University of Bath School of Management University of Bath School of Management

Past research seminars and events 2018

Research

UK and overseas speakers are invited to the School to share their experiences and findings with staff, doctoral students and the members of the public. Previous seminars can be found here 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014.

Further Information

View the University Calendar

If you are a member of staff and wish to organise an event or seminar please contact the Research Office

 

14
Dec

Rhetorical history as a dynamic capability


History plays an important role in much of the theory in strategic management, yet its precise role in creating a sustainable competitive advantage remains implicit and undertheorized. We argue that the capacity to manage the analysis, interpretation and extrapolation of the past is a dynamic capability. Drawing from an emerging body of research on rhetorical history we demonstrate how Teece's (2007) three micro-foundations of sensing, seizing and reconfiguring require firms to adopt clusters of historical skills, each premised on a different understanding of history as an objective, interpretive and imaginative capacity. Viewed as a dynamic capability, rhetorical history allows firms to systematically deploy skills devoted to managing elements of history so that they can more effectively innovate, adapt and change.

Speaker: Prof Roy Suddaby, Victoria University, Canada

Contact: Research Office

5
Dec

Fraud-perception, superegos, and cultural spread of unethical behaviour: theory and evidence from Enron


Speaker: Dr Richard Fairchild, University of Bath

Location: 3 West North 3.7

Time: 1.45 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

30
Nov

The growing importance of governance to investors


A CGR&IS event.

Speaker: Dr Renee Friedman, The Economist

Location: 6 East 2.2

Time: 12.15 - 1.00pm

Contact: Research Office

30
Nov

Exact and heuristic algorithms for the carrier-vehicle traveling salesman problem


The Carrier-Vehicle Traveling Salesman Problem (CVTSP) is concerned with a multi-vehicle system consisting of a slow but large vehicle called the Carrier (e.g.,a ship), which is capable of transporting, deploying, and servicing a smaller but faster Vehicle (e.g., a helicopter or an unmanned aerial vehicle) with a limited range. The Vehicle is expected to visit or service a given set of Points-of-Interest (POI). For each POI, the Vehicle should leave the Carrier at some take-off point, visit the POI, and return to the Vehicle for refueling or recharging purposes without exhausting its fuel or battery. The objective is to determine the take-off and landing points of the Vehicle for each POI so as to minimize the total distance traveled by the Carrier. Introduced by Garone et al. in 2011, CVTSP has extensive applications in search-and-rescue and humanitarian operations, logistics problems in oil rigs, and surveillance operations. Prof Yildirim develops a new mixed integer second order conic programming formulation for the CVTSP. He identifies several structural properties and exploit those properties in an attempt to obtain improved formulations. For larger instances, he proposes approximate solution methods. He will present computational results on both sets of instances from the literature as well as on larger randomly generated instances. The results illustrate the effectiveness of our exact and approximate solution methods. This is joint work with Dr Gunes Erdogan (University of Bath) and Muge Yalcinkaya (Koc University).

Speaker: Prof Emre Alper Yildirim, Koc University

Location: Chancellors' Building 4.5

Time: 2.15 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

28
Nov

Contracting for innovation in public services: capabilities, institution and intermediation


Innovation is central to boosting competitiveness and growth, creating jobs, and improving public services and social welfare. Governments stimulate innovation through various policy interventions such as R&D tax credits and research grants. Innovation-oriented public procurement is a particular demand-side policy instrument aiming to articulate demand for innovative solutions that help improve public services and address grand societal challenges e.g. affordable healthcare and security. Despite the supportive rhetoric in policy and academic circles alike, existing research suggests that implementation of innovation-oriented public procurement is fraught with some persisting challenges, namely a shortfall of relevant capabilities and a mismatch between innovation processes and the institutional set up within which these take place. In this talk, Dr Selviaridis drew on the capabilities literature and the systems-of-innovation perspective to investigate how, and to what extent, public organisations overcome these challenges and develop or improve their capabilities to effectively contract for innovation. The ongoing empirical study comprises expert interviews and two in-depth case studies of intermediary organisations helping to build capacity and capability, and to fill in institutional voids in the UK defence and healthcare settings. Data collection has involved so far 50 semi-structured interviews and analysis of 60-plus relevant documents.

Speaker: Dr Kostas Selviaridis, Lancaster University

Location: EB 3.13

Time: 3.15pm

Contact: Research Office

28
Nov

Risk factor and use of proceeds declarations and their effects on IPO subscription, price, "fixings", liquidity and after-market returns


Refreshments served from 1.15pm in 8 West foyer.

Speaker: Prof Paul McGuinness, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Location: 8 West 3.22

Time: 1.45 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

26
Nov

Genealogical observations about Silicon Valley and the US military industrial complex


Genealogical observations about Silicon Valley and the US military industrial complex. This paper examines the militarization of corporate communications networks and their appropriation for military and national security purposes. The profound significance of military organizations in the evolution of new technologies of social control has been largely neglected within the field of organization studies. The contribution of this paper is threefold: i) it extends the existing research within organization studies into the security-industrial complex by mapping out the military colonization of communications networks and the 'transversal' development of techniques of social control between the military and corporate domains; ii) the paper shows that the power relations underpinning these increasingly militarized communications networks are a form of 'war by other means' iii) this conceptual reformulation of power relations reveals the instability of the networks of alliance that underpin the new security apparatus, as witnessed by protests from whistleblowers, hacktivist groups and corporations themselves who have publicly objected to these measures. These instabilities require sustained analysis from scholars of organization to map out the changing terrain of organizational power relations and the new possibilities for resistance to this militarization.

Speaker: Prof Iain Munro, Newcastle University Business School

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 12.30pm

Contact: Research Office

21
Nov

Investment consultants' claims about their own performance: What lies beneath?


