Skip to main content

Social Work and Applied Social Studies BSc (Hons)

3 years, starting in September 2023

Develop social work knowledge and skills to practice as a registered professional social worker. You'll mix academic learning and practice placements.

This course will prepare you for a challenging and rewarding career in social work. You’ll receive comprehensive training to enable you to apply to register as a social worker and practice in a range of settings.

You’ll be based in the Department of Social and Policy Sciences. Our teaching staff work closely with colleagues across the disciplines of sociology, social policy, criminology and international development. Because of this, you’ll benefit from their diverse knowledge and our 50 years of experience in training social work practitioners at the University.

Local practitioners, service users and carers also contribute to the course, ensuring your learning is up-to-date and relevant. This helps to prepare you for the reality of social work practice.

In Year 1, you’ll study social work alongside psychology, sociology and social policy. You will develop your awareness of social inequality and social justice, which will give you the foundation to enhance your social work skills in readiness for your practice placements.

In Year 2, you’ll do your first practice placement and advance your study of social work. You will explore core social work units, such as social work with children and families, social work with adults and mental health.

In your final year, you’ll continue your social work studies. In your last semester, you will undertake a final practice placement. During this, you’ll build on the knowledge and skills you have developed in previous years and apply this to your practice with service users and carers.

Informed teaching to advance your learning

You’ll learn from teaching staff with diverse backgrounds and international expertise. Their passion, knowledge and research impact their teaching and contribute to your learning experience.

Develop your professional skills

Throughout the course, you will develop skills and knowledge that you can apply to your placements or future career. You will have the opportunity to apply them in practice and will learn from professionals working within those settings.

We will provide you with the tools and support to prepare you for employment such as:

  • research methods
  • critical reflection
  • critical analysis
  • ethics and values

Professional standards

Our course has enabled students to meet the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF) and Social Work England professional standards for a number of years. A programme approval exercise takes place every few years, or when we make changes to the course. We are currently going through this approval process and are awaiting the outcome of this evaluation.

Prepare for your future career

As a professionally qualified social worker, you might work in a range of health and social care settings. The course will also provide you with knowledge, skills and experiences that are transferable to many careers outside of social work.

Companies and organisations our graduates have gone on to work for include:

  • Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • Bristol City Council
  • First Steps
  • Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust
  • Slough Children’s Services Trust
Find out what our graduates go on to do

2023/24 Academic Year


Due to the ongoing impact of COVID-19, information about courses starting in the 23/24 academic year may be subject to change. We continue to improve your teaching and learning experience, so you gain skills and understanding which are valuable to you and sought after by employers.

Before you apply for a course, please check the website for the most recently published course detail. If you apply to the University of Bath, you will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

We understand that you will want to know more about the shape of the academic year. We work hard and plan for different scenarios, to be able to welcome you to the University of Bath at the start of each semester.

Find out about our approach for a safe campus experience for the current 2021 to 2022 academic year.

Course structure

This course lasts 3 years. It starts in September 2023 and ends in 2026. Welcome week starts on 25 September 2023.


Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

Units

At Bath, our courses are made up of units of study. Compulsory units cover core concepts that you'll need to understand as part of your degree programme. Some of our courses also offer the opportunity for you to study optional units. These allow you to specialise in particular areas of knowledge that interest you.

As an undergraduate, you will be expected to take 60 credits (ECTS) in each academic year. These are usually split into 30 credits for each semester you study. 60 credits are the equivalent of 1,200 notional hours of study; this includes contact time with staff and your own independent learning.

