University of Bath School of Management University of Bath School of Management

Research Seminars and Events 2015

Research

UK and overseas speakers are invited to the School to share their experiences and findings with staff, doctoral students and the members of the public. Previous seminars can be found here: 2018, 2017, 2016, 2014.

Further Information

View the University Calendar

If you are a member of staff and wish to organise an event or seminar please contact the Research Office

11
Nov

Social Valuation Across Multiple Audiences


How is valuation by a focal audience influenced by popularity with an alternate audience? The question is critical to individual and organizations relying on several audiences for key resources. We argue that popularity with an alternate audience provides a signal about unobserved quality but, passed a certain level, undermines conformity to the identity expected by the focal audience. The resulting inverted U-shape relationship, we further argue, is attenuated when actors’ have established a track record for quality, but strengthened when their track record is uncertain. We successfully test our hypotheses using panel data on 9,500 academic scientists at Imperial College London facing a focal audience of academic peers and an alternate audience of firms. Our work contributes to the understanding of valuation and socially endogenous inferences, and has implications for the management of organizations in complex environment

Event poster

PDF

Speaker:

Markus Perkmann is an associate professor at Imperial College Business School. His research interests include the business of science, university-industry relations, scientific entrepreneurship, translational research and organizational theory. He has published in journals including: Organizational Science, Research Policy and MIT Sloan Management Review. He holds a PhD in Sociology from Lancaster University.

Location: 8 West 2.34

Time: 12:15

Contact: Research Office

05
Nov

Is There a Future for Management? A Tale of Rhizomatic Organizations


Abstract: After the "solid": and "liquid" modern eras, to use the metaphors of Zygmunt Bauman, there follows a time of a profound crisis, if not an outright failure, of legitimization. Bauman, using Gramsci's term, calls this period the Interregnum. However, is not just a time of collapse of the old order, but also the moment of possibility. Nobody knows what will follow and therefore new ideas can now be seriously considered. Management: a science, a practice and an ideology, used to play a significant role in the two previous eras; its position was not unlike that of a triumphant colonizer. It has become something of a contemporary common knowledge and lingua franca. Perhaps it is now time to consider how to use it to construct a fairer, more humane and ecologically sustainable world? Based on field research conducted among value-driven organizations, operating outside of the neoliberal mainstream, I propose how to reclaim management and use it to serve other aims than profit maximization. Some old are being recycled and some new coined by organizations in my field, and perhaps such a new approach management can be put into broader use in the world after the Interregnum..

 

Event poster

PDF

Speaker:

Professor Monika Kostera, Professor Ordinaria and Chair in Management at Jagiellonian University, Poland, Guest Professor/Visiting Professor at University of Bradford, University of Essex, University of Leicester , Linnaeus University (Vaxjo, Sweden)

Location: 8 West 1.29

Time: 14:00 - 16:00

Contact: Research Office

28
Oct

The Architecture of Dynamic Capability Research: A Scientometric Investigation


The dynamic capability view (DCV) of the firm has become one of the leading explanatory
frameworks aimed at addressing the sources of enterprise-level competitive advantage over time and seeking to explain why some firms prosper and survive in turbulent operating environments, and identifying underlying drivers of long-term firm survival and growth. The scholarly interest in the DCV is driven by a host of factors, the dominant of which is the failure of past frameworks to address the dynamic evolution and sustainability of enterprises in changing environments. Yet, despite considerable academic interest in the DCV, there are many questions and concerns about what dynamic capabilities are, how they relate to other aspects of an organization’s operations, and how they relate to firm performance. In this paper, we provide a unique and comprehensive examination of the DCV literature that goes beyond past reviews by combining text based analysis with surveys of, and interviews with, researchers working in the field. With this approach we are able to examine how the DCV has evolved in the written literature and what the missing and emerging research themes are that authors are attempting to address going forward. Based on this review, we argue that many of the gaps in the DCV can be addressed by integrating it with configuration theory and recent thinking on the microfoundations of dynamic capabilities. We encapsulate this discussion via an architectural model of the DCV (which we entitle the ‘House of Dynamic Capabilities’) that combines the microfoundations and cognitive processes underlying DCs at the varying levels of analysis (individual, business unit, and organizational) while also accounting for important enablers of DCs and the strategic orientations of the firm. We also show how this logic requires a completely different set of methodological approaches to those currently in use.

