University of Bath School of Management University of Bath School of Management

Research Seminars and Events 2016

Research

UK and overseas speakers are invited to the School to share their experiences and findings with staff, doctoral students and the members of the public. Previous seminars can be found here 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014.

Further Information

View the University Calendar

If you are a member of staff and wish to organise an event or seminar please contact the Research Office

8
Dec

Seminar 1: 'Research paper presentation' and Seminar 2: 'Thinking about publication strategies'


Professor Noorderhaven will present two papers the first titled ‘Export performance of SMEs: Cultural intelligence as a condition for a successful internationalization strategy’ and the second paper ‘Towards a Collaborative Integration Culture in M&As: Combining Task and Human Integration Management’. In the afternoon there will be a seminar around ‘Thinking about publication strategies’ where Professor Noorderhaven will offer his thoughts on publishing in leading management journals.

Speaker: Professor Niels Noorderhaven is Professor of International Management, Associate Dean for Internationalization and Head of Department of Management, Tilburg University, the Netherlands.

Location: The Edge - Exec Education Space

Time: 10.30-12.00 & 15:30-16:30

Contact: Research Office

7
Dec

Sense-making in intuitive judgment


Humans have a powerful drive to make sense of the world. In this talk, I present three kinds of tools that people use to explain events and I demonstrate their implications for consumer behavior. First, people use strategies for prediction that ignore all but the highestprobability hypothesis in predicting future events; I show that this bias leads to overconfidence in financial predictions. Second, people use explanatory heuristics that result in systematic biases in diagnostic reasoning; I discuss implications for consumer choice. Finally, people use simplified intuitive theories of complex systems such as the economy; I show that people believe simple economic transactions to be zero-sum, causing consumers to be dissatisfied with purchases and to hold negative attitudes toward trade. Together, these lines of inquiry highlight ways that psychology research can lead to actionable insights about consumer behavior.

Speaker: Sam Johnson, PhD Candidate, Yale University.

Location: 8W 3.14

Time: 14:00-15:30

Contact: Research Office

30
Nov

The Charity Beauty Premium: Satisfying Donors' Want versus Should Desires


Despite widespread conviction that neediness is the most important criterion for charitable allocations, the results of several studies demonstrate a “charity beauty premium” in which donors often favor beautiful, but less needy charity recipients. The authors propose that donors hold simultaneous, yet incongruent preferences of wanting to support beautiful recipients (who tend to be judged as less needy) yet believing they should support needy recipients instead. Furthermore, the preferences for beautiful recipients are most likely to emerge when decisions are intuitive, whereas preferences for needy recipients are most likely to emerge when decisions are deliberative. The presentation will discuss how these propositions were tested and will conclude with an overview of the ongoing research on the effect of marketing communications on people’s prosocial behaviour.

Speaker: Dr Yvetta Simonyan, Marketing Department, University of Birmingham.

Location: CB 4.1

Time: 14:00

Contact: Research Office

23
Nov

The evolvement of strategic HRM: 20 years in search of long term viability


Does people management really matter? Can we make a difference by having excellent links between corporate strategy and human resource management? And what are the implications for firm performance and well-being. These are some of the questions which will be addressed during the lecture by Jaap Paauwe (Tilburg University-The Netherlands). He will highlight the challenges of strategic HRM and will present the abundant evidence on HRM and bottom line performance. More importantly, he will also discuss the underlying mechanisms and linkages, the different sources of inspiration and the possible tensions between well-being and performance. Is it all about mutual gains for the different stakeholders involved or are there also conflicting outcomes. Finally research suggestions for the future will be addressed for a dynamic field of scientific enquiry, which is still evolving.

Speaker: Professor Jaap Paauwe is a Professor of Human Resource Studies ar Tilburg University and vice-dean for research at the Tilburg School of Social and Behavioural Sciences.

Location: 8W 1.32

Time: 13:30-14:30

Contact: Research Office

21
Nov

"Towards A Social-practice Theory of Relational Competitive Dynamics"


We take a practice-theoretical approach to studying relational competition (Chen & Miller, 2015) drawing on a global ethnography of the reinsurance industry, which, as a syndicated market, provides a theoretically salient example of relational competition. Our findings show variation in relational and rivalrous competitive dynamics across competitors and across moments of competing. We locate this variation in the unfolding interplay between the competitive arena and the implementation of each firm’s strategic portfolio. The resultant conceptual framework enables us to extend the concept of relational competition, to reconceptualize action and response within competitive dynamics within an expanded theory of action, and to link the micro and macro elements of competition in ways that extend both the competitive dynamics and strategy-as-practice literatures.