Year 1

Compulsory units

  • Community social work

    5 credits

  • Introduction to social work

    10 credits

  • Psychology for social work

    10 credits

  • Readiness for direct practice

    10 credits

  • Research for social work

    5 credits

  • Social problems, social change and the state

    10 credits

  • The making of modern society

    10 credits

Year 2

Compulsory units

  • Applied social work practice 1: practice evidence

    5 credits

  • Applied social work practice 2: anti-discriminatory practice plan

    5 credits

  • Applied social work practice 3: discrimination and empowerment

    10 credits

  • Applied social work practice 4: critical reflection

    10 credits

  • Mental health social work 1

    10 credits

  • Social work with adults 1

    5 credits

  • Social work with children and families 1

    10 credits

  • Theories and methods 1

    5 credits

Year 3

Compulsory units

  • Mental health social work 2

    5 credits

  • Qualifying practice 1: practice evidence

    5 credits

  • Qualifying practice 2: critical analysis of organisation

    5 credits

  • Qualifying practice 3: ethics and values

    5 credits

  • Qualifying practice 4: critical reflection

    15 credits

  • Social work with adults 2

    10 credits

  • Social work with children and families 2

    10 credits

  • Theories and methods 2

    5 credits

Placement


This course includes two mandatory social work practice placements. These take place in the first semester of Year 2 and the final semester of Year 3.

We have established strong partnerships with local agencies to provide you with a wide range of placement opportunities and experiences.

In your practice placement, you will apply your knowledge, skills and professional understanding to direct practice with service users. You’ll be supported by your Practice Educator, Practice Supervisor and University Tutor.

Students have completed placements within a range of organisations and teams, including adult and children’s safeguarding, hospitals, community teams for people with learning difficulties, youth offending teams, adoption and fostering, and community mental health.

We work in partnership with several local councils and social care providers that supply our professional practice placements. These include:

  • Alzheimer’s Support
  • Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership
  • Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • Curo
  • Developing Health and Independence drug and alcohol service
  • Julian House homeless service
  • NSPCC
  • Somerset County Council
  • Swindon Borough Council

Learning and assessment

You’ll be taught and assessed by a variety of methods and it will vary between units. These methods are designed to promote in-depth learning and understanding of the subject.


Learning

  • Lectures
  • Practical sessions
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

Assessment

  • Coursework
  • Essay
  • Portfolio
  • Practical work
  • Written examination
  • Other

Learning and teaching

Contact hours

Timetabled contact hours, which may be made up of lectures, practical sessions, seminars, tutorials and workshops, vary throughout your course and between courses but are typically between 12 and 15 hours a week in your first year.

Independent learning

In addition to timetabled contact hours, you are expected to undertake independent learning and assessment activities. Typically, this might be around 20 to 28 hours per week in your first year, and include individual research, reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, preparing coursework assignments, presentations, or revising for exams. After your first year, the emphasis on independent learning may become greater.

Assessment breakdown

You will be assessed in a range of methods designed to develop and test your skills and knowledge.

5% to 10% of your course will be assessed through examinations.

90% to 95% will be assessed through essays, presentations, portfolio work, and your placement.

The final degree classification is determined by your second and final year marks and each contributes 32% and 68% respectively. 

We can make reasonable adjustments to assessment procedures for students with disabilities, take a look at our Disability Service’s pages for information.  

Recognition of professional qualifications


As well as being recognised as a higher academic qualification, a number of our degrees are also accredited by professional bodies in the United Kingdom. An accredited degree may entitle you to work in a specific profession within the UK, and abroad (where there are reciprocating arrangements with professional bodies in other countries).

The requirements to practise a profession vary from country to country. If you wish to practise your profession outside the United Kingdom, you are advised to confirm that the UK professional qualification you seek is valid in the country in which you are intending to work.

The United Kingdom currently subscribes to The Mutual Recognition of Professional Qualifications (MRPQ) Directive. The MRPQ Directive provides a reciprocal framework of rules which enables European Economic Area (EEA) and Swiss nationals to have their professional qualifications recognised in a state other than the one in which the qualification was obtained. In the event of a no deal Brexit, from 1 January 2021, the MRPQ Directive will no longer apply to the UK. However, it is anticipated that there will be a new system for recognising professional qualifications between the UK, EEA, and Switzerland.

‘One of the best things about Bath was the quality of the lecturers. They're still actively producing research; some are still actively working in social work.’
Gabriel Alves BSc (Hons) Social Work and Applied Social Studies (Graduating year, 2020)

Entry requirements


Your application should demonstrate that you have personal, volunteering and/or employment experience that's relevant to social work or social care, and that you are capable of studying social work at degree level.

