University of Bath School of Management University of Bath School of Management

Past research seminars and events 2018

Research

UK and overseas speakers are invited to the School to share their experiences and findings with staff, doctoral students and the members of the public. Previous seminars can be found here 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014.

Further Information

View the University Calendar

If you are a member of staff and wish to organise an event or seminar please contact the Research Office

 

14
May

Bridging cultural holes: Organizational vocabularies and communcation networks across organisational subunits


Knowledge, advice and communication patterns across formal organizational boundaries are widely acknowledged as important determinants of organizational effectiveness. A considerable body of research shows that organizations whose subunits are able to absorb knowledge from different, and possibly distant sources tend to attain higher levels of performance, productivity, and growth. However, the difficulties associated with sharing knowledge across organizational subunits, i.e. across bounded repositories of specialized expertise, competencies and resources, make this learning process unlikely to happen naturally in organizations. Socialization processes encourage members of organizational subunits to develop specialized language that allows them to communicate effectively with colleagues. A common specialized language, in turn, sustains a shared awareness of problems, solutions, and the repertoire of actions that are appropriate in various situations. Enacting this logic of identity makes organizational subunits both more internally cohesive and efficient, as well as less permeable to extramural information and knowledge stored in different and possibly distant sites within the organization. A sandwich lunch will be provided.

Speaker: Dr Stefano Tasselli, Rotterdam School of Management

Location: EB 0.15

Time: 12.15pm

Contact: Research Office

11
May

The sense and non-sense of (Early) supplier involvement in New Product Development


In this talk, Mr Suurmond will talk about studying supplier involvement in New Product Development (NPD). Prior research presents mixed empirical outcomes of supplier involvement and, in general, does not differentiate between NPD efficiency and NPD effectiveness. The aim is to reconcile these issues by reconceptualizing the phenomenon along the dimensions of extensive and early supplier involvement and by meta-analytically assessing their effects on NPD efficiency and effectiveness, respectively. A systematic review was conducted and meta-analysis of the empirical literature from more 4,315 unique projects to understand to what extent and when suppliers should be involved to achieve better NPD performance. The findings show that more extensive supplier involvement, through delegation of design labour and tasks, contributes to both NPD efficiency and NPD effectiveness. On the other hand, earlier involvement of suppliers as such, for example in idea generation or concept development, does not contribute to product effectiveness but improves project efficiency somewhat. Hence, under constrained resources, managers can design more effective product development strategies by unravelling supplier involvement into the extent and the moment of the supplier's participation and selecting the most optimal strategy for achieving higher efficiency or effectiveness. In conclusion, this talk advances theorization on supplier involvement in NPD by carefully unraveling the construct into its constituent dimensions and exploring their respective effects on NPD efficiency and effectiveness.

Speaker: Mr Robert Stuurmond, Rotterdam School of Management

Location: CB 3.11

Time: 2.30pm

Contact: Research Office

8
May

Knowledge and Power in Higher Education


What should be taught in the university and school curriculum? Should we focus on a western enlightenment paradigm? Are we ignoring other epistemologies and views of the world? Two distinguished speakers tackle this from divergent viewpoints. The presentations will be followed by fishbowl conversations to break down traditional speaker-audience divides.

Speaker: Professor Michael Young, UCL Institute of Education & Ms Melz Owusu, University of Leeds

Location: The Edge Management Suite

Time: 2.00pm


2
May

Household Inequality: Entrepreneurial dynamism and corporate financing


Speaker: Prof Steven Orgena, University of Zurich

Location: 3E 2.4

Time: 1.45pm

Contact: Research Office

27
Apr

Worker mobility and innovation in manufacturing


Regular, non-R&D workers can be a critical driver of competitive advantage and innovation for companies, especially in the manufacturing sector. In this talk, Dr Gokpinar will investigate how interplant mobility of such workers affects innovation value created by them in a multi-plant manufacturing network. To test the hypotheses, a large scale innovation database from a multinational car parts manufacturer in Europe was used and the value generated by workers' product and process improvement ideas was examined. The analyses reveal several important insights. First, interplant mobility results in an immediate increase in the value of workers' innovation ideas as a result of knowledge application and recombination. Second, the results indicate that interplant mobility permanently enhances workers' ability to generate innovative ideas. Third, unlike production knowledge which has been found to depreciate quickly when it is based on cumulative output (Argote et al. 1990; Epple et al. 1996), the value of production knowledge does not diminish over time when it is based on conceptual learning through mobility. Finally, this talk will show moves between functionally overlapping plants increase the value of workers' process and product improvement ideas more than between functionally dissimilar plants.

