University of Bath School of Management University of Bath School of Management

Research Seminars and Events 2014

Research

UK and overseas speakers are invited to the School to share their experiences and findings with staff, doctoral students and the members of the public. Previous seminars can be found here: 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015

Further Information

View the University Calendar

If you are a member of staff and wish to organise an event or seminar please contact the Research Office.

12
Dec

Struggling with Resistance? Masculine Discourses of New Managerialism in Academia

Event poster

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A proliferation of audit, accountability and monitoring controls has accompanied the managerialist agenda within universities emphasising efficiency, usually at the expense of effectiveness. Based on empirical research in UK business schools, this paper explores the conditions and consequence of oppressive masculine, discursive practices of new managerialism in relation to professional practice, equality, and gendered subjectivity in academia. It also explores the potential of feminist struggles to engage different moral values to those that are currently imposed on academics. Our research indicates how disembodied masculine managerialism has wide-reaching implications for academics yet attract only limited levels of resistance. However, if this limited resistance can be mobilised in the direction of building embodied, ethically engaged academic communities as articulated by post humanist feminists, future generations might see the current university preoccupation with competition, conquest and control as merely an historical blip.

Speaker:

Professor David Knights and Dr Caroline Clarke

Location: 8 West 1.29

Time: 11:00 - 12:00

Organisation Studies Group

Contact: Research Office

10
Dec

Internal Seminar

Speaker: Svenja Tams

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies (OS)

Contact: Research Office

10
Dec

Internal Seminar

Speaker:

Clive Lennox

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & finance

Contact: Research Office

03
Dec

Internal Seminar

Speaker:

Pietro Perotti

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & finance

Contact: Research Office

27
Nov

"The Relevance Debate in Management Studies" and "Publishing in Organization Studies"

Speaker:

Professor David Seidl

Location: 8 West 2.13

Time: 12:15 - 15:00

Strategic & International Management(SIM)

Contact: Research Office

26
Nov

Interpretation of multiple institutional logics on the ground: the case of the English NHS

Event poster

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This study examines interpretation of multiple institutional logics by interdependent actors in a professionalised context. Empirically, we examine actor’s interpretation of three institutional logics – professional logic, corporate logic , and market logic in the English National Health Service. Across two comparative cases of hospitals, our study shows how nurses, relatively low status in the institutional field, exhibit agency in their enactment of corporate logic, which is sensitive to both, potentially complementary market logic, and potentially countervailing professional logic. In so doing, they enhance their social position in professional and managerial organization. Theoretically, by focusing upon interpretation of institutional logics at the micro-level, our study renders visible agency of interpreting actors, interdependency of actors and institutional logics, and the effect of, and upon, social position of actors. In particular, we highlight opportunities for, and situational constraints upon, lower status actors seeking to enhance their social position through agency in interpreting institutional logics.

Speaker:

Dr Dimitrios Spyridonidis

Location: Chancellor Building 4.5

Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Information, Decision and Operations Group

Contact: Research Office

25
Nov

Corporate Strategy in a Challenged Europe

Speaker:

Andrew Morgan

Location: 4 West 1.2

Time: 09:00 - 10:30

Centre for International Business & Management

Contact: Research Office

20
Nov

Optimal Portfolio Allocation for Electricity Generation in Energy Markets

Speaker:

Several

Location: To be confirmed

Time: Weds & Thurs 09:00 - 17:00, Fri 09:00 - 13:00

Contact: Research Office

19
Nov

Internal Seminar

Speaker:

Ian Tonks

Location: 8 West 3.6

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & finance

Contact: Research Office

19
Nov

The Future of Idiosyncratic Deals: How Individual Agreements Shape the 21st Century Workplace

Employees nowadays increasingly negotiate individual arrangements with their employers about for instance their development, financial compensation and their working schedules. Employees no longer accept equal treatment, but increasingly demand their employers to approach them as individual human beings rather than human resources, which can be easily substituted by other human resources. These individual negotiations have been conceptualized scientifically as idiosyncratic deals, or i-deals for short (Rousseau, 2005; Rousseau et al., 2006). I-deals are individual agreements negotiated between employees and their organizations, and have gained increasing popularity since the publication of the book of Rousseau (2005) on i-deals. An increasing number of studies have been published on the determinants and effects of i-deals, as well as the context in which i-deals are negotiated (eg., Anand et al., 2010; Bal et al., 2012; Hornung et al., 2008; Rosen et al., 2013). However, despite the accumulating evidence that i-deals may have a profound impact on employees and organizations, there are multiple conceptual issues that researchers have raised concerning the concept and its effects on outcomes.

The purpose of the SGM is to bring i-deal researchers together and to discuss important matters concerning i-deals, such as conceptualization, measurement, and future research. The meeting will take place with 20-25 participants, and will have 2 keynote speakers, Professor Rob Briner and professor Veronica Hope-Hailey, University of Bath, who will present a their reflection on i-deals research and practice. There will be ample time to present papers, discuss individual papers, as well as general future directions. The SGM will take place 19-20 November 2014, in Bath, United Kingdom. We are planning to publish selected papers in a special issue of an academic journal, e.g., EJWOP. More information will follow and to be discussed during the meeting.

Location: Carpenter House, Broad Quay, Bath, BA1 1UD

Date: 19-20 November 2014

Book a place

Contact: Research Office

11
Nov

Facing the Regulators: Non-Compliance with Mandatory Compensation Disclosure in Brazil

Event poster

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A preliminary court injunction based on alleged personal security risks to managers and directors gave Brazilian public companies the option of non-compliance with the most sensitive part of newly mandated compensation disclosure rules. We find, however, no association between state-level crime data and non-compliance, which is possibly motivated by agency conflicts. Non-compliers tend to present lower corporate governance (CG) quality, higher ownership concentration, larger total assets, and less profitability. State and foreign owned companies are significantly less likely non-compliers. Shareholders correctly anticipated that lower CG quality firms were more likely to exercise their non-compliance option, but may have been negatively surprised when some higher CG quality firms did not comply.