We will give consideration to candidates who wish to claim accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL) status on a case-by-case basis. However, the practice placement units cannot be accredited through prior learning from other institutions or from personal or practice experience and must be completed as a part of the course. Please contact us to discuss any application involving APEL before applying.

We know that the context in which you are studying can have an impact on your ability to perform your best in exams and coursework, or limit which subjects or qualifications you are able to study at your school or college. We consider any application based on its merits, including your background and circumstances, including through:

Origin of qualifications

British qualifications

A level Typical offer

BBB

BBB in three A levels.

A level Alternative offer

BBC

Most of our students will join us with three A levels, but you may have study beyond this (such as a project qualification or additional study in maths) which demonstrates your individual talents that will help you with your degree. We recognise these studies through our alternative offers.

BBC in three A levels plus one of:

If you receive an offer for this course and are studying one of these qualifications you will be given both the typical and alternative offer.

You can find out more about our alternative offers, including a complete list of qualifications we consider on our dedicated page.

International Baccalaureate Typical offer

35 points

International Baccalaureate Diploma

35 points overall and 5, 5, 5 in three Higher Level subjects.

International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme

We consider applicants studying the IBCP on a case-by-case basis based on the individual components studied. For this course you will typically need to study a combination of IB Higher Level courses and appropriate vocational study equivalent to three A levels. This vocational study can be any qualification we accept, such as a BTEC National Diploma (RQF) or two BTEC National Extended Certificates (RQF). If you are studying a BTEC National Extended Diploma (RQF) we may be able to consider you on the basis of that alone - please see our Pearson Edexcel BTEC requirements below.

Our typical offer will including individual grades in the relevant components - please contact admissions@bath.ac.uk for further advice before you apply.

Pearson Edexcel BTEC RQF Typical offer

DDM

DDM in the BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (RQF).

We prefer the above qualifications to be in a relevant subject area and are not typically able to consider qualifications in Public Services, Uniformed Protective Services, Travel and Tourism and other less relevant disciplines.

Pearson Edexcel BTEC QCF Typical offer

DDM

DDM in the BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF).

We prefer the above qualifications to be in a relevant subject area and are not typically able to consider qualifications in Public Services, Uniformed Protective Services, Travel and Tourism and other less relevant disciplines.

OCR Cambridge Technical Typical offer

DDM

DDM in the Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma.

We prefer the above qualifications to be in a relevant subject area and are not typically able to consider qualifications in less relevant disciplines.

T Level Typical offer

Distinction overall

We are able to consider the above T Level technical qualification in Education and Childcare.

Cambridge Pre-U Typical offer

M1, M1, M1

M1, M1, M1 in three principal subjects.

Cambridge Pre-U Alternative offer

M1, M1, M3

Most of our students will join us with three principal subjects, but you may have study beyond this (such as a Global Perspectives course or additional study in maths) which demonstrates your individual talents that will help you with your degree. We recognise these studies through our alternative offers.

M1, M1, M3 in three principal subjects plus one of:

If you receive an offer for this course and are studying one of these qualifications you will be given both the typical and alternative offer.

You can find out more about our alternative offers, including a complete list of qualifications we consider on our dedicated page.

Scottish Highers Typical offer

BB in Advanced Highers

BB in two Advanced Highers.

We make offers based on Advanced Highers. You will typically be expected to have completed five Scottish Highers and your grades in these will be considered as part of your application. We prefer applicants who have achieved at least BBBBB in their Highers.

Access to HE Diploma Typical offer

27 credits at Distinction

A pass in the Access to HE Diploma, with at least 27 credits awarded at Distinction and 12 credits awarded at Merit or above.

Ideally your Access to HE Diploma should cover relevant social sciences units, such as: Psychology, Sociology, Social Policy, Criminology, or Education.

Open University credits Typical offer

Pass units worth 120 credits including a minimum of a Pass 3 with 62% in a relevant Level 2 unit.

Typically, we would be looking for you to have studied units worth at least 120 credits including at least 30 credits at Level 2. We would generally be looking for you to have taken relevant units in essay-based subjects, preferably but not exclusively in social sciences. This information is a guide and we consider students applying with Open University Credits on a case-by-case basis. We will consider your application carefully and take note of any previous qualifications or relevant work experience. We may be able to consider alternative units to those listed. Please contact us to discuss your profile.

