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University of Bath

Mechanisms of disease and regeneration: routes to new immune-biotherapeutics

Understanding molecular pathways responsible for physiological processes, how their dysregulation leads to disease, how they can be repaired, or regenerated.

cancer visible in lung tissue
We aim to understand the molecular pathways responsible for physiological processes, how their dysregulation leads to disease and how they can be repaired or regenerated

The focus is to understand the molecular pathways responsible for physiological processes, how their dysregulation leads to disease and how they can be repaired or regenerated. The theme seeks to develop new therapeutics that include traditional small molecule chemical entities but better harness the new field of “biologic” medicines that span vaccines, monoclonal antibodies (and their variants) and cell-based therapeutics such as stem cells. We use interdisciplinary pharmacological, biochemical, chemical biology as well as cellular, molecular and genetic approaches to better understand, interrogate and manipulate these processes. Our approaches span in vitro/vivo models through to identification of biomarkers in groups of patients with a distinct disease phenotype or response to a therapeutic strategy. Clinical variability is likely to result from an interplay of genetic factors with environmental and lifestyle differences. We are entering the era of ‘precision medicine’ where drug development is moving away from the traditional one-size-fits-all therapeutic approach. Ultimately, linking a molecular pathway or biomarker to a patient group and new sensing techniques will transform our therapeutic approach and the effectiveness of new and emerging medicines. We have a breadth of expertise in several areas of immune regulation and inflammation including autoimmune and inflammatory disease, cardiovascular disease, obesity and cancer. This area is both interdisciplinary and strongly collaborative with clinical, pharmaceutical and biotech partners.

Theme Leaders