University of Bath School of Management University of Bath School of Management

Research Seminars and Events 2017

Research

UK and overseas speakers are invited to the School to share their experiences and findings with staff, doctoral students and the members of the public. Previous seminars can be found here: 2018, 2016, 2015, 2014.

Further Information

View the University Calendar

If you are a member of staff and wish to organise an event or seminar please contact the Research Office

 

6
Dec

Are pensions contribution a threat to shareholder payouts


UK companies have been making large contributions to reduce the deficits of their pension funds, and are believed to fund such contributions in part by reducing dividends. Using data from 2003, this talk shows that there is very little evidence that large contributions are associated with reductions in dividends or other payouts to shareholders. The talk further shows that companies tend to make large contributions when they have healthy cash flows and profits. This suggests that the Pensions Regulator allows companies flexibility regarding the timing of contributions, which means contributions are less of a shock to cash flows, and easier to manage.

Speaker: Professor Seth Armitage, University of Edinburgh

Location: 3 East 2.4

Time: 2.00pm

Contact: Research Office

 

5
Dec

Health and Clinical Research Seminar: The role of health care management science in the NHS


Christos conducts analytical rigorous but highly applied research that generates both academic and practical impact. Working in close collaboration with clinicians and healthcare professionals he develops and applies rigorous methods to help better plan and deliver care services. He is interested in the evaluation of the likely impact of healthcare interventions and policy initiatives using mathematical modelling and computer simulation. He has worked on a large number of problems in health and care ranging from the monitoring of surgical site infections to the organisation of care services such as stroke prevention, glaucoma, mental health and others.

Hosted by the Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology.

Speaker: Professor Christos Vasilakis

Location: 5 West 2.4

Time: 13.15pm

Contact: Research Office

5
Dec

Experiments in the digital age: Moving from the laboratory to computational social science


This talk will look at how technology and data can reveal information about individuals and their behaviour. Often referred to as digital traces, the work jumps between disciplines (e.g., psychology, medicine, computer science) and methodologies. This talk will consider two complementary strands of work which focus on healthcare engagement and healthcare promotion. The former documents the practical application of basic research that explored how people mentally represent days of the week (N=60). Surprisingly, these representations predict real world trends in behaviour including missed medical appointments. This has recently led to the development and testing of systems to maximise attendance in the NHS (e.g., N=500,000). The second strand relates to complementary work involving the use of smartphones and wearable devices to both make inferences about the end user, but also as tools to improve health. Unfortunately, this technology often fails to change behaviour and has, in turn, led back to traditional experimentation. The talk will end by presenting some new data from a recent randomised controlled trial that assessed the relationship between the timing of wearable feedback and personality (N=50).

Speaker: Dr David Ellis

Location: 1 West 2.104

Time: 2.30pm

Contact: Research Office

1
Dec

Integrating sustainability into governance: what are the drivers?


Dr Friedman will talk about the growth of environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG), impact investing and green finance. She will discuss estimates of the size of the various markets, what is growing most, what are some of the drivers behind each of these different types of investment approaches, and what this means for corporate governance reporting (e.g. the end of CSR and more integrated reporting) particularly in terms of active shareholders. She will also talk about The Economist's report on climate change and related financial risks.

Speaker: Dr Renée Friedman

Location: 6 East 2.2

Time: 12.15pm

Contact: Research Office

30
Nov

Harmful Diversification: evidence from alternative investments


Alternative assets have become as important as equities and fixed income in the portfolios of major investors, and so their diversification properties are also important. However, adding five alternative assets (real estate, commodities, hedge funds, emerging markets and private equity) to equity and bond portfolios is shown to be harmful for US investors. We use 19 portfolio models, in conjunction with dummy variable regression, to demonstrate this harm over the 1997-2015 period. This finding is robust to different estimation periods, risk aversion levels, and the use of two regimes. Harmful diversification into alternatives is not primarily due to transactions costs or non-normality, but to estimation risk. This is larger for alternative assets, particularly during the credit crisis which accounts for the harmful diversification of real estate, private equity and emerging markets. Diversification into commodities, and to a lesser extent hedge funds, remains harmful even when the credit crisis is excluded.