Taking OU credits may be counted as degree-level study by the Student Loans Company and therefore may be counted as previous study and have an impact on your ability to access student loans for the entirety of your chosen degree. We recommend that you discuss this in detail with the SLC before following this progression route to the University of Bath.

Combinations of qualifications Typical offer

Your application will be considered individually based on the particular combination of qualifications and subjects that you are taking.

We can consider combinations of accepted qualifications, of which some common examples are:

  • BB in two A levels plus D in the BTEC National Extended Certificate (RQF) or the Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate (RQF)
  • B in one A level subject plus DD in the BTEC National Diploma (RQF)
  • BB in two A levels plus M1 in a Pre-U Principal Subject
  • BB in two A levels (excluding Accounting) and B in the LIBF Level 3 Diploma in Financial Studies (DipFS)
  • BB in two A levels (excluding Criminology) and B in the WJEC Applied Diploma in Criminology

We can also consider combinations that are not listed and that do not include A levels. You should read the information about essential and preferred subjects and subject combinations. We cannot consider different qualifications in the same subject area.

GCSE requirements

  • GCSE Mathematics grade 4 or C
  • GCSE English Language or Literature grade 4 or C (or equivalent from English language category B)

You do not need the required grade in Mathematics if you study a higher level qualification in Mathematics or Statistics (such as an A level, AS level or a Core Mathematics qualification).

English language requirements

Category B

You will normally need one of the following:

  • IELTS: 7.0 overall with no less than 6.5 in all components
  • IELTS Indicator: 7.0 with 6.5 in each component
  • TOEFL IBT: 100 overall with a minimum 24 in all 4 components
  • TOEFL iBT and iBT Special Home Edition: 100 overall with 24 in each component
  • The Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic): 69 with no less than 62 in any element
  • The Pearson Test of English Academic Online (PTE Academic Online): 69 with no less than 62 in any element
  • Cambridge English: Proficiency (CPE): 185 with no less than 176 in all elements
  • Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE): 185 with no less than 176 in all elements
  • Duolingo: 120 overall with sub scores of Literacy 120, Comprehension 130, Conversation 115, Production 100.
  • LanguageCert SELT: C1 Expert Pass

See the full list of accepted English qualifications.

Irish qualifications

Irish Leaving Certificate

H2, H2, H3, H3, H3, H3 in six Irish Leaving Certificates.

A levels or the International Baccalaureate Diploma

We accept these qualifications whether you have studied them in the UK or abroad. Our entry requirements are listed under the 'United Kingdom' section.

European Baccalaureate

We accept the European Baccalaureate and our entry requirements are listed under the 'European Baccalaureate' section.

English language requirements

Category B

You will normally need one of the following:

  • IELTS: 7.0 overall with no less than 6.5 in all components
  • IELTS Indicator: 7.0 with 6.5 in each component
  • TOEFL IBT: 100 overall with a minimum 24 in all 4 components
  • TOEFL iBT and iBT Special Home Edition: 100 overall with 24 in each component
  • The Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic): 69 with no less than 62 in any element
  • The Pearson Test of English Academic Online (PTE Academic Online): 69 with no less than 62 in any element
  • Cambridge English: Proficiency (CPE): 185 with no less than 176 in all elements
  • Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE): 185 with no less than 176 in all elements
  • Duolingo: 120 overall with sub scores of Literacy 120, Comprehension 130, Conversation 115, Production 100.
  • LanguageCert SELT: C1 Expert Pass

See the full list of accepted English qualifications.

French qualifications

French Baccalaureate

An overall score of 14.

If you do not study Mathematics as a specialty in your French Baccalaureate, you will need either 60 in Mathematics from the Brevet or 10 in Additional Mathematics in your final year.

Our requirements for the French Baccalaureate are the same for students studying the International Option Baccalaureate (OIB) for this course.

