To find out more about HSRPP 2022, see the main conference webpage.

We are fortunate to have three excellent keynote speakers, who will share their unique perspectives on delivering impact for patients and other stakeholders.

Dr Barbara Farrell, Bruyère Research Institute, Ottawa

Developing and Implementing Deprescribing Guidelines - Lessons Learned through Knowledge Mobilization

Dr Barbara Farrell is a pharmacist with the Bruyère Continuing Care Geriatric Day Hospital, and Senior Investigator with the Bruyère Research Institute in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. She is the lead Canadian researcher for the development of evidence-based deprescribing guidelines and hosts the deprescribing.org website. Dr Farrell is a co-founder of the Canadian Deprescribing Network, is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the United States Deprescribing Research Network, has been a Canadian Pharmacists Association Pharmacist of the Year and is a recent recipient of the CIHR Betty Havens Prize for Knowledge Translation in Aging.

Abstract

Dr Farrell will discuss her team’s experience with engaging stakeholders and users to promote the uptake and impact of deprescribing guidelines. She will highlight how this research and knowledge has influenced and contributed to change in how people approach deprescribing and what difference this has made.

Professor Mahendra Patel, University of Bradford

Promoting Inclusion and Diversity in Clinical Trials – the PRINCIPLE Trial

Mahendra is a leading pharmacist and academic with a national and international standing and professorial roles at three UK universities as well as the USA and Malaysia.

He has passionately served the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) as elected national pharmacy board, assembly member and Treasurer. His outstanding contributions to pharmacy culminated in him receiving a Fellowship from the RPS and thereafter its prestigious President’s Charter Award.

Mahendra is national Pharmacy and Ethnic Minority Communities Research Lead with the PRINCIPLE trial, University of Oxford in the world’s largest randomized clinical trial investigating COVID-19 treatment in the community. The trial’s innovative work and findings influencing policy and practice nationally and internationally, and how recruitment has been representative in terms of ethnicity and deprivation, have been published in world-renowned medical journals.

Mahendra cherishes a longstanding relationship with NICE as an advisor and his pioneering work developing the NICE National Student Champions Programme has become a mainstay in over 40 university medical, dental, nursing and pharmacy faculties. He became the first pharmacist to gain a fellowship from NICE (2013).

As an active member of the South Asian Health Foundation, Mahendra was central to the team that won the BMJ Team Diabetes Awards for the prevention of type-2 diabetes in South Asians (2016). For many years he has worked closely with the British Heart Foundation with his early work leading to developing a national educational tool kit, the Healthy Hearts Tool Kit, which received the BMA Patient Information Award (2010).

Overseas, Mahendra has extensively supported the Indian pharmacy profession and its colleges and universities, becoming the first International Fellow of the Indian Pharmaceutical Association (2019). His work with the Lebanese pharmacy profession culminated in him being appointed International Honorary Ambassador by the Order of Lebanese Pharmacists (OPL). He is also Teaching Faculty Member of UNESCO’s Department of Education’s International Programme of Bioethics and in 2020 became the University of Bradford’s first Global Ambassador.

Mahendra is highly active promoting issues of equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI) within pharmacy and the NHS, and as Pharmacy Lead for the British Association of Physicians of Indian Origin (BAPIO) where he received Outstanding Service Award (2019). He is also a formal advisor on EDI issues to many national pharmacy organisations including the Guild of Healthcare Pharmacists, and recently Professional Advisor to the Chief Pharmaceutical Officer, NHSE&I on Inclusive Pharmacy Practice.

Abstract

The delivery of research studies in the pandemic has proven to be a significant challenge for many, including organisations such as the NIHR and those working in primary care. The PRINCIPLE study is the world’s largest randomised clinical trial of its kind for the early treatment of COVID-19 in the community in helping prevent hospitalization and even death, and stands out as the NIHR’s flagship primary care COVID-19 study.

It is increasingly and often becoming an accepted norm that recruitment into clinical trials of people living in socioeconomically deprived areas and those from ethnically diverse communities is generally poor compared to the larger population.

The PRINCIPLE trial is innovative in many ways, and incorporates a particular focus on how pharmacy and its wider network may be better utilised to help reach out to underserved communities and those most at risk in helping to enhance recruitment.

This is an opportunity for pharmacy to be recognised as a strength in supporting wider research within the community in developing the evidence base and ultimately improving health and health outcomes.

Learning outcomes:

  1. How clinical studies in the community can be better supported through pharmacy
  2. Better understand how those from ethnic minority and underserved communities may be more representative in clinical studies
  3. Gain deeper insight and understanding to some of the challenges to engaging in clinical studies
  4. How UK clinical trials can influence or change practice internationally as well as nationally

Ade Williams, MJ Williams Pharmacy Group

Delivering impact in community pharmacy

Ade is an independent prescriber and the lead pharmacist at the multi-award-winning Bedminster Pharmacy in South Bristol, a Non-Executive Director at Southern Health Foundation Trust and Associate Non-Executive Director of North Bristol NHS Trust. Ade is part of a local GP practice clinical team and a qualified Canadian pharmacist.

Ade and his colleagues are renowned for finding pragmatic, scalable solutions to complex health and wellbeing challenges, alongside a passion for addressing health inequalities by engaging and empowering their community.

Recognition for this work includes the 2019 NHS Parliamentary Award for Excellence in Primary Care, the 2019 GP-Pharmacist of the Year, the 2018 UK Pharmacist of the Year and the inaugural Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s Patient Champion in 2017. He also holds fellowships from the Royal Society of Public Health, the Royal Society of Arts and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society. As part of the NHS70 Parliamentary Awards, he was nominated as the Person-Centred Care Champion.

He has worked with NHS Right Care to develop patient care pathways, the British Association for Study of Headaches on guidelines and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society on deprescribing and joint pain management. He is a resident expert contributor to the All-Party Parliamentary Health Group and part of ministerial working groups on public health, vaccination uptake and health inequalities. An NIHR fellowship supervisor, he also supports ongoing research projects exploring continence, early cancer diagnosis, headaches, and joint pain.

Ade is a regular media contributor, conference speaker and writer. He is part of the BBC Radio Bristol Morning Show team. He is a board member and trustee of the Self Care Forum charity, as well as pharmacy ambassador for the Pancreatic Cancer Action charity. He is a Public Health England Vaccine Champion – promoting broader access, education, and increased vaccination uptake.

Ade’s image was captured by Rankin, the acclaimed photographer, as one of 12 individuals representing the professions who played a critical role in managing the initial NHS response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Abstract

Ade will discuss how researchers can work with practising pharmacists to co-develop ‘’real-life’’ impact programmes. He will also highlight how transformations in the NHS governance structure, Long Term Plan ambitions and COVID-19 legacy work are unique opportunities for community pharmacy to play a vital role. These will be reliant and underpinned by collaborative research ideas and evidence-led solutions that we can harness.