Event poster

PDF

Speaker:

Dr Timothy Devinney, Pro-Dean for Research and Innovation Leadership Chair in International Business, Leeds University Business

Location: 8 West 2.34

Time: 12:15

Contact: Research Office

22
Oct

Seminar on Variation in Institutional Pressures and Organizational Responses to Pluralism


The aim of this paper is to develop a model of organizational responses to pluralism derived from selective coupling. We predict that, in fields characterized by competing logics, the adoption of logic’s stipulations depends on their centrality with respect to both logics. Central stipulations to one logic and peripheral to the other one are adopted, while, when stipulations are central to both logics, blending and compromising is expected. Similarly, stronger compliance pressures from one logic lead to increasing adoption of central stipulations to that logic, but not of peripheral stipulations in conflict with the competing logic. We test quantitatively these hypotheses on 26 universities in eight European countries, which are subject to different managerial pressures due to national policies.While confirming our hypotheses, these results extend previous work in three directions. First, we show that the distinction between core and peripheral stipulation of logics plays a central role in determining responses. Second, we extend compartimentalization to a broader set of possible responses, where different degrees of adoption are found and blending takes place in case of overt conflict. Third, we provide evidence on the differential impact of increasing institutional pressures, depending on the level of centrality of the stipulation.

Speaker:

Dr Benedetto Lepori, University of Lugano and Visiting Fellow ICHEM

Location: Ensemble Room, The Edge

Time: 12:00 - 13:20

Contact: Research Office

21
Oct

Innovation in Legal Services: An Oxymoron


Despite its potential social and economic benefit, innovation in legal services has to date received little academic attention. Drawing on the largest survey of legal services innovation ever undertaken (c. 1500) this paper explores the strategic, resource and environmental drivers of service and delivery innovation among solicitors, barristers and other legal service providers. Adopting an activity-based approach, modelling emphasises the value of a structured and organised approach to innovation involving multi-functional working, promoting effective team-working, developing in-house R&D capability, having a leadership team committed to innovation and having strong external relationships. Relationships with suppliers and professional associations, for example, contribute positively both to idea generation and transformation. Non-lawyer ownership also has positive impacts on innovation also influencing both idea generation and transformation. Regulatory effects on innovation prove relatively weak, and we find little evidence of competition effects on innovation, suggesting perhaps that de-regulation in the sector has some way to go if market forces are to operate effectively.

Event poster

PDF

Speaker:

Prof Stephen Roper, Professor of Enterprise, University of Warwickl

Location: 8 West 2.4

Time: 12:15 TBC

Contact: Research Office

01
Oct

Workshop on Identities in Organisations


Speaker:

Prof. Christine Coupland, Professor of Organisational Behaviour, Loughborough University

Prof. Dan Karreman, Professor in Management and Organization Studies. Copenhagen Business School

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 10:00 TBC

Contact: Research Office

05
Aug

Behavioural Approaches to Corporate Governance


Speaker:

Dr Cameron Gordon, University of Canberra, Australia

Location: CB 4.1

Time: 14:10 - 16:05

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

10
Jun

Internal Seminar


Speaker:

Russ Vince, University of Bath

Location: 8W 4.23

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies

Contact: Research Office

08
Jun

Employable or 'Capable'? Graduate Employability and Inclusive Development

Speaker:

Melanie Walker, University of the Free State, South Africa

Location: 8W 4.23

Time: 14:00 - 16:00

The International Centre for Higher Education Management

Contact: Research Office

The event will bring together leading business people, academics, public policymakers, business consultants and representatives of NGOs to discuss the Morality challenges presented to business.

04
Jun

When the Brand is a Person: Understanding and Managing Corporeal Brands (Distinguished International Visitor)

Speaker:

Professor Susan Fournier, Boston University

Location: CB 4.10

Time: 14:15 - 16:00

Centre for Research in Advertising & Consumption

Contact: Research Office

03
Jun

Advertising Discourse and Disappearing Dads: A Case of Good Housekeeping

Speaker:

Professor David MArshall, University of Edinburgh

Location: CB 4.10

Time: 14:15 - 16:00

Centre for Research in Advertising & Consumption

Contact: Research Office

29
May

Collective identity, strategy practice and the integrative rationality of environmental sustainability and social responsibility discourses: Insights from the Grassroots Glamour enterprise development story

Event poster

PDF

This presentation explores how social responsibility and environmental sustainability discourses were entangled in the strategy practice of a fashion sector startup. It reveals how these discourses provided the integrative rationality for a collective identity that was enacted in the firm’s strategy practice to produce competitive advantage and a successful business.

