Pessimism may sustain gender pay gap

Women have lower expectations of their pay prospects while men overestimate theirs

Female pessimism about pay could sustain the gender pay gap

Efforts to end the gender pay gap could be thwarted by the tendency for women to be pessimistic about their earning potential, shows new research from the University's School of Management.