University of Bath School of Management University of Bath School of Management

Research seminars and events

Research

Further information

UK and overseas speakers are invited to the School to share their experiences and findings with staff, doctoral students and the members of the public. Previous seminars can be found here: 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014

View the University Calendar.

If you are a member of staff and wish to organise an event or seminar please contact the Research Office.

Forthcoming events:

18
Mar

Understanding and tracking the history of management: Future of Work workshop


Does an understanding of the past enhance our understanding of the future? In this seminar an international group of scholars puts British industrial history under the microscope. This 'view from outside' seeks answers to the question of how British history may continue to influence contemporary management practice. Provoked by Britain's role as originator of the First Industrial Revolution, it traces the emergence of management in Georgian Britain, tracks its inheritance and development in the Victorian age, and explores its continuation in the Interwar period. British management thought gave way to American thinking about management in the 20th century, but have the ideas that inspired the First Industrial Revolution totally disappeared? Do they continue to reverberate in some ways? Importantly, is there something to be rediscovered or resurrected from those earlier periods that can help in our anticipation of how work and management will evolve in the Fourth Industrial Revolution?

Programme Leaders: Dr Yasin Rofcanin & Professor Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 9.30 - 4.00pm

Contact: Yasin Rofcanin

20
Mar

Many are called, few are chosen: The role of science in drug developement decisions


As science is continuously evolving, it is essential for the sustainability of firms' competitive position to recognize and act upon opportunities in new research areas. Firms are likely unequipped to process the overwhelming amount of, often, incomplete scientific output on their own. Hence, they might benefit from social connections to scientists hopefully passing through helpful information. By examining firms' likelihood to enter a particular research area, this study aims to investigate the role of different social connections to the community of scientists active in the research area on firms' ability to act upon scientific developments. The empirical analysis examines the entry behaviour of 133 biopharmaceutical companies within 290 disease areas between 1995 and 2002. The results signal that outsiders, scientists who do not publish in the area themselves, are inferior access points for information due to a lack of affinity, credibility, and information flow. In contrast, the information gathered from insiders - scientists actively publishing within the focal area - appear to strongly influence firms' probability on entry. While this information can directly originate from the insider, it can also reach the firm indirectly originating from the insider's co-authors in the area. In respect to this indirect information, the results signal that insiders are effective brokers, arguably thanks to their affinity with the area and the peer-review character of the scientific community. In summary, this study suggests that firms with ties to highly-connected insiders are more likely to pursue opportunities within a new research area.

Speaker: Ms Relinde Colen , KU Leuven

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 12.00pm

Contact: Research Office

20
Mar

Non-bank loans, corporate investments, and firm performance


An AFL division seminar. Refreshments will be served in 8 West foyer at 1.15pm. The Seminar will take place at 1.45pm. One to one meetings with the seminar speaker can be arranged via the AFL research seminar coordination team: Dr Winifred Huang & Dr Pietro Perotti.

Speaker: Prof Nesliham Ozkan , University of Bristol

Location: 8 West 3.14

Time: 1.15pm

Contact: Research Office

27
Mar

Does light touch cluster policy work? Evaluating the Tech City Programme


Despite academic scepticism, cluster policies remain popular with policymakers. This talk evaluates the causal impact of a flagship UK technology cluster programme that ran in East London from late 2010. Using rich microdata and synthetic controls to identify policy effects. Dr Nathan further tested for timing, cross-space variation, and distributional change. The policy increased cluster size and density, especially for 'digital tech' plants, where revenue/worker and high-growth firm activity also rose. But for a larger set of incumbent 'digital content' plants, the policy also led to de-concentration and lower revenue productivity. Even light touch cluster programmes risk unintended consequences. Keywords: Cities, clusters, ICTs, local economic development, causal inference, synthetic control.

Speaker: Dr Max Nathan , LSE

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 12.00pm

Contact: Research Office

27
Mar

Sticking around too long? Dynamics of the benefits of dual-class voting


An AFL division seminar. One to one meetings with the seminar speaker can be arranged via the AFL research seminar coordination team: Dr Winifred Huang & Dr Pietro Perotti

Speaker: Prof Roni Michaely , Cornell University

Location: Chancellors' Building 3.5

Time: 1.15pm

Contact: Research Office

1
Apr

Colloquium on Advances in OR Transportation Applications (AORTA)


The inaugural AORTA colloquium take place at the University of Bath on April 1st, 2019. This one-day event will host four global leaders in the application of Operational Research to transportation. Attendance is free, but registration is mandatory.

Speaker: Prof Gilbert Laporte, Eindhoven University of Technology, Prof Daniele Vigo, University of Bologna, Prof Harilas N. Psaraftis, Technical University of Denmark & Prof Kjetil Fagerholt, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Location: The Edge, School of Management Executive Suite

Time: 9.00 - 4.30pm

Contact: Research Office

1
Apr

The Impact of AI on the UK workforce


We are delighted to welcome Ravin Jesuthasan to this event, which forms part of a series of events looking at the future of work in the UK. This event will explore AI, and how various UK sectors may need to reinvent jobs in the future.

Speaker: Mr Ravin Jesuthasan, Willis Towers Watson

Location: University of Bath in London, 118 Pall Mall, London

Time: 9.30 - 4.30pm

Contact: Research Office

3
Apr

European perceptions on crowdfunding for renewables: Positivity and pragmatism


An AFL division seminar. One to one meetings with the seminar speaker can be arranged via the AFL research seminar coordination team: Dr Winifred Huang & Dr Pietro Perotti

Speaker: Prof Bruce Burton , University of Dundee

Location: Chancellors' Building 4.1

Time: 1.15pm

Contact: Research Office

4
Apr

Future of work Writing Bootcamp


This one day writing bootcamp aims to provide an impetus to start or make progress on a piece of writing; offer a quiet place for intense writing; offer and receive advice about your own and colleagues' writing; help push through blockages and barriers to writing; spend time getting to know colleagues and learning from each other's experience; help reduce journal writing from a monster that towers over us to a challenge and (sometimes) a pleasure. This workshop is open to all colleagues across the School of Management.

Programme Leaders: Dr Yasin Rofcanin & Professor Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: Wessex House Council Chamber

Time: 10.15 - 4.00pm

Contact: Yasin Rofcanin

9
Apr

Getting those Grants workshop


This event is open to the whole School. If you are aiming to secure funding for a research project in the future, or might do so if you knew more about applying for grants, or would be interested in helping to form a team of like-minded colleagues to write a grant proposal, this workshop could really help increase your chances of success.

Speaker: Prof Gareth Shaw, University of Exeter Business School

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 10.00 - 4.00pm

Contact: Research Office

10
Apr

TBC


Speaker: Prof Wolfgang Guttel , Johannes Kepler University

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 12.00pm

Contact: Research Office

17
Apr


Industrial and regional policy is back on the agenda. This paper reflects on Northern Ireland's (NI) experience of industrial policy under devolved governments and the backdrop of 'The Troubles' from the 1920's to the present day. The paper notes that while many supply-side weaknesses predated the 'Troubles' and while significant progress has been made since the 1998 Good Friday agreement, issues remain. Just as the 'Troubles' cannot totally explain NI's economic malaise, neither can Brexit provide a monocausal explanation of it's future. Success or Failure does not depend upon devolution per se, but the form of devolved governance in operation.

Speaker: Dr Graham Brownlow, Queen's Management School, Belfast

Location: 8 West 3.13

Time: 2.00pm

Contact: Research Office