Speaker:

Dr Colleen Mills

Location: 8 West, 1.29

Time: 12:00 - 14:30

Organisation Studies

Contact: Research Office

19
May

External Seminar

Speaker:

Rodolfo Catena, Oxford University

Location: EB O.12

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Information, Decision & Operations (IDO)

Contact: Research Office

14
May

#NOMOREPAGE3: Feminism and Institutional Work in Corporate Constructed Arenas of Citizenship

Speaker:

Dr Sarah Glozer from Nottingham University

Location: 8 West, 4.23

Time: 14:45 - 16:45

Centre for Business, Organisations and Society (CBOS)

Contact: Research Office

13
May

Internal Seminar

Speaker:

Patrick Devine-Wright, University of Exeter

Location: 8W 3.13

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Centre for Research in Advertising & Consumption

Contact: Research Office

13
May

Seminar

Speaker:

Grazia Santagelo, University of Catania, Italy

Location: 6E 2.1

Time: 12:15

Strategic & International Management

Contact: Research Office

06
May

Seminar

Speaker:

Katharina Chudzikowski

Location: 8W 4.23

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies

Contact: Research Office

29
Apr

Seminar

Speaker:

Dominika Langenmayr, University of Munich, Germany

Location: 8W 1.29

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

28
Apr

Seminar

Speaker:

Diane Martin, School of Business, Aalto University, Finland

Location: 8W 3.22

Time: 16:30 - 17:45

Centre for Research in Advertising and Consumption and Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Environment

Contact: Research Office

21
Apr

Seminar

Speaker:

Gary Dushnitsky, London Business School

Location: CB 3.7

Time: 12:00

Strategic & International Management

Contact: Research Office

09
April

Geography, Clusters and Motorsport: Explorations of learning and competitive advantage

Event poster

PDF

We consider the mechanisms that permit and enhance the movement of highly tacit component (technical) knowledge and geographically sticky architectural knowledge across borders and between clusters and firms. We use a theory driven, longitudinal, single-case study to develop a conceptual framework to examine and describe how shifting the geography of knowledge sourcing can facilitate architectural change by following the transformation of one business unit within a specialist global organization. We close by generalizing this model to address the fundamental processes of the spatial aspects of organizational learning.

Speaker:

Dr Mark Jenkins, Director of Community for Strategy, People & Leadership, Cranfield School of Management

Location: 8 West, 2.11

Time: 12:15 - 14:15

Strategy and International Management Group

Contact: Research Office

08
Apr

Seminar

Speaker:

Zeynep Yalabbik

Location: 8W 1.29

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies

Contact: Research Office

31
Mar

Seminar

Speaker:

Mats Alvesson, Lunds University, Sweden

Location: 8W 1.29

Time: 13:30 - 15:00

Organisation Studies and The International Centre for Higher Education Management

Contact: Research Office

30
March

Logics of Higher Education: Qualification, Customer-Satisfaction or Looking Good?

Event poster

PDF

The talk discusses the contemporary nature of higher education, in particular business schools, and the key drivers behind developments. The idea of HE leading to higher (cognitive) qualifications is increasingly questionable. A recent US study (Academically Adrift) suggests that 40 % of all students do not improve intellectually during their education. Instead making students satisfied and looking good in the face of accreditations, rankings and complying with institutionalized myths for what is 'rational' often take upper hand. The talk is partly based on the speaker's recent book The Triumph of Emptiness (Oxford University Press)

Speaker:

Professor Mats Alvesson, Professor of Business Administration at the University of Lund, Sweden and at University of Queensland Business School, Australia

Location: 8 West, 3.14

Time: 14:00 - 16:00

International Centre for Higher Education Management (ICHEM) and Organisation Studies Group