Speaker: Dr Emmanouil Platanakis

Location: 8 West 2.30

Time: 12.15pm

Contact: Research Office

29
Nov

Public access defibrillator location under demand and supply uncertainty


Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a significant public health issue, and treatment, namely, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation, is very time sensitive. Public access defibrillation programs, which deploy automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for lay responder use in an emergency, reduce the time to defibrillation and improve survival rates. The talk will present the models developed to guide the deployment of AEDs in public settings. The models generalize the maximal covering location problem and are motivated by real-world views on AED retrieval behavior by lay responders during a cardiac arrest emergency. We formulated three mixed integer nonlinear models and derived either equivalent integer linear reformulations or easily computable bounds. A case study where the modeling framework is applied to data from Toronto, Canada will also be presented. The talk will then look at ongoing work on a brand new location problem where both demand (OHCA) and supply (AED and lay responder) locations are subject to uncertainty. This new problem is inspired by a Dutch civilian response smart phone app which alerts volunteers when an OHCA occurs in the vicinity, and directs them to first a nearby AED and then to the victim. The talk will propose a comprehensive modeling framework which combines spatial data analytics, optimization and geographical information systems (GIS) modeling. This framework is primarily motivated by the AED deployment in the Netherlands, but can be extended to various other settings in which demand and supply locations are uncertain, such as emergency planning and humanitarian logistics.

Speaker: Dr Derya Demirtas

Location: Chancellors Building 3.15

Time: 2.00pm

Contact: Research Office

28
Nov

The rhetorical historic turn and the role of history in strategy


The historic turn in strategy is predominantly objectivist and preoccupied with the ontology of the past where " history matters " as a constraint on managerial agency in the present. By contrast the rhetorical historic turn makes a distinction between the past and its representation in narrative or non-narrative historical accounts. History, therefore - as a representation of the past - is a resource that can be used strategically. This distinction provides the basis for objectivist and rhetorical readings of three types of history in strategy: corporate history, consisting of narrative accounts of corporate entities; analogical history, where parallels are found between events in the past and the present from historical research; and canonical history, in which well-known historical episodes are invoked for legitimacy, corroboration, and inspiration.

Speaker: Professor Michael Rowlinson

Location: 8 West 1.34

Time: 1:30pm

Contact: Research Office

22
Nov

Regulations of Charlatans in High Skill Professions


We study a market for a skill that is in short supply and high demand, where the presence of charlatans (professionals who sell a service that they do not deliver on) is an equilibrium outcome. We use this model to evaluate the standards and disclosure requirements that exist in these markets. We show that reducing the number of charlatans through regulation decreases consumer surplus. Although both standards and disclosure drive charlatans out of the market, consumers are worse off because of the resulting reduction in competition amongst producers. Producers, on the other hand, strictly benefit from the regulation, implying that the regulation we observe in these markets likely derives from producer interests. Using these insights, we study the factors that drive the cross-sectional variation in charlatans across professions. Professions with weak trade groups, skills in larger supply, shorter training periods and less informative signals regarding the professional's skill, are more likely to feature charlatans.

Speaker: Professor Jonathan Berk, Stanford, USA

Location: 8 West 2.23

Time: 2-3:30pm

Contact: Research Office

10
Nov

International Centre for Higher Education Management and Strategy and Organisation Division Joint Seminar

Return to Meaning: For a social science with something to say

With the expansion of higher education and social research and the competition for rankings we find that much research is becoming more a matter of an instrument for rankings and careers. Metrics outscore meaning. Publications become the end, not the means for quality improvement and dissemination of knowledge results. There is an explosion of journals and publications that seem to say less and less. We have moved from research to roi-search (Return on Investment Search). The talk describes the situation, offers strong critiques, points at some of the causes for the problems and illuminates consequences. It discusses ways out of the contemporary situation at the level of policy, organization and the individual. The focus is on how to make social science relevant and meaningful. The talk is based on Alvesson, Gabriel & Paulsen (2017) Return to Meaning. Oxford University Press.

