Department of Psychology

Inaugural lecture - The science of human values: why they explain nothing and everything

Thu Apr 27 09:09:00 BST 2017

Time: 6.15pm
Location: 10 West 2.47

In this inaugural lecture, Professor Gregory Maio will highlight evidence that there are strong similarities in values between cultures, despite widespread belief that values differ between cultures.

About this inaugural lecture

 
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In this inaugural lecture, Professor Gregory Maio will highlight evidence that there are strong similarities in values between cultures, despite widespread belief that values differ between cultures.

 
 

Around the world, people talk about the importance of their values – the abstract ideals that matter to us as guiding principles in our lives – such as equality, freedom, or helpfulness.

This presentation highlights evidence that there are strong similarities in values between cultures, despite widespread belief that values differ between cultures. To help explain this discrepancy, we tour two decades of research examining how individuals represent values in memory. 

We begin by considering evidence testing the hypothesis that values function as truisms, followed by research probing the effects of thinking about our values on attitudes and behaviour, concluding with a series of studies examining mental maps of values in individuals across the UK, Brazil, and India. Together, this body of work will show that values retain the fascinating ability to connect people and differentiate them at the same time.

Speaker biography

Greg Maio received his PhD at Western University (Canada) in 1997, became Professor of Social Psychology at Cardiff University in 2004, and joined the University of Bath as Head of the Department of Psychology in 2016.

He has published widely on the topics of human values, attitudes, prejudice, and family relationships, and served as Senior Associate Editor for Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (2006-2008).

Greg received a Canadian Governor General’s Gold Medal, an APA Dissertation Award, and the British Psychological Society Spearman Medal for his early career research. 

He is author of The Psychology of Attitudes and Attitude Change (with G. Haddock, 2010, 2015) and The Psychology of Human Values (2016), and lead or co-investigator for diverse RCUK-funded projects on topics related to values, attitudes, prejudice, or behaviour change.

Attend this event

To attend this event please contact Caroline Ransford.