Refreshments served from 1.15pm in 8 West foyer.

Speaker: Prof Tim Jenkinson, University of Oxford

Location: 8 West 3.22

Time: 1.45 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

19
Nov

The disability employment gap: translating research into policy and practice


In this seminar Professor Hoque will present his recent academic research with colleagues at Cass and Cardiff Business Schools in the area of disability, and outline the steps taken to use this research to influence the government's labour market policies regarding disabled people. Prior research has focused on: the government's 'Positive About Disabled People' Two Ticks symbol; the influence of joint regulation and trade union disability champions on employer disability equality practices; the impact of High Performance Work Practices on disabled people; the Great Recession and disabled people's employment outcomes; and the impact of workplace-level support on the employment and well-being of informal carers. This talk will outline how this research helped inform the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Disability report 'Ahead of the Arc: A Contribution to Halving the Disability Employment Gap', which was co-authored with Disability Rights UK. There will then be a discussion of the work undertaken with the APPG for Disability and Disability Rights UK to get the report's recommendations embedded into government policy. This has included: key interventions from Lisa Cameron MP (Chair of the APPG for Disability) in debates in the House of Commons; influence on the Industrial Strategy white paper and the DWP's 'Improving Lives' command paper (which lays out the government's plans to meet its manifesto target to increase the number of disabled people by 1 million); and the development of an ongoing relationship with the No.10 policy unit.

Speaker: Prof Kim Hoque, Warwick Business School

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 12.30pm

Contact: Research Office

16
Nov

Regulation, regulators and the regulated: Perspectives on the regulation of public services


Andrew Wright will give a talk drawing from his many years of experience, particularly as a senior partner in Energy Systems and a Board Member at Ofgem, the gas and electricity regulator for Great Britain. He has worked at Ofgem in board level positions for more than ten years, including a period as interim Chief Executive. Andrew has more than 30 years of experience of working in the gas and electricity sector. Before joining Ofgem he was a senior equity research analyst covering UK and European utilities for a number of major investment banks, including, most recently, UBS.

Speaker: Dr Andrew Wright, Durham Energy Institute

Location: 8 West 2.20

Time: 2.15 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

14
Nov

TBC


Speaker: Prof David Newton, University of Bath

Location: 3 West North 3.7

Time: 1.45 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

12
Nov

School of Management Writing Bootcamp


This one day writing bootcamp aims to provide an impetus to start or make progress on a piece of writing; offer a quiet place for intense writing; offer and receive advice about your own and colleagues´ writing; help push through blockages and barriers to writing; spend time getting to know colleagues and learning from each other´s experience; help reduce journal writing from a monster that towers over us to a challenge and (sometimes) a pleasure. This workshop is open to all colleagues across the School of Management.

Programme Leaders: Dr Yasin Rofcanin & Professor Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: Wessex House Council Chamber

Time: 9.30 - 4.00

Contact: Yasin Rofcanin

9
Nov

Investor stewardship in the context of the common ownership debate


Following the financial crisis, stewardship, i.e. responsible and conscious involvement of institutional investors into the governance of companies they invest in, seemed like the right step forward. However, with the growth of passive management, asset managers are finding themselves increasingly in the 'common owner' position where they invest across listed firms within the same sector. Consequently, the question has arisen as to whether this situation can reduce competition. The debate on the coexistence of investor stewardship and common ownership is very timely and relevant, especially in the UK context, where institutional investors hold a significant fraction of publicly listed companies. Dr Anastasia Petraki, Head of Research and Statistics at the Investment Association (IA), is responsible for all IA research output and data services that are concerned with the fund market, financial stability, and investor stewardship.

Speaker: Dr Anastasia Petraki, Investment Association

Location: 6 East 2.2

Time: 12.15 - 1.00pm

Contact: Research Office

8
Nov

Beyond the Ivory Tower: working towards greater equality


Uncovering the dark side of inequalities of our great public institutions like parliament, the health service and the entertainment industry has recently preoccupied discourse and media attention. Similar structural inequalities experienced by women and people from black and minority ethnic backgrounds (BME) is also under scrutiny in higher education. Universities pride themselves as being progressive and liberal institutions delivering a public good. However, the exposure of inequalities, such as gaps in pay, inequality in promotion and BME student attainment, challenges core beliefs. What are some of the conflicting narratives of university cultures, policies and practice as played out in evidence based 'stories' illustrating inequalities from the perspective of students, staff and governance? The seminar will explore these stories to focus on perspectives beyond the 'ivory towers' of prestige and privilege. The first story is based on the journey taken by a large university that took an institution wide transformational approach to addressing the gap in attainment between white and BME students. The second draws from empirical evidence of the opportunities and realities of progression and success for women in higher education careers. Finally, some questions will be asked about the governance of universities and the role of external drivers in accelerating greater equality for example levers used in the national assessment of research excellence.

Speaker: Prof Fiona Ross, Kingston Univeristy and St George's, University of London

Location: The Edge Management Suite, The Edge

Time: 11.00 - 12.30pm

Contact: DBA Programmes Officer

7
Nov

How active are Active Managers?