Speaker: Dr Bilal Gokpinar, UCL School of Management

Location: CB 5.5

Time: 2.30pm

Contact: Research Office

26
Apr

21st Century U.S. industrial policy and its illusive beneficiaries


Some would say industrial policy (IP) has always been with us. A creature of early 20th-century local economic development practice, the downturn of the 1970s inspired the formation of U.S. federal, state and local policies designed to harness the benefits of sectoral growth in order to counter a decline of traditional industries. The resulting economic development programming yielded few winners while unleashing an arms race of smokestack chasing and indiscriminate rewards distribution. 40 years later, few places gained sufficient leverage to reshape their economies around new sectors. On today's stage, we find a new type of industrial policy, one with a modern twist: financial backing of unprecedented scale (billion dollar bets). How will such bets play out and will communities benefit? Do the goals of this new policy targeting include beneficiaries of by-gone eras or is the resulting development impulse a difference in kind? Can we formulate policies to foster inclusive economic development or is the price of progress the creation of more "left behinds"? Using the case of life sciences in the Boston Metropolitan Area of the U.S., we set up the story of an agency designed to foster growth of extraordinary scope and then ask the question how the local scale fits in if at all in an era of new (old) industrial development. A Centre for Governance & Regulation (CGR) public lecture in association with the Institute for Policy Research (IPR).

Speaker: Prof Amy Glasmeier, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Location: Arts Theatre, The Edge

Time: 5.30pm

Contact: Book a ticket

26
Apr

Mobilising authority: Narrative dialogism in organisational renewal


A communicative challenge of organisational renewal is to foster a new future-oriented framing of collective action, based on learning from adversity, which sustains a dynamic, mutual understanding of the organization's progressive trajectory. Yet, given that different lessons may be drawn from past failure, it is unclear how such common ground is restored and sustained. Dr Golant will shed light on this process in his study of the articulation of decline and recovery at a Scottish media organisation, STV plc. Based on extensive interview data, he will show how alternative "narratives of redemption" emerged that emphasised the breach and restitution of different core values. The talk will then explore the leadership role, which sought to assert their intersecting significance through dialogic encounter with new, responsive interlocutors - the audience-as-consumers - and through the metrics of organisational performance by which they were signified. In this way, he will highlight the emergent re-constitution of the organisation as a complex domain of authority, located between interpretations of the organisational past and the anticipated organisational future.

Speaker: Dr Ben Golant, University of Edinburgh

Location: 8 West 1.32

Time: 1.30pm

Contact: Research Office

25
Apr

Does equity crowdfunding democratize entrepreneurial finance?


Co-authored with Douglas Cumming and Michele Meoli

Speaker: Prof Silvio Vismara, University of Bergamo

Location: 3E 2.4

Time: 1.45pm

Contact: Research Office

25
Apr

A trickle-down model of telecommuting: exploring mechanisms and boundary conditions


Telecommuting, which refers to work conducted from home and that is often supported by telecommunication technologies, is becoming increasingly prevalent in today's organisations. While one stream of research has shown that telecommuting impacts work attitudes and behaviours of telecommuters positively, another stream of research has pointed out to the negative downstream consequences of telecommuting. Drawing on Social Learning Theory and integrating research on telecommuting, our main aim to explore the trickle-down effect of telecommuting from supervisors to subordinates and the consequential impact on subordinates' work performance. Furthermore, we integrate two contextual conditions - supervisors' well-being and subordinates' segmentation preference - as contextual variables to explain when the trickle-down effect of telecommuting unfolds. We tested our hypotheses using matched-data from supervisors and their subordinates collected in Chile. Findings from multi-level analyses revealed that only for supervisors whose well-being is higher and for subordinates who prefer to integrate work with family, subordinates' telecommuting positively mediates the association between supervisors' telecommuting and subordinates' work performance. Our results contribute to telecommuting research by demonstrating a trickle-down effect, integrating two contextual conditions and hence revealing how telecommuting can be a beneficial HR intervention tool for everyone including supervisors and their subordinates.