Speaker:

Professor Ricardo Pereira Câmara Leal

Location: Junior Common Room

Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Accounting and Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

10
Nov

Does CEO Gender Matter for Firm-Level Risk Taking and Performance

Event poster
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Using a matched-pairs sample consisting of 1,358 observations, we investigate the effects of CEO gender on firm-level risk taking and on the risk-performance relationship. The upper echelons literature has argued and found empirical support for the proposition that companies are “reflections” of their corporate leaders. Nevertheless, the influences of CEO gender on firm outcomes like risk taking and performance have yet to be systematically conceptualized and empirically studied. We take a step in this direction by developing competing theories arguing that female CEOs will be less (more) likely to take high risks than male CEOs. When female CEOs do take high risks, however, they will be more likely than males to achieve superior performance. Our findings indicate that overall female CEOs take less risk than their male counterparts, but also corroborate our arguments that high risks by female CEOs will be more effective. Moreover, CEO duality dampens the effect of gender on corporate risk-taking. Overall, our study provides preliminary evidence that, while CEO gender matters, the influences of CEO gender on organizational outcomes are anything but straightforward

Speaker:

Professor Richard Priem

Location: 8W 3.13

Time: 18:00 - 19:00

Business, Society and Business Economics Group

Contact: Research Office

7
Nov

Technological Distance and the Structure of MNC Subunit Knowledge Sourcing

Event poster
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The foreign subunits of multinational corporations (MNCs) have an important role to play in the search for relevant knowledge which is technologically distant from the traditional core domains of the firm. When MNC subunits create new knowledge that relies upon novel combinations of technologically more distant and core knowledge, this affects their relative reliance on internal and external sources of knowledge across geographic space. Focusing on the pharmaceutical industry in Germany, we find that as technological distance rises, firms rely more on both internal and external sources of knowledge accumulation. However, international internal sources are used for a more intensive cross-border exploitation of knowledge within a field, while local external sources are used more for the exploration of new knowledge combinations across distinct and more distant fields. Moreover, as international integration efforts rise, subunits rely more on intra-firm knowledge sources, but when international integration is combined with local responsiveness efforts, knowledge accumulation relies more on inter-organizational sources. These findings suggest that when subunits play a more creative role in knowledge generation within their corporate group, international knowledge exchanges in MNCs are enhanced (not reduced) and complement external sources.

Speaker:

Professor John Cantwell

Location: 8W 2.13

Time: 12:15 - 14:00

Strategy and International Management Group

Contact: Research Office

05
Nov

Internal Seminar

Speaker:

Yan Yan

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & finance

Contact: Research Office

04
Nov

Internal Seminar

Speaker:

Dr Llyr Jones

Location: 8 West 3.22

Time: 17:00 - 18:15

Centre for International Business & Management

Contact: Research Office

04
Nov

Moving Forward: Developing Theoretical Contributions in Management Studies

Event poster

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How do we, as management researchers, develop novel theoretical contributions and, thereby, potentially break new ground in management studies? To address this question, we review previous methodological work on theorizing and advance a typology of the reasoning processes that underlie theoretical contributions and significant advances in management studies. This typology consists of various types of analogical and counterfactual reasoning, ranging from focused thought experiments aimed at prodding existing theory in the direction of alternative assumptions, constructs, and hypotheses to more expansive efforts for inducing new theoretical models and alternative explanations. Applying this typology, we detail the mechanisms behind the formation of novel theoretical contributions and illustrate the currency of our typology through a review of 24 major theoretical breakthroughs in management studies. We conclude the paper by discussing the implications of this typology for our collective efforts in building, elaborating, and expanding theory in management studies.

Speaker:

Professor Joep Cornelissen

Location: 8W 4.23

Time: 11:00 - 11:50

Organisation Studies Group

Contact: Research Office

31
Oct

Mass Customization and Profitability: The Roles of Incentives, Inventory, and Option-based Revenue

Event poster

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Mass customization strategies have been widely heralded as a source of competitive advantage for manufacturing firms. We quantify the relative financial impact of a firm’s order-fulfillment strategy by exploiting a context that allows us to simultaneously contrast the post-manufacturing cost and revenue implications of building products to order, and building them to forecast. We integrate unit-level production, logistics, sales, and profitability data from a large automotive producer that manufactured vehicles to order as well as to forecast. Our analysis of 48,534 vehicle sales confirms that building products to order yields a higher profit margin per unit. Sales incentives, inventory holding costs, and option-based revenue fully mediate between order-fulfillment strategy and unit profitability. We draw on interviews with executives at the firm under study and the automotive industry to situate our findings. Subsequent to our data collection, we find that build-to-order is no longer just a means to deliver unique value for those customers desiring custom vehicles. Rather, it is now one component of a multi-modal approach to satisfy customer needs, including selecting to order from centralized inventory, dynamic reconfiguration in the product production pipeline, dealer inventory, and interdealer exchange. While all these modalities have been available for some time, the current approaches emphasize the identification of each customer’s need, followed in turn by a selection of the optimal product source after need is substantiated. This obviates many of the advantages to dealers of holding large quantities of finished goods inventory.

Speaker:

Dr Benn Lawson

Location: 8W 2.6

Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Information, Decision and Operations Group

Contact: Research Office

31
Oct

Ignorance and critical incident management in high reliabilty organizations

Event poster

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Starting from defining the terms "knowledge" and "ignorance", I will analyze interactive cognitive processes in high reliability organizations. Especially in the field of medicine and aviation it is important to know how doctors and pilots deal with ignorance and failures. In their daily work, doctors and pilots have to make decisions under uncertainty. The society expects, however, not only high performance of these professionals but also a high level of security, reliability and error prevention. Therefore, members of these organizations as well as the profession itself have to develop strategies how they deal with ignorance and critical incidents. The presentation will give empirically informed answers to the following research questions:

For this purpose, I will compare the use of critical-incident-reporting systems with the help of two case studies in medicine and aviation.