Speaker: Professor Paula Jarzabkowski is a Professor of Strategic Management at Cass Business School, City University London.

Location: 8W 1.32

Time: 13:00-14:00

Contact: Research Office

16
Nov

The Effect of Social Exclusion on Consumer Preference for Anthropomorphized Brands


Prior research has mainly examined the effect of social exclusion on individuals’ interactions with other people or on their product choices as an instrument to facilitate interpersonal connection. The current research takes a novel perspective by proposing that socially excluded consumers would be more motivated to establish a relationship with a brand (rather than using the brand to socially connect with other people) when the brand exhibits human-like features. Based on this premise, we predict and find support in three studies that socially excluded consumers, compared with non-excluded consumers, exhibit greater preference for anthropomorphized brands (studies 1-3). This effect is mediated by consumers’ need for social affiliation and is moderated by the opportunity for social connection with other people (study 2). Furthermore, socially excluded consumers differ in the types of relationships they would like to build with anthropomorphized brands, depending on their attributions about the exclusion. Specifically, consumers who blame themselves (others) for being socially excluded show greater preference for anthropomorphized partner (fling) brands (study 3).

Speaker: Dr Eric Levy is a lecturer in Marketing at Cambridge University Judge Business School.

Location: 8W 3.14

Time: 14:30

Contact: Research Office

05
Oct

Higher Education and Peace Building


 

For more than half a century, Colombia has experienced internal armed conflict between State forces and illegal organizations. In many respects, the situation has been depicted in terms of disorder and instability. However, the hostilities have not affected all regions equally and it is important to remember that Colombia is considered one of the oldest democracies in Latin America. While the war has evolved over the decades, peace initiatives have flourished leading to the (partial) reintegration of combatants into civilian life. A few weeks ago, the Colombian government reached an accord with the most powerful insurgent group: the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia-People’s Army (FARC-EP). If the agreement is approved by referendum, the country will enter a post-conflict environment on an unprecedented scale. Drawing on field analysis, the presentation analyses the recent trends in Colombia’s higher education system which offers a hybrid configuration between public and private institutions. Far from collapsing in the midst of violence, the universities have undergone dramatic transformations in particular since the 1990s. The changes have been motivated by complex considerations which tend to towards inclusive development and responsible citizenship. As a consequence, significant improvements have been registered in different spheres – including access, pedagogical standards of teaching and learning, academic mobility, research and publications and services to community. Specifically, the presentation seeks to address the coming challenges faced by higher education in the light of a post-conflict era in Colombia. What is at stake is an understanding as to how Colombian universities can contribute to sustainable peace and what lessons can be learnt for the rest of the world.

Speaker: Jose Manuel Restrepo is President of Universidad del Rosario.

Location: The Edge, Room 2.1

Time: 14:00-16:00

Contact: Research Office

05
Oct

Internalisation theory and emerging market multinationals


Speaker: Professor Peter Buckley is Professor or International Business and Founder Director of CIBUL the Business Confucius Institute at the University of Leeds.

Location: 8W 2.6

Time: 14:15

Contact: Research Office

22
Sept

Quondam Commitment and the Future of Commitment Research


Professor Klein will summarize his views of the current state of workplace commitment research, discuss the future research needed to advance our understanding of commitment, and share his recent work on quondam commitments -- commitments people no longer hold.

Speaker: Professor Howard Klein is Professor of Management and Human Resources, Fisher College of Business at The Ohio State University.

Location: 8W 2.8

Time: 15:30-16:30

Contact: Research Office

20
Sept

Hospital Bed Management with Random Patient Length-of-Stay


For the last few decades, it has been very challenging to manage the limited hospital resources due to the constantly increasing demand on health care services. In this talk, we are interested in managing one such resource, namely hospital beds when patients stay at the hospital for a random amount of time with known probability distributions. Bed management involves a variety of decisions at different planning levels, including, but not limited to, the number of beds allocated to each ward, the number of admissions, the number patients that are discharged. We illustrate different modeling approaches that:
 consider interactions between different hospital resources, such as hospital beds and operating rooms or hospital beds in different wards,
 support tactical or operational level decisions,
 assume exponential-based or general LOS distributions.

Speaker: Dr Lerzan Ormeci is Associate Professor at the Department of Industroal Engineering, Koc University.