Joint work with Julian Franks and Hannes Wagner

Speaker: Prof Marco Becht, Universite libre de Bruxelles

Location: 3 West North 3.7

Time: 1.45 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

6
Nov

Taking an event-oriented perspective to understanding everyday psychological contract breach and fulfilment


Like many management concepts, the psychological contract is inherently about events, specifically about broken and fulfilled promises that shape employees' perceived relationship with the organization. The psychological contract literature, however, has typically treated breach and fulfilment as polar opposites of each other, obscuring potential differences between both types of events. We conceptualize everyday breach and fulfilment as distinct emotional events, which leads to different theoretical assumptions about event-specific antecedents and effects of breach and fulfillment. The event perspective offers a different way of thinking about breach and fulfilment, but also allows for a theoretical integration with traditional research based on more stable global beliefs. Findings from a diary study (N = 1,570 days) differ significantly from previous research, showing that breach and fulfilment events are associated with valence-congruent outcomes, where breach mainly affected negative, but not positive, outcomes and vice versa for fulfilment. Distinct patterns of attributions are associated with breach and fulfilment and explained emotional reactions and outcomes. Both breach and fulfilment over time aggregate to predict global evaluations of the employment relationship. We discuss how breach and fulfilment events are not best explained as inherent in each other at event level, suggesting traditional conceptualizations of the psychological contract may not apply to the experience of everyday events at work. In particular, the role of fulfilment, which so far has been underestimated, needs re-evaluating.

Speaker: Prof Tina Kiefer, Warwick Business School

Location: 8 West 2.29

Time:2.00pm

Contact: Research Office

31
Oct

Chief financial officers, resistance to pressure and earnings management


Speaker: Prof Chris Florackis, University of Liverpool

Location: 3 East 2.2

Time: 1.45 - 3.00pm

Contact: Research Office

24
Oct

Responding to climate change financial risks: What do insurers need to do?


A recent Bank of England study has shown that only 1 in 10 UK banks are making long term plans for the catastrophic risk of climate change. Patrick Clearly chairs the meetings of the Bank of England insurance supervision climate change specialism which considers the financial risks arising from climate change risk for insurers and the financial sector.

Speaker: Mr Patrick Cleary, Prudential Regulation Authority, Bank of England

Location: 3 East 2.2

Time: 2.15 - 3.30pm

Contact: Research Office

16-17
Oct

Markov Decision Process Short Course


This short course will provide a high-level overview of Markov Decision Process (MDP) application, computation, theory and recent advances. MDPs are now widely recognized as the standard framework for modeling and analyzing dynamic probabilistic optimization problems. Machine learning and artificial intelligence draw heavily on Markov decision process methods. Applications are broad and include appointment scheduling, clinical decision-making, communication system control, ecological modeling, inventory management and robotic control. Recent research focuses on solving large-scale models through value function approximation and simulation and linear programming based computation. Short course hosted by IDO Division and is open to all faculty, researchers and PhD students of the School. Tea and coffee will be provided, please make your own arrangements for lunch.

Programme Leaders: Professor Martin Puterman, University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business

Location: 8 West 3.14

Time: 10.00 - 12.00 and 1.30 - 3.30pm each day

Contact: Research Office

11
Oct

Do you get what you desire? Consequences of (Mis)Fit of Expected versus Desired Servant Leadership; and the Role of Context across Ten Countries

This talk explores how (in)congruence of desired and actual behaviours of servant leaders shape followers' work outcomes. Furthermore, recognising the importance of context, we integrate a gender-cultural perspective and study the moderating role of gender inequality across ten countries on the associations between (in)congruence of servant leadership and follower outcomes. Utilising a sample comprising mainly of full-time employees across ten countries (n = 2,960), our findings from polynomial regression analyses support our hypotheses and reveal important findings with regards to the role of the importance of shared perceptions and the role of national context to understand how servant leaders become effective. The paper contributes to the theorizing of servant leadership by outlining the contextual, relational and role dynamics shaping leader behavior and follower outcomes; thus offering implications for training and development interventions in organisations to ensure a mutual understanding of servant conduct.

Speaker: Dr Yasin Rofcanin, University of Bath

Location: 8 West 1.34

Time: 12.30pm

Contact: Research Office

8
Oct

School of Management Writing Bootcamp


This one day writing bootcamp aims to provide an impetus to start or make progress on a piece of writing; offer a quiet place for intense writing; offer and receive advice about your own and colleagues´ writing; help push through blockages and barriers to writing; spend time getting to know colleagues and learning from each other´s experience; help reduce journal writing from a monster that towers over us to a challenge and (sometimes) a pleasure. This workshop is open to all colleagues across the School of Management.

Programme Leaders: Dr Yasin Rofcanin & Professor Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: Wessex House Council Chamber

Time: 9.30 - 4.00

Contact: Yasin Rofcanin

4
Oct

Professors versus Robots: Is there value in being human in an Automated University?


Many of the drivers of an 'automated academia' are subtle and more or less already accepted by the academic community. Here are two wide-reaching examples, one drawn from teaching and the other from research: First, consider 'student-centred learning', which amounts to 'empowering' students with various visual aids that reduces the instructor to an ad hoc presence who comes into play only once the Powerpoints and videos fail to meet the student's learning needs. Second, consider the increasing weight given by publishers, editors, as well as academic administrators, to 'meta-data', ranging from search-friendly abstracts to various metrics of reception. These serve as an additional layer of regulation on the research process beyond the standardization already imposed by academic jargon and normal peer review. Where is the human dimension in this increasingly mechanized world of academic knowledge production? I shall suggest a hopeful answer to this question, in the full knowledge that 'automated academi' is reasonably portrayed as a force for 'epistemic democracy', as it effectively -- for better or worse -- levels the difference between the producers and consumers of knowledge.

Speaker: Professor Steve Fuller, University of Warwick

Location: The School of Management Executive Suite, The Edge

Time: 4.00pm

Contact: DBA Programmes Officer

28
Sept

Futures: European Researchers' Night 2018


We invite you to join scientists, historians, psychologists, artists and philosophers from Bath, Bristol and Cardiff Universities, Bath Spa University and the University of the West of England to to create, imagine and explore a future where anything is possible. Come along and support colleagues from the School of Management at this International event.