Speaker: Professor Mats Alvesson. Professor of Business Administration at Lund University

Social Science Research: From quest of universal knowledge to quest of personal meaning

I will develop the argument that the transmutation of vocation into game changes the nature of scientific research from quest of universal knowledge to quest of personal meaning. Research thus becomes one of the many pathways along which individuals pursue the chimera of meaning at a times when belief in absolutes has declined or disappeared altogether, especially among social scientists. In the absence of such absolutes, the quest for meaning turns into a quest for intense emotional experiences, experiences which a game, any game including the publishing game can provide in trumps. In this connection, I will discuss joy, pride, guilt, shame, anxiety, contempt, envy, nostalgia, anger, fear and disgust not as by-products but as core outputs of the publishing game. With the help of Campbell (1989), and against Henry Kissinger's "Academic Politics Are So Vicious Because the Stakes Are So Small", I will argue that far from small, the emotional stakes of academic politics are very high indeed..

Speaker: Professor Yiannis Gabriel, University of Bath School of Management

Location: The Edge Management Suite

Time: 14:30am

Contact: Research Office

8
Nov

Learning about organizational innovation: Evidence from the conglomerate merger wave


The emergence, rapid adoption, and rapid decline of the conglomerate form remains a puzzle to strategy and organizational scholars. This paper conceptualizes the conglomerate form as an organizational innovation, the value of which was revealed over time through experimentation and learning. We test our conjectures using a sample of conglomerate firms from the 1960s and early 1970s and find evidence of systematic learning effects. Results from a series of event studies reveal investors systematically updated their beliefs about the value of conglomerates as a whole when new information (positive or negative) about the largest, most newsworthy conglomerates was revealed. This suggests that financial-market participants make judgments about organizational structure itself.

Speaker: Professor Peter Klein. Professor of Entrepreneurship at Baylor Business

Location: Chancellors Building 5.6

Time: 11:30am

Contact: Research Office

11
Oct

Exploring Antecedents of Impact in Business and Management: An Analysis of Structural Characteristcs of Successful REF Impact Case Studies


Acknowledging the complex and dynamic nature of impact, the aim of this study is to provide a conceptual framework of main structural characteristics by which successful manifestations of impact are conceived. Based on a qualitative analysis of 95 impact case studies rated “outstanding” or “very considerable” (4* or 3*) by the REF 2014 panel, the framework developed outlines 33 structural variables which are assigned to six higher-order categories. We expand upon these structural characteristics by offering a description of the investigated 95 cases alongside the set of dimensions. Doing so, we add to our understanding of the conceptual foundations of impact in the context of business and management specifically. With regard to practical implications, uncovering relevant characteristics of high-quality impact can provide guidance for initiating and conducting impactful research in our field.

Speaker: Professor Christof Backhaus. Professor and Chair in Marketing, Aston Business School

Location: 8W 4.23

Time: 13:00-14:00

Contact: Research Office

10
Oct

IDO Research Seminar Series: Research Seminar and a Master Class with Professor Vinod Singhal


Seminar: Supply Chain Risks and Financial Performance: Evidence from Demand-Supply Mismatches

This talk will present empirical evidence on the effect of supply chain risks on financial performance. Financial performance is measured using measures related to shareholder value, share price volatility, and profitability. It will compare and contrast the corporate performance effects of three different types of supply chain risks; supply chain disruptions, product introduction delays, and excess inventory. The implications of these results on making the business case for supply chain initiatives and strategies that mitigate supply chain risks will be discussed.

Location: The Edge, School of Management Suite

Time: 10:30-12:00

Masterclass - Publishing Research - Lessons Learned and Good Practices​

I will discuss my experiences with publishing empirical research in Operations Management from the perspective of an author as well as an editor and associate editor of various journals.  I will share some of the lessons I have learnt and discuss some of the practices that I have found useful.  I will also address questions and issues that you may have related to the publication process.  

Location: The Edge, School of Management Suite

Time: 14:30-16:00

Contact: Research Office

28
June

Influences of Product Color Brightness and Visuo-Spatial Configuration on Food Consumption


Professor Suresh Ramanthan will give a talk on "Influences of Product Color Brightness and Visuo-Spatial Configuration on Food Consumption".

Speaker: Professor Suresh Ramanthan is Professor of Marketing and holds the David R. Norcom’73 Endowed Professorship in the Mays Business School at Texas A&M University.

Location: 8W 1.29

Time: 12:00-13:30

Contact: Research Office

24
May

The momentum, rationales, and consequences of student mobility to the EU countries: The cases of Russia, Eastern Europe, Caucasus, and Central Asia


The presentation will chart the flows of students from Russia, Eastern Europe (Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Ukraine), Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia), and Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan) to the EU countries since the late 1990s to show a dramatic increase in the numbers of students from this region pursuing degree
programmes at European universities.

