Building Research Park

At a glance

Funding Body: EPSRC
Principal Investigator: Dr Michael Lawrence
Co-investigators: Prof Pete Walker, Prof Tim Ibell, Dr Antony Darby
Project Manager: Eve Walkden

Our services

To find out how you can use our facilities, visit our consultancy page; or, for general enquiries, please email us.


The HIVE is a £1 million ground-breaking building project designed to support research into construction materials and is the first building project being developed at the Building Research Park.

This Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) funded project (EP/K040391/1 and EP/L005689/1) will allow researchers to study the carbon emissions and the environmental impact of construction materials that will make a real difference to the future of construction both in the UK and worldwide.


The HIVE is made up of test cells that support research in areas such as hygrothermal performance, flood and construction load research.

Hygrothermal cells

The term 'hygrothermal' refers to the transmission of heat and moisture through buildings. The HIVE offers the facility to test out façades to prove the construction efficiency of materials under real weather scenarios. Not only can energy efficiencies of materials be tested, but also air tightness and acoustic efficiency can be investigated.

The HIVE logo

Double-storey cell

At the HIVE there is the ability to look at the multi-level aspect of façade efficiency with the ability to create different internal scenarios such as internal walls and floors. The double-storey cell also offers a strong roof capable of load testing large panels and floors.

Bladder cell

For small panels, Uniformly Distributed Load (UDL) testing can be achieved, testing the impacts of windloading and retainment scenarios.

Flood cell

The HIVE offers a flood tank that can be used to flood test façades and construction materials with water up to a metre in height.  This can help to analyse the performance of the construction before, during and after flooding, providing vital information on construction materials in the flood plain.