University of Bath School of Management University of Bath School of Management

Research seminars and events

Research

Further information

UK and overseas speakers are invited to the School to share their experiences and findings with staff, doctoral students and the members of the public. Previous seminars can be found here: 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014

View the University Calendar.

If you are a member of staff and wish to organise an event or seminar please contact the Research Office.

Forthcoming events:

12
Nov

School of Management Writing Bootcamp


This one day writing bootcamp aims to provide an impetus to start or make progress on a piece of writing; offer a quiet place for intense writing; offer and receive advice about your own and colleagues´ writing; help push through blockages and barriers to writing; spend time getting to know colleagues and learning from each other´s experience; help reduce journal writing from a monster that towers over us to a challenge and (sometimes) a pleasure. This workshop is open to all colleagues across the School of Management.

Programme Leaders: Dr Yasin Rofcanin & Professor Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: Wessex House Council Chamber

Time: 9.30 - 4.00

Contact: Yasin Rofcanin

14
Nov

TBC


Speaker: Prof David Newton, University of Bath

Location: 3 West North 3.7

Time: 1.45 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

16
Nov

Regulation, regulators and the regulated: Perspectives on the regulation of public services


Andrew Wright will give a talk drawing from his many years of experience, particularly as a senior partner in Energy Systems and a Board Member at Ofgem, the gas and electricity regulator for Great Britain. He has worked at Ofgem in board level positions for more than ten years, including a period as interim Chief Executive. Andrew has more than 30 years of experience of working in the gas and electricity sector. Before joining Ofgem he was a senior equity research analyst covering UK and European utilities for a number of major investment banks, including, most recently, UBS.

Speaker: Dr Andrew Wright, Durham Energy Institute

Location: 8 West 2.20

Time: 2.15 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

19
Nov

The disability employment gap: translating research into policy and practice


In this seminar Professor Hoque will present his recent academic research with colleagues at Cass and Cardiff Business Schools in the area of disability, and outline the steps taken to use this research to influence the government's labour market policies regarding disabled people. Prior research has focused on: the government's 'Positive About Disabled People' Two Ticks symbol; the influence of joint regulation and trade union disability champions on employer disability equality practices; the impact of High Performance Work Practices on disabled people; the Great Recession and disabled people's employment outcomes; and the impact of workplace-level support on the employment and well-being of informal carers. This talk will outline how this research helped inform the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Disability report 'Ahead of the Arc: A Contribution to Halving the Disability Employment Gap', which was co-authored with Disability Rights UK. There will then be a discussion of the work undertaken with the APPG for Disability and Disability Rights UK to get the report's recommendations embedded into government policy. This has included: key interventions from Lisa Cameron MP (Chair of the APPG for Disability) in debates in the House of Commons; influence on the Industrial Strategy white paper and the DWP's 'Improving Lives' command paper (which lays out the government's plans to meet its manifesto target to increase the number of disabled people by 1 million); and the development of an ongoing relationship with the No.10 policy unit.

Speaker: Prof Kim Hoque, Warwick Business School

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 12.30pm

Contact: Research Office

21
Nov

Investment consultants' claims about their own performance: What lies beneath?


Refreshments served from 1.15pm in 8 West foyer.

Speaker: Prof Tim Jenkinson, University of Oxford

Location: 8 West 3.22

Time: 1.45 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

26
Nov

Genealogical observations about Silicon Valley and the US military industrial complex


Genealogical observations about Silicon Valley and the US military industrial complex. This paper examines the militarization of corporate communications networks and their appropriation for military and national security purposes. The profound significance of military organizations in the evolution of new technologies of social control has been largely neglected within the field of organization studies. The contribution of this paper is threefold: i) it extends the existing research within organization studies into the security-industrial complex by mapping out the military colonization of communications networks and the 'transversal' development of techniques of social control between the military and corporate domains; ii) the paper shows that the power relations underpinning these increasingly militarized communications networks are a form of 'war by other means' iii) this conceptual reformulation of power relations reveals the instability of the networks of alliance that underpin the new security apparatus, as witnessed by protests from whistleblowers, hacktivist groups and corporations themselves who have publicly objected to these measures. These instabilities require sustained analysis from scholars of organization to map out the changing terrain of organizational power relations and the new possibilities for resistance to this militarization.

