Students

Information for your subject

Jobs related to your subject

Your subject might be a good starting point to thinking about possible careers. Your degree comes with a wealth of choice and opportunity, whatever you study but it doesn't always come with a specific tag or guarantee of relevant work. Start by considering how much connection you want between your degree and your working life. These two resources can be a useful starting point particularly if you are looking for jobs with a direct link:

Skills from your degree

Another way to think about your subject is to consider the skills you have developed - not just knowledge but transferable skills. This can help you to understand your own strengths and also recognise your values and interests.

Check the relevant QAA Subject Benchmark Statement for the skills your subject should be teaching you.

Many jobs are not subject-specific

Nearly half of all new graduate vacancies advertised do not ask for a specific degree subject. Of course your degree subject is important, but it doesn't define you. Employers will value the package of knowledge, skills, qualities and experience you present and they will seek it from every degree discipline. Your subject is a springboard to an array of future choices.

Some students find using their subject a useful starting point to generate career ideas. For others their subject is something that that they want to disregard or avoid. Read our leaflet Don’t want to use your subject?

Bath graduates can help you

Bath Connection provides a secure online platform for you to network with our Alumni Experts. These are Bath graduates who are willing to talk to Bath students (and graduates) about working for their employer, what's involved in their job and also diversity issues. It includes a wide range of graduate employers and types of role from the high profile to the more unusual, and can be searched by department of study. Find out more about Bath Connection.

Recommended resources for your subject

Architecture & Civil Engineering

Large engineering firms will advertise their opportunities on MyFuture and may be highly present on campus and at careers fairs. However, architectural practices, local authorities and conservation organisations don’t tend to recruit in the same ways as household name graduate recruiters. To find more specialised sources of information have a look at the suggestions below, as well as relevant areas of our catalogue, e.g. Construction, civil engineering and property; Engineering and manufacturing; Natural resources, the environment and ethical careers and Public sector.
Architecture in particular, is an area where good networking skills will serve you well. You will have found, or will find, this the case when you are looking for your professional work experience and this continues later in your career. Make the most of contacts through academics in your department and through professional bodies.
Professional bodies provide not only networks, but events, vacancies and careers information. The more directly relevant are here but you will find others on TotalProfessions.com and it’s also worth looking for cross discipline interest groups. Try online discussion groups as a start, through www.jiscmail.ac.uk and LinkedIn.

Biology & Biochemistry

Chemical Engineering

Large firms which employ Chemical Engineers (e.g. food & drink, oil & gas, chemical, pharmaceutical and water companies) will tend to advertise their opportunities on MyFuture and may be highly present on campus and at careers fairs. However, you may not be looking for a big well known company. To find more specialised sources of information have a look at the suggestions below, as well our catalogue.
Professional bodies provide not only networks, but events, vacancies and careers information. The more directly relevant are here but you will find others on TotalProfessions.com and it’s also worth looking for cross discipline interest groups. Try online discussion groups as a start, through www.jiscmail.ac.uk and LinkedIn.

Chemistry

Computer Science

Economics

Careers for those studying Economics – an information sheet written by one of our Advisers

You may also find it useful to look at Politics or Mathematics dependent on your degree programme.

If you are a postgraduate student you may also find the careers web pages for Humanities and Social Science researchers useful.

Education with Psychology

Slides from your Departmental Careers sessions can be found on your moodle space. If you are wishing to pursue a career in teaching, you should keep up to date with current developments in Initial Teacher Training on the Get Into Teaching website.

Electronic & Electrical Engineering

Large firms which employ Electronic & Electrical Engineers (e.g. power, technology, electronics companies) will tend to advertise their opportunities on MyFuture and may be highly present on campus and at careers fairs. However, you may not be looking for a big well known company. To find more specialised sources of information have a look at the suggestions below, as well our catalogue.
Professional bodies provide not only networks, but events, vacancies and careers information. The more directly relevant are here but you will find others on TotalProfessions.com and it’s also worth looking for cross discipline interest groups. Try online discussion groups as a start, through www.jiscmail.ac.uk and LinkedIn.

Mathematics or Statistics

The Institute of Mathematics and its Applications runs mathscareers, home to job profiles and information on careers open to mathematicians at various career stages.

The Royal Statistical Society has a careers section with information on the types of jobs statisticians can go into, as well as some job profiles and a jobs board.

Slides from Departmental Careers lectures can be found in your Undergraduate Zone on Moodle.

Mechanical Engineering

Large firms which employ Mechanical Engineers (e.g. automotive, aerospace, defence and design companies) will tend to advertise their opportunities on MyFuture and may be highly present on campus and at careers fairs. However, you may not be looking for a big well known company. To find more specialised sources of information have a look at the suggestions below, as well our catalogue.
Professional bodies provide not only networks, but events, vacancies and careers information. The more directly relevant are here but you will find others on TotalProfessions.com and it’s also worth looking for cross discipline interest groups. Try online discussion groups as a start, through www.jiscmail.ac.uk and LinkedIn.

Modern Languages

Natural Sciences

Please refer to the extra resources for the subjects you are specialising in or hoping to work in.

Pharmacy & Pharmacology

Physics

Politics

Psychology

If you find that most of the employer and career information you see is focused on areas you aren’t interested in don’t worry. Certain employers and sectors dominate some communication channels, such as careers fairs and graduate vacancy bulletins. You are eligible for many of those opportunities if you want them, but many Psychology students don’t. To find more specialised sources of information have a look at the suggestions below, as well as relevant areas of our catalogue, e.g. Health and psychology, Public sector and Social, guidance and community work.

Your academic department and link careers adviser consider areas of interest and arrange talks from graduates working in various areas of Psychology, or closely related. Many of those talks are from recent graduates and are invaluable for discovering more about options you are considering and for hearing useful tips and advice.

The British Psychological Society provide excellent information on careers in Psychology, a vacancies bulletin and lists of BPS accredited courses. Consider becoming a member for additional benefits, it’s much less expensive to join as a student.

Consider engaging with the regional BPS branch to access knowledge, networks, events and a job board for voluntary roles. You don’t have to be a member of the BPS nationally so there are no costs involved.

Discussion groups are a great place to hear about many opportunities for work, conferences and bursaries for postgraduate research and other projects. You will find a group for postgraduate Psychology students and others with more specific interests, e.g. community, environmental or health psychology. Find groups though www.jiscmail.ac.uk and LinkedIn.

You may also find the careers website pages for Humanities and Social Science researchers useful.

School of Management

There are well known sectors and business functions many School of Management students choose to work in. However, once you have considered your career preferences you may want to explore other less well advertised options through our catalogue.

Professional bodies provide not only networks, but events, vacancies and careers information. You will find many professional body websites listed in our catalogue, alternatively you can find over 300 listed at www.totalprofessions.com/profession-finder

It’s worth looking for specific interest groups. Try online discussion groups as a start, through www.jiscmail.ac.uk and LinkedIn.

You may also find the careers website pages for Management researchers useful.
 

Social & Policy Science

Sport

(comprising Sport and Exercise Science, Sport and Social Science, and Sports Performance)

You will find many useful links to organisations in our Careers in Sport guide as well as suggestions of job boards and sports business market research.

Your degree also contains Professional Development modules in part delivered by the Careers Service and the slides from these will be available on your course moodle space.