Speaker:

Dr Maximiliane Wilkesmann

Location: 8W 4.23

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies Group

Contact: Research Office

30
Oct

Intrinsic and internalized modes of teaching motivation: Influences of transactional and transformational governance

Event poster

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The introduction of New Public Management in the German system of higher education raises issues of the academics’ motivation to do research and to teach. Evidence-based findings about contextual factors that influence intrinsic and related modes of internalized teaching motivation in German higher education institutions are presented. In accordance with Self-Determination Theory, we empirically test factors which correlate with autonomous motivation to teach. The results support the basic claims of the Self-Determination Theory that intrinsic teaching motivation is facilitated by social relatedness, competence, and partly by autonomy for German professors, too. If teaching is managed by objective agreements intrinsic motivation is significantly decreased. Additionally, the results are discussed by the help of the differentiation between transactional and transformational modes of governance. Transactional governance encompasses all forms of managerial governance, which includes selective incentives and monitoring capacity. Whereas transformational governance covers, on the one hand, the means of restructuring the roles of principals and agents or the interaction situation in the organization, on the other hand, it also addresses all the means of restructuring the relationship between perceived environment and motivation, as can be seen in Self-Determination Theory.

Speaker:

Professor Uwe Wilkesmann

Location: 8W 1.32

Time: 14:00 - 16:00

International Centre for Higher Education Management (ICHEM)

Contact: Research Office

29
Oct

Poverty and Vulnerability in Consumer Culture

Event poster

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Contemporary calls for research suggests exploring how those who are vulnerable can improvise, navigate, solve problems and gain access to consumption related experiences. Funded by the British Academy this seminar is in part an opportunity to disseminate the findings of a study conducted by the universities of Bath, Stirling and Lancaster into individual and collective coping strategies employed to facilitate access to a significant adolescent ritual: the high-school prom.

To facilitate a wider discussion our key note speaker will present her published work in the field. This will be followed by a summary of findings from the DARE project and a debate on the challenges and opportunities for advancing our knowledge in this important area of consumer research.

Speaker:

Dr Kathy Hamilton and Dr Peter Nuttall

Location: 8W 1.29

Time: 13:15 - 15:15

Marketing Group and Centre for Research in Advertising and Consumption (CRiAC)

Contact: Research Office

29
Oct

Disadvantage and Ritual Excess (DARE): Examining Inclusion and Exclusion During Adolescent Transition

Event poster

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Speaker:

Dr Kathy Hamilton & Dr Pete Nuttall

Location: 8 West 1.29

Time: 13:15 - 15:15

Centre for Research in Advertising and Consumption (CRiAC)

Contact: Research Office

22
Oct

Internal Seminar

Speaker:

Muhamed Alsharman

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & finance

Contact: Research Office

17
Oct

Self-Fulfilling Prophecies in Social Networks: Motivation, Cognition and Network Dynamics AND Publishing in ASQ

Speaker:

Professor Martin Kilduff, UCL, London

Location: 8W 1.32

Time: 12:15 - 15:00

Strategy and International Management (SIM) Group

Contact: Research Office

17
Oct

Publishing in ASQ

Speaker:

Professor MArtin Kilduff

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 14:00 - 15:00

Strategic & International Management

Contact: Research Office

08
Oct

Internal Seminar

Speaker:

Juani Swart

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies

Contact: Research Office

08
Oct

Is environmental orientation dynamic?

Event poster

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The aim of this paper is, on one hand, to explore if the drivers of environmental orientation are dynamic or not, and, on the other hand, to evaluate the impact of carry-over effects on companies behavior. For this study we have use a sample of 159 automotive companies (NACE code 29) from 2008 to 2012 Spanish Technological Innovation Panel (PITEC). We followed Johnson et al. (2006) to model the temporal effects on a Partial Least Square (PLS) framework. Results indicate that drivers are not dynamic in the short term. However, we can clearly see a switch on the impact of Market Information Sources on Environmental Orientation from a mediation to a direct effect. Additionally, we confirmed an increase of the importance on the carry over effects reinforcing the argument that past behaviors are fundamental in predicting future behavior.

Speaker:

Dr Marival Segarra-Oña & Dr Ángel Peiró-Signes

Location: 8W 4.23

Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Information, Decision and Operations

Contact: Research Office

08
Oct

Internal Seminar

Speaker:

Simone Giansante

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & finance

Contact: Research Office

08
Oct

Opening up innovation in buyer-supplier relationships: Empirical evidence of antecedents and its effect on supply chain competence

Event poster

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This paper focuses on coupled processes with key suppliers, which we call supply chain-open innovativeness relationships. Drawing on social exchange theory, we identify some antecedents of this orientation in the relationship an organization can maintain with its key supplier. We measure some of these constructs in terms of gap by comparing perceptions with previous expectations. We also analyze open innovation performance in terms of competence improvement. Both the proposed model and the hypotheses were tested on a sample of 285 firms. The results confirm that trust, commitment, and procedural justice enable the existence of a supply chain-open innovativeness relationship and the effect of this relationship on supply chain competence. We also confirm the positive effect of supply chain competence on firm performance.

Speaker:

María Isabel Roldán Bravo

Location: 8W 4.23

Time: 15:30 - 17:00

Information, Decision and Operations

Contact: Research Office

01
Oct

“I’m sorry but i don’t have a loyalty card”: How dispositifs produce consumer resistance.

Event poster

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Why do some people refuse becoming member of a loyalty program, a supposedly benevolent and free market offering? Despite comprehensive approaches of consumer resistance, research addressing why and how people might resist benign dispositifs such as loyalty programs (LPs) is absent in the literature. To address the gap, the authors investigate how people explain and justify their refusal to join LPs. Findings from consumer in-depth interviews conducted in France reveal that people resist dispositifs by invoking various moral arguments that conflict with the dominant discursive market logic of LPs. They also show that the hidden industrial logic of LPs also betrays promises of consumers' recognition. The authors theorize these findings through a general grammar of moral justifications. They provide a theoretical framework of individuals’ critical capacities that extend our understanding of consumer resistance.