Location: 8W 3.14

Time: 4pm

Contact: Research Office

1
July

Improving Environmental, Health and Safety in Supply Chains: Some Preliminary Studies


Many factories in developing countries have serious Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) issues. Due to inconsistent law enforcement, limited progress has been made. What can be done? This is an open research topic that operations management and supply chain researchers should explore. Professor Christopher Tang plans to share some of his preliminary studies in this presentation.

Speaker: Professor Christopher Tang, Distinguished Professor and Edward W. Carter Chair in Business Administration, UCLA Anderson School of Management

Professor Tang is University Distinguished Professor and the holder of the Edward W. Carter Chair in Business Administration at the UCLA Anderson School. He is a former Dean of NUS Business School at the National University of Singapore and a former Senior Associate Dean of the UCLA Anderson School.

Chris received his B.Sc. (First class honours) from King’s College, University of London, M.A., M.Phil, and PhD from Yale University.

Location: 8W 3.14

Time: 10.30-12.00

Contact: Research Office

1
July

Innovative Operations Management Research: Why? What? How?


Professor Christopher Tang shall explain there is a new opportunity for Operations Management researchers to embark on research about innovative operations. Also, heI shall discuss the dynamics between supply and demand of OM research publications and how to strike a balance to make supply meet demand.

Speaker: Professor Christopher Tang, Distinguished Professor and Edward W. Carter Chair in Business Administration, UCLA Anderson School of Management

Dr. Tang is University Distinguished Professor and the holder of the Edward W. Carter Chair in Business Administration at the UCLA Anderson School. He is a former Dean of NUS Business School at the National University of Singapore and a former Senior Associate Dean of the UCLA Anderson School.

Chris has been on the faculty at UCLA for 30 years, consulted with numerous global companies including HP, IBM, Nestlé, GKN, Accenture, etc. He has published 6 books and over 100 research articles in various leading academic journals, and he has written articles for Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Fortune, Los Angeles Times, and The Guardian. He is the recipient of numerous teaching and research awards including the UCLA (university-wide) Distinguished Teaching Award in 2012. Also, he was elected as the Institute of Operations and Management Sciences (INFORMS) lifetime fellow in 2011, the Production and Operations Management Society (POMS) lifetime fellow in 2011, and the Manufacturing and Service Operations Management Society (MSOM) lifetime fellow in 2015. He served as President of Production and Operations Management Society (POMS) in 2014, and now serves as Editor-in-Chief of the journal, Manufacturing & Service Operations Management (M&SOM).

Chris received his B.Sc. (First class honours) from King’s College, University of London, M.A., M.Phil, and PhD from Yale University.

Location: 8W 3.14

Time: 13.30-15.00

Contact: Research Office

09
June

Alternative perspectives on new employee adjustment: results from three studies

New employees experience rapid change and adjustment during the first weeks and months in a new role and/ or new organization. How can we best assess how well they are doing? What things can newcomers do to help themselves? In this talk I will describe three studies with different foci that investigate the processes underlying newcomer adjustment, also known as organizational socialization. One study focuses on measuring newcomer learning; a second study presents a meta-analysis of newcomer proactive behavior; and a third study looks at newcomers’ perceptions of their obligations towards their employer at organizational entry, and how this aspect of their psychological contract shapes their subsequent adjustment.

Speaker:

Helena Cooper-Thomas is an Associate Professor in Organisational Psychology at The University of Auckland, New Zealand. Helena’s research interests focus primarily on new employees and employee-employer relations. She publishes in the areas of newcomer adjustment and organizational socialization, and both positive effects of employment (work engagement, person-organisation fit) and well as negative effects (stress and bullying, misfit). Helena has published her research in a number of respected applied psychology, organizational behaviour and human resources journals including Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Journal of Organizational Behavior, and Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology. She is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Managerial Psychology, a Senior Reviewer for the Journal of Organizational Behavior, and on the Consulting Editorial Board of the Journal of Business and Psychology.

Location: 8W 2.22

Time: 12.30

Contact: Research Office

01
June

A picture is worth a thousand words: multimodal framing of the global financial crisis

This article takes the proliferation of visual (and multimodal) material in virtually all social spheres as the point of departure. It sets out to examine the discursive mechanisms by which a multiplicity of different, yet interrelated, empirical phenomena become encapsulated and eventually objectified in a specific and consistent idea with identifiable boundaries and coherent narratives. In more detail, we argue that images and other visual artifacts constitute a key resource for negotiating social reality: They communicate information, issues, accounts, legitimate cast of actors, and underlying frames of reference in an immediate, comprehensive, metaphoric, emotional, and intelligible way, and thereby embed novel empirical phenomena in the established and taken-for-granted myths and categories within the social stock of knowledge.

