Help us understand the mechanisms of chronic pain

We're looking for people with chronic pain to study changes in the way they notice or tend to sensations and other information about their affected limb.

We are running a study to understand the mechanisms of chronic pain. Chronic pain is pain that has been experienced most days for at least three months. Some chronic pain conditions are associated with changes in the way that people notice or tend to sensations and other information about their affected limb. We would like to investigate these changes and hope that the knowledge we gain could eventually improve treatment.

Eligibility

We are looking for people with chronic pain who:

  • are over 18 years of age
  • are fluent in written and spoken English
  • have suffered from chronic pain for at least three months that primarily affects one upper or lower limb
  • don't have a history of neurological disorders like stroke, brain injury, or Multiple Sclerosis

What you'll get

  • You will receive reimbursement for travelling expenses and earn £10 per hour.
  • Your participation will help contribute to the understanding of chronic pain.

We are accepting participants until 1 March 2020.

What's involved

You will take part in a series of activities which will last approximately four hours altogether including breaks.


You will complete several questionnaires and undergo some tests of vision and of the sensations in your hands and/or feet. You will also take part in a series of computer tasks. During the computer tasks, we will measure your eye movements and responses you make using the keyboard or computer mouse.

The research will take place at the University of Bath in the research facilities of the Department of Psychology. Participating is possible whenever it fits best with your schedule.

Take part in this study

If you would like to take part in this research study or if you have any questions, please get in touch.


All information and data provided will remain strictly confidential and all reports will be anonymised. This research has been approved by the UK Health Research Authority (REC reference: 18/LO/1430) and the University of Bath Psychology Ethics Committee (REC reference: 18-251).