Speaker:

Professor Dominique Roux
Professor at Paris-Sud

Location: 8W 1.32

Time: 14:15 - 16:00

Marketing

Contact: Research Office

01
Oct

Optimal Portfolio Allocation for Electricity Generation in Energy Markets

Event poster

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Although higher penetration of renewables may increase the mean cost of generation investment and operation, they can also induce benefits in terms of risk reductions on system operation costs (e.g., less exposure to volatile fuel prices). In this context, we present a model that determines robust mix of generation technologies, including renewables, by minimizing the mean cost of investment and operation while constraining risk exposure. The model also considers effects on system inertial response and reserves, and demand participation. We show that higher penetration of renewables may serve as an effective hedge against risks associated with volatile fuel prices and uncertain hydrological scenarios.

Speaker:

Dr Alejandro Bernales

Location: 8W 1.29

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

18
Sept

Mapping the spatial associations among social values for conservation, ecological values and pro-environmental behaviour: Recent methodological advancements and future directions

Event poster

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Over recent years, sophisticated spatial methods have been developed in the conservation sciences for spatially comparing community perceived (social) values for conservation with ecological values and pro-environmental behaviour. In this presentation, I will present an overview of a range of techniques for spatially assessing the associations between these variables and discuss how the spatial results can inform private land conservation actions and policy development. These techniques will be applied to a range of conservation problems in Australia, including the management of land-use conflicts and protection of matters of national environmental significance in New South Wales, the identification of protected areas in Victoria and the management of climate change risks in South Australia. Future directions in inter-disciplinary modelling will be discussed, with a specific focus on opportunities for better understanding private land conservation opportunities, and for encouraging social learning among multiple stakeholders who have an interest in regional conservation planning. The presentation will conclude with an overview of my wider research interests, including: 1) the measurement of place attachment; 2) the development of knowledge integration and social learning frameworks to support environmental management, and; 3) the barriers and opportunities to adapting to environmental change.

Speaker:

Dr Christopher Raymond
Research Fellow, School of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Tasmania Adjunct Senior Research Fellow, Barbara Hardy Institute, University of South Australia

Location: CB 4.7

Time: 14:00 - 15:00

Marketing

Contact: Research Office

11
Sept

CSCMP Hot Topics: Big Data


“Big Data” seems to be a big buzzword, but there is limited agreement regarding what it is, what purpose it serves, and what it means for the future of supply chain management (SCM). Many consultants and experts think it will revolutionize industry in a major way by enabling supply chain (SC) managers to make more informed, data-driven decisions. However, more conservative companies suggest that Big Data’s SC value is overblown and that it is little more than an extension of “analytics.” Therefore, our goal was to get to the bottom of this Big Data craze and uncover how SC partners view it.

Event poster

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This Hot Topics article is the beginning of a CSCMP-sponsored study of SCM Big Data strategy. Using a “going native” qualitative interview method, we performed in-depth interviews with 31 senior-level SC managers around the world. Specifically, we asked them:

• What is Big Data?
• What are the obstacles to using Big Data?
• What are the opportunities of using Big Data?

Speaker:

Professor Robert “Glenn” Richey, Jr.

Location: CB 4.5

Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Information, Decision and Operations Group

Contact: Research Office

10
Sept

Rule 3522 and the aggressive tax schemes sold by accounting firms to their audit clients

Event poster

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Rule 3522 prohibited accounting firms from selling aggressive tax schemes to audit clients. I examine the impact of Rule 3522 on: 1) auditor-provided tax services (APTS), 2) financial reporting quality, and 3) market values. First, there was a significant drop in APTS when Rule 3522 came into effect and the drop is significantly larger for the audit firms that had been accused of selling aggressive tax schemes. Second, the companies that reduced their APTS purchases in response to Rule 3522 were more likely to misstate their financial statements in the period before Rule 3522. However, these companies did not improve their financial reporting quality subsequent to Rule 3522. Finally, the market reaction to Rule 3522 is positive and statistically significant although the magnitude is small. I conclude that Rule 3522 curtailed the selling of aggressive tax shelters to audit clients, but it did not improve financial reporting quality and it had only a small positive impact on market values.

Speaker:

Professor Clive Lennox

Location: 8 West, 3.13

Time: 15:00 - 16:30

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

15
July

Governance of Complex Performance: Managing the commissioning-support interface

This presentation explores how the degree of formalization evolves during the governance of complex performance in commissioning and service support of UK naval vessels. Mainstream literature presumes the formalization process between organizations is directed at coordination and control (Macneil, 1980; Williamson, 1996). Yet recent efforts to provide managers with more choice have led to formalization presented as a trade-off between its functions and dysfunctions over time, where cognition and learning must be considered part of inter-organizational performance (Vlaar et al, 2007). I aim to progress organizational behavioural studies by building on Filochev and Nakajima’s call for a more ‘context-dependent understanding’ of governance (2010: 593).

Speaker:

Professor Mickey Howard

Location: 8W 1.29

Time: 11:00 - 12:30

Information, Decision & Operation Group

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

11
July

Entry performance in a foreign country given product and brand strategies


This paper tests the effect of branding strategy entry mode -- labeled here global and local brand strategies -- on the post-entry performance of firms entering a foreign market. The empirical setting is the automobile industry in Spain at the end of 1990s when tariff and non-tariff reductions were introduced due to the integration of Spain into the European Union. This empirical context allows testing the entrance in Spain of foreign brands already present in other European countries. The paper identifies the two branding strategies through the trademarks registered by the firms across diverse countries. Our main results highlight that global brands have a positive impact on performance if they are coupled with the across-niche product diversification of the company, but on the contrary, they have a negative impact on performance if the local market where companies compete it is highly niche specialized. From empirical standpoint, we employ a two-step Heckman model, which reduces concerns about endogeneity issue of the choice of brand strategies at entry.

