Department of Social & Policy Sciences

Dr Dinerstein takes part in cooperative practices in urban spaces workshop

Wed Jul 06 13:14:00 BST 2016

 

Dr Ana Dinerstein speaking to participants at the Gemaal op Zuid, central space of the Afrikaanderwijk Neighbourhood Coöperative

— Dr Ana Dinerstein speaking to participants at the Gemaal op Zuid, central space of the Afrikaanderwijk Neighbourhood Coöperative.

 

On 25 June 2016, Dr Ana Cecilia Dinerstein in collaboration with Dr Graham Taylor (University of the West of England) and Jeanne van Heeswijk and Annet van Otterloo, from Freehouse, South Rotterdam, Netherlands, convened a workshop on the issue of the social harbour.

The workshop took place within the Rotterdam International Architecture Biennale (IARB) and was titled: The Next Economy. It covered the topic of Harbouring Migrant Economies, Balancing formal and informal economic networks.

Participants to the workshop discussed the connection between new forms of labour and the harbour as a cooperative space. The meetings took place at the Gemaal op Zuid, central space of the Afrikaanderwijk Neighbourhood Coöperative, and at the IABR exhibition space (Fenixloods). The workshop used the Freehouse’s mobile visualisation of the Afrikaanderwijk Coöperative’s network as a round table.

 

Round table attendees at the Rotterdam International Architecture Biennale (IARB)

— Round table attendees at the Rotterdam International Architecture Biennale (IARB).

 

After creating the Afrikaanderwijk Coöperative, as the first cooperative at a neighbourhood scale, Freehouse is imagining Rotterdam South as the first social harbour. Traditionally harbours not only serve as gates between the city and the world, they are also dynamic places in which there are always plenty of social, cultural, and economic developments going on. They generate movement of people, ideas, and goods and are nodes of migration flows. Harbours stimulate innovation and create employment. This in turn attracts new people, which means that harbours play an important role in the development and positioning of the city, the region, and the country.

At the workshop (led by Dr Dinerstein and her research international sociologists), artists, urbanists and architects gathered to share ideas and practices that would characterise the social harbour. They interrogated future socioeconomic possibilities the social harbour articulates in the present.

Commenting on the event, Dr Dinerstein said: ‘ The workshop was the beginning of an exciting collaborative research project on the transition and multiplication of work, space, immigration and social cooperation in interesting urban spaces, like South Rotterdam. The social harbour is a new concept that features new forms of social interaction and cooperation in the next economy in Rotterdam and elsewhere.’