Using data from the worldwide news coverage of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) in the Financial Times between 2008 and 2012, we analyze the discourse on the GFC as represented in the business press, and find that only a limited number of perspectives is used to provide a comprehensive framing and accessible theorization. In particular, we identify the specific multimodal techniques that are used to evoke these perspectives on the GFC, and summarize our conceptual insights in a tentative model of multimodal encapsulation. Our work contributes to the growing body of visual organization studies as well as to the emerging research on the role of multimodality in the process and mechanisms of (de-)institutionalization.

Speaker:

Markus Höllerer is Full Professor at the Department of Management at WU Vienna University of Economics and Business. He also holds a position at UNSW Australia Business School in Sydney. His research interests include the dissemination and local adaptation of global ideas, in particular the heterogeneous theorizations and local variations in meaning, as well as the relationship between different bundles of managerial concepts and their underlying governance and business models in the public and private sector. His recent work has been concerned with discursive framing as well as with visual/multi-modal rhetoric. Markus has published in journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, the Journal of Management Studies, the Academy of Management Annals and Research in the Sociology of Organizations, among others.

Location: 8W 2.24

Time: 12.30

Contact: Research Office

18
May

Interrogate the ethnographer! or Yeah yeah yeah. We've read the papers. Now tell us what really happened.

In marketing academia our published research registers our ideas and findings in the public record. If we’re lucky, people read them and respond with research of their own. But what are they really reading? Fifteen journal pages of finely-tuned narrative, rhetorically refined by authors, reviewers and editors to point convincingly to that single drop of academic essence we call contribution? It should make us wonder, What isn’t there? In ethnographic work the answer is inevitably “a lot.” For every carefully culled quote that makes it to the paper, a hundred stories lie unused in electronic file folders collecting the cyber version of dust. And that is if they ever got written at all. This presentation is an invitation to rummage around in the dustbins of the ethnographer’s brain for the uncensored tidbits, the untold stories, the embarrassing truths and half-truths of what happens in the field and behind the curtains of the writing process.

Speaker:

Professor John Schouten is Professor of Marketing at Aalto University, Finland.

Location: 8W 3.13

Time: 2pm

Contact: Research Office

03
May

Implementing change in a hybrid organisation: career model innovation in elite law firms

Institutional complexity, the confrontation of conflicting institutional demands, or logics, is now a widely accepted, permanent reality for a broad range of organizations, from social enterprises to hospitals to professional service firms. These organizations, by their very nature, are an ‘embodiment of multiple logics’ or, in short, ‘hybrids’. Recent institutional scholarship has developed a good understanding of how hybrid organizations are built and become established as their constituent logics ‘settle’. However, we know virtually nothing about how established hybrids change. Resistance from individuals is recognized as a central challenge in implementing change in any organization but in a hybrid it poses a greater challenge of overcoming entrenched differential commitments of individuals to different logics that assign different meanings to a proposed change. Existing work on resistance to change does not penetrate to such institutionalized values and individual-level complexities that drive individual resistance.

We therefore ask: How is change implemented in an established hybrid organization? We address this question by studying how London’s elite law firms implemented the role of ‘Counsel’ as an alternative to partnership to alleviate junior staff’s work-life balance concerns. Drawing on field-level media, organizational policies, and interviews with a range of key individuals – Partners, Associates, Managing Partners, HR Directors - we examine how these firms responded to a variety of concerns, overcame resistance, and stabilized the change. We outline three contributions to the literature on institutional and organizational change.

Speaker:

Timothy Morris is Professor of Management Studies at Saïd Business School, University of Oxford. Tim’s research and teaching activities mainly focus on the increasingly important field of professional service firms (PSFs) in which he is acknowledged as a leading international expert. His other research, conducted with colleagues at Said Business School, has been concerned with the role and development of CEOs in large corporations based on data from interviews with a large sample of CEOs around the world. The results were presented at the World Economic Forum. Before taking up his chair at Oxford, he was a professor at Imperial College, London, and at London Business School. His work has been widely published in journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Management Studies, Organization Studies and Human Resource Management.