Speaker:

Professor Marco Giarratana

Location: 8W 3.22

Time: 12:30 - 13:30

Strategy and International Management

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

Designers today are taking on the role of facilitating the collective creativity of people in order to address wicked problems. Codesign tools and methods are quickly attracting interest beyond design and marketing communities, offering participatory approaches to organizational change, community engagement, education and sustainability. This growing interest from outside design communities results from codesign practice offering a particular mindset and tools to generating pragmatic solutions to complex and poorly understood social systems.

The session will consist of a 1-hour seminar, followed by a 2-hour experiential workshop.

[more information]

22-23
June

Centre for Governance and Regulation Conference


This Conference will bring together leading academics and practitioners from around the world working in the area of asset management industry with emphasis placed on this part of the industry that provides investments for old-age. Special attention will be given to the post-financial crisis development and performance of the pension industry, investment issues, and household saving opportunities and behaviour. In other words, it will look at the industry both from the perspective of institutional and individual investors.

More information

Contact: Research Office

11
June

Antecedents to IT Tool Usage in New Product Development Phases


More and more, companies are using information technology (IT) tools/applications to enable the NPD process. I will present the preliminary results of a study that investigates various antecedents to the frequency of IT usage in each of three phases of the NPD process and the relationship between usage and new product performance. The study, based on a survey of Japanese companies, examines organization level factors/resources that impact the frequency of IT tool usage. These factors include: an executive champion, NPD process formalization, collocation, and IT embeddedness.

Speaker:

Professor Gloria Barczak

Location: WH 9.32

Time: 14:00 - 16:00

Centre for Research in Advertising & Consumption (CRiAC)

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

11
June

Organizing Counter Terrorism: Sensemaking Amidst Dynamic Complexity

Speaker:

Dr Ian Colville

Location: 8West 4.23

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies

Contact: Research Office

9
June

Evasive Shareholder Meetings


We study the location and timing of annual shareholder meetings. When companies move their annual meetings a great distance from headquarters, they tend to announce disappointing earnings results and experience pronounced stock market underperformance in the months after the meeting. Companies appear to schedule meetings in remote locations when the managers have private, adverse information about future performance and wish to discourage scrutiny by shareholders, activists, and the media. However, shareholders do not appear to decode this signal, since the disclosure of meeting locations leads to little immediate stock price reaction. We find that voter participation drops when meetings are held at unusual hours, even though most voting is done electronically during a period of weeks before the meeting convenes.

Speaker:

Professor David Yermack

Location: 8West 4.23

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

14
May

Evidence-based practice in management: Towards a research agenda


There are some indications of increasing interest in evidence-based management (EBMgt) which is defined as "making decisions through the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the best available evidence from multiple sources to increase the likelihood of a favourable outcome" through a series of steps. However, this is happening in the absence of much good quality evidence about the nature of the problems EBMgt aims to tackle or the solutions it proposes. This presentation, which takes the form of a discussion of ideas rather that a paper in preparation for publication, will address a some of the questions that need to be answered in order to identify a research agenda for EBMgt. Such questions include: To what extent to managers and organizations adopt an evidence-based approach to decision making? What is the nature and extent of the alleged 'gap' between management theory/research and management practice? Why do managers adopt practices which are counterproductive to the espoused goals of managers and organizations? How does the work of management school researchers and educators facilitate or inhibit EBMgt? How is EBMgt perceived and understood by managers, academics and students? How can the effects of EBMgt teaching and training (e.g., critical thinking) be evaluated?

Speaker:

Professor Rob Briner

Location: 8West 1.29

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies Group

Contact: Research Office


Location: Bank of America, London, United Kingdom

[more information]

7
May

Social influence, learning, and the abandonment of corporate venture capital practices

Abstract: This study examines the abandonment of organizational practices. We argue that firm choices in implementing practices affect how firms experience a practice and their subsequent likelihood of abandonment. We focus on utilization of the practice and staffing, i.e. career backgrounds of managers, as two important implementation choices that firms make. The findings demonstrate that practice utilization and staffing choices not only affect abandonment likelihood directly but also condition firms' susceptibility to pressures to abandon when social referents do. Our study contributes to diffusion research by examining practice abandonment - a relatively unexplored area in diffusion research - and by incorporating specific aspects of firms' post-adoption choices into diffusion theory.

Speaker:

Dr Gina Dokko (UC Davis)

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 13:00 - 14:30

Organisation Studies Group

Contact: Research Office

7
May

Buddhism and consumption in China: toward a new materialism


Abstract: Buddhist values have suffused Chinese culture for the past two thousand years. In relation to consumption, Buddhism emphasizes the importance of eliminating desire for material goods, and the perils of becoming attached to material possessions. Not only does Buddhism advocate non-attachment from the idea of having in terms of consumer possessing, but goes further in discussing self-consumption or self-creation through consumption as an illusion. Given this conceptualization that consumption should not be used to create or enhance identity, one of the cornerstones of consumer research in the past twenty five years, in conjunction with Buddhism's increased influence on Chinese society in the past ten years, this paper investigates how Chinese consumers incorporate their Buddhist beliefs with their increasing materialism. We find that consumers reconcile their consumption with their beliefs by emphasizing intention; focusing on making sure Buddhism has a place in modern consumer culture, and ultimately engaging an alternate conceptualization of materialism. We theorize this new materialism, pointing out the implications for marketing, Buddhism and society.

Speaker:

Prof Giana M Eckhardtr

Location: Chancellors Building Room 3.5

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

CRiAC

Contact: Research Office

1
May

An investigation of the short-run and long-run stock market response to insurer rating changes

Speaker:

Professor Stephen Pottier

Location: 8 West 1.34

Time: 10:30 - 12:00

CRSI

Contact: Research Office

16
April

Financially Constrained Arbitrage and Cross-Market Contagion

 

Abstract: We propose a continuous time infinite horizon equilibrium model of financial markets in which arbitrageurs have multiple valuable investment opportunities but face financial constraints. The investment opportunities, heterogeneous along different dimensions, are provided by pairs of similar assets trading at different prices in segmented markets. By exploiting these opportunities, arbitrageurs alleviate the segmentation of markets, providing liquidity to other investors by intermediating their trades. We characterize the arbitrageurs' optimal investment policy, and derive implications for market liquidity and asset prices.