Contact: Research Office

25
March

Personal Nostalgia in a Cross-Cultural Context:
Avoiding the Pseudo-Etic Trap

Event poster

PDF

This is a presentation of two simultaneous scale development projects done in the US and in France creating a scale to measure the personal nostalgic experience as stimulated by exposure to advertising. The scales follow similar development protocols using the Churchill (1979) methodology comprehensively deconstructing the personal nostalgia experience, developing a psychometrically sound metric that measures all dimensions of the nostalgic experience and ensures cultural equivalence across the two distinct cultural settings. The two scales are compared, and the results are important for cross-cultural researchers as the scales are significantly different in the two settings lending strong support for the danger inherent in researchers falling into the pseudo-etic trap by taking a scale developed in one country/cultural setting and back translating it for use in another country/cultural setting.

Speaker:

Professor John Ford, Old Dominion University, Virginia

Location: 8 West, 1.33

Time: 14:15 - 16:00

Centre for Research in Advertising and Consumption

Contact: Research Office

25
Mar

Emotional Finance: Theory and Application

Speaker:

Professro Richard Taffler, Warwick Business School

Location: 8W 1.32

Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

25
March

Business Models: Concepts, Categories and Consequences


Event poster

PDF

In this paper, we propose that scientific research and managerial practice on business model design could be advanced by developing a classification system built upon first principles related to how value is created and for whom; and by deriving mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive business model ideal categories (types) that might be robust to changing context and time. We develop this idea using the network-relational view from sociological-economic literature as a starting point. We identify four categories: work-for hire, product, market-matchmaking, and platform. We explain how these categories can be generative, and that they can be used to shed insights into what is meant by business model innovation and the role of changes in technology; and to improve theorizing, policy and empirical work.

Speaker:

Professor Stefan Haefliger, Professor in Strategic Management and Innovation, Cass Business School.

Location: 8 West, 2.8

Time: 12:15 - 14:30

Strategy and International Management Group

Contact: Research Office

18
March

Permeability of Organizational Boundaries: Open innovation and governance of contractual relations

Event poster

PDF

This paper sets out to improve our theoretical understanding of recent developments in the innovation process where firms organize increased innovation openness through a wide variety of partners while at the same time searching for adequate modes of governance through conjointly designed inter-organizational contracts. In order to interpret these developments, we return to a classical theory development approach in which ‘ideal types’ are used as an analytical tool. We concentrate on ‘closed innovation’ and ‘classical contracting’ as initial ideal types against which we can interpret developments from both a more closed innovation system towards a higher degree of openness and from inter-organizational contracting in a more classical setting towards a more relational contracting perspective. Our analysis is organized in terms of two main steps. We first describe these two ideal types in more general terms and interpret empirical evidence regarding the extent to which firms deviate from closed innovation and, in a parallel development, from classical contracting. Second, in an analysis of the broader implications of these ideal types, we identify theoretical dimensions in terms of efficiency, power, identity, and capabilities. These theoretical dimensions enable us to further reconstruct the ideal types as well as explain deviations from these ideal types. In line with these theoretical dimensions, we then develop a set of propositions that stipulate the mechanisms through which firms transition from closed to more open innovation and from classical to more relational contracting.

Speaker:

Professor John Hagedoorn, Professorial Fellow, Maastricht University

Location: Chancellor Building, 5.6

Time: 12:15 - 14:15

Strategy and International Management Group

Contact: Research Office

11
March

Game theory considerations on third countries' reciprocal access rules to the EU public procurement

Event poster

PDF

This paper aims at contributing to the discussion on the reasons for the possible difficulties in reciprocating open Public Procurement Markets (PPM), between the EU and third countries (TCs), and related policy measures the EU could adopt to enhance it. It does so focusing on some main strategic themes underlying the EU and TCs interaction in PPM. Within a very stylised game theory framework, a main message of the paper suggests that, under appropriate conditions, open PPM may be more likely when, in the parties’ negotiations, the perspective of contracting authorities prevails on that of the business firms.