Speaker: Dr Yasin Rofcanin, University of Bath

Location: 8W 1.34

Time: 1.30pm

Contact: Research Office

18
Apr

Future of Work afternoon tea


The Future of Work research centre is hosting its first afternoon tea of the year on Wednesday 18 April from 3.15pm until when the discussion dries up. Please come along to hear 'tasters' of the research done within the centre, and to debate and discuss what these ideas may mean for the future of work. Speakers have been asked to talk about their work for a maximum of 15 minutes (so tasters rather than rockets). They are Mairi Maclean, Yasin Rofcanin and Deborah Brewis. After their talks we can explore the implications of their ideas for the Future of Work.

Organiser: Prof Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: 8W 3.14

Time: 3.15pm

Contact: Research Office

12
Apr

The Double-edged sword of Proactivity: How entrepreneurs influence their employees' job satisfaction


Previous research highlights the positive consequences of proactivity such as its benefits for individuals' work performance and entrepreneurs' firm performance. Offering a complementary perspective, our study explores the neglected effects of entrepreneurs' proactivity for their employees and investigates how entrepreneurs' proactive personality relates to the quality of jobs they create for their employees and to their employee's wellbeing (job satisfaction). We collected multi-source data from 511 employees working in 43 firms and the 43 CEO-entrepreneurs of these firms. Multi-level regressions showed that employees working for proactive entrepreneurs experienced higher job demands linked with lower job satisfaction. Drawing on path dependence theory, we expected the effect of entrepreneur proactive personality on job autonomy and job satisfaction to be context dependent. In stable firms, proactive entrepreneurs granted greater autonomy to their employees, thus creating challenging, motivating work environments. In contrast, in firms characterised by instability (increases or decreases in the number of employees), the controlling aspects of proactive personality seem to come to the fore. Proactive entrepreneurs appeared to restrict employee job autonomy, and employees were less satisfied. Our findings provide a more nuanced understanding of when and how proactive personality can have negative and positive effects for others in the organization. They also extend job design research by highlighting the firm-context and characteristics of strategic leaders such as CEO-entrepreneurs as influences on employee job design.

Speaker: Dr Karoline Strauss, ESSEC Business School, France

Location: 8 West 1.34

Time: 1.30pm

Contact: Research Office

11
Apr

TBC


Speaker: Dr Francesso Mazzi, University of Florence

Location: 8W 2.10

Time: 1.45pm

Contact: Research Office

11
Apr

Designed for Hi-Fi Living: The Vinyl LP in Midcentury America


In this project, we consider the contributions of midcentury record albums to the postwar imagination and their relevance for contemporary consumer culture. We have selected illustrative examples from a large, privately owned record album archive, and discuss album cover photography and graphic design, along with liner notes and music, to illuminate how LPs provided listeners with guides for becoming more culturally confident, cosmopolitan, and sophisticated. For example, home-entertaining records and travel records often included content dedicated to achieving a "modern" lifestyle, developing good taste, and becoming familiar with new sights and sounds. More information:https://www.designedforhifiliving.com/

Speaker: Prof Janet Borgerson, Cass Business School & Prof Jonathan Schroeder, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York

Location: The Edge Management Suite

Time: 2.00pm

Contact: Research Office

21
Mar

A development Bank's choice of private equity partner: A behavioural game-theoretic approach


Speaker: Dr Richard Fairchild, University of Bath

Location: 1W 2.01

Time: 13.45pm

Contact: Research Office

14
Mar

What a difference a day makes in executive compensation


Co-authored with Steve Rock (University of Colorado at Boulder) and Ana Simpson (LSE).