Speaker:

Denis Gromb (INSEAD) and Dimitri Vayanos (LSE)

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

16
April

The Marketing Group Seminar: Markets in Higher Education: Mad Utopia or Sound Money

For more than two decades, governments around the world, led by the English-speaking polities, have moved higher education systems closer to the forms of textbook economic markets. Reforms include corporatisation, competitive funding, student charges, output formats and performance reporting. But, no country has established a bona fide economic market in the first-degree education of domestic students. No research university is driven by shareholders, profit, market share, allocative efficiency or the commodity form. There is commercial tuition only in parts of vocational training and international education.

 At the most, there are regulated quasi-markets, as in post-Browne UK. This differs from the experience of privatisation and commercialisation of transport, communications, broadcasting and health insurance in many nations. The article argues that bona fide market reform in higher education is constrained by intrinsic limits specific to the sector (public goods, status competition), and political factors associated with those limits. This suggests that market reform is utopian, and the abstract ideal is sustained for exogenous policy reasons (e.g. fiscal reduction, state control, ordering of contents). But, if capitalist markets are clearly unachievable, a more authentic modernisation agenda is needed.

Speaker:

Professor Simon Marginson, Institute of Education, University of London

Location: CB 3.10

Time: 14:00 - 16:30

The Marketing Group

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

9
April

Accounting & Finance Group Seminar: Split ratings and spreads: The credit signals that matter most for sovereign bonds

We investigate how split ratings influence the information content of credit events on the sovereign bond markets during 2000-2012. We find that market reactions differ across agencies and types of split. Specifically, market reactions are far stronger for negative events on the inferior ratings and for positive events on the superior ratings. Sovereign credit spreads are particularly responsive to negative events by S&P (the more conservative agency in the sample). Moody’s positive events have a significant impact only when Moody’s assigns superior pre-event ratings than S&P. There is little evidence that split ratings involving Fitch have any market implication.

Speaker:

Professor Owain ap Gwilym, Bangor Business School

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

9
April

Organisation Studies Group Seminar: Experiences of promotions among professionals: Of closed doors, leapfrogs and others

The aim of this study is to investigate experiences of promotions among professionals by analysing how these are represented through the combination of visual imagery and talk.  While there is considerable knowledge on promotional structures in professional contexts (e.g. Galanter & Palay, 1990; Galanter & Henderson, 2008; Malhatra et al., 2010; Morris & Pinnington, 1998), their potential effect on projects of the self (e.g. Grey, 1994) and the career strategies that professionals engage in vis-a-vis these structures (e.g. Mueller et al., 2011; Tomlinson et al., 2013), we currently do not know much about how professionals make sense of and experience the project of promotion. Based on a combination of interviews and participant drawings collected during promotions to partnership in seven UK law firms, I present these experiences embedded within four main imageries: closed doors, leapfrogs, facing two faces and wading through treacle. While for all being promoted to partnership, or reaching of the ‘promised land’, filled them with a strong sense of achievement, each of the four imageries emphasises a different aspect of their experience. Each also enables us to discern the dynamics underpinning promotions in professional context and hence contributes to our understanding of experience of professional work. By making use of visual data, in addition this study makes methodological contributions by showing how professionals construct their experiences through the use of imageries. As a result it shows how visual methods can considerably enrich our understanding of professional work (Strangleman, 2004).

Speaker:

Stefanie Gustafsson, School of Management, University of Bath

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies Group

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

9
April

Information, Decision and Operations Group Seminar: TBC

 

Speaker:

TBC

Location: 8 West 2.5

Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Information, Decision and Operations Group

Contact: Research Office

2
April

Accounting & Finance Group Seminar: Design of equity covenants: the effect of informational asymmetry

This model analyses the design of covenants in equity contracts as a specific example of the contractual assignment under the informational asymmetry. Specifically, this model considers a probability that the informational asymmetry exists between E and VC. Both agents are confident about their knowledge and the party in control will implement his decision in the face of disagreement of the other party. In this study, like the monetary right, the control right is distributed to partners in proportion. In the initial contract, entrepreneur has the bargaining power on the monetary right and VC has bargaining power on the control right. Partners bargain about both monetary and control right simultaneously. They can select to defect (retain as much equity/control as possible) and both obtain low payoff or cooperate (exchange the equity with control right) and both obtain high payoff. The result shows that the VC would like to see the informational asymmetry to some extent while the entrepreneur prefers informational symmetry.

Speaker:

Yan Yao, School of Management, University of Bath

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

26
March

Accounting & Finance Group Seminar: Time-varying Noise Trader Risk and Asset Prices

By introducing time varying noise trader risk in De Long, Shleifer, Summers, and Waldmann (1990) model, we predict that noise trader risk significantly affects time variations in the small-stock premium. Consistent with the theoretical predictions, we find that when noise trader risk is high, small stocks earn lower contemporaneous returns and higher subsequent returns relative to large stocks. In addition, noise trader risk has a positive effect on the volatility of the small-stock premium. After accounting for macroeconomic uncertainty and controlling for time variation in conditional market betas, we demonstrate that systematic risk provides an incomplete explanation for our results. Noise trader risk has a similar impact on the distress premium.

Speaker:

Dr Qingwei Wang, Lecturer in Finance, Bangor Business School, Bangor University.

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

20
March

Seminar: The Ethical Economy: Rebuilding Value after the Crisis


A more ethical economic system is now possible, one that rectifies the crisis spots of our current downturn while balancing the injustices of extreme poverty and wealth. Adam Arvidsson will talk on his book authored with Nicolai Peitersen to outline the shape such an economy might take, identifying its origins in innovations already existent in our production, valuation, and distribution systems. Much like nineteenth-century entrepreneurs, philosophers, bankers, artisans, and social organizers who planned a course for modern capitalism that was more economically efficient and ethically desirable, we now have a chance to construct new instruments, institutions, and infrastructure to reverse the trajectory of a quickly deteriorating economic environment.