Location: Bath and Bristol

Time: All day

Contact: Research Office

26
Sept

Future of Work Afternoon tea and discussion


Please join us at the first Future of Work Afternoon Tea of 2018-2019. We will find out more about the research being carried out by members of the Research Centre, and debate and discuss the implications of this work for understanding the Future of Work. The Speakers will be Andrew Brown, Nina Hansen and Stefanie Gustafsson. Each speaker will discuss their work for 15 minutes, and there will be five-minutes for discussion of each presentation. This is followed by debate, discussion, talk and exploration, that will finish when we run out of things to say. Cake supplied, but please bring a drink.

Programme Leaders: Dr Yasin Rofcanin & Professor Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 3.00pm

Contact: Yasin Rofcanin

18
Sept

CANCELLED - A general framework to compare announcement accuracy: static vs LES-based announcement


This event has been cancelled.
Service providers often share delay information, in the form of delay announcements, with their customers. In practice, simple delay announcements, such as average waiting times or a weighted average of previously delayed customers, are often used. Our goal in this talk is to gain insight into when such announcements perform well. To do so, the accuracies are compared of two announcements: (i) a static announcement which does not exploit real-time information about the state of the system, and (ii) a dynamic announcement, specifically the last-to-enter-service (LES) announcement, which equals the delay of the last customer to have entered service at the time of the announcement. So far, the literature on delay announcements has focused, for the most part, on studying the accuracy of various types of announcements in specific queueing models. As such, the validity of various announcements remains intimately tied to the appropriateness of the technical conditions under which these models were studied. In other words, in order to decide whether a type of announcement is appropriate for her system, a manager would need to assess whether a certain queueing model is a good fit for her data. Because this is often difficult to do, we propose a new approach in this talk. In particular, a proposed a novel correlation-based approach which is theoretically appealing because it allows for a comparison of the performances of announcements across different queueing models, including multi-class models with a priority service discipline. It is also practically useful because estimating correlations is much easier than fitting an entire queueing model. Using a combination of queuing-theoretic analysis, real-life data analysis, and simulation, we analyze the performance of static and dynamic announcements, and derive an appropriate weighted average of the two which we demonstrate has a superior performance using both simulation and actual call centre data.

Speaker: Dr Rouba Ibrahim, University College London

Location: 6E 2.1

Time: 14.30

Contact: Research Office

17
Sept

School of Management Writing Bootcamp


This one day writing bootcamp aims to provide an impetus to start or make progress on a piece of writing; offer a quiet place for intense writing; offer and receive advice about your own and colleagues´ writing; help push through blockages and barriers to writing; spend time getting to know colleagues and learning from each other´s experience; help reduce journal writing from a monster that towers over us to a challenge and (sometimes) a pleasure. This workshop is open to all colleagues across the School of Management.

Programme Leaders: Dr Yasin Rofcanin & Professor Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 9.00 - 5.00

Contact: Yasin Rofcanin

12-13
Sept

School of Management writing workshop


This two-day workshop aims to develop an understanding of how to write papers for 4* journals; writing support networks and reduce the pressures and increase the pleasures of writing papers. This workshop is open to all colleagues and final year PhD students.

Programme Leaders: Dr Yasin Rofcanin & Professor Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 9.00 - 4.30 (each day)

Contact: Yasin Rofcanin

11
Sept

Leadership: should it have a future?


This seminar asks: should leadership have a future? It builds on a recent debate in the journal Leadership in which Mark Learmonth and Kevin Morrell questioned the status of leadership as an academic subject and organizational practice. Dennis Tourish, co-editor of Leadership, and Jackie Ford, both major critical leadership scholars, disagree. They think there is a future for leadership, albeit a different one from the dominant models that originate largely in the US. This seminar, hosted jointly by the Future of Work and the Strategy and Leadership research centres at the University of Bath School of Management, will delve into this argument.

Chair: Professor Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: Chancellors' Building 3.15, University of Bath

Time: 10.00 - 13:00 (BST)

Contact: Research Office

29
Jun

Does mandatory environmental reporting affect firms' operational efficiency? Evidence from a quasi-natural experiment in the UK


While regulators around the world have started to force firms to report environmental performance compulsorily, little is known about whether and how such mandates affect firms' operations. Our research tackles this important and timely issue based on a quasi-natural experiment in the UK in which firms listed on the main market of the London Stock Exchange are required to report their annual carbon emissions for financial years ending on or after 30 September 2013. We utilise propensity score matching and difference-in-differences methodologies to estimate the impact of this mandate on the operational efficiency of the UK firms concerned. We also analyse how its impact on operational efficiency varies across firms and industries with different characteristics. Our research provides a better understanding of the operational consequences of mandatory environmental reporting and offers some important implications for both practice and research.

Speaker: Dr Hugo Lam, University of Liverpool

Location: 6E 2.2

Time: 10.30am - 12.00pm

Contact: Research Office

21
Jun

All in it together? How organisational Strategies enhance or diminish the Common Good


The common good refers to contextual conditions that contribute to human wellbeing and flourishing. In this paper we examine how the design of organizational strategies enhances or diminishes the common good. In our qualitative investigation, we gathered data from chief executives and senior managers of large and profitable social enterprises in the United Kingdom. We theorize from the data that organizational strategies may give to, take a future stake in, or take from the common good. Further, we develop the concepts of referential and inferential moral reasoning to explain how strategic decision makers employ comparisons between the expected behaviour of their own organization and the strategies of other organizational forms.