Speaker:

Professor Nicola Dimitri, Professor of Economics, University of Siena

Location: Chancellor Building, 4.8

Time: 15:30 - 17:00

Information, Decision and Operations Group

Contact: Research Office

11
March

Advancing the universality of quadrature methods to any underlying process for option pricing

Event poster

PDF

Exceptional accuracy and speed for option pricing are available via quadrature (Andricopoulos et al., JFE, 2003,), extending into multiple dimensions with complex path-dependency and early exercise (Andricopoulos et al., JFE, 2007). However, the technique was incomplete, leaving many modelling processes outside the Black-Scholes-Merton framework unattainable. In this paper, we (Chen, Harkonen & Newton) show how to remove the remaining major block to universal application. Although this had appeared highly problematic, the solution turns out to be conceptually simple and implementation is straightforward. Crucially, the method retains its speed and flexibility across complex combinations of option features but is now applicable across other underlying processes.

Quadrature is simply numerical integration – the area under a graph, in school mathematics. In the seminar, I shall aim to keep doctoral students interested, who are familiar with option pricing and the Black-Scholes equations for plain European options but who would like some reminders of alternative pricing methods and a general description of the work in this area.

Speaker:

Professor David Newton, Nottingham University Business School

Location: 8 West, 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting & Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

11
March

Social network food revolution: transitions in sustainable food purchasing


Event poster

PDF

A transition towards sustainable food purchasing behaviour is vital for the survival of the planet. This talk discusses survey results (N=474) and an agent-based model (ABM) applied to explore how a transition in sustainable food purchasing may be achieved. The online survey, based on main environmental psychology theories and social network theory, explored which factors significantly influence sustainable food purchasing behaviour. Findings show that social network factors influence sustainable food purchasing behaviour mainly via descriptive norm. We further applied our empirical findings and theoretical knowledge to build an ABM to understand (1) transitions in sustainable food purchasing behaviour, and, (2) how three social network factors (i.e. network size, percentage of sustainable shoppers and percentage of food discussion partners in the social network) influence these transitions via psychological factors shown to be relevant to influence sustainable purchasing behaviour (i.e. intention, habit, personal and descriptive norm). The agents in the model are individual consumers embedded in social circles within a large social network. The three social network factors are systematically varied in the decision making process of the agents, resulting in a 3*3*3 experimental design (i.e., 27 experimental simulations). Findings provide evidence that there is (1) a threshold effect during the transition in sustainable food purchasing behaviour as the spread of sustainable food shopping behaviour is fastest at the beginning phase of the experiments, slowing down towards the middle and end phase. The speed of the spread of behaviour is significantly influenced by the size of the social network and the number of initial sustainable shoppers in the personal network (2). This research provides a first glimpse of what a transition in sustainable food shopping may look like with the influence of social networks.

Speaker:

Iljana Schubert, Bournemouth University

Location: 8 West, 3.22

Time: 14:15 - 16:00

Centre for Research in Advertising and Consumption (CRiAC)

Contact: Research Office

10
March

Towards a Cartography of Impact: Analysing the Process of ‘Impact’ Peer Review in the REF

Event poster

PDF

This presentation is based on the author's empirical and conceptual research into an 'impact agenda' for Higher Education in the UK and' impact' as a new indicator of research excellence. It focuses on how adjudications of the socio-economic impact of research are made in the peer-review context of the UK’s Research Excellence Framework (REF) and, therefore, peer-review of impact as a new facet of performance assessment with significant bearings on Higher Education research cultures and praxis. It reveals what senior-academics and user-group assessors, with responsibility for making such assessments, recognise and reward as excellence in the review of their disciplines’ impact claims; the process they undertake in making these decisions; and the influences (extraneous and indigenous) that shape these decisions

Speaker:

Dr Richard Watermeyer, Associate Professor in Higher Education, University of Surrey

Location: The Edge Room 2.1

Time: 14:30 - 16:30

International Centre for Higher Education Management (ICHEM)

Contact: Research Office

04
Mar

Internal Seminar

Speaker:

Mehdi Boussebaa

Location: 8W 1.32

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies

Contact: Research Office

03
March

Choice for All: Users as Consumers of Public Services in the UK and Elsewhere

Event poster

PDF

There is a widespread belief that users of public services want to be treated as consumers when choosing where and how they will be treated or educated and who will provide social care to them. Drawing on psychosocial perspectives relating to the embodiment of vulnerability, I show that while most users want better information about choices available and want to be more involved in making the decision as to which option to follow, there is no evidence that greater choice will, in itself, improve the quality of services. For how far patients behave as consumers depends on the severity of their illness, the nature of the procedure involved and their individual circumstances. More severely ill patients face complex treatment options and prefer decisions to be made on their behalf by a well-informed and trusted health professional. Further, although there is no social gradient when patients express their interest in choice, the pre-existing inequalities of education and income are likely to have an impact on access to information enabling health choices for different groups. Overall, the experience of user choice in public services including health and education indicates that wealthy and educated populations are likely be the main beneficiaries of a policy of extending choice, unless specific measures are introduced to help disadvantaged groups interpret and make use of information.