Speaker:

Dr Adam Arvidsson, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Milan.

Location: 8 West 2.23

Time: 14:00 - 16:30

Marketing Group

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

19
March

Seminar: To be confirmed

Speaker:

Xin Yi Huang, School of Management, University of Bath

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

12
March

Seminar: Do dividends provide information about earnings? Evidence from Oman

We analyse the information content of dividend announcements and factors that drive dividend changes in Oman as a unique environment for the period 2000-2011. Our work complements, and contrasts with, an existing study (Al-Yahyaee et al., 2011), which demonstrates a positive correlation between dividends and stock prices in Oman, in support of the signalling theory. Employing multiple methods from earlier studies, we demonstrate that there is some relationship between dividends and future profitability. However, after controlling for the nonlinearity in the profitability process we find no evidence for the signalling theory of dividends. Furthermore, we find no evidence of life cycle theory as an important factor that influences dividend changes in Omani market.

Speaker:

Abdullah Al-Ghazali, School of Management, University of Bath

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

12
March

Seminar: Complexity in large-scale automotive supply networks


The rise of standardization, modular products, and supporting collaboration technology reduced the need for tight control and coordination, and allowed outsourcing to play a bigger role in production and supply networks. As a result, these networks became more global, intertwined and complex.  Although operations literature offers many sophisticated dyadic models and case studies to describe inter-organisational risk and coordination, there is a dearth of knowledge on the impact of the extended ecosystem on which firms rely. In this talk we will explore this gap by assembling large-scale empirical datasets on Toyota and Ford’s global production network and examining how the global structure of supply relationships impact system properties such as network resilience. Our results sound a cautionary note, showing that structure has significant impact on these properties. Beyond demonstrating how these characteristics link to structure, we will debate how the field of supply chain management can advance through the application of interdisciplinary approaches that use tools of analysis from the field of complex networks.

Speaker:

Dr Alexandra Brintrup, Lecturer in Manufacturing Informatics at Cranfield University and a Fellow of the University of Oxford

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 10:00 - 11:30

Information, Decision and Operations

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

March 2014

11
March

CSRI Event: David Stevens - Admiral Story


David Stevens (Board Director, Operations, Admiral plc) and co-founder of the Admiral insurance group will visit the School of Management to give a presentation to the MBA students on the “Admiral Story”.  The Admiral insurance company entered the highly competitive UK motor insurance market as a new entrant in the early 1990s to today become a leading UK publicly quoted financial services firm and Wales’ largest company.

Location: 8 West 3.14

Time: 17:15

Centre for Strategic Risk and Insurance (CSRI)

Contact: Research Office

5
March

Seminar: Mortgage Market Concentration, Foreclosures and House Prices


Previous work has shown that mortgage foreclosures generate a negative externality on nearby house prices. In this paper, we conjecture that lenders with a larger share of a neighborhood's outstanding mortgages on their balance sheets internalize this externality and thus more inclined to renegotiate defaulting loans. We provide evidence supporting this conjecture using zip code level data on house prices and foreclosures during the 2007-2009 US housing market crisis. We find that zip codes with larger concentration of outstanding mortgages experienced fewer foreclosures and a smaller decline in house prices. These findings are not driven by prior local economic conditions, mortgage securitization or ex-ante lenders characteristics, and hold within geographical areas exposed to common economic shocks, such as MSAs or counties. We also find that the concentration of outstanding mortgages matters more in ZIP codes of non-judicial states where foreclosure procedures are less costly.

Speaker:

Professor Mariassunta Glannetti Professor of Finance, Stockholm School of Finance

Location: 8West 1.32

Time: 14:00 - 16:30

Accounting and Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

Event poster PDF

February 2014

27
Feb

Seminar:

Speaker:

Location: 8West 1.32

Time: 14:00 - 16:00

Information, Decision & Operations

Contact: Research Office

26
Feb

Seminar: The Timeliness of Financial Reporting in UK Private Companies


In this paper, we examine the influence of both regulatory and fundamental factors in driving the timeliness of UK private companies’ accounting information. We study the response to a change in the Companies Act that shortened the time for publishing private companies’ accounts from 10 months to 9 months. We also examine whether companies which use the accounting process to communicate financial information to outside capital providers are more timely in publishing their accounts than companies filing accounts for regulatory and/or tax purposes. We find that the statutory deadline has a significant effect on companies’ filing behaviour and on their propensity to file late. We also find that companies using accounting for communicating to outside capital providers publish their accounts significantly more quickly than those filing for compliance or tax reasons.

Overall, we conclude that UK private companies’ accounting is more timely when there is economic demand for the information, although consistent with prior research showing demand for private companies’ accounting to be of lower than for public companies’, regulatory forces are highly influential in driving companies’ behaviour.

Speaker:

Professor Mark Clatworthy external website, Professor of Accounting and Finance, University of Bristol

Location: 8West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting and Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

20
Feb

Seminar: Business Schools in Society: Critical Assessments and Future Perspectives

While business schools are achieving success on numerous fronts, the role of the business school in society is coming under increasing scrutiny. Recent landmark cases in relation to corporate fraud, the global financial crisis, climate change and environmental destruction have eroded trust in corporate capitalism and raised questions about corporate excesses. In this context, the contribution of management research and management education to a more sustainable future has been increasingly scrutinised and debated. In addition there have been questions around agendas being driven by rankings and markets, debates around 'rigorous' versus 'relevant' and 'formulaic' research; evidence based management and the balance between the 'bottom line' and a moral imagination in the business school curriculum. This seminar develops critical insights and the space for discussion and debate in examining the challenges that business schools face and offers a range of perspectives in going forward.

Each panel member will present for 15 -20 minutes followed by discussion.