Speaker: Prof Iain Munro, Newcastle University Business School

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 12.30pm

Contact: Research Office

28
Nov

Risk factor and use of proceeds declarations and their effects on IPO subscription, price, "fixings", liquidity and after-market returns


Refreshments served from 1.15pm in 8 West foyer.

Speaker: Prof Paul McGuinness, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Location: 8 West 3.22

Time: 1.45 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

28
Nov

Contracting for innovation in public services: capabilities, institution and intermediation


Innovation is central to boosting competitiveness and growth, creating jobs, and improving public services and social welfare. Governments stimulate innovation through various policy interventions such as R&D tax credits and research grants. Innovation-oriented public procurement is a particular demand-side policy instrument aiming to articulate demand for innovative solutions that help improve public services and address grand societal challenges e.g. affordable healthcare and security. Despite the supportive rhetoric in policy and academic circles alike, existing research suggests that implementation of innovation-oriented public procurement is fraught with some persisting challenges, namely a shortfall of relevant capabilities and a mismatch between innovation processes and the institutional set up within which these take place. In this talk, Dr Selviaridis drew on the capabilities literature and the systems-of-innovation perspective to investigate how, and to what extent, public organisations overcome these challenges and develop or improve their capabilities to effectively contract for innovation. The ongoing empirical study comprises expert interviews and two in-depth case studies of intermediary organisations helping to build capacity and capability, and to fill in institutional voids in the UK defence and healthcare settings. Data collection has involved so far 50 semi-structured interviews and analysis of 60-plus relevant documents.

Speaker: Dr Kostas Selviaridis, Lancaster University

Location: EB 3.13

Time: 3.15pm

Contact: Research Office

30
Nov

Exact and heuristic algorithms for the carrier-vehicle traveling salesman problem


The Carrier-Vehicle Traveling Salesman Problem (CVTSP) is concerned with a multi-vehicle system consisting of a slow but large vehicle called the Carrier (e.g.,a ship), which is capable of transporting, deploying, and servicing a smaller but faster Vehicle (e.g., a helicopter or an unmanned aerial vehicle) with a limited range. The Vehicle is expected to visit or service a given set of Points-of-Interest (POI). For each POI, the Vehicle should leave the Carrier at some take-off point, visit the POI, and return to the Vehicle for refueling or recharging purposes without exhausting its fuel or battery. The objective is to determine the take-off and landing points of the Vehicle for each POI so as to minimize the total distance traveled by the Carrier. Introduced by Garone et al. in 2011, CVTSP has extensive applications in search-and-rescue and humanitarian operations, logistics problems in oil rigs, and surveillance operations. Prof Yildirim develops a new mixed integer second order conic programming formulation for the CVTSP. He identifies several structural properties and exploit those properties in an attempt to obtain improved formulations. For larger instances, he proposes approximate solution methods. He will present computational results on both sets of instances from the literature as well as on larger randomly generated instances. The results illustrate the effectiveness of our exact and approximate solution methods. This is joint work with Dr Gunes Erdogan (University of Bath) and Muge Yalcinkaya (Koc University).

Speaker: Prof Emre Alper Yildirim, Koc University

Location: EB 3.13

Time: 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

5
Dec

Foreign investors, firm level productivity and European economic integration


Speaker: Prof Gulnur Muradoglu, Queen Mary University of London

Location: 3 West North 3.7

Time: 1.45 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

7
Dec

Diversification strategies in banking: like lemmings falling off a cliff


This talk develops a theory of bank diversification across business segments and income streams. Motives for diversification include the alleged impact on performance, risk, and value; however, the theory also permits herd behavior. The paper tests four propositions using hand-collected business segment data of the top 100 banks from 1998 to 2010. The study distinguishes between retail, corporate, investment, and private banking and various income streams. Empirical evidence suggests that diversification enhanced performance but did not reduce risk. After the financial crisis, diversification contributed to risks. Diversification did not deliver economic value added and only moved banks closer to the efficient frontier in the pre-crisis period. These findings caution strategists against applying theories developed in finance to understanding business strategies in a different strategic space.

Speaker: Prof Gerhard Kling, SOAS, University of London

Location: 8 West 1.33

Time: 2.00pm

Contact: Research Office