Speaker: Dr. Chankseliani is based at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance (SKOPE) at the University of Oxford.

Location: 8W 4.23

Time: 15:00-17:00

Contact: Research Office

10
May

Big Data-Visuals, Desire and Shame: On the Affective Economy of Transnational Higher Education


In this presentation Dr Katja Brøgger explores the affective impact of performance measurement technologies such as publication and grant graphs measuring the performance of individual researchers and scorecards measuring the performance of nation states.

Speaker: Katja Brøgger, PhD, is associate professor at the Department of Education Science, the Danish School of Education, Aarhus University.

Location: The Edge' Management Suite, Level 1, Room 1.04

Time: 14:00-15:30

Contact: Research Office

5
May

Rethinking Rigour for Management Research: Challenging Technocratic Conceptions of Rigour


Rigour in empirical research can be defined as the strict application of rules and procedures to ensure that the knowledge produced has a sound empirical basis. In practice, however, a narrow positivist definition of rigour which emphasises technical precision in methods has become dominant. Quantitative researchers have, for obvious reasons, rarely challenged this definition. Qualitative researchers have responded either by rejecting rigour as a meaningful concept for their work, or alternatively by seeking to make their work more consistent with positivist conceptions of rigour. The result has been that quantitative researchers have been less reflexively engaged with rigour than they might and qualitative researchers have undermined either the legitimacy of their work or their ability to develop particular kinds of theory. By focusing on the logic of reasoning, in which scholars seek to bridge the empirical with the theoretical and thus to advance knowledge, it is possible to challenge the dominant conceptualisation of rigour and to propose different criteria which may overcome the limitations of existing approaches.

Speaker: Prof Bill Harley is a Professor of Management in the Faculty of Business and Economics at
the University of Melbourne.

Location: 8 West 3.14

Time: 12:00-13:30

Contact: Research Office

11
April

Social Ties for Labor Market Access - Lessons from the Migration of East German Inventors


Dr Karin Hoisl will look at the impact of social ties on the migration of inventors from East to West Germany, using the fall of the Iron Curtain and German reunification as a natural experiment.

Speaker: Dr Karin Hoisl Chair of Organization and Innovation at the University of Mannheim.

Location: 8W 2.11

Time: 11:30am (lunch will be provided)

Contact: Research Office

04
April

Which Firms Care about Diplomacy? International Relations and Foreign Investment Locations


Firms and governments exist in a broad network in which the home government and its diplomatic service are a critical node—or a “referral point”—between firms and potential partners in business or government in foreign locations. Thus, diplomatic relations between countries matter for choice of foreign investment location. Using a network perspective, we argue that good diplomatic relations may bring some firms benefits ranging from enhanced investment opportunities to reduced political risks and to increased legitimacy, thus inducing them to invest in friendly host countries. However, firms vary in their ability to benefit from good diplomatic relations, as those with stronger political ties to home governments can better access and leverage intergovernmental diplomatic connections. Such ability of politically connected firms is more useful where weak institutional impartiality in the host country inhibits impartial treatment of foreign investors. Empirically, we test our hypotheses on overseas investment location decisions by Chinese firms and find empirical support. We discuss implications of our study to research on political ties, network theory, and internationalization of emerging market firms.

Speaker: Professor Klaus Meyer, Professor of Strategy and International Business at the China Europe International Business School.

Location: 8W 1.29

Time: 1pm (lunch included)

Contact: Research Office

08
March

Research in practice: OR and Forecasting


"In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is." Multiple attributions including Einstein and Yogi Berra Practice in OR and forecasting differs substantially from what modellers typically study. This presentation will briefly examine the roots of OR and forecasting and how an increasing gap has developed between theory and practice. But why is such a gap important for the profession? In two surveys ten years apart, we have investigated the state of OR in practice. The primary techniques and application areas of OR practitioners have changed little. However, OR and its boundaries are increasingly disputed and OR is yet again at risk of being side-lined in practice by the ‘analytics movement’. Forecasting research faces similar problems where the evidence of implementation is limited. Overall, researchers have paid little attention to issues of identifying limitations in current practice, as well as implementing improvements. It is too often assumed that a model or approach that research finds it performing well will automatically be adopted and found useful. The talk ends with a discussion of the role and responsibilities of the academy. The key is through improved ‘knowledge exchange’. Taking an optimistic view, research focused on the real problems organisations face coupled with a training and development programme can help overcome the gap between theory and practice. The increased prominence of analytics makes the issues of implementation particularly acute.