Speakers:

Professor Rob Briner, Professor of Organisational Psychology, School of Management, University of Bath

Professor Yiannis Gabriel, Chair in Organisation Studies, School of Management, University of Bath

Professor Ken Starkey external website, Professor of Management & Org. Learning, Business School, Nottingham University

Location: 4West 1.1

Time: 14:00 - 16:30

CRiAC and Organisational Studies Group

Contact: Research Office

The seminar will be followed by a drinks reception. For catering purposes please email dbahem@management.bath.ac.uk by 14 February.

19
Feb

Seminar: To be confirmed

Speakers:

Dr. Fei Fei

Location: 8West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

13
Feb

Seminar: The Future of Retail


Retail powers economic growth. There will be more retail change in the next 10 years than there has been in the past 50. So to understand our economic future we need to understand the past and where retail is going. This lecture will pinpoint the key drivers creating disruptive change in the retail industry and illustrate what ‘The Future of Retail’ in a digital world will be and its implications for Consumers, Brands, Advertising, The Economy and The Universe.

Speaker:

David Roth, CEO The Store WPP, EMEA and Asia

Location: 8West 3.22

Time: 15:30 - 17:00

Centre for International Business & Management (CIBAM)

Contact: Research Office

12
Feb

Seminar: Exploring Leadership Learning: Experiences of an MBA Elective in South Africa

Leadership is perhaps most required when the way forward is least clear, choices are limitless and solutions to problems temporary and imperfect. Learning to lead change in a complex environment may require an approach that matches these challenges. This research has been exploring the experiences of MBA students studying the leadership of change through meeting leaders of the transformation process in South Africa. Their sensemaking raises questions for the design of leadership learning that brings insight to how to construct effective learning opportunities. It allows prompts thinking about the nature of leadership itself.

Speaker:

Dr Graham Abbey, Director of Executive Development, School of Management, University of Bath

Location: 8West 1.32

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisational Studies Group

Contact: Research Office

12
Feb

Seminar: Pricing and mispricing effects of the adoption of IAS 38


We assess the informativeness of stock prices to reflect future earnings information following an exogenous event of introducing a more "rules-based" accounting standard. Using the UK setting, we focus on the adoption of IAS 38 which introduced a requirement to recognise research and development costs as an asset following the adoption of IFRS in 2005, while the previous UK GAAP permitted managers to exercise their discretion when recognising R&D as an asset. We find that prior to the introduction of IAS 38, for those firms that chose to capitalize, capitalisation resulted in more informative prices: with more information about future earnings being impounded in current stock prices. However, after the adoption of IFRS for all firms, capitalization resulted in less informative prices. Our earnings mispricing tests confirm these price-informativeness tests. Overall, our findings show that IAS 38 removed a useful tool for managers to communicate their private information, consistent with the concerns expressed in prior research with regards to the adoption of the standard.

Speaker:

Fanis Tsoligkas, Lecturer School of Management, University of Bath

Location: 8West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

5
Feb

Seminar: Accounting for the Externalities of Offshore Wind Power: The Cost of the Renewables Obligation

As part of its drive to reduce carbon emissions, the UK government has operated a market-based subsidy mechanism to encourage the development of electricity generation from renewable sources, the Renewables Obligation. While this policy yields external benefits through carbon saving, the resulting development of offshore wind power potentially imposes welfare costs through changes in the marine environment as well as by increasing the price of electricity. In the context of evaluating the net cost-benefit of offshore wind power, this workshop examines a potential method for assessing the incremental cost of the Renewables Obligation to electricity users.

Speaker:

Dr Philip Cooper, Senior Lecturer in Accounting, School of Management, University of Bath

Location: 8West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting and Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

12
Feb

Seminar: An Analysis of the Corporate Income Tax Policy of Less Developed Countries

Speaker:

Paul Baker, School of Management, University of Bath

Location: 8West 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting and Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

12
Feb

Seminar: Predictability of Stock Market Activity Using Google Search Queries

Speaker:

Sofia Ramos, ISCTE-IUL, Portugal

Location: 8West 1.32

Time: 12:15 - 13:45

Accounting and Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

January 2014

17
Jan

Conference: A free event for businesses and academics is to be held by the University of Bath and the Royal Economic Society.


The one-day conference will focus on the current challenges/advantages for M&A activity in Europe - new EU regulations influenced the financial crisis and proactive EU Commission. The panel discussion will engage with these issues as well as with policy implications and academic relevance. Panel is confirmed as: Professor Jo Danbolt, Chair of Financial Markets, University of Edinburgh Business School; Professor Gerhard Kling, School of Oriental and Africa Studies, London; Professor Ania Zalwelska, Professor of Finance and Director of the Centre for Governance and Regulation, University of Bath; Dr Christian Stadler, Associate Professor of Strategic Management, Warwick Business School and industry participants from Maplecroft, the world’s leading global risk analytics, research and strategic forecasting company.

Speakers:

Professor Jo Danbolt, Chair of Financial Markets, University of Edinburgh Business School

Professor Gerhard Kling, School of Oriental and Africa Studies, London

Professor Ania Zalwelska, Professor of Finance and Director of the Centre for Governance and Regulation, University of Bath

Dr Christian Stadler, Associate Professor of Strategic Management, Warwick Business School

And industry participants from Maplecroft

Location: 8West 3.13

Time: 10:00 - 16:30

Strategy and International Management (SIM)

14
Jan

Seminar: Behavioural tools to improve decision-making in operational and professional settings

Speaker: Dr Zoe Theocharis Researcher Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences Department, Judgment and Decision Making Group UCL London

Location: 8West 1.29

Time: 10:30 - 12:00

Information, Decision & Operations

Contact: Research Office

8
Jan

Seminar: Re(dis)covering Class: Mnemonic Constitution of Collective Subjectivity

Speaker: Dr Gregory Schwartz Lecturer in Organisation Studies, Tutor for BSc in International Management and Modern Languages, School of Management, University of Bath

Location: 8West 4.23

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies

Contact: Research Office