Location: 8W 1.29

Time: 12.30-13.30

Contact: Research Office

18
Apr

Identities in Organisations

Programme

10:30 – 10:45 Welcoming coffee

10:45 – 11:35 Sierk Ybema Varieties of talk: Exploring new avenues for identity studies

11:40 – 12:30 Sandra Corlett Mundane materiality and agential cuts: A sociomaterial reading of disabled people’s identity work

12:30 – 13:30 Lunch

13:30 – 14:20 Caroline Clarke Practice makes Perfect? Precarious Identities at Work in Veterinary Practice

14:20 – 15:10 Simon Down Performing entrepreneurial masculinity: An ethnographic account

15:10 – 15:25 Coffee break

15:25 – 16:25 Andrew Brown Roundtable discussion: Gathering our thoughts on identities and next steps for research

16:25 – 16:30 Wrap up and final comments

 

Location: EB 05

Time: 10.30

Contact: Research Office

23
Mar

ADHD, Impulsivity and Entrepreneurship

Recently, entrepreneurship scholars have started to show interest in how "negative" traits associated with mental disorders such as ADHD and dyslexia may have positive implications in entrepreneurship. While this research has the potential of reaching important and counterintuitive results, it is still in its infancy, and the causal mechanisms as to why those individuals would be attracted to entrepreneurship have received very limited attention.

Speaker:

Johan Wiklund is the Al Berg Endowed Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship at Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, USA and professor at Lund University, Sweden, and Nordland University, Norway. His research interests include entrepreneurship and mental health as well as the performance, exit, and failure of entrepreneurial firms.

Location: 8 West 2.3

Time: 12.15

Contact: Research Office

16
Mar

REF Seminar


In this one-hour special Research Excellence Framework (REF) seminar session, Professor Hugh Willmott and Professor Ian Tonks will be discussing their experiences of being on the REF panel. They will share their key leaning points with interested faculty members and provide an insight into the REF process. Following their presentations, there will then be an opportunity for Q&A from the audience members.

Speaker:

Hugh Willmott has been a Professor in Management and Organization Studies at Cass Business School since 2014. He has previously held professorial appointments at Cardiff Business School, Cambridge (Judge Business School) and UMIST (now Manchester Business School) and visiting appointments at Copenhagen Business School, University of Sydney and Uppsala University.

Hugh’s research interests span the sub-fields of management organization studies. He is particularly interested in the development and application of management theory by drawing upon the resources of critical social science. Substantively, his research has contributed to the areas of professionalization, teamwork, regulation, business ethics, management learning, accounting policy and practice, organizational culture, financialization, and the management of higher education.


Location: 8 West 3.22

Time: 14:15

Contact: Research Office

09
Mar

Social Science Parks: Society's New Super–Labs


This presentation introduces SPARKs: purpose-built facilities co-locating social scientists with other disciplines and collaborators from private, public and third sectors. Developments at Cardiff University and elsewhere are promising, but it remains to be seen whether this potentially powerful institutional mechanism for addressing the problems and possibilities of our time will be widely adopted.

Speaker:

Rick Delbridge is Cardiff University's Dean of Research, Innovation and Enterprise and Professor of Organizational Analysis in Cardiff Business School. He is an experienced researcher whose interests include the management and organization of innovation. He has published widely on these and related issues.

Location: 8 West 1.29

Time: 15:00 - 16:00

09
Mar

Annual Founders Day Presentation: Empowering Higher Education for a Sustainable Future

The School of Management's International Centre for Higher Education Management (ICHEM) presents the key challenges and innovative responses relating to the transformation of higher education in the 21st century through the voices of faculty, alumni and PhD students.

Professor Rajani Naidoo introduces the centre and reflects on the aim of bringing together research and practice to contribute to global wellbeing. She will introduce the advanced leadership programme for university managers, the Doctor of Business Administration in Higher Education Management, which has been running since 2002 with 14 cohorts from 19 countries. ICHEM has also launched the Future Leader’s Initiative in collaboration with the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in South Africa to bring together managers from each of the country’s universities to contribute to the countrys transformation agenda.

Professor Jurgen Enders will present the multi-level research of ICHEM and the development of Praxis Circles which bring together researchers and professionals.

Professor Yiannis Gabriel will discuss some of the challenges facing management education, most especially reconciling an ethic of care with a critical pedagogy relevant to the practical concerns of future organisational leaders and followers.

Mukovhe Masuta, a PhD candidate and Chief Executive of an organisation which aims to enhance the success of rural youth in higher education will reflect on how his research will develop insights for government and university policy makers.

DBA Alumnus Professor Nigel Healey, Vice Chancellor of the National University of Fiji will reflect on the importance of global interaction and the impact of ICHEM in equipping leaders with the skills needed to navigate turbulent change in an ethical manner.

Location: East Building Lecture Theatre

Time: 14:00 - 15:00