English language requirements

Category B

You will normally need one of the following:

  • IELTS: 7.0 overall with no less than 6.5 in all components
  • IELTS Indicator: 7.0 with 6.5 in each component
  • TOEFL IBT: 100 overall with a minimum 24 in all 4 components
  • TOEFL iBT and iBT Special Home Edition: 100 overall with 24 in each component
  • The Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic): 69 with no less than 62 in any element
  • The Pearson Test of English Academic Online (PTE Academic Online): 69 with no less than 62 in any element
  • Cambridge English: Proficiency (CPE): 185 with no less than 176 in all elements
  • Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE): 185 with no less than 176 in all elements
  • Duolingo: 120 overall with sub scores of Literacy 120, Comprehension 130, Conversation 115, Production 100.
  • LanguageCert SELT: C1 Expert Pass

See the full list of accepted English qualifications.

European qualifications

European Baccalaureate

82% overall with 9.0 in one subject..

English language requirements

Category B

You will normally need one of the following:

  • IELTS: 7.0 overall with no less than 6.5 in all components
  • IELTS Indicator: 7.0 with 6.5 in each component
  • TOEFL IBT: 100 overall with a minimum 24 in all 4 components
  • TOEFL iBT and iBT Special Home Edition: 100 overall with 24 in each component
  • The Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic): 69 with no less than 62 in any element
  • The Pearson Test of English Academic Online (PTE Academic Online): 69 with no less than 62 in any element
  • Cambridge English: Proficiency (CPE): 185 with no less than 176 in all elements
  • Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE): 185 with no less than 176 in all elements
  • Duolingo: 120 overall with sub scores of Literacy 120, Comprehension 130, Conversation 115, Production 100.
  • LanguageCert SELT: C1 Expert Pass

See the full list of accepted English qualifications.

Fees and funding

Fees and funding information for Social Work and Applied Social Studies BSc (Hons)


Fees

Your tuition fees and how you pay them will depend on whether you are a Home, Island or Overseas student.

Learn how we decide fee status

Tuition fees

Fee information is not yet available for this course. Tuition fees are liable to increase annually for all University of Bath students.

Find out more about student fees

Extra costs

The following course-related costs are not included in your fees:

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check

You are required to pay for a DBS check. This will be payable at the start of your course at an approximate cost of £50.

You will also be required to register with the DBS update service for each year of your degree. The current cost of the update service is £13 per year.

Placement travel costs

You are responsible for covering the cost of travel to your placement in years 2 and 3. These costs will vary depending on your placement location.

If you are eligible for a social work bursary, then you may find some of these costs covered through the Placement Travel Allowance. The NHS bursary website has further details.

In the social work profession, the use of a car is often an essential prerequisite as the role involves visiting people in their communities. To ensure you have a placement opportunity that best prepares you for practice, we ask that, where possible, you're able to drive and have access to a vehicle at the point you apply for your placement. This is around March or April in Year 1.

Read more about advice for budgeting and see more information about day-to-day costs.

How to pay

Tuition fee loans

If you are studying an undergraduate course, you may be able to take out a loan for your tuition fees and living costs.

Read more about tuition fee loans

Scholarships and bursaries

You could be considered for a bursary or scholarship to help you study at Bath. This is in addition to your student loan and you do not have to pay it back.

The NHS offers a bursary for this course.

Read more about bursaries and scholarships

Other payment options

You can pay your tuition fees by Direct Debit, debit card, credit card or bank transfer. You may also be eligible for a student loan to help you pay your fees.

Read more about your payment options

Budgeting

You will need to budget at least £100 for the cost of photocopying, printing and binding. You will also need to budget for the cost of textbooks.

Some courses involve visits away from campus and you may be required to pay some or all of the costs of travel, accommodation and food and drink.

If you’re on a placement, you’re responsible for your own travel, accommodation and living costs. You should also consider the financial implications if you go on an unpaid or overseas placement.

Application information


  • Course title
    Social Work and Applied Social Studies
  • Final award
    BSc (Hons)
  • Mode of study
    Full-time
  • Course code
    U160
  • Institution code
    B16
  • Department
  • Location
    University of Bath
    Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY
  • Home application deadline
    25 January 2023
  • Overseas application deadline
    25 January 2023
  • Application eligibility
    Home and Overseas students are eligible to apply
  • Regulator

Selection process

If you pass an initial assessment based on your application you will be invited to attend an interview. You will also be provided with guidance on this in advance if you are invited to an interview, so you can come fully prepared.