Speaker: Prof Bob Doherty, University of York

Location: 8W 4.23

Time: 1.30pm

Contact: Research Office

19
Jun

Voiceless but empowered farmers in corporate supply chains: Contradictory imagery and industrumental approach to employment


There have been calls for a shift of focus toward the political and power-laden aspects of transitioning toward socially equitable global supply chains. This article offers an empirically grounded response to these calls from a critical realist stance in the context of global food supply chains. We examine how an imaginary for sustainable farming structured around an instrumental construction of empowerment limits what is viewed as permissible, desirable, and possible in global food supply chains. Dr Touboulic adopted a multimodal critical discourse analysis to examine the sustainable farming imaginary for smallholder farmers constructed by one large organization, Unilever, in a series of videos produced and disseminated on YouTube. This talk exposes the underlying mechanisms of power and marginalization at work within the sustainability imaginary and show how 'empowerment' has the potential to create new dependencies for these farmers. Dr Touboulic recontextualize the representations to show that while the imaginary may be commercially feasible, it is less achievable in terms of empowering smallholder farmers.

Speaker: Dr Anne Touboulic, Nottingham University Business School

Location: 6 East 2.1

Time: 10.30 - 12.00pm

Contact: Research Office

15
Jun

Moving abroad while doing a PhD in STEM fields at Chinese universities: Impact on Knowledge creation and networking


Many scholars believe that international mobility during PhD studies can significantly benefit knowledge creation and research collaborations for the present and the future. This is an idea that is well-accepted and promoted in many policymaking and academic circles. However, the underlying process linking the creation of an international network during PhD studies and its potentially incremental benefits to the research performance of PhD students and mentors over time is yet to be analysed in a coherent and widely accepted framework. In this seminar, Prof Mattia Cattaneo and Sebastian Birolini will present results from a study of almost 1,800 elite Chinese STEM PhD students that sheds lights on these processes and the short-to-mid-term impact on PhD students' research careers. This is joint work with Hugo Horta, Stefano Paleari and Chen Wenqin.

Speaker: Prof Mattia Cattaneo & Mr Sebastian Birolini, University of Bergamo

Location: 8W 1.34

Time: 12.15pm

Contact: Research Office

13
Jun

Investment dynamics and earning-return properties: A structural approach


Speaker: Dr David Windisch, University of Graz

Location: 3E 2.4

Time: 1.45pm

Contact: Research Office

11
Jun

Healthcare for the 21st Century: Using Analytics to improve the design and operation of healthcare systems


Providing effective, affordable, and accessible healthcare is a key challenge of the 21st century. Healthcare costs have been steadily increasing but resources for providing healthcare are limited. At the same time, emerging new technologies and massive amounts of newly available data are changing the landscape of what is possible in healthcare provision. This talk describes how analytic and computational tools - and, more generally, an analytic way of thinking - can be used to support the design and management of effective and efficient healthcare systems. The Professor has worked with Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford which has had significant impact on improving patient care while reducing costs. This talk will cover projects in areas relating to hospital operations (operating room scheduling, capacity planning, supply management) and patient care (inpatient monitoring, triage, patient decision making). The talk will conclude with thoughts on challenges and opportunities for applying analytics to improve healthcare now and in the future. A buffet lunch will be served at 12.30pm. The talk starts at 1.15pm.

Speaker: Professor Margaret Brandeau, Stanford University

Location: The Edge Management Suite

Time: 12.30pm

6
Jun

Market manipulation and innovation


Speaker: Prof Douglas Cumming, York University, Canada

Location: 5W 2.4

Time: 1.45pm

Contact: Research Office

25
May

A Theoretical Analysis of the lean startup's product development


The widely-touted Lean Startup method is emerging as a best practice for entrepreneurs' early product development and in entrepreneurship curriculums in academia. Central to its paradigm is the view that startups should iteratively launch minimum viable products (MVPs) to gather consumer feedback and then modify (or "pivot") the product design goals in response to that feedback. In startup settings where neither the product nor a market exists, this agile approach is desirable because it reduces the costs of failure that would be associated with developing the wrong product. This paper examines a stylized model focusing on the Lean Startup MVP-induced learning process. Our analysis identifies which MVP the entrepreneur should develop and when (i.e., at what development level) to launch it, and it also presents insights into the product-market conditions for which implementation of the Lean Startup approach is the most or least desirable. Our results refine our understanding of how the Lean Startup approach works in order to help entrepreneurs derive the most benefit from it, and our model also provides an empirically testable framework to aid future research.

Speaker: Dr Onesun Steven Yoo, UCL School of Management

Location: 6E 2.1

Time: 2.30pm

Contact: Research Office

24
May

One discount or two? It depends on how (much) you feel


Despite the presence of multiple, stacked price discounts in the marketplace, beliefs about the effectiveness of such discounts are mixed. On the one hand, consumers may overestimate the numeric value of stacked discounts (versus a single, equivalent discount), increasing deal attractiveness. On the other hand, stacked discounts involve multiplicative calculations, in effect requiring cognitive effort; this may evoke negative affect, undermining deal attractiveness. Using field and lab studies, we test these competing views, and we find that – amongst consumers who prefer affective processing, and in contexts associated with affective processing - stacked discounts evoke negative effect, reducing deal attractiveness. This paper contributes to the literatures on behavioural pricing, price promotions, numeric processing, and effective processing. By focusing on the role of negative affect, it provides a contrasting perspective relative to prior work on price promotions that has focused either on cognitive evaluations or on the role of positive effect.

Speaker: Prof Dhruv Grewal, Babson College

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 1.30pm

Contact: Research Office

23
May

Supporting healthcare system change and pathway redesign


The purpose of this event is to learn about the application of operations management and organisational theory to exploring and improving health and healthcare delivery. This event is aimed at healthcare professionals and academics with an interest in applied health research and quality improvement. CHI2 is a multi-disciplinary research centre focused on solving the practical challenges of health and social care systems. It leads and contributes to applied health research projects using a mixed methods approach while adopting a flexible and collaborative outlook to the choice and framing of the problems tackled and to the research methods and modelling techniques used.