Speaker: Prof Bjorn Jorgensen, London School of Economics

Location: 3 East 2.2

Time: 13.45pm

Contact: Research Office

13
Mar

The rise and fall of shared leadership in a top management team


This paper reports on the emergence of competing forms of leadership-shared and hierarchical in a Top Management Team (TMT). Drawing on a three-year ethnography of the full life-cycle of the TMT, Dr Petriglieri show how the possibility of alternative forms of leadership emerging created a battle for authority that undermined the team's collective and its members' individual capacity to lead. Using this ethnography as empirical ground, she built a theory of the fabrication of leadership that details the complex group and emotional processes (both conscious and unconscious) through which leadership forms emerge in senior teams.

Speaker: Dr Jennifer Petriglieri, INSEAD

Location: 8 West 1.33

Time: 12.30pm

Contact: Research Office

28
Feb

Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide: Asset diversification in a flat world


Co-authored by Stuart Gabriel and Richard Roll.

Speaker: Prof John Cotter, University College Dublin

Location: 3 East 2.2

Time: 13.45pm

Contact: Research Office

 

20
Feb

Heat, greed and human need: climate change, capitalism and sustainable wellbeing


This lecture asks how far can dangerous global warming be averted, without worsening deprivation and inequality. Professor Gough will argue that the satisfaction of human needs - as opposed to wants - is the only viable measure for negotiating trade-offs between climate change and human wellbeing, now and in the future. A transition is proposed, moving from 'green growth' to 'recomposing' patterns of consumption in the rich world, cutting high-energy luxuries in favour of low-energy routes to meeting basic needs. This, in turn, can prepare the way if necessary for an economy that flourishes without growth. Implications for business and higher education institutions will be outlined.

Speaker: Professor Ian Gough, London School of Economics

Location: 8 West 3.22

Time: 14.00 - 15.30pm

Contact: DBA Programme Office

 

14
Feb

How alternative are alternative investments? The case of private equity


Dr Ludovic Phalippou will discuss his new book 'Private equity laid bare'. There will be copies available after the talk at 3pm. Please follow the discussion @PELaidbare on Twitter and Facebook.

Speaker: Dr Ludovic Phalippou, University of Oxford

Location: 3 East 2.4

Time: 13.45pm

Contact: Winifred Huang

 

7
Feb

Insider trading and managerial networks


Speaker: Professor Marc Goergen, University of Cardiff

Location: 3 East 2.4

Time: 13.45pm

Contact: Research Office

 

31
Jan

Qualitative Research Symposium 2018: How do we belong? Researcher positionality within qualitative inquiry


In the Symposium this year, researchers were invited to explore their positionality within their current work. Often, there is not have the time or space to explore these positions with much depth. Peer- reviewers, editors, and funders all tend to privilege the knowledge generated through the work over its multiple methodological nuances. This symposium hopes to help researcher reflect on their work in the context of positionality.

Keynote speaker: Doctor Sara Delamont, Cardiff University

Location: Chancellors' Building

Time: 8.00am - 4.00pm

Contact: QRS Organising Committee

 

30
Jan

International political risk management: perspectives, approaches and emerging agendas


In this talk the extant and emerging perspectives on, and approaches to, political risk management, particularly in the context of foreign direct investment will be reviewed. The talk will identify and classify the various theoretical lenses in the domain of political risk management, and suggest a future research agenda. The talk contributes by conceptually categorising and mapping the extant research onto three approaches to the management of political risk. Through conducting a narrative literature review, the suggestion is of three theoretical perspectives on political risk management: institutions, resources and capabilities, and resource dependence. The argument that the institution's approach to political risk management is reactive, responding to external stimuli, whereas the resources and capabilities based approach is proactive, preparing and acting in anticipation. The resource dependence domain offers an intermediate approach - the active management of political risk. There is also the suggestion that the effectiveness of the domains' approaches may vary across different national contexts.

Speaker: Professor Tom Lawton, The Open University

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 13.30pm

Contact: Research Office

 

16
Jan

Struggling with the material: How can we understand materialities when all we have is the medium of word?


Speaker: Professor Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Location: 8 West 4.23

Time: 13.30pm

Contact: Research Office