Due to the nature of this degree, you will be asked to declare whether or not you have any relevant spent or unspent criminal convictions as part of completing your UCAS application. Should you declare that you have a conviction we will contact you for further information and you will be considered in line with our policy on applicants with criminal convictions.

You will also need to obtain a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure & Barring Service (DBS) check when you join this course. You will be asked to register for the DBS update service for the duration of your degree which allows you to keep your DBS certificate up to date for practice placements.

We are unable to consider applicants for deferred entry due to the nature of the selection process.

Immigration requirements

If you need a Student Visa to study in the UK, you will not be able to join this course.

If you are an EU or EEA national (except an Irish citizen), you will only be able to join this course if you have Settled or Pre-Settled status in the UK (or hold other relevant immigration permission that allows you to study without a Student Visa). If you join this course on immigration permission which subsequently expires and you are unable to secure a suitable alternative, you may be unable to complete your course or receive a final qualification.

If you have any concerns regarding this please contact admissions@bath.ac.uk for further advice.

Course enquiries


Learn more about living and studying at Bath

Visit our undergraduate virtual experience

Community social work

5 credits

Gain an introduction to community social work. You will be provided with an overview of the historical development of community social work and current practice approaches both nationally and internationally.

Introduction to social work

10 credits

Gain an overview of the social work profession. You will be introduced to core social work knowledge and the skills that are required for professional practice as well as the core values of the profession, including social justice and empowerment. Explore legislative and policy frameworks that inform practice and regulate the profession, and examine the historical development of the profession.

Psychology for social work

10 credits

Gain knowledge of human growth and development, examining psychology across the life course and the ability to apply these concepts in relation to social work practice. A psycho-social approach will be introduced, providing perspectives that explain societal and structural influences on human behaviour.

Readiness for direct practice

10 credits

You will prepare for your first professional practice placement and assess your readiness to go out on placement the following semester. The unit includes workshops delivered by people who use social work services and their carers.

Research for social work

5 credits

Gain an introduction to the principles and values of social work and a grounding in the social research methods required to undertake research in an applied social work context. You will be introduced to techniques around research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to social work research.

Social problems, social change and the state

10 credits

Explore how social policy responds to social problems encountered by societies across the world. You’ll practice how to succinctly report social problems to decision-making audiences.

The making of modern society

10 credits

Explore the fundamental principles of sociological analysis, and trace the emergence of sociology in the 19th century in the context of industrialisation, colonialism, nationalism and social revolution in Europe. You’ll discover how sociology has developed as a way of making sense of key defining features of capitalist modern society, including the formation of social class, new forms of social oppression (gender and race), democratisation of the state and the emergence of the public space.

Applied social work practice 1: practice evidence

5 credits

Demonstrate your social work practice. You’ll do this in accordance with the domains of the End of First Placement level descriptors of the British As-sociation for Social Work’s Professional Capabili-ties Framework and the Professional Standards for Social Work as defined by Social Work Eng-land, the professional regulator for the Social Work Profession.

You’ll do this in a practical setting. This will be less complex than the final placement during Year 3.

Applied social work practice 2: anti-discriminatory practice plan

5 credits

Explore the fundamentals of anti-discriminatory practice (ADP), and the social work core values of equalities and diversity. The taught content of this unit will be provided prior to your placement and it will enable you to apply the knowledge and develop an ADP plan. Whilst on placement you can challenge any discrimination and op-pression that may arise in order to empower ser-vice users and carers.

Applied social work practice 3: discrimination and empowerment

10 credits

Gain an overview of the legislative and theoreti-cal frameworks of anti-oppressive practice, fo-cusing on social work core values of equalities and diversity. Studying this unit alongside your placement enables you to apply social work theo-ries that promote social justice to challenge stig-ma, discrimination and oppression and to em-power service users and carers and promote equality.