Speaker: Dr Sharon Williams, Swansea University & Dr Eleanor Murray, SaÏd Business School

Location: The Edge Management Suite

Time: 5.30pm

23
May

Misreporting by Financial Institutions in the years leading up to the financial crisis


Speaker: Prof Clive Lennox, University of Southern California

Location: 5W 2.4

Time: 1.45pm

Contact: Research Office

23
May

Digital marketing in a retail setting


Digitalization in retailing often leads the thought to e-commerce. However, e-commerce has only gained a small market share in grocery retailing and even if it remains a threat for the physical stores in the future, new technology also means a lot of new business opportunities for traditional retail stores. In this seminar, Dr Jens Nordfält will cover some of his research on digital marketing in a retail setting. More specifically he will go through papers about how and when grocery stores can benefit from using digital signage and the effect of shoppers interacting with their mobile phones while shopping for groceries. Lunch will be served at 12.30pm. The talk will begin at 1.00pm.

Speaker: Dr Jens Nordfält, Stockholm School of Economics

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 12.30pm

Contact: Research Office

14
May

Bridging cultural holes: Organizational vocabularies and communcation networks across organisational subunits


Knowledge, advice and communication patterns across formal organizational boundaries are widely acknowledged as important determinants of organizational effectiveness. A considerable body of research shows that organizations whose subunits are able to absorb knowledge from different, and possibly distant sources tend to attain higher levels of performance, productivity, and growth. However, the difficulties associated with sharing knowledge across organizational subunits, i.e. across bounded repositories of specialized expertise, competencies and resources, make this learning process unlikely to happen naturally in organizations. Socialization processes encourage members of organizational subunits to develop specialized language that allows them to communicate effectively with colleagues. A common specialized language, in turn, sustains a shared awareness of problems, solutions, and the repertoire of actions that are appropriate in various situations. Enacting this logic of identity makes organizational subunits both more internally cohesive and efficient, as well as less permeable to extramural information and knowledge stored in different and possibly distant sites within the organization. A sandwich lunch will be provided.

Speaker: Dr Stefano Tasselli, Rotterdam School of Management

Location: EB 0.15

Time: 12.15pm

Contact: Research Office

11
May

The sense and non-sense of (Early) supplier involvement in New Product Development


In this talk, Mr Suurmond will talk about studying supplier involvement in New Product Development (NPD). Prior research presents mixed empirical outcomes of supplier involvement and, in general, does not differentiate between NPD efficiency and NPD effectiveness. The aim is to reconcile these issues by reconceptualizing the phenomenon along the dimensions of extensive and early supplier involvement and by meta-analytically assessing their effects on NPD efficiency and effectiveness, respectively. A systematic review was conducted and meta-analysis of the empirical literature from more 4,315 unique projects to understand to what extent and when suppliers should be involved to achieve better NPD performance. The findings show that more extensive supplier involvement, through delegation of design labour and tasks, contributes to both NPD efficiency and NPD effectiveness. On the other hand, earlier involvement of suppliers as such, for example in idea generation or concept development, does not contribute to product effectiveness but improves project efficiency somewhat. Hence, under constrained resources, managers can design more effective product development strategies by unravelling supplier involvement into the extent and the moment of the supplier's participation and selecting the most optimal strategy for achieving higher efficiency or effectiveness. In conclusion, this talk advances theorization on supplier involvement in NPD by carefully unraveling the construct into its constituent dimensions and exploring their respective effects on NPD efficiency and effectiveness.

Speaker: Mr Robert Stuurmond, Rotterdam School of Management

Location: CB 3.11

Time: 2.30pm

Contact: Research Office

8
May

Knowledge and Power in Higher Education


What should be taught in the university and school curriculum? Should we focus on a western enlightenment paradigm? Are we ignoring other epistemologies and views of the world? Two distinguished speakers tackle this from divergent viewpoints. The presentations will be followed by fishbowl conversations to break down traditional speaker-audience divides.

Speaker: Professor Michael Young, UCL Institute of Education & Ms Melz Owusu, University of Leeds

Location: The Edge Management Suite

Time: 2.00pm


2
May

Household Inequality: Entrepreneurial dynamism and corporate financing


Speaker: Prof Steven Orgena, University of Zurich

Location: 3E 2.4

Time: 1.45pm

Contact: Research Office

27
Apr

Worker mobility and innovation in manufacturing


Regular, non-R&D workers can be a critical driver of competitive advantage and innovation for companies, especially in the manufacturing sector. In this talk, Dr Gokpinar will investigate how interplant mobility of such workers affects innovation value created by them in a multi-plant manufacturing network. To test the hypotheses, a large scale innovation database from a multinational car parts manufacturer in Europe was used and the value generated by workers' product and process improvement ideas was examined. The analyses reveal several important insights. First, interplant mobility results in an immediate increase in the value of workers' innovation ideas as a result of knowledge application and recombination. Second, the results indicate that interplant mobility permanently enhances workers' ability to generate innovative ideas. Third, unlike production knowledge which has been found to depreciate quickly when it is based on cumulative output (Argote et al. 1990; Epple et al. 1996), the value of production knowledge does not diminish over time when it is based on conceptual learning through mobility. Finally, this talk will show moves between functionally overlapping plants increase the value of workers' process and product improvement ideas more than between functionally dissimilar plants.