Speaker:

Professor Marianna Fotaki, Professor of Business Ethics, Warwick Business School

Location: 8 West, 3.14

Time: 14:30 - 16:30

Organisation Studies Group , Centre for Research in Advertising and Consumption (CRiAC) and The International Centre for Higher Education Management (ICHEM)

Contact: Research Office

25
Feb

Imagining a Neoliberal Sociology: Myth and ideology in consumer culture theory

Event poster

PDF

In this presentation Professor Fitchett will question the ability of the CCT community to contribute significantly to any progressive dialogue about the current state and future prospects for consumer capitalism. CCT can be only be considered to have progressive potential if one is prepared to first subscribe to the view that that neoliberal ideologies, policies and myths are progressive. This presentation will be of interest to marketing researchers interested in or committed to developing a critical agenda in marketing as well as researchers conducting CCT-style research. A growing number of PhD students and early career researchers in marketing studies are either considering or using the CCT approach as a way to position their research. The presentation will also be of interest to academics in other areas of management studies curious about critical approaches in marketing and consumer research studies. An essential question raised by this discussion of CCT concerns the types of contribution that marketing research can hope to make in the broader context of the business and management field.

Speaker:

Professor James Fitchett, University of Leicester

Location: 8 West, 4.23

Time: 14:00 - 16:00

Centre for Research in Advertising and Conspumtion (CRiAC)

Contact: Research Office

25
Feb

Effects of Lit and Dark Market Fragmentation on Liquidity


Event poster

PDF

Based on data from eight exchanges and a trade reporting facility for a large sample of LSE- and Euronext-listed equities, this article investigates how lit and dark market fragmentation affects liquidity on the primary exchange and across markets. Fragmentation between lit order books is found to improve liquidity, with greater benefits for large stocks and stocks with less electronic trading. When algorithmic trading (AT) is controlled for: (1) spreads decrease with both lit fragmentation and AT but the impact of fragmentation is greater; (2) lit fragmentation increases depth across markets without reducing it on the primary exchange, while AT has a negative impact on depth. Dark trading is associated with greater depth but wider quoted spreads, the combination of both effects being neutral for effective spreads.

Speaker:

Professor Carole Gresse, Professor of Finance at Université Paris Dauphine

Location: 8 West, 1.32

Time: 14:30 - 16:00

Accounting and Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

04
Feb

Internal Seminar

Speaker:

Stefanie Gustafsson, University of Bath

Location: 8W 1.32

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies

Contact: Research Office

30
Jan

Toxic Arbitrage


Event poster

PDF

Short lived arbitrage opportunities can arise when the prices of asset pairs do not adjust to information at the same speed. These opportunities are toxic because they expose investors to the risk of trading with arbitrageurs at stale quotes. Hence, more frequent toxic arbitrage opportunities and a faster arbitrageurs' response to these opportunities can impair liquidity. We provide supporting evidence using data on triangular arbitrage in currency markets. In our sample, a 1% increase in the likelihood that a toxic arbitrage terminates with an arbitrageur's trade (rather than a quote update) is associated with a 4% increase in bid-ask spreads. Our findings suggest that fast arbitrageurs' response to toxic arbitrage opportunities enhances pricing efficiency while raising trading costs for other market participants.