Speaker: Professor Robert Fildes is Professor of Management Science in the School of Management, Lancaster University and Director of Lancaster Centre for Forecasting..

Location: 6E 2.2

Time: 1:30-15:00

Contact: Research Office

07
March

The Value of Experience Under Change: A Contingency View


Successfully embracing technological change is an important but challenging task, as firms have to leverage their prior experience by combining it with exogenous and endogenous contingencies. Prior studies have attempted to isolate and investigate the drivers that enhance performance via product change in technological settings. This paper complements their findings by analyzing the role played by a firm’s prior experience and its value vis-à-vis different contingencies.

Speaker: Dr Paolo Aversa is lecturer in Strategy at Cass Business School, visiting Professor at the University of Trento, and Fellow of the Center for Automotive and Mobility Innovation at University Ca'Foscari, Venice.

Location: 3E 3.5

Time: 17:00-18:00

Contact: Research Office

01
March

Organizational Time: Preliminary steps towards a theoretical framework


Tor Hernes, Professor of Organization Theory, Copenhagen Business School, is visiting with us on Wednesday 1 March to present 'Organizational Time: Preliminary steps towards a theoretical framework’. Tor is a world class scholar in the burgeoning area of Process Organizational Studies and has agreed, and is indeed keen, to give a Workshop: “Working with and writing up process data for publication ".

This will be at 3pm following a break for a cup of tea after the paper presentation.

So please bring along questions/issues about working with process data and trying to get it
accepted for publication (PhD students might particularly benefit).

Speaker: Professor Tor Hernes, from Copenhagen Business School.

Location: 8 West 3.13

Time: 1:30pm

Contact: Research Office

22
Feb

Competition in Higher Education - A Research Agenda


Competition plays an increasingly strong role in higher education, at different levels and in different national systems. However, the phenomenon is not well understood. Therefore, Professor Georg Krücken’s presentation is mainly conceptual, though empirical data from different areas are used for illustration. It draws in particular on more recent conceptualizations of competition in sociology, economics, management studies and higher education research.

Speaker: Professor Georg Krücken is Professor of Higher Education Research and Director of INCHER-Kassel, the International Centre for Higher Education Research, both at the University of Kassel (Germany).

Location: 'The Edge' Management Suite, Level 1, 1.04

Time: 11:00-13:00

Contact: Research Office

22
Feb

Goal Setting Autonomy and Organizational Goal Commitment: In an Organizational Multi-task Context


Goal setting autonomy (GSA) is an important feature of organizational goal setting where managers can for several reasons allow their subordinates to set their own goals. While extant literature found mixed results concerning GSA, it surprisingly never examined its efficacy in a natural organizational setting that include two neglected aspects: first, an organizational hierarchy with a manager who nonrandomly chooses GSA for a given subordinate; and second, a complex multi-task context in which GSA concerns aggregate performance and results in subordinates choosing their preferred levels of task engagement. Using data from the New Zealand Real Estate Industry we find that the effective use of GSA depends on subordinates’ belief in themselves (self-efficacy) and their organization’s goal commitment. Importantly, different levels of self-efficacy invert the efficacy of GSA and organization goal commitment thereby suggesting that GSA is a non-trivial organizational mechanism. Our findings may explain mixed results of earlier work on GSA and have several important implications.

Speaker: Dr Jenny Gibb is senior lecturer in the Department of Strategy & Human Resource Management at the Waikato Management School, New Zealand..

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 13:30-14:30

Contact: Research Office

18
Jan

Crafting papers for publication in the Journal of Management Studies


Despite the conventions about what constitutes a strong/original theoretical contribution, publishing academic research inevitably takes the shape of a craft that authors frequently (and quite often painfully) learn by doing. In this session, we will look at some techniques that authors can use for developing effective arguments, leveraging academic conventions in a constructive fashion, and communicating clear contributions to their audiences (editors, reviewers, and academic readers).

Speaker: Professor Gerardo Patriotta is Professor of Management and Organization, Nottingham University Business School Senior Associate Editor at the Journal of Management Studies.

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 12pm

Contact: Research Office