Speaker: Dr Bilal Gokpinar, UCL School of Management

Location: CB 5.5

Time: 2.30pm

Contact: Research Office

26
Apr

21st Century U.S. industrial policy and its illusive beneficiaries


Some would say industrial policy (IP) has always been with us. A creature of early 20th-century local economic development practice, the downturn of the 1970s inspired the formation of U.S. federal, state and local policies designed to harness the benefits of sectoral growth in order to counter a decline of traditional industries. The resulting economic development programming yielded few winners while unleashing an arms race of smokestack chasing and indiscriminate rewards distribution. 40 years later, few places gained sufficient leverage to reshape their economies around new sectors. On today's stage, we find a new type of industrial policy, one with a modern twist: financial backing of unprecedented scale (billion dollar bets). How will such bets play out and will communities benefit? Do the goals of this new policy targeting include beneficiaries of by-gone eras or is the resulting development impulse a difference in kind? Can we formulate policies to foster inclusive economic development or is the price of progress the creation of more "left behinds"? Using the case of life sciences in the Boston Metropolitan Area of the U.S., we set up the story of an agency designed to foster growth of extraordinary scope and then ask the question how the local scale fits in if at all in an era of new (old) industrial development. A Centre for Governance & Regulation (CGR) public lecture in association with the Institute for Policy Research (IPR).

Speaker: Prof Amy Glasmeier, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Location: Arts Theatre, The Edge

Time: 5.30pm

Contact: Book a ticket

26
Apr

Mobilising authority: Narrative dialogism in organisational renewal


A communicative challenge of organisational renewal is to foster a new future-oriented framing of collective action, based on learning from adversity, which sustains a dynamic, mutual understanding of the organization's progressive trajectory. Yet, given that different lessons may be drawn from past failure, it is unclear how such common ground is restored and sustained. Dr Golant will shed light on this process in his study of the articulation of decline and recovery at a Scottish media organisation, STV plc. Based on extensive interview data, he will show how alternative "narratives of redemption" emerged that emphasised the breach and restitution of different core values. The talk will then explore the leadership role, which sought to assert their intersecting significance through dialogic encounter with new, responsive interlocutors - the audience-as-consumers - and through the metrics of organisational performance by which they were signified. In this way, he will highlight the emergent re-constitution of the organisation as a complex domain of authority, located between interpretations of the organisational past and the anticipated organisational future.

Speaker: Dr Ben Golant, University of Edinburgh

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 1.30pm

Contact: Research Office

25
Apr

Does equity crowdfunding democratize entrepreneurial finance?


Co-authored with Douglas Cumming and Michele Meoli

Speaker: Prof Silvio Vismara, University of Bergamo

Location: 3E 2.4

Time: 1.45pm

Contact: Research Office

25
Apr

A trickle-down model of telecommuting: exploring mechanisms and boundary conditions


Telecommuting, which refers to work conducted from home and that is often supported by telecommunication technologies, is becoming increasingly prevalent in today's organisations. While one stream of research has shown that telecommuting impacts work attitudes and behaviours of telecommuters positively, another stream of research has pointed out to the negative downstream consequences of telecommuting. Drawing on Social Learning Theory and integrating research on telecommuting, our main aim to explore the trickle-down effect of telecommuting from supervisors to subordinates and the consequential impact on subordinates' work performance. Furthermore, we integrate two contextual conditions - supervisors' well-being and subordinates' segmentation preference - as contextual variables to explain when the trickle-down effect of telecommuting unfolds. We tested our hypotheses using matched-data from supervisors and their subordinates collected in Chile. Findings from multi-level analyses revealed that only for supervisors whose well-being is higher and for subordinates who prefer to integrate work with family, subordinates' telecommuting positively mediates the association between supervisors' telecommuting and subordinates' work performance. Our results contribute to telecommuting research by demonstrating a trickle-down effect, integrating two contextual conditions and hence revealing how telecommuting can be a beneficial HR intervention tool for everyone including supervisors and their subordinates.

Speaker: Dr Yasin Rofcanin, University of Bath

Location: 8W 1.34

Time: 1.30pm

Contact: Research Office

18
Apr

Future of Work afternoon tea


The Future of Work research centre is hosting its first afternoon tea of the year on Wednesday 18 April from 3.15pm until when the discussion dries up. Please come along to hear 'tasters' of the research done within the centre, and to debate and discuss what these ideas may mean for the future of work. Speakers have been asked to talk about their work for a maximum of 15 minutes (so tasters rather than rockets). They are Mairi Maclean, Yasin Rofcanin and Deborah Brewis. After their talks we can explore the implications of their ideas for the Future of Work.

Organiser: Prof Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: 8W 3.14

Time: 3.15pm

Contact: Research Office

12
Apr

The Double-edged sword of Proactivity: How entrepreneurs influence their employees' job satisfaction


Previous research highlights the positive consequences of proactivity such as its benefits for individuals' work performance and entrepreneurs' firm performance. Offering a complementary perspective, our study explores the neglected effects of entrepreneurs' proactivity for their employees and investigates how entrepreneurs' proactive personality relates to the quality of jobs they create for their employees and to their employee's wellbeing (job satisfaction). We collected multi-source data from 511 employees working in 43 firms and the 43 CEO-entrepreneurs of these firms. Multi-level regressions showed that employees working for proactive entrepreneurs experienced higher job demands linked with lower job satisfaction. Drawing on path dependence theory, we expected the effect of entrepreneur proactive personality on job autonomy and job satisfaction to be context dependent. In stable firms, proactive entrepreneurs granted greater autonomy to their employees, thus creating challenging, motivating work environments. In contrast, in firms characterised by instability (increases or decreases in the number of employees), the controlling aspects of proactive personality seem to come to the fore. Proactive entrepreneurs appeared to restrict employee job autonomy, and employees were less satisfied. Our findings provide a more nuanced understanding of when and how proactive personality can have negative and positive effects for others in the organization. They also extend job design research by highlighting the firm-context and characteristics of strategic leaders such as CEO-entrepreneurs as influences on employee job design.