Speaker:

Professor Thierry Foucault, Professor of Finance, HEC, Paris

Location: 8 West, 1.29

Time: 16:00 - 18:30

Accounting and Finance Group

Contact: Research Office

22
Jan

Change and Reform in China's Higher Education System: Local and Global Implications

Speaker:

Professor Wanhua Ma, University of Peking

Location: To be confirmed

Time: To be confirmed

The International Centre for Higher Education Management

Contact: Research Office

21
Jan

Seminar POSTPONED due to illness


Game theory considerations on third countries' reciprocal access rules to the EU public procurement

Event poster

PDF

This paper aims at contributing to the discussion on the reasons for the possible difficulties in reciprocating open Public Procurement Markets (PPM), between the EU and third countries (TCs), and related policy measures the EU could adopt to enhance it. It does so focusing on some main strategic themes underlying the EU and TCs interaction in PPM. Within a very stylised game theory framework, a main message of the paper suggests that, under appropriate conditions, open PPM may be more likely when, in the parties’ negotiations, the perspective of contracting authorities prevails on that of the business firms.

Speaker:

Professor Nicola Dimitri, Professor of Economics, University of Siena

Location: East Building, 0.12

Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Information, Decision and Operations Group

Contact: Research Office

21
Jan

Continuous Change, Public Service Motivation and Taking Charge Behavior: A Multi-Level Study in the German State Police

Event poster

PDF

Public organizations are increasingly required to adapt to changing economic, political and societal demands in turbulent environments. Accordingly, there is a growing scholarly interest in the adaptability and flexibility of public organizations (Piening 2013) and Public Administration literature (Fernandez & Rainey, 2006). However, this stream of literature still lacks evidences of how individual members engage in behaviors promoting organizational change. Focusing on continuous change of organizational practices and procedures, this study provides such microfoundations by exploring antecedents of taking charge behavior (TCB) within the German police service. Taking charge is defined as “voluntary and constructive efforts, by individual employees, to effect organizationally functional change with respect to how work is executed within the context of their jobs, work units, or organizations” (Morrison & Phelps, 1999, p. 403). We devote special attention to public service motivation (PSM) as a driver of TCB. This link is of particular interest because PSM predominantly has an external orientation towards citizens and the general public, while TCB is more directed towards internal processes. PSM has been shown to negatively affect resistance to change (Ritz & Fernandez, 2011). Additionally, recent work emphasized the importance of understanding the relation between the different dimensions of PSM and organizational change (Wright et al. 2013). This work found that self-sacrifice and potentially compassion exhibit small positive effects on affective commitment to change. We build on this line of research to investigate if PSM and its dimensions also drive behaviors that do not, or not directly, address the public but are concerned with the improvement of work processes within the organization.

Speaker:

Dr. Fabian Homberg, Senior Lecturer at Bournemouth University Business School

Location: 8 West, 4.23

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisation Studies

Contact: Research Office

16
Jan

With Whom do Technology Sponsors Partner?

Speaker:

Kristina Dhalin, HEC Paris

Location: EB 1.1

Time: 11:00

Strategic & International Management

Contact: Research Office

16
Jan

Hierarchies and Entrepreneurship

Speaker:

Thomas Astebro, HEC Paris

Location: EB 1.1

Time: 13:15

Strategic & International Management

Contact: Research Office

14
Jan

How to fundraise for operational expenditures in international humanitarian aid? The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies case

Event poster

PDF

International humanitarian organizations (IHOs) frequently implement both development and disaster response programs. Based on the operational needs of the programs, the IHOs calculate the estimated operational expenditures and then they appeal for donations. Their operations and their actual operational expenditures depend on the donations that they receive. They face budget constraints; some programs get overfunded while others get underfunded. In this paper, using multiple regression analysis, we estimate the responsiveness of donations to a number of variables including the fundraising cost, the budget appeal and the area/country where the program takes place, and then we link the donations with the actual operational expenditures. We also study whether some operational expenditures require higher fundraising efforts than others. We use data of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), one of the largest IHOs. The data on the development programs come from the 243 development programs that IFRC implemented in the period 2010-2012. For disaster response programs we complement with data from the EM database on the type and magnitude of the disaster, and the number of beneficiaries targeted by the program. The data on disaster response regard the 80 disasters that IFRC responded to in the time period January 2010 – April 2014.

Speaker:

Dr Maria Besiou, Associate Professor, Kühne Logistics University

Location: 8 West 1.29

Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Information, Decision and Operations Group

Contact: Research Office

07
Jan

Internal Seminar

Speaker:

Michael Gill, University of Bath

Location: 8W 1.29

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

Organisational Studies

Contact: Research Office