Applied social work practice 4: critical reflection

10 credits

Explore theories and methods for critical reflec-tion and apply these to your experiences on placement. The assessment involves a critical reflection on your direct observation.

Mental health social work 1

10 credits

Gain a grounding in mental health social work. You’ll explore the ways in which understandings of mental health problems have developed over time and how mental health is conceptualised by different public and professional groups. Learn the basics of mental capacity and mental health law and gain an overview of different types of mental health problems.

Social work with adults 1

5 credits

Gain working knowledge of the policy and legis-lation that regulates and guides social work prac-tice in working with adults. You will learn to critically analyse how to use policy and legislation to inform your social work practice with adults.

Social work with children and families 1

10 credits

Develop the core skills and knowledge required for professional social work practice with chil-dren and families. You’ll explore legislative and policy frameworks that guide practice, theories of child development, how to make use of research to inform practice and make evidence-informed judgements, undertaking assessments and specif-ic areas of practice involving direct work with children.

Theories and methods 1

5 credits

Explore the theories and methods used in con-temporary social work practice. You’ll develop a critical understanding of the range of theories and models for social work intervention with indi-viduals, families, groups and communities, and the methods derived from them.

Mental health social work 2

5 credits

Builds on Mental Health Social Work 1, in which you developed foundational knowledge of the contested nature of mental health problems as well as mental health policy and law. You will learn about key themes and issues within con-temporary mental health policy, and develop your understanding of more complex mental health and capacity law. The unit prepares you to assess needs, risks and strengths and work collab-oratively with service users and their carers to promote their wellbeing.

Qualifying practice 1: practice evidence

5 credits

By the end of the final placement you will be able to apply knowledge and skills of the social work profession in more complex situations and where there may be no clear-cut solutions to problems. You will be able to work autono-mously, demonstrating social work practice in accordance with the End of Final Placement level descriptors of the British Association for Social Work’s Professional Capabili-ties Framework and the Professional Standards for Social Work as defined by Social Work England.

Qualifying practice 2: critical analysis of organisation

5 credits

Develop a critical understanding of how social care organisations operate within, and respond to, changing economic, social, political contexts. Drawing on your placements, you will critically analyse how organisations are managed, governed and regulated. Learn how organisations respond to contemporary challenges in the sec-tor and implement change. Examine how profes-sional accountability works in social work, as well as how risk management and resilience is managed by organisations.

Qualifying practice 3: ethics and values

5 credits

Develop a critical understanding of ethics and values applied to social work practice. Drawing on placement experiences, you will explore and critically engage with ethical dilemmas, and ten-sions in values arising in everyday social work practice. Learn about philosophical and theoreti-cal approaches to ethical decision-making. Ap-plied methods and frameworks will be covered to enable you to undertake ethical decision-making in social work practice.

Qualifying practice 4: critical reflection

15 credits

Learn how to critically analyse and evaluate your own practice and professional competence. Your work will demonstrate your readiness to work as a qualified social work professional, showcasing your understanding of the Professional Capabilities Framework; 1. Professionalism, 2. Values & Ethics, 3. Recognising Diversity, 4. Rights, Jus-tice & Economic Wellbeing, 5. Knowledge, 6. Critical Re-flection & Analysis, 7. Intervention & Skills, 8. Contexts and Organisations, 9. Professional Leadership.

Social work with adults 2

10 credits

Develop your working knowledge of the policy and legislation that regulates and guides social work practice in working with adults. You will be able to critically analyse how you can use policy and legislation to inform your social work prac-tice with adults.

Social work with children and families 2

10 credits

Build on your prior learning from personal and/or professional experience and from previous study, including Social Work with Children and Families 1. You will learn the knowledge, skills and values to work with children and their families in multi-professional settings, across the private, volun-tary and statutory settings. This unit prepares you to assess risks and strengths within families, in order to safeguard children and promote their wellbeing.

Theories and methods 2

5 credits

Build on your learning from the previous unit, ‘Theories and methods 1’. This unit will provide you with a deeper knowledge of the range of theories and models for social work intervention with individuals, families, groups and communi-ties, and the methods derived from them.