Speaker: Dr Karoline Strauss, ESSEC Business School, France

Location: 8 West 1.34

Time: 1.30pm

Contact: Research Office

11
Apr

TBC


Speaker: Dr Francesso Mazzi, University of Florence

Location: 8W 2.10

Time: 1.45pm

Contact: Research Office

11
Apr

Designed for Hi-Fi Living: The Vinyl LP in Midcentury America


In this project, we consider the contributions of midcentury record albums to the postwar imagination and their relevance for contemporary consumer culture. We have selected illustrative examples from a large, privately owned record album archive, and discuss album cover photography and graphic design, along with liner notes and music, to illuminate how LPs provided listeners with guides for becoming more culturally confident, cosmopolitan, and sophisticated. For example, home-entertaining records and travel records often included content dedicated to achieving a "modern" lifestyle, developing good taste, and becoming familiar with new sights and sounds. More information:https://www.designedforhifiliving.com/

Speaker: Prof Janet Borgerson, Cass Business School & Prof Jonathan Schroeder, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York

Location: The Edge Management Suite

Time: 2.00pm

Contact: Research Office

21
Mar

A development Bank's choice of private equity partner: A behavioural game-theoretic approach


Speaker: Dr Richard Fairchild, University of Bath

Location: 1W 2.01

Time: 13.45pm

Contact: Research Office

14
Mar

What a difference a day makes in executive compensation


Co-authored with Steve Rock (University of Colorado at Boulder) and Ana Simpson (LSE).

Speaker: Prof Bjorn Jorgensen, London School of Economics

Location: 3 East 2.2

Time: 13.45pm

Contact: Research Office

13
Mar

The rise and fall of shared leadership in a top management team


This paper reports on the emergence of competing forms of leadership-shared and hierarchical in a Top Management Team (TMT). Drawing on a three-year ethnography of the full life-cycle of the TMT, Dr Petriglieri show how the possibility of alternative forms of leadership emerging created a battle for authority that undermined the team's collective and its members' individual capacity to lead. Using this ethnography as empirical ground, she built a theory of the fabrication of leadership that details the complex group and emotional processes (both conscious and unconscious) through which leadership forms emerge in senior teams.

Speaker: Dr Jennifer Petriglieri, INSEAD

Location: 8 West 1.33

Time: 12.30pm

Contact: Research Office

28
Feb

Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide: Asset diversification in a flat world


Co-authored by Stuart Gabriel and Richard Roll.

Speaker: Prof John Cotter, University College Dublin

Location: 3 East 2.2

Time: 13.45pm

Contact: Research Office

 

20
Feb

Heat, greed and human need: climate change, capitalism and sustainable wellbeing


This lecture asks how far can dangerous global warming be averted, without worsening deprivation and inequality. Professor Gough will argue that the satisfaction of human needs - as opposed to wants - is the only viable measure for negotiating trade-offs between climate change and human wellbeing, now and in the future. A transition is proposed, moving from 'green growth' to 'recomposing' patterns of consumption in the rich world, cutting high-energy luxuries in favour of low-energy routes to meeting basic needs. This, in turn, can prepare the way if necessary for an economy that flourishes without growth. Implications for business and higher education institutions will be outlined.

Speaker: Professor Ian Gough, London School of Economics

Location: 8 West 3.22

Time: 14.00 - 15.30pm

Contact: DBA Programme Office

 

14
Feb

How alternative are alternative investments? The case of private equity


Dr Ludovic Phalippou will discuss his new book 'Private equity laid bare'. There will be copies available after the talk at 3pm. Please follow the discussion @PELaidbare on Twitter and Facebook.

Speaker: Dr Ludovic Phalippou, University of Oxford

Location: 3 East 2.4

Time: 13.45pm

Contact: Winifred Huang

 

7
Feb

Insider trading and managerial networks


Speaker: Professor Marc Goergen, University of Cardiff

Location: 3 East 2.4

Time: 13.45pm

Contact: Research Office

 

31
Jan

Qualitative Research Symposium 2018: How do we belong? Researcher positionality within qualitative inquiry


In the Symposium this year, researchers were invited to explore their positionality within their current work. Often, there is not have the time or space to explore these positions with much depth. Peer- reviewers, editors, and funders all tend to privilege the knowledge generated through the work over its multiple methodological nuances. This symposium hopes to help researcher reflect on their work in the context of positionality.

Keynote speaker: Doctor Sara Delamont, Cardiff University

Location: Chancellors' Building

Time: 8.00am - 4.00pm

Contact: QRS Organising Committee

 

30
Jan

International political risk management: perspectives, approaches and emerging agendas


In this talk the extant and emerging perspectives on, and approaches to, political risk management, particularly in the context of foreign direct investment will be reviewed. The talk will identify and classify the various theoretical lenses in the domain of political risk management, and suggest a future research agenda. The talk contributes by conceptually categorising and mapping the extant research onto three approaches to the management of political risk. Through conducting a narrative literature review, the suggestion is of three theoretical perspectives on political risk management: institutions, resources and capabilities, and resource dependence. The argument that the institution's approach to political risk management is reactive, responding to external stimuli, whereas the resources and capabilities based approach is proactive, preparing and acting in anticipation. The resource dependence domain offers an intermediate approach - the active management of political risk. There is also the suggestion that the effectiveness of the domains' approaches may vary across different national contexts.

Speaker: Professor Tom Lawton, The Open University

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 13.30pm

Contact: Research Office

 

16
Jan

Struggling with the material: How can we understand materialities when all we have is the medium of word?


Speaker: Professor Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 13